Make a positive impact toward sustainability.

Bachelor of Environmental Studies Degree Program

Want more information about Bachelor of Environmental Studies Degree Program? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Sustainability Officer
  • Environmental Manager
  • Sustainability Policy Analyst
  • Environmental Educator
  • Ecotourism Officer
The Environmental Studies program office is located in the Duffy Science Centre.

"Acquire the knowledge to create a sustainable future.
The reasons why are all around you."

With the new Bachelor of Environmental Studies program at the University of Prince Edward Island you will learn to make environmental connections across academic fields and to analyze environmental challenges we face today. In the classroom, field, and community, you will lead the way in finding innovative solutions—making a positive impact toward sustainability in your personal life, locally and globally.

Environmental issues typically do not respect traditional academic boundaries and require scientific, technical, human and social perspectives to address. As an interdisciplinary liberal arts and science program, the Bachelor of Environmental Studies will provide students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge across faculties of Arts, Science, and Business.

Dr. Carolyn Peach Brown, Director
Environmental Studies
Want more information about Bachelor of Environmental Studies Degree Program? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Sustainability Officer
  • Environmental Manager
  • Sustainability Policy Analyst
  • Environmental Educator
  • Ecotourism Officer
The Environmental Studies program office is located in the Duffy Science Centre.

Degree Description

A student enrolled in the BES will require a total of 120 credit hours or 40 Courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 300 level or above, including at least 2 at the 400 level.  There are 5 required core (ENV) courses  included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses, one of which requires a 30 hour internship working with a community partner engaged in the environmental field (ENV 301). There are requirements from the Faculties of Arts, Science, and School of Business. Students are required to choose one of three specializations:

  • Environmental Thought and Practice
  • Island Environments and Sustainability
  • Environmental Innovation and Change Management

Note: Each specialization has specific required courses (see Specializations tab).

Degree Requirements

ALL BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (BES) MAJORS

A total of 120 credit hours or 40 Courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 300 level or above, including at least 2 at the 400 level.  There are 5 required core (ENV) courses included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses.

Five Core Environmental Studies Courses (ENV) = 15 Hours Credit

  • ENV 101 - Introduction to Environmental Studies
  • ENV 203 - Societies and Sustainability: Past and Present
  • ENV 204 - Methods of Environmental Inquiry
  • ENV 301 - Environmental Studies Internship
  • ENV 401 - Public Scholars on Environmental Issues

At least nine (9) additional Environmental Studies (ENV) courses = 27 Hours Credit.   Please note that these 9 courses can be taken as part of a specialization requirement (see Specialization tab) or as an ENV elective to fulfil the requirements indicated above.
 

CHOICE OF ONE (1) SPECIALIZATION - (see Specialization tab for description and required courses for each Specialization)

REQUIRED COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS – ALL BES MAJORS 

  • One of UPEI 101, 102, or 103  = 3 Hours Credit

3 Foundational Cognate Courses = 9 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • Biology 101 - Environmental Biology
  • Philosophy 203 - Environmental Philosophy
  • Either Sociology 101 - Introduction to Sociology I OR Anthropology 105 - Introduction to Anthropology I

1 Course in Statistical Methods = 3 Hours Credit

  • Statistics  221 (formerly Math 221) - Introductory Statistics I (or other course with permission of Director)  (Note: Please contact the Director if you lack the requirements for university level Math courses)

4 Foundational Courses from Science and Business that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • 2 Science
  • 2 Science or Business

4 Foundational Courses from Arts that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • It is recommended that students take 1 Political Science or Economics
  • 3 Arts

GENERAL ELECTIVES

The remaining number of semester hours required to complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Environmental Studies (120 credit hours) will be made up from courses selected by the students.

WRITING INTENSIVE COURSE

  • All graduating students at UPEI must include at least one Writing Intensive course as part of their graduation requirements
  • Either English 381 - Professional Writing or Business 211 - Business Communications or other writing intensive course with approval of Director
Want more information about Bachelor of Environmental Studies Degree Program? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Sustainability Officer
  • Environmental Manager
  • Sustainability Policy Analyst
  • Environmental Educator
  • Ecotourism Officer
The Environmental Studies program office is located in the Duffy Science Centre.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

Students are expected to apply for a particular specialization at the beginning of their second year. However, it is possible for students to declare a specialization until the end of their third year. Please note that ENV courses taken as part of a specialization requirement can be used to fulfil the ENV requirements for the BES.

See the Suggested Course Sequence tab for each specialization's suggested sequence.


ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in Environmental Innovation and Change Management focuses on learning how to live within the limits of our environment, and develop innovations to manage the interaction of human activities with and upon the environment in a positive way; to challenge the conventional and move organizations, businesses and communities to invoke positive change.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • ENV 332 - Environmental Innovation and Change Management Skills
  • Either Economics 211 - Introduction to Resource Economics OR Economics 215 - Environmental Economics

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 224 - Field Course in Ecological Forestry
  • ENV  242 - Society and Natural Resources
  • ENV 351 - Sustainable Community Planning
  • ENV 354 - Environmental Valuation:  Theory and Practice
  • ENV 433 - Environmental Communication Strategies
  • ENV 495 - Environmental Studies Symposium
  • ENGN 152 - Engineering and the Biosphere
  • BUS 141 - Marketing
  • BUS 265 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
  • BUS 373 - Tourism Management
  • PHYS 261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy
  • S/A 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment

ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT AND PRACTICE SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in Environmental Thought and Practice focuses on the exploration of the values, attitudes and beliefs of people in relation to the environment in order to provide answers to pressing environmental concerns.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • Either Psychology 101- Introduction to Psychology I OR Psychology 333 – Ecopsychology
  • Sociology/Anthropology 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 242 - Society and Natural Resources
  • ENV 231 - Island Environmental Histories
  • ENV 342 - Environment and Development
  • ENV 411 - Environmental Governance
  • ENV 433 - Environmental Communication Strategies
  • ENV 495 - Environmental Studies Symposium
  • ENG 322 - English-Canadian Poetry
  • ENG 362 - 19th-Century American Literature 1830-1910
  • HIST 483 - The History of the Environmentalist Movement
  • PHIL 206 - Animal Ethics
  • PHIL 371 - Community-based Ethical Inquiry

ISLAND ENVIRONMENTS AND SUSTAINABILITY SPECIALIZATION
The Island Environments and Sustainability specialization focuses on the diverse characteristics of islands and islanders’ interaction with the environment in order to gain an understanding of lessons for sustainability in all places.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • IST 201 - Introduction to Island Studies
  • Either POLS 233 - Political Geography OR ENV 334 - Environmental Stresses on Island Communities

9 credit hours from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 212 - Earth's Physical Environment
  • ENV 231 - Island Environmental Histories
  • ENV 311 - Understanding Climate Change
  • ENV 321 - Natural Hazards
  • ENV 351 - Sustainable Community Planning
  • ENV 411 - Environmental Governance
  • BIO 222 - Ecology
  • BIO 327 - Field Coastal Ecology
  • BIO 391 - Marine Biology
  • BIO 452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
  • BIO 462 - Watershed Ecology
  • SOC 305 - Population and Society
Want more information about Bachelor of Environmental Studies Degree Program? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Sustainability Officer
  • Environmental Manager
  • Sustainability Policy Analyst
  • Environmental Educator
  • Ecotourism Officer
The Environmental Studies program office is located in the Duffy Science Centre.

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

A minor in Environmental Studies will be recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses drawn from Environmental Studies courses and cross-listed courses.

These courses must include:

1) Two core introductory Environmental Studies courses (Environmental Studies 101 and 203)
2) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Science; and
3) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts; and
4) A minimum of 3 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts or Faculty of Science

APPROVED COURSES ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES MINOR:  Students who do not have the required prerequisites for particular courses that are cross-listed in the Environmental Studies Program are encouraged to consult with the instructors of these courses to seek their permission to enrol.  Instructors may choose to admit students to these courses based upon alternative prerequisites that are judged to provide the student with sufficient background preparation for the course.  

Faculty of Science

  • **Biology 101 - Current Issues in Environmental Biology
  • Biology 132 - Introduction to Organisms
  • Biology 222 - Ecology
  • Biology 314 - Plant Community Ecology
  • Biology 327 - Field Coastal Ecology
  • Biology 391 - Marine Biology
  • Biology 411 - Principles of Wildlife Biology
  • Biology 452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
  • Biology 454 - Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
  • Biology 462 - Watershed Ecology
  • Biology 465 - Marine Community Ecology
  • Biology 485 - Environmental Toxicology
  • Chemistry 202 - Environmental Chemistry
  • Physics 261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy

** Students may only credit either Biology 101 or Biology 132 toward their minor.

Faculty of Arts

  • Economics 211 - Introduction to Resource Economics
  • Economics 215 - Environmental Economics
  • Economics 352 - Applied Resource Economics
  • English 322 - English Canadian Poetry
  • English 331 - The Literature of Atlantic Canada
  • English 335 - British Romantic Literature
  • History 483 - History of the Environmental Movement
  • Island Studies 201 - Introduction to Island Studies
  • Philosophy 102 - Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
  • Philosophy 105 - Technology, Values, and Science
  • Philosophy 203 - Environmental Philosophy
  • Philosophy 206 - Animal Ethics
  • Philosophy 371 - Community-Based Ethical Inquiry
  • Psychology 333 - Ecopsychology
  • Sociology 305 - Population and Society
  • Sociology/Anthropology 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment
Want more information about Bachelor of Environmental Studies Degree Program? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Sustainability Officer
  • Environmental Manager
  • Sustainability Policy Analyst
  • Environmental Educator
  • Ecotourism Officer
The Environmental Studies program office is located in the Duffy Science Centre.

Suggested course sequences (all specializations)

First year

ENV 1010 (3 hours credit)
BIO 1010 (3 hours credit)
Either SOC 1010 or ANTH 1050 (3 hours credit)
Math 1110 or 1120 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2120 (3 hours credit)
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives (3 to 6 hours credit)

Environmental Innovation and Change Management specialization

Second year

ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
Either EC 2110 or EC 2150 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year

ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
ENV 3320 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of: ENV 2240, ENV 2420, ENV 3510, ENV 3540, ENV 4330, ENV 4950, ENGN 1520, BUS 1410, BUS 2650, BUS 3730, PHYS 2610, S/A 3410 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year

ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level (6 hours credit)
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Environmental Thought and Practice specialization

Second year

ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
Either PSYCH 1010 or PSYCH 3330 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year
ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
SOC/ANTH 3410 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of: ENV 2420, ENV 2310, ENV 3420, ENV 4110, ENV 4330, ENV 4950, ENG 3220, ENG 3620, HIST 4830, PHIL 2060, PHIL 3710 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year
ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level 
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Island Environments and Sustainability specialization

Second year
ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
IST 2010 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year
ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
Either POLS 2330 or ENV 3340 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of ENV 2120, ENV 2310, ENV 3110, ENV 3210, ENV 3510, ENV 4110, BIO 2220, BIO 3270, BIO 3910, BIO 4520, BIO 4620, SOC 3050 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year
ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Overview

"Acquire the knowledge to create a sustainable future.
The reasons why are all around you."

With the new Bachelor of Environmental Studies program at the University of Prince Edward Island you will learn to make environmental connections across academic fields and to analyze environmental challenges we face today. In the classroom, field, and community, you will lead the way in finding innovative solutions—making a positive impact toward sustainability in your personal life, locally and globally.

Environmental issues typically do not respect traditional academic boundaries and require scientific, technical, human and social perspectives to address. As an interdisciplinary liberal arts and science program, the Bachelor of Environmental Studies will provide students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge across faculties of Arts, Science, and Business.

Environmental Studies
Dr. Carolyn Peach Brown, Director
Degree

Degree Description

A student enrolled in the BES will require a total of 120 credit hours or 40 Courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 300 level or above, including at least 2 at the 400 level.  There are 5 required core (ENV) courses  included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses, one of which requires a 30 hour internship working with a community partner engaged in the environmental field (ENV 301). There are requirements from the Faculties of Arts, Science, and School of Business. Students are required to choose one of three specializations:

  • Environmental Thought and Practice
  • Island Environments and Sustainability
  • Environmental Innovation and Change Management

Note: Each specialization has specific required courses (see Specializations tab).

Degree Requirements

ALL BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (BES) MAJORS

A total of 120 credit hours or 40 Courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 300 level or above, including at least 2 at the 400 level.  There are 5 required core (ENV) courses included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses.

Five Core Environmental Studies Courses (ENV) = 15 Hours Credit

  • ENV 101 - Introduction to Environmental Studies
  • ENV 203 - Societies and Sustainability: Past and Present
  • ENV 204 - Methods of Environmental Inquiry
  • ENV 301 - Environmental Studies Internship
  • ENV 401 - Public Scholars on Environmental Issues

At least nine (9) additional Environmental Studies (ENV) courses = 27 Hours Credit.   Please note that these 9 courses can be taken as part of a specialization requirement (see Specialization tab) or as an ENV elective to fulfil the requirements indicated above.
 

CHOICE OF ONE (1) SPECIALIZATION - (see Specialization tab for description and required courses for each Specialization)

REQUIRED COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS – ALL BES MAJORS 

  • One of UPEI 101, 102, or 103  = 3 Hours Credit

3 Foundational Cognate Courses = 9 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • Biology 101 - Environmental Biology
  • Philosophy 203 - Environmental Philosophy
  • Either Sociology 101 - Introduction to Sociology I OR Anthropology 105 - Introduction to Anthropology I

1 Course in Statistical Methods = 3 Hours Credit

  • Statistics  221 (formerly Math 221) - Introductory Statistics I (or other course with permission of Director)  (Note: Please contact the Director if you lack the requirements for university level Math courses)

4 Foundational Courses from Science and Business that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • 2 Science
  • 2 Science or Business

4 Foundational Courses from Arts that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • It is recommended that students take 1 Political Science or Economics
  • 3 Arts

GENERAL ELECTIVES

The remaining number of semester hours required to complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Environmental Studies (120 credit hours) will be made up from courses selected by the students.

WRITING INTENSIVE COURSE

  • All graduating students at UPEI must include at least one Writing Intensive course as part of their graduation requirements
  • Either English 381 - Professional Writing or Business 211 - Business Communications or other writing intensive course with approval of Director
Specializations

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

Students are expected to apply for a particular specialization at the beginning of their second year. However, it is possible for students to declare a specialization until the end of their third year. Please note that ENV courses taken as part of a specialization requirement can be used to fulfil the ENV requirements for the BES.

See the Suggested Course Sequence tab for each specialization's suggested sequence.


ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in Environmental Innovation and Change Management focuses on learning how to live within the limits of our environment, and develop innovations to manage the interaction of human activities with and upon the environment in a positive way; to challenge the conventional and move organizations, businesses and communities to invoke positive change.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • ENV 332 - Environmental Innovation and Change Management Skills
  • Either Economics 211 - Introduction to Resource Economics OR Economics 215 - Environmental Economics

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 224 - Field Course in Ecological Forestry
  • ENV  242 - Society and Natural Resources
  • ENV 351 - Sustainable Community Planning
  • ENV 354 - Environmental Valuation:  Theory and Practice
  • ENV 433 - Environmental Communication Strategies
  • ENV 495 - Environmental Studies Symposium
  • ENGN 152 - Engineering and the Biosphere
  • BUS 141 - Marketing
  • BUS 265 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
  • BUS 373 - Tourism Management
  • PHYS 261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy
  • S/A 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment

ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT AND PRACTICE SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in Environmental Thought and Practice focuses on the exploration of the values, attitudes and beliefs of people in relation to the environment in order to provide answers to pressing environmental concerns.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • Either Psychology 101- Introduction to Psychology I OR Psychology 333 – Ecopsychology
  • Sociology/Anthropology 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 242 - Society and Natural Resources
  • ENV 231 - Island Environmental Histories
  • ENV 342 - Environment and Development
  • ENV 411 - Environmental Governance
  • ENV 433 - Environmental Communication Strategies
  • ENV 495 - Environmental Studies Symposium
  • ENG 322 - English-Canadian Poetry
  • ENG 362 - 19th-Century American Literature 1830-1910
  • HIST 483 - The History of the Environmentalist Movement
  • PHIL 206 - Animal Ethics
  • PHIL 371 - Community-based Ethical Inquiry

ISLAND ENVIRONMENTS AND SUSTAINABILITY SPECIALIZATION
The Island Environments and Sustainability specialization focuses on the diverse characteristics of islands and islanders’ interaction with the environment in order to gain an understanding of lessons for sustainability in all places.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • IST 201 - Introduction to Island Studies
  • Either POLS 233 - Political Geography OR ENV 334 - Environmental Stresses on Island Communities

9 credit hours from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 212 - Earth's Physical Environment
  • ENV 231 - Island Environmental Histories
  • ENV 311 - Understanding Climate Change
  • ENV 321 - Natural Hazards
  • ENV 351 - Sustainable Community Planning
  • ENV 411 - Environmental Governance
  • BIO 222 - Ecology
  • BIO 327 - Field Coastal Ecology
  • BIO 391 - Marine Biology
  • BIO 452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
  • BIO 462 - Watershed Ecology
  • SOC 305 - Population and Society
Minor

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

A minor in Environmental Studies will be recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses drawn from Environmental Studies courses and cross-listed courses.

These courses must include:

1) Two core introductory Environmental Studies courses (Environmental Studies 101 and 203)
2) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Science; and
3) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts; and
4) A minimum of 3 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts or Faculty of Science

APPROVED COURSES ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES MINOR:  Students who do not have the required prerequisites for particular courses that are cross-listed in the Environmental Studies Program are encouraged to consult with the instructors of these courses to seek their permission to enrol.  Instructors may choose to admit students to these courses based upon alternative prerequisites that are judged to provide the student with sufficient background preparation for the course.  

Faculty of Science

  • **Biology 101 - Current Issues in Environmental Biology
  • Biology 132 - Introduction to Organisms
  • Biology 222 - Ecology
  • Biology 314 - Plant Community Ecology
  • Biology 327 - Field Coastal Ecology
  • Biology 391 - Marine Biology
  • Biology 411 - Principles of Wildlife Biology
  • Biology 452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
  • Biology 454 - Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
  • Biology 462 - Watershed Ecology
  • Biology 465 - Marine Community Ecology
  • Biology 485 - Environmental Toxicology
  • Chemistry 202 - Environmental Chemistry
  • Physics 261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy

** Students may only credit either Biology 101 or Biology 132 toward their minor.

Faculty of Arts

  • Economics 211 - Introduction to Resource Economics
  • Economics 215 - Environmental Economics
  • Economics 352 - Applied Resource Economics
  • English 322 - English Canadian Poetry
  • English 331 - The Literature of Atlantic Canada
  • English 335 - British Romantic Literature
  • History 483 - History of the Environmental Movement
  • Island Studies 201 - Introduction to Island Studies
  • Philosophy 102 - Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
  • Philosophy 105 - Technology, Values, and Science
  • Philosophy 203 - Environmental Philosophy
  • Philosophy 206 - Animal Ethics
  • Philosophy 371 - Community-Based Ethical Inquiry
  • Psychology 333 - Ecopsychology
  • Sociology 305 - Population and Society
  • Sociology/Anthropology 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment
Suggested Course Sequence

Suggested course sequences (all specializations)

First year

ENV 1010 (3 hours credit)
BIO 1010 (3 hours credit)
Either SOC 1010 or ANTH 1050 (3 hours credit)
Math 1110 or 1120 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2120 (3 hours credit)
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives (3 to 6 hours credit)

Environmental Innovation and Change Management specialization

Second year

ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
Either EC 2110 or EC 2150 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year

ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
ENV 3320 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of: ENV 2240, ENV 2420, ENV 3510, ENV 3540, ENV 4330, ENV 4950, ENGN 1520, BUS 1410, BUS 2650, BUS 3730, PHYS 2610, S/A 3410 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year

ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level (6 hours credit)
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Environmental Thought and Practice specialization

Second year

ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
Either PSYCH 1010 or PSYCH 3330 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year
ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
SOC/ANTH 3410 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of: ENV 2420, ENV 2310, ENV 3420, ENV 4110, ENV 4330, ENV 4950, ENG 3220, ENG 3620, HIST 4830, PHIL 2060, PHIL 3710 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year
ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level 
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Island Environments and Sustainability specialization

Second year
ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
IST 2010 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year
ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
Either POLS 2330 or ENV 3340 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of ENV 2120, ENV 2310, ENV 3110, ENV 3210, ENV 3510, ENV 4110, BIO 2220, BIO 3270, BIO 3910, BIO 4520, BIO 4620, SOC 3050 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year
ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Overview

"Acquire the knowledge to create a sustainable future.
The reasons why are all around you."

With the new Bachelor of Environmental Studies program at the University of Prince Edward Island you will learn to make environmental connections across academic fields and to analyze environmental challenges we face today. In the classroom, field, and community, you will lead the way in finding innovative solutions—making a positive impact toward sustainability in your personal life, locally and globally.

Environmental issues typically do not respect traditional academic boundaries and require scientific, technical, human and social perspectives to address. As an interdisciplinary liberal arts and science program, the Bachelor of Environmental Studies will provide students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge across faculties of Arts, Science, and Business.

Dr. Carolyn Peach Brown, Director
Environmental Studies

Degree

Degree Description

A student enrolled in the BES will require a total of 120 credit hours or 40 Courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 300 level or above, including at least 2 at the 400 level.  There are 5 required core (ENV) courses  included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses, one of which requires a 30 hour internship working with a community partner engaged in the environmental field (ENV 301). There are requirements from the Faculties of Arts, Science, and School of Business. Students are required to choose one of three specializations:

  • Environmental Thought and Practice
  • Island Environments and Sustainability
  • Environmental Innovation and Change Management

Note: Each specialization has specific required courses (see Specializations tab).

Degree Requirements

ALL BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (BES) MAJORS

A total of 120 credit hours or 40 Courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 300 level or above, including at least 2 at the 400 level.  There are 5 required core (ENV) courses included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses.

Five Core Environmental Studies Courses (ENV) = 15 Hours Credit

  • ENV 101 - Introduction to Environmental Studies
  • ENV 203 - Societies and Sustainability: Past and Present
  • ENV 204 - Methods of Environmental Inquiry
  • ENV 301 - Environmental Studies Internship
  • ENV 401 - Public Scholars on Environmental Issues

At least nine (9) additional Environmental Studies (ENV) courses = 27 Hours Credit.   Please note that these 9 courses can be taken as part of a specialization requirement (see Specialization tab) or as an ENV elective to fulfil the requirements indicated above.
 

CHOICE OF ONE (1) SPECIALIZATION - (see Specialization tab for description and required courses for each Specialization)

REQUIRED COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS – ALL BES MAJORS 

  • One of UPEI 101, 102, or 103  = 3 Hours Credit

3 Foundational Cognate Courses = 9 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • Biology 101 - Environmental Biology
  • Philosophy 203 - Environmental Philosophy
  • Either Sociology 101 - Introduction to Sociology I OR Anthropology 105 - Introduction to Anthropology I

1 Course in Statistical Methods = 3 Hours Credit

  • Statistics  221 (formerly Math 221) - Introductory Statistics I (or other course with permission of Director)  (Note: Please contact the Director if you lack the requirements for university level Math courses)

4 Foundational Courses from Science and Business that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • 2 Science
  • 2 Science or Business

4 Foundational Courses from Arts that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit  (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)

  • It is recommended that students take 1 Political Science or Economics
  • 3 Arts

GENERAL ELECTIVES

The remaining number of semester hours required to complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Environmental Studies (120 credit hours) will be made up from courses selected by the students.

WRITING INTENSIVE COURSE

  • All graduating students at UPEI must include at least one Writing Intensive course as part of their graduation requirements
  • Either English 381 - Professional Writing or Business 211 - Business Communications or other writing intensive course with approval of Director

Specializations

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

Students are expected to apply for a particular specialization at the beginning of their second year. However, it is possible for students to declare a specialization until the end of their third year. Please note that ENV courses taken as part of a specialization requirement can be used to fulfil the ENV requirements for the BES.

See the Suggested Course Sequence tab for each specialization's suggested sequence.


ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in Environmental Innovation and Change Management focuses on learning how to live within the limits of our environment, and develop innovations to manage the interaction of human activities with and upon the environment in a positive way; to challenge the conventional and move organizations, businesses and communities to invoke positive change.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • ENV 332 - Environmental Innovation and Change Management Skills
  • Either Economics 211 - Introduction to Resource Economics OR Economics 215 - Environmental Economics

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 224 - Field Course in Ecological Forestry
  • ENV  242 - Society and Natural Resources
  • ENV 351 - Sustainable Community Planning
  • ENV 354 - Environmental Valuation:  Theory and Practice
  • ENV 433 - Environmental Communication Strategies
  • ENV 495 - Environmental Studies Symposium
  • ENGN 152 - Engineering and the Biosphere
  • BUS 141 - Marketing
  • BUS 265 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
  • BUS 373 - Tourism Management
  • PHYS 261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy
  • S/A 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment

ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT AND PRACTICE SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in Environmental Thought and Practice focuses on the exploration of the values, attitudes and beliefs of people in relation to the environment in order to provide answers to pressing environmental concerns.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • Either Psychology 101- Introduction to Psychology I OR Psychology 333 – Ecopsychology
  • Sociology/Anthropology 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 242 - Society and Natural Resources
  • ENV 231 - Island Environmental Histories
  • ENV 342 - Environment and Development
  • ENV 411 - Environmental Governance
  • ENV 433 - Environmental Communication Strategies
  • ENV 495 - Environmental Studies Symposium
  • ENG 322 - English-Canadian Poetry
  • ENG 362 - 19th-Century American Literature 1830-1910
  • HIST 483 - The History of the Environmentalist Movement
  • PHIL 206 - Animal Ethics
  • PHIL 371 - Community-based Ethical Inquiry

ISLAND ENVIRONMENTS AND SUSTAINABILITY SPECIALIZATION
The Island Environments and Sustainability specialization focuses on the diverse characteristics of islands and islanders’ interaction with the environment in order to gain an understanding of lessons for sustainability in all places.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit

  • IST 201 - Introduction to Island Studies
  • Either POLS 233 - Political Geography OR ENV 334 - Environmental Stresses on Island Communities

9 credit hours from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:

  • ENV 212 - Earth's Physical Environment
  • ENV 231 - Island Environmental Histories
  • ENV 311 - Understanding Climate Change
  • ENV 321 - Natural Hazards
  • ENV 351 - Sustainable Community Planning
  • ENV 411 - Environmental Governance
  • BIO 222 - Ecology
  • BIO 327 - Field Coastal Ecology
  • BIO 391 - Marine Biology
  • BIO 452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
  • BIO 462 - Watershed Ecology
  • SOC 305 - Population and Society

Minor

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

A minor in Environmental Studies will be recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses drawn from Environmental Studies courses and cross-listed courses.

These courses must include:

1) Two core introductory Environmental Studies courses (Environmental Studies 101 and 203)
2) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Science; and
3) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts; and
4) A minimum of 3 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts or Faculty of Science

APPROVED COURSES ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES MINOR:  Students who do not have the required prerequisites for particular courses that are cross-listed in the Environmental Studies Program are encouraged to consult with the instructors of these courses to seek their permission to enrol.  Instructors may choose to admit students to these courses based upon alternative prerequisites that are judged to provide the student with sufficient background preparation for the course.  

Faculty of Science

  • **Biology 101 - Current Issues in Environmental Biology
  • Biology 132 - Introduction to Organisms
  • Biology 222 - Ecology
  • Biology 314 - Plant Community Ecology
  • Biology 327 - Field Coastal Ecology
  • Biology 391 - Marine Biology
  • Biology 411 - Principles of Wildlife Biology
  • Biology 452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
  • Biology 454 - Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
  • Biology 462 - Watershed Ecology
  • Biology 465 - Marine Community Ecology
  • Biology 485 - Environmental Toxicology
  • Chemistry 202 - Environmental Chemistry
  • Physics 261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy

** Students may only credit either Biology 101 or Biology 132 toward their minor.

Faculty of Arts

  • Economics 211 - Introduction to Resource Economics
  • Economics 215 - Environmental Economics
  • Economics 352 - Applied Resource Economics
  • English 322 - English Canadian Poetry
  • English 331 - The Literature of Atlantic Canada
  • English 335 - British Romantic Literature
  • History 483 - History of the Environmental Movement
  • Island Studies 201 - Introduction to Island Studies
  • Philosophy 102 - Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
  • Philosophy 105 - Technology, Values, and Science
  • Philosophy 203 - Environmental Philosophy
  • Philosophy 206 - Animal Ethics
  • Philosophy 371 - Community-Based Ethical Inquiry
  • Psychology 333 - Ecopsychology
  • Sociology 305 - Population and Society
  • Sociology/Anthropology 341 - Technology, Society and the Environment

Suggested Course Sequence

Suggested course sequences (all specializations)

First year

ENV 1010 (3 hours credit)
BIO 1010 (3 hours credit)
Either SOC 1010 or ANTH 1050 (3 hours credit)
Math 1110 or 1120 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2120 (3 hours credit)
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives (3 to 6 hours credit)

Environmental Innovation and Change Management specialization

Second year

ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
Either EC 2110 or EC 2150 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year

ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
ENV 3320 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of: ENV 2240, ENV 2420, ENV 3510, ENV 3540, ENV 4330, ENV 4950, ENGN 1520, BUS 1410, BUS 2650, BUS 3730, PHYS 2610, S/A 3410 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year

ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level (6 hours credit)
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Environmental Thought and Practice specialization

Second year

ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
Either PSYCH 1010 or PSYCH 3330 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year
ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
SOC/ANTH 3410 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of: ENV 2420, ENV 2310, ENV 3420, ENV 4110, ENV 4330, ENV 4950, ENG 3220, ENG 3620, HIST 4830, PHIL 2060, PHIL 3710 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year
ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level 
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

Island Environments and Sustainability specialization

Second year
ENV 2030 (3 hours credit)
ENV 2040 (3 hours credit)
PHIL 2030 (3 hours credit)
STAT 2210 (3 hours credit)
IST 2010 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
General Electives

Third year
ENV 3010 (3 hours credit)
Either POLS 2330 or ENV 3340 (3 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Science and Business (3 or 6 hours credit)
Foundational courses from Arts (3 or 6 hours credit)
Three of ENV 2120, ENV 2310, ENV 3110, ENV 3210, ENV 3510, ENV 4110, BIO 2220, BIO 3270, BIO 3910, BIO 4520, BIO 4620, SOC 3050 (9 hours credit)
General Electives

Fourth year
ENV 4010 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled, one writing Intensive course, for example, ENG 3810 or BUS 2110 (3 hours credit)
If not already fulfilled:
ENV electives to complete at least 4 at 3000 level
One ENV elective at 4000 level (3 hours credit)

ENV electives to complete a total of 14 ENV courses
General Electives

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Careers: 
Sustainability Officer
Environmental Manager
Sustainability Policy Analyst
Environmental Educator
Ecotourism Officer
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

101 (formerly 201) INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
This course introduces students to a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental issues; and emphasizes the interrelationships among the various physical, biological, and human systems. It examines major contemporary environmental issues, such as global warming and land use, and focuses on how these issues are understood and addressed within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
Three hours a week (some field trips may be required)
Three semester hours of credit

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

203 SOCIETIES AND SUSTAINABILITY: PAST AND PRESENT
This course explores the concept of sustainability in relation to how societies have interacted with the environment overtime.  Through exploration of successes and failures from historical and contemporary societies, students will develop the capacity to understand the ecological context in which humans live, to recognize limits, and to design sustainable human systems for the future.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

204 METHODS OF ENVIRONMENTAL INQUIRY
This course introduces students to the diverse nature of inquiry in the various fields of environmental studies. Through practical case studies it provides literacy in key methods used in understanding the environment in the sciences, social sciences and humanities.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Three semester hours of credit

212  EARTH’S PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
This course will introduce students to the basic ‘building blocks’ of Earth’s physical characteristics, providing a foundation on which to develop more specialist knowledge in their understanding of Environmental Studies. It will examine the geologic and geomorphic cycles, including processes of weathering, erosion, transportation and deposition, and investigate how these create fluvial, glacial, and coastal landforms and impacts on human activity. It also aims to address atmospheric processes and the links between global climate zones and world ecosystems.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

224  FIELD COURSE IN ECOLOGICAL FORESTRY
This course introduces students to the principles and practices of ecological forestry management.  By combining theory-based lectures and an experiential learning approach at the MacPhail Woods Ecological Forestry site students will gain a deep understanding of the forest and forest restoration efforts.
PREREQUISITE: Second year standing or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

231 ISLAND ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORIES 
Environmental history is broadly defined as the study of continuity and change in human relationships with the environment. This course introduces students to environmental history and historical methods with a focus on historic and current, interaction with the environment on global islands.  Special focus will be given to ocean, forest, and land use activity in Prince Edward Island and islands in the Atlantic region.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

242 SOCIETY AND NATURAL RESOURCES
This course examines the development, use and conservation of natural resources. It explore the definition of natural resources, the history of resource use, governance regimes, and theories and practices around integrated resource planning and management, ecosystem management, adaptive management, conflict resolution approaches, local knowledge and public participation. Case studies explore recent trends in forestry, fisheries, agriculture, parks and recreation, wildlife, and water resources management.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

291 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course offers recognition for equivalency-learning to returned CUSO cooperants and interns who have completed an international development placement overseas. Students who have completed a CUSO placement with a focus on environmental issues – such as environmental science, resource management, conservation, environmental education – can apply to receive credit toward their Environmental Studies degree.
Three semester hours of credit

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

301 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES INTERNSHIP
This course provides students with opportunities to develop, integrate and apply their knowledge of environmental issues and theory. Students will be involved in 'internship' experiences with varied environmental organizations, in environmental action research on campus issues or in other settings, and in developing personal plans for environmental action and change. Classroom discussions and written work will aid students in developing a multidisciplinary and systems approach to the analysis of these experiences.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 101. Students taking this course concurrently may apply for admission to the instructor
One and a half hours per week in class, two and a half hours per week in practicum work
Three semester hours of credit

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Three semester hours of credit

311 UNDERSTANDING CLIMATE CHANGE
This course introduces students to the science of climate change. Students explore its social and political implications, and examine its impact on daily life by reviewing current scientific data as it relates to vulnerabilities of particular regions. Topics include methods, strategies, and technologies that address climate change, using case studies of adaptive and mitigative programs in North America, with a special emphasis on Canada’s climate action plan.
PREREQUISITE: Environmental Studies 101 or 203
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

321 NATURAL HAZARDS
This course provides an introduction to the causes of a variety of natural hazards (tectonic - e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic activity; meteorological - e.g. hurricanes and flooding; and mass movement - e.g. landslides, mudslides, and avalanches) as well as their impact on human activities and the strategies available to predict and manage such events.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

332 ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SKILLS
This course will introduce students to a general overview of innovations to address environmental goals. It will examine how using a structured approach to change can move organizations, businesses and communities toward more environmentally sustainable practices. 
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

334 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES ON ISLAND COMMUNITIES
This course explores the risk and vulnerabilities associated with climate change and other environmental stress on island communities. This course will focus on the special characteristics of island communities and will explore island vulnerabilities in the natural and built environment as well as in social and economic systems.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

342 ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on environment and development issues in an international, particularly a developing country, context. Issues related to trade, biodiversity conservation, agriculture, climate change, wealth, poverty, population, and gender will be explored.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

351 SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY PLANNING
An overview of how planning tools and practice shape the form of communities, including: (1) Key issues and principles of sustainability at a community scale; as well as related planning approaches; (2) Sustainable community planning approaches and tools for identifying and achieving quality of life, and (3) The components and process of developing an integrated sustainable community plan. Students will learn how to assess community capital, identify and recruit key stakeholders and develop, implement, monitor and evaluate a community plan.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

354 ENVIRONMENTAL VALUATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course would develop the theory and techniques in the valuation of non-market (ecological) good and services.  It will focus on the techniques and methods for placing monetary values on the environment and incorporating them into economic decision making at both the macro and project level.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

401 PUBLIC SCHOLARS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
This seminar course will provide a forum for students to interact and learn from local, national and international experts in various fields of environmental studies. Students will gain an increased awareness and understanding of the diverse ways in which our society is addressing issues related to the environment. The course will provide opportunities for students to develop in their own expertise as public scholars.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 301 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

411 ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE
This course focuses on developing an understanding of principles, practices and emerging issues relating to environmental governance. An emphasis is placed on exploring the roles of governments, markets and collective action in environmental policy and management. Examples of governance arrangements are drawn from different parts of the world and different ecological contexts, including the uniqueness of island contexts.
Crosslisted with Island Studies (c.f. Island Studies 619)
PREREQUISITES: ENV 101 or permission of the instructor. For students taking the course as IST 619 they need to be an active graduate student
Three semester hours of credit

431 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
This course examines Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) from philosophical, methodological and institutional perspectives. The evolution of EIA in Canada will be the focus. The strategic role of EIA will be explored as to its effectiveness as a tool for achieving sustainability goals. Case studies illustrating major issues and applications will be presented at a variety of geographical scales. Some field trips may be required.
Crosslisted with Environmental Sciences (c.f. ESC 803)
PREREQUITES:  ENV 101 or with permission of instructor
Three semester hours of credit

433 ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES
This course promotes the development of communication skills in the context of environmental issues and exposes students to direct interaction with representatives from industry, government and the community. The course will also provide broad theoretical and practical knowledge needed to resolve disputes as well as skills training in techniques of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

441 ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Ecological problems such as climate change and resource scarcity transcend the boundaries of nation-states and therefore necessitate international cooperation between states and non-state actors. This course will examine the dynamics of global environmental politics.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses offer students the opportunity for the study of other subjects in environmental studies in two different forms: (1) In response to an individual student's needs, a program of directed readings or directed research can be developed with a faculty member; (2) Directed Studies courses are offered on occasion by members of the faculty or by visiting instructors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

495 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES SYMPOSIUM
The Student Environmental Studies Symposium course is an opportunity for students to facilitate a public forum to raise awareness and discussion about a contemporary environmental issue. This unique course will focus on students planning and running a one day symposium about a relevant environmental issue of their choice. It will provide an opportunity for active and collaborative learning as students dialogue with important stakeholders engaged in real world issues from government, the private sector and civil society. Through the process of organizing this symposium, students will deepen their knowledge of the complex nature of environmental issues and the challenges in finding sustainable solutions. Practical outcomes of the course include the development of critical thinking and writing skills, as well as organizational, communication and team-building skills.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

Course Level: 
Recommended Courses
Courses: 

RECOMMENDED LIST OF SCIENCE, BUSINESS, AND ARTS COURSES for the BES
Unless otherwise indicated, students who do not have the required prerequisites for particular courses that are approved for the Bachelor of Environmental Studies are encouraged to consult with the instructors of these courses to seek their permission to enrol. Instructors may choose to admit students to these courses based upon alternative prerequisites that are judged to provide the student with sufficient background preparation for the course.

SCIENCE COURSES:

Applied Human Sciences:

Foods and Nutrition 223 - Nutrition and Dietary Behaviour

Biology: (please note that Biology 131-132 are required as prerequisites for the other Biology courses below)

101 - Current Issues in Environmental Biology
131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
132 - Introduction to Organisms
222 - Ecology
202 - Botany
204 - Zoology
311 - Plants and People
314 - Plant Community Ecology
327 - Field Coastal Ecology
351 - Ornithology
371 - Life of Mammals
391 - Marine Biology
411 - Principles of Wildlife Biology
452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
454 - Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
462 - Watershed Ecology
465 - Marine Community Ecology
485 - Environmental Toxicology

Chemistry: (please note that Chemistry 111-112 are required as prerequisites for the other Chemistry courses below)

111 - General Chemistry I
112 - General Chemistry II
202 - Environmental Chemistry
243 - Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences

Engineering:

152 - Engineering and the Biosphere
212 - Geology for Engineers

Physics:

261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy 

BUSINESS COURSES:

101 - Introduction to Business
141 - Marketing
171 - Organizational Behaviour
211 - Business Communication
251 - Introduction to Management Science
265 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
275 - Introduction to Biotechnology
373 - Tourism Management

ARTS COURSES:

Economics: 

211 - Introduction to Resource Economics
215 - Environmental Economics
283 - Agricultural Economics
352 - Applied Resource Economics

English:

322 - English Canadian Poetry
331 - The Literature of Atlantic Canada
335 - British Romantic Literature
362 - 19th century American literature, 1830-1910

History:

231 - The Atlantic Region
331 - History of Prince Edward Island: Pre-Confederation
332 - History of Prince Edward Island: Post-Confederation
483 - History of the Environmental Movement

International Development Studies:

201 - Introduction to International Development Studies

Island Studies

201 - Introduction to Island Studies

Modern Languages:

211 - Latin American Studies:  South America

Philosophy:

102 - Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
105 - Technology, Values, and Science
111 - Critical Thinking
203 - Environmental Philosophy
206 - Animal Ethics
301 - Philosophy of Science
371 - Community-Based Ethical Inquiry

Political Science:

101 - Introductory Politics I: Government and Politics in Liberal Democracies
102 - Introductory Politics II: Political Ideologies in Liberal Democracies
253 - Introduction to Political Theory

Psychology:

101 - Introduction to Psychology: Part I
242 - Introduction to Social Psychology
333 - Ecopsychology
362 - Ergonomics

Religious Studies:

102 - Religions of the World: Eastern Traditions

Sociology:

102 - Introduction to Sociology II
271 - Self and Society
282 - Social Psychology
305 - Population and Society
332 - Methodology and Research II
372 - Collective Behaviour and Social Movements
392 - Media and Society

Sociology/Anthropology:

222 - Native Canadians
266 - Science, Culture and Society
341 - Technology, Society, and the Environment 

Calendar Courses

101 (formerly 201) INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
This course introduces students to a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental issues; and emphasizes the interrelationships among the various physical, biological, and human systems. It examines major contemporary environmental issues, such as global warming and land use, and focuses on how these issues are understood and addressed within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
Three hours a week (some field trips may be required)
Three semester hours of credit

203 SOCIETIES AND SUSTAINABILITY: PAST AND PRESENT
This course explores the concept of sustainability in relation to how societies have interacted with the environment overtime.  Through exploration of successes and failures from historical and contemporary societies, students will develop the capacity to understand the ecological context in which humans live, to recognize limits, and to design sustainable human systems for the future.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

204 METHODS OF ENVIRONMENTAL INQUIRY
This course introduces students to the diverse nature of inquiry in the various fields of environmental studies. Through practical case studies it provides literacy in key methods used in understanding the environment in the sciences, social sciences and humanities.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Three semester hours of credit

212  EARTH’S PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
This course will introduce students to the basic ‘building blocks’ of Earth’s physical characteristics, providing a foundation on which to develop more specialist knowledge in their understanding of Environmental Studies. It will examine the geologic and geomorphic cycles, including processes of weathering, erosion, transportation and deposition, and investigate how these create fluvial, glacial, and coastal landforms and impacts on human activity. It also aims to address atmospheric processes and the links between global climate zones and world ecosystems.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

224  FIELD COURSE IN ECOLOGICAL FORESTRY
This course introduces students to the principles and practices of ecological forestry management.  By combining theory-based lectures and an experiential learning approach at the MacPhail Woods Ecological Forestry site students will gain a deep understanding of the forest and forest restoration efforts.
PREREQUISITE: Second year standing or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

231 ISLAND ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORIES 
Environmental history is broadly defined as the study of continuity and change in human relationships with the environment. This course introduces students to environmental history and historical methods with a focus on historic and current, interaction with the environment on global islands.  Special focus will be given to ocean, forest, and land use activity in Prince Edward Island and islands in the Atlantic region.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

242 SOCIETY AND NATURAL RESOURCES
This course examines the development, use and conservation of natural resources. It explore the definition of natural resources, the history of resource use, governance regimes, and theories and practices around integrated resource planning and management, ecosystem management, adaptive management, conflict resolution approaches, local knowledge and public participation. Case studies explore recent trends in forestry, fisheries, agriculture, parks and recreation, wildlife, and water resources management.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

291 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course offers recognition for equivalency-learning to returned CUSO cooperants and interns who have completed an international development placement overseas. Students who have completed a CUSO placement with a focus on environmental issues – such as environmental science, resource management, conservation, environmental education – can apply to receive credit toward their Environmental Studies degree.
Three semester hours of credit

301 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES INTERNSHIP
This course provides students with opportunities to develop, integrate and apply their knowledge of environmental issues and theory. Students will be involved in 'internship' experiences with varied environmental organizations, in environmental action research on campus issues or in other settings, and in developing personal plans for environmental action and change. Classroom discussions and written work will aid students in developing a multidisciplinary and systems approach to the analysis of these experiences.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 101. Students taking this course concurrently may apply for admission to the instructor
One and a half hours per week in class, two and a half hours per week in practicum work
Three semester hours of credit

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Three semester hours of credit

311 UNDERSTANDING CLIMATE CHANGE
This course introduces students to the science of climate change. Students explore its social and political implications, and examine its impact on daily life by reviewing current scientific data as it relates to vulnerabilities of particular regions. Topics include methods, strategies, and technologies that address climate change, using case studies of adaptive and mitigative programs in North America, with a special emphasis on Canada’s climate action plan.
PREREQUISITE: Environmental Studies 101 or 203
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

321 NATURAL HAZARDS
This course provides an introduction to the causes of a variety of natural hazards (tectonic - e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic activity; meteorological - e.g. hurricanes and flooding; and mass movement - e.g. landslides, mudslides, and avalanches) as well as their impact on human activities and the strategies available to predict and manage such events.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

332 ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SKILLS
This course will introduce students to a general overview of innovations to address environmental goals. It will examine how using a structured approach to change can move organizations, businesses and communities toward more environmentally sustainable practices. 
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

334 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES ON ISLAND COMMUNITIES
This course explores the risk and vulnerabilities associated with climate change and other environmental stress on island communities. This course will focus on the special characteristics of island communities and will explore island vulnerabilities in the natural and built environment as well as in social and economic systems.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

342 ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on environment and development issues in an international, particularly a developing country, context. Issues related to trade, biodiversity conservation, agriculture, climate change, wealth, poverty, population, and gender will be explored.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

351 SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY PLANNING
An overview of how planning tools and practice shape the form of communities, including: (1) Key issues and principles of sustainability at a community scale; as well as related planning approaches; (2) Sustainable community planning approaches and tools for identifying and achieving quality of life, and (3) The components and process of developing an integrated sustainable community plan. Students will learn how to assess community capital, identify and recruit key stakeholders and develop, implement, monitor and evaluate a community plan.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

354 ENVIRONMENTAL VALUATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course would develop the theory and techniques in the valuation of non-market (ecological) good and services.  It will focus on the techniques and methods for placing monetary values on the environment and incorporating them into economic decision making at both the macro and project level.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

401 PUBLIC SCHOLARS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
This seminar course will provide a forum for students to interact and learn from local, national and international experts in various fields of environmental studies. Students will gain an increased awareness and understanding of the diverse ways in which our society is addressing issues related to the environment. The course will provide opportunities for students to develop in their own expertise as public scholars.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 301 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

411 ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE
This course focuses on developing an understanding of principles, practices and emerging issues relating to environmental governance. An emphasis is placed on exploring the roles of governments, markets and collective action in environmental policy and management. Examples of governance arrangements are drawn from different parts of the world and different ecological contexts, including the uniqueness of island contexts.
Crosslisted with Island Studies (c.f. Island Studies 619)
PREREQUISITES: ENV 101 or permission of the instructor. For students taking the course as IST 619 they need to be an active graduate student
Three semester hours of credit

431 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
This course examines Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) from philosophical, methodological and institutional perspectives. The evolution of EIA in Canada will be the focus. The strategic role of EIA will be explored as to its effectiveness as a tool for achieving sustainability goals. Case studies illustrating major issues and applications will be presented at a variety of geographical scales. Some field trips may be required.
Crosslisted with Environmental Sciences (c.f. ESC 803)
PREREQUITES:  ENV 101 or with permission of instructor
Three semester hours of credit

433 ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES
This course promotes the development of communication skills in the context of environmental issues and exposes students to direct interaction with representatives from industry, government and the community. The course will also provide broad theoretical and practical knowledge needed to resolve disputes as well as skills training in techniques of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

441 ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Ecological problems such as climate change and resource scarcity transcend the boundaries of nation-states and therefore necessitate international cooperation between states and non-state actors. This course will examine the dynamics of global environmental politics.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses offer students the opportunity for the study of other subjects in environmental studies in two different forms: (1) In response to an individual student's needs, a program of directed readings or directed research can be developed with a faculty member; (2) Directed Studies courses are offered on occasion by members of the faculty or by visiting instructors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

495 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES SYMPOSIUM
The Student Environmental Studies Symposium course is an opportunity for students to facilitate a public forum to raise awareness and discussion about a contemporary environmental issue. This unique course will focus on students planning and running a one day symposium about a relevant environmental issue of their choice. It will provide an opportunity for active and collaborative learning as students dialogue with important stakeholders engaged in real world issues from government, the private sector and civil society. Through the process of organizing this symposium, students will deepen their knowledge of the complex nature of environmental issues and the challenges in finding sustainable solutions. Practical outcomes of the course include the development of critical thinking and writing skills, as well as organizational, communication and team-building skills.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

RECOMMENDED LIST OF SCIENCE, BUSINESS, AND ARTS COURSES for the BES
Unless otherwise indicated, students who do not have the required prerequisites for particular courses that are approved for the Bachelor of Environmental Studies are encouraged to consult with the instructors of these courses to seek their permission to enrol. Instructors may choose to admit students to these courses based upon alternative prerequisites that are judged to provide the student with sufficient background preparation for the course.

SCIENCE COURSES:

Applied Human Sciences:

Foods and Nutrition 223 - Nutrition and Dietary Behaviour

Biology: (please note that Biology 131-132 are required as prerequisites for the other Biology courses below)

101 - Current Issues in Environmental Biology
131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
132 - Introduction to Organisms
222 - Ecology
202 - Botany
204 - Zoology
311 - Plants and People
314 - Plant Community Ecology
327 - Field Coastal Ecology
351 - Ornithology
371 - Life of Mammals
391 - Marine Biology
411 - Principles of Wildlife Biology
452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
454 - Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
462 - Watershed Ecology
465 - Marine Community Ecology
485 - Environmental Toxicology

Chemistry: (please note that Chemistry 111-112 are required as prerequisites for the other Chemistry courses below)

111 - General Chemistry I
112 - General Chemistry II
202 - Environmental Chemistry
243 - Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences

Engineering:

152 - Engineering and the Biosphere
212 - Geology for Engineers

Physics:

261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy 

BUSINESS COURSES:

101 - Introduction to Business
141 - Marketing
171 - Organizational Behaviour
211 - Business Communication
251 - Introduction to Management Science
265 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
275 - Introduction to Biotechnology
373 - Tourism Management

ARTS COURSES:

Economics: 

211 - Introduction to Resource Economics
215 - Environmental Economics
283 - Agricultural Economics
352 - Applied Resource Economics

English:

322 - English Canadian Poetry
331 - The Literature of Atlantic Canada
335 - British Romantic Literature
362 - 19th century American literature, 1830-1910

History:

231 - The Atlantic Region
331 - History of Prince Edward Island: Pre-Confederation
332 - History of Prince Edward Island: Post-Confederation
483 - History of the Environmental Movement

International Development Studies:

201 - Introduction to International Development Studies

Island Studies

201 - Introduction to Island Studies

Modern Languages:

211 - Latin American Studies:  South America

Philosophy:

102 - Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
105 - Technology, Values, and Science
111 - Critical Thinking
203 - Environmental Philosophy
206 - Animal Ethics
301 - Philosophy of Science
371 - Community-Based Ethical Inquiry

Political Science:

101 - Introductory Politics I: Government and Politics in Liberal Democracies
102 - Introductory Politics II: Political Ideologies in Liberal Democracies
253 - Introduction to Political Theory

Psychology:

101 - Introduction to Psychology: Part I
242 - Introduction to Social Psychology
333 - Ecopsychology
362 - Ergonomics

Religious Studies:

102 - Religions of the World: Eastern Traditions

Sociology:

102 - Introduction to Sociology II
271 - Self and Society
282 - Social Psychology
305 - Population and Society
332 - Methodology and Research II
372 - Collective Behaviour and Social Movements
392 - Media and Society

Sociology/Anthropology:

222 - Native Canadians
266 - Science, Culture and Society
341 - Technology, Society, and the Environment 

Calendar Courses

100 Level

101 (formerly 201) INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
This course introduces students to a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental issues; and emphasizes the interrelationships among the various physical, biological, and human systems. It examines major contemporary environmental issues, such as global warming and land use, and focuses on how these issues are understood and addressed within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
Three hours a week (some field trips may be required)
Three semester hours of credit

200 Level

203 SOCIETIES AND SUSTAINABILITY: PAST AND PRESENT
This course explores the concept of sustainability in relation to how societies have interacted with the environment overtime.  Through exploration of successes and failures from historical and contemporary societies, students will develop the capacity to understand the ecological context in which humans live, to recognize limits, and to design sustainable human systems for the future.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

204 METHODS OF ENVIRONMENTAL INQUIRY
This course introduces students to the diverse nature of inquiry in the various fields of environmental studies. Through practical case studies it provides literacy in key methods used in understanding the environment in the sciences, social sciences and humanities.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Three semester hours of credit

212  EARTH’S PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
This course will introduce students to the basic ‘building blocks’ of Earth’s physical characteristics, providing a foundation on which to develop more specialist knowledge in their understanding of Environmental Studies. It will examine the geologic and geomorphic cycles, including processes of weathering, erosion, transportation and deposition, and investigate how these create fluvial, glacial, and coastal landforms and impacts on human activity. It also aims to address atmospheric processes and the links between global climate zones and world ecosystems.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

224  FIELD COURSE IN ECOLOGICAL FORESTRY
This course introduces students to the principles and practices of ecological forestry management.  By combining theory-based lectures and an experiential learning approach at the MacPhail Woods Ecological Forestry site students will gain a deep understanding of the forest and forest restoration efforts.
PREREQUISITE: Second year standing or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

231 ISLAND ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORIES 
Environmental history is broadly defined as the study of continuity and change in human relationships with the environment. This course introduces students to environmental history and historical methods with a focus on historic and current, interaction with the environment on global islands.  Special focus will be given to ocean, forest, and land use activity in Prince Edward Island and islands in the Atlantic region.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

242 SOCIETY AND NATURAL RESOURCES
This course examines the development, use and conservation of natural resources. It explore the definition of natural resources, the history of resource use, governance regimes, and theories and practices around integrated resource planning and management, ecosystem management, adaptive management, conflict resolution approaches, local knowledge and public participation. Case studies explore recent trends in forestry, fisheries, agriculture, parks and recreation, wildlife, and water resources management.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

291 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course offers recognition for equivalency-learning to returned CUSO cooperants and interns who have completed an international development placement overseas. Students who have completed a CUSO placement with a focus on environmental issues – such as environmental science, resource management, conservation, environmental education – can apply to receive credit toward their Environmental Studies degree.
Three semester hours of credit

300 Level

301 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES INTERNSHIP
This course provides students with opportunities to develop, integrate and apply their knowledge of environmental issues and theory. Students will be involved in 'internship' experiences with varied environmental organizations, in environmental action research on campus issues or in other settings, and in developing personal plans for environmental action and change. Classroom discussions and written work will aid students in developing a multidisciplinary and systems approach to the analysis of these experiences.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 101. Students taking this course concurrently may apply for admission to the instructor
One and a half hours per week in class, two and a half hours per week in practicum work
Three semester hours of credit

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Three semester hours of credit

311 UNDERSTANDING CLIMATE CHANGE
This course introduces students to the science of climate change. Students explore its social and political implications, and examine its impact on daily life by reviewing current scientific data as it relates to vulnerabilities of particular regions. Topics include methods, strategies, and technologies that address climate change, using case studies of adaptive and mitigative programs in North America, with a special emphasis on Canada’s climate action plan.
PREREQUISITE: Environmental Studies 101 or 203
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

321 NATURAL HAZARDS
This course provides an introduction to the causes of a variety of natural hazards (tectonic - e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic activity; meteorological - e.g. hurricanes and flooding; and mass movement - e.g. landslides, mudslides, and avalanches) as well as their impact on human activities and the strategies available to predict and manage such events.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

332 ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SKILLS
This course will introduce students to a general overview of innovations to address environmental goals. It will examine how using a structured approach to change can move organizations, businesses and communities toward more environmentally sustainable practices. 
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

334 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES ON ISLAND COMMUNITIES
This course explores the risk and vulnerabilities associated with climate change and other environmental stress on island communities. This course will focus on the special characteristics of island communities and will explore island vulnerabilities in the natural and built environment as well as in social and economic systems.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

342 ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on environment and development issues in an international, particularly a developing country, context. Issues related to trade, biodiversity conservation, agriculture, climate change, wealth, poverty, population, and gender will be explored.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

351 SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY PLANNING
An overview of how planning tools and practice shape the form of communities, including: (1) Key issues and principles of sustainability at a community scale; as well as related planning approaches; (2) Sustainable community planning approaches and tools for identifying and achieving quality of life, and (3) The components and process of developing an integrated sustainable community plan. Students will learn how to assess community capital, identify and recruit key stakeholders and develop, implement, monitor and evaluate a community plan.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

354 ENVIRONMENTAL VALUATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course would develop the theory and techniques in the valuation of non-market (ecological) good and services.  It will focus on the techniques and methods for placing monetary values on the environment and incorporating them into economic decision making at both the macro and project level.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

400 Level

401 PUBLIC SCHOLARS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
This seminar course will provide a forum for students to interact and learn from local, national and international experts in various fields of environmental studies. Students will gain an increased awareness and understanding of the diverse ways in which our society is addressing issues related to the environment. The course will provide opportunities for students to develop in their own expertise as public scholars.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 301 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

411 ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE
This course focuses on developing an understanding of principles, practices and emerging issues relating to environmental governance. An emphasis is placed on exploring the roles of governments, markets and collective action in environmental policy and management. Examples of governance arrangements are drawn from different parts of the world and different ecological contexts, including the uniqueness of island contexts.
Crosslisted with Island Studies (c.f. Island Studies 619)
PREREQUISITES: ENV 101 or permission of the instructor. For students taking the course as IST 619 they need to be an active graduate student
Three semester hours of credit

431 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
This course examines Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) from philosophical, methodological and institutional perspectives. The evolution of EIA in Canada will be the focus. The strategic role of EIA will be explored as to its effectiveness as a tool for achieving sustainability goals. Case studies illustrating major issues and applications will be presented at a variety of geographical scales. Some field trips may be required.
Crosslisted with Environmental Sciences (c.f. ESC 803)
PREREQUITES:  ENV 101 or with permission of instructor
Three semester hours of credit

433 ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES
This course promotes the development of communication skills in the context of environmental issues and exposes students to direct interaction with representatives from industry, government and the community. The course will also provide broad theoretical and practical knowledge needed to resolve disputes as well as skills training in techniques of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

441 ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Ecological problems such as climate change and resource scarcity transcend the boundaries of nation-states and therefore necessitate international cooperation between states and non-state actors. This course will examine the dynamics of global environmental politics.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses offer students the opportunity for the study of other subjects in environmental studies in two different forms: (1) In response to an individual student's needs, a program of directed readings or directed research can be developed with a faculty member; (2) Directed Studies courses are offered on occasion by members of the faculty or by visiting instructors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

495 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES SYMPOSIUM
The Student Environmental Studies Symposium course is an opportunity for students to facilitate a public forum to raise awareness and discussion about a contemporary environmental issue. This unique course will focus on students planning and running a one day symposium about a relevant environmental issue of their choice. It will provide an opportunity for active and collaborative learning as students dialogue with important stakeholders engaged in real world issues from government, the private sector and civil society. Through the process of organizing this symposium, students will deepen their knowledge of the complex nature of environmental issues and the challenges in finding sustainable solutions. Practical outcomes of the course include the development of critical thinking and writing skills, as well as organizational, communication and team-building skills.
PREREQUISITE:  ENV 101 or ENV 203 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

Recommended Courses

RECOMMENDED LIST OF SCIENCE, BUSINESS, AND ARTS COURSES for the BES
Unless otherwise indicated, students who do not have the required prerequisites for particular courses that are approved for the Bachelor of Environmental Studies are encouraged to consult with the instructors of these courses to seek their permission to enrol. Instructors may choose to admit students to these courses based upon alternative prerequisites that are judged to provide the student with sufficient background preparation for the course.

SCIENCE COURSES:

Applied Human Sciences:

Foods and Nutrition 223 - Nutrition and Dietary Behaviour

Biology: (please note that Biology 131-132 are required as prerequisites for the other Biology courses below)

101 - Current Issues in Environmental Biology
131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
132 - Introduction to Organisms
222 - Ecology
202 - Botany
204 - Zoology
311 - Plants and People
314 - Plant Community Ecology
327 - Field Coastal Ecology
351 - Ornithology
371 - Life of Mammals
391 - Marine Biology
411 - Principles of Wildlife Biology
452 - Biogeography and Macroecology
454 - Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
462 - Watershed Ecology
465 - Marine Community Ecology
485 - Environmental Toxicology

Chemistry: (please note that Chemistry 111-112 are required as prerequisites for the other Chemistry courses below)

111 - General Chemistry I
112 - General Chemistry II
202 - Environmental Chemistry
243 - Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences

Engineering:

152 - Engineering and the Biosphere
212 - Geology for Engineers

Physics:

261 - Energy, Environment and the Economy 

BUSINESS COURSES:

101 - Introduction to Business
141 - Marketing
171 - Organizational Behaviour
211 - Business Communication
251 - Introduction to Management Science
265 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
275 - Introduction to Biotechnology
373 - Tourism Management

ARTS COURSES:

Economics: 

211 - Introduction to Resource Economics
215 - Environmental Economics
283 - Agricultural Economics
352 - Applied Resource Economics

English:

322 - English Canadian Poetry
331 - The Literature of Atlantic Canada
335 - British Romantic Literature
362 - 19th century American literature, 1830-1910

History:

231 - The Atlantic Region
331 - History of Prince Edward Island: Pre-Confederation
332 - History of Prince Edward Island: Post-Confederation
483 - History of the Environmental Movement

International Development Studies:

201 - Introduction to International Development Studies

Island Studies

201 - Introduction to Island Studies

Modern Languages:

211 - Latin American Studies:  South America

Philosophy:

102 - Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
105 - Technology, Values, and Science
111 - Critical Thinking
203 - Environmental Philosophy
206 - Animal Ethics
301 - Philosophy of Science
371 - Community-Based Ethical Inquiry

Political Science:

101 - Introductory Politics I: Government and Politics in Liberal Democracies
102 - Introductory Politics II: Political Ideologies in Liberal Democracies
253 - Introduction to Political Theory

Psychology:

101 - Introduction to Psychology: Part I
242 - Introduction to Social Psychology
333 - Ecopsychology
362 - Ergonomics

Religious Studies:

102 - Religions of the World: Eastern Traditions

Sociology:

102 - Introduction to Sociology II
271 - Self and Society
282 - Social Psychology
305 - Population and Society
332 - Methodology and Research II
372 - Collective Behaviour and Social Movements
392 - Media and Society

Sociology/Anthropology:

222 - Native Canadians
266 - Science, Culture and Society
341 - Technology, Society, and the Environment 

Contact UPEI