Languages form a unique addition to a student's university education.

Modern Languages

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First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
The Modern Languages department is located in SDU Main Building.

Photo by Ben Ramirez, used by Creative Commons agreement.

The Department of Modern Languages provides its students with the opportunity to study various languages and to obtain a good grounding in these, but sees languages within its appropriate cultural contexts, i.e., the acquisition is seen as a vehicle to enter the thought, history, literature, cinema, etc., with which each of the languages is associated.

Whenever circumstances warrant it, the Department offers courses in languages other than French, German or Spanish. In the past introductory courses have been offered in Chinese, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Mi'kmaq and Scottish Gaelic. For Japanese or other Asian languages see Asian Studies.

Language Studies have always been an integral part of university studies. Such studies complement many areas of study and are recommended by other disciplines such as:

  • English
  • Music
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Religious Studies
  • Fine Arts
  • Social Sciences

Language studies are seen as preparation for graduate studies, education programs, travel, and work abroad. They form a unique addition to a student's university education, with the variety of teaching and learning techniques adding variety, balance, or counter-balance to the education process.

Global markets are competing for supremacy, in Europe (with Germany as the pivotal point), the Americas (North and South America), and Asia (Japanese). Prince Edward Island is not removed from this struggle of the internationalization of commerce. Learning a language also helps alleviate, to varying degrees, a lack of knowledge regarding the intricacies and elementary aspects of English on the part of our students.

 

Want more information about Modern Languages? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
The Modern Languages department is located in SDU Main Building.

Carlo Lavoie
Associate Professor and Chair
Main Building, 421
clavoie@upei.ca
(902) 566-0431

Overview

Photo by Ben Ramirez, used by Creative Commons agreement.

The Department of Modern Languages provides its students with the opportunity to study various languages and to obtain a good grounding in these, but sees languages within its appropriate cultural contexts, i.e., the acquisition is seen as a vehicle to enter the thought, history, literature, cinema, etc., with which each of the languages is associated.

Whenever circumstances warrant it, the Department offers courses in languages other than French, German or Spanish. In the past introductory courses have been offered in Chinese, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Mi'kmaq and Scottish Gaelic. For Japanese or other Asian languages see Asian Studies.

Language Studies have always been an integral part of university studies. Such studies complement many areas of study and are recommended by other disciplines such as:

  • English
  • Music
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Religious Studies
  • Fine Arts
  • Social Sciences

Language studies are seen as preparation for graduate studies, education programs, travel, and work abroad. They form a unique addition to a student's university education, with the variety of teaching and learning techniques adding variety, balance, or counter-balance to the education process.

Global markets are competing for supremacy, in Europe (with Germany as the pivotal point), the Americas (North and South America), and Asia (Japanese). Prince Edward Island is not removed from this struggle of the internationalization of commerce. Learning a language also helps alleviate, to varying degrees, a lack of knowledge regarding the intricacies and elementary aspects of English on the part of our students.

 

Contact

Carlo Lavoie
Associate Professor and Chair
Main Building, 421
clavoie@upei.ca
(902) 566-0431

Overview

Photo by Ben Ramirez, used by Creative Commons agreement.

The Department of Modern Languages provides its students with the opportunity to study various languages and to obtain a good grounding in these, but sees languages within its appropriate cultural contexts, i.e., the acquisition is seen as a vehicle to enter the thought, history, literature, cinema, etc., with which each of the languages is associated.

Whenever circumstances warrant it, the Department offers courses in languages other than French, German or Spanish. In the past introductory courses have been offered in Chinese, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Mi'kmaq and Scottish Gaelic. For Japanese or other Asian languages see Asian Studies.

Language Studies have always been an integral part of university studies. Such studies complement many areas of study and are recommended by other disciplines such as:

  • English
  • Music
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Religious Studies
  • Fine Arts
  • Social Sciences

Language studies are seen as preparation for graduate studies, education programs, travel, and work abroad. They form a unique addition to a student's university education, with the variety of teaching and learning techniques adding variety, balance, or counter-balance to the education process.

Global markets are competing for supremacy, in Europe (with Germany as the pivotal point), the Americas (North and South America), and Asia (Japanese). Prince Edward Island is not removed from this struggle of the internationalization of commerce. Learning a language also helps alleviate, to varying degrees, a lack of knowledge regarding the intricacies and elementary aspects of English on the part of our students.

 

Contact

Carlo Lavoie
Associate Professor and Chair
Main Building, 421
clavoie@upei.ca
(902) 566-0431

Want more information about Modern Languages? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

101 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED MODERN LANGUAGE] I
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course provides an introduction to the language in question, through the study of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. It includes numerous oral drills, frequent written exercises, short oral presentations and simple readings.
Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED MODERN LANGUAGE] II
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course is a continuation of Modern Languages 101. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammar and introduces aspects of civilization.
Three hours a week
 

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

211 LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES:  SOUTH AMERICA
This course is an introduction to the socio-political history and theories of cultures in Brazil, the Andean, and the Southern Cone regions of South America. Some of the topics examined are the construction of the nation state, populist governments, military dictatorships, the search for social reform in the 20th century, and the transition to economic development. Subtopics include: slavery and native servitude, acculturation, immigration and urbanization, machismo and marianismo, and current native and women’s movements. Classes are conducted in English.
NOTE: Students taking this course as a Spanish credit must submit their written assignments in Spanish. The instructor will provide a weekly tutorial for Spanish students conducted in Spanish.

212 LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES:  MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN
An introductory course studying the development of societies in Mexico and the Caribbean from its pre-Columbian past to this heterogeneous present. Cultural, geographical, historical, literary, political and social topics are examined combining traditional historical narratives with art, cinema and other texts from popular culture and mass media. The course is structured thematically around significant themes and events. Some of
the themes covered are the Mexican, Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, gender relations and U.S. imperialism and hegemony policies in the region. Classes are conducted in English.
NOTE: Students taking this course as a Spanish credit must submit their written assignments in Spanish. The instructor will provide a weekly tutorial for Spanish students conducted in Spanish.

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

Calendar Courses

101 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED MODERN LANGUAGE] I
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course provides an introduction to the language in question, through the study of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. It includes numerous oral drills, frequent written exercises, short oral presentations and simple readings.
Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED MODERN LANGUAGE] II
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course is a continuation of Modern Languages 101. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammar and introduces aspects of civilization.
Three hours a week
 

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

211 LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES:  SOUTH AMERICA
This course is an introduction to the socio-political history and theories of cultures in Brazil, the Andean, and the Southern Cone regions of South America. Some of the topics examined are the construction of the nation state, populist governments, military dictatorships, the search for social reform in the 20th century, and the transition to economic development. Subtopics include: slavery and native servitude, acculturation, immigration and urbanization, machismo and marianismo, and current native and women’s movements. Classes are conducted in English.
NOTE: Students taking this course as a Spanish credit must submit their written assignments in Spanish. The instructor will provide a weekly tutorial for Spanish students conducted in Spanish.

212 LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES:  MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN
An introductory course studying the development of societies in Mexico and the Caribbean from its pre-Columbian past to this heterogeneous present. Cultural, geographical, historical, literary, political and social topics are examined combining traditional historical narratives with art, cinema and other texts from popular culture and mass media. The course is structured thematically around significant themes and events. Some of
the themes covered are the Mexican, Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, gender relations and U.S. imperialism and hegemony policies in the region. Classes are conducted in English.
NOTE: Students taking this course as a Spanish credit must submit their written assignments in Spanish. The instructor will provide a weekly tutorial for Spanish students conducted in Spanish.

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

Calendar Courses

100 Level

101 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED MODERN LANGUAGE] I
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course provides an introduction to the language in question, through the study of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. It includes numerous oral drills, frequent written exercises, short oral presentations and simple readings.
Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED MODERN LANGUAGE] II
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course is a continuation of Modern Languages 101. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammar and introduces aspects of civilization.
Three hours a week
 

200 Level

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

211 LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES:  SOUTH AMERICA
This course is an introduction to the socio-political history and theories of cultures in Brazil, the Andean, and the Southern Cone regions of South America. Some of the topics examined are the construction of the nation state, populist governments, military dictatorships, the search for social reform in the 20th century, and the transition to economic development. Subtopics include: slavery and native servitude, acculturation, immigration and urbanization, machismo and marianismo, and current native and women’s movements. Classes are conducted in English.
NOTE: Students taking this course as a Spanish credit must submit their written assignments in Spanish. The instructor will provide a weekly tutorial for Spanish students conducted in Spanish.

212 LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES:  MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN
An introductory course studying the development of societies in Mexico and the Caribbean from its pre-Columbian past to this heterogeneous present. Cultural, geographical, historical, literary, political and social topics are examined combining traditional historical narratives with art, cinema and other texts from popular culture and mass media. The course is structured thematically around significant themes and events. Some of
the themes covered are the Mexican, Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, gender relations and U.S. imperialism and hegemony policies in the region. Classes are conducted in English.
NOTE: Students taking this course as a Spanish credit must submit their written assignments in Spanish. The instructor will provide a weekly tutorial for Spanish students conducted in Spanish.

300 Level

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

400 Level

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which various topics or issues are explored in an introductory manner. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Special Topics courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

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