Sustainable Design Engineering

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First Name:
Last Name:
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Careers:
  • Automotive Engineer
  • Energy Engineer
  • Product Designer
  • Developer
  • Mechanical Engineer

The Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering at UPEI offers a progressive and innovative four-year Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Design Engineering degree which recognizes the need for a broad and balanced engineering education. The program follows current trends in engineering education and focuses on student outcomes. Small class sizes within an activity-based learning environment allow faculty and staff to be student-centric and to provide specific and timely input to individual students.

Students are exposed to a broad base of knowledge and skills in engineering science, natural science, mathematics, and complementary studies in concert with an applied project-based design stream simulating the engineering profession. Students entering the degree program will be actively engaged in the profession of engineering from day one, providing creative and sustainable solutions to society’s problems. The degree program is designed to provide a highly flexible learning environment that is responsive to the dynamic needs of students and the industries that employ them.

In addition to fundamental science, engineering science and mathematics courses, students are required to develop skills in engineering design, communication, analysis, project management, professional ethics and more. With a solid grounding in these fundamentals, students in Program Years 3 and 4 can enhance their technical knowledge by choosing an engineering focus area:

  • renewable energy
  • bioresources
  • sensors, optics, and imaging
  • robotics and industrial automation
  • advanced manufacturing
Want more information about Sustainable Design Engineering? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Automotive Engineer
  • Energy Engineer
  • Product Designer
  • Developer
  • Mechanical Engineer

It is increasingly recognized that understanding basic science and mathematics are only two of the many areas that are essential to professional engineering practice. Engineering students in this program must make responsible decisions based on good judgment and an ability to justify decisions within a structured analytical framework. Based on this generalist philosophy, this program is designed to develop a student’s ability to think. This fundamental requirement of engineers to think critically in response to ever-changing and complex situations is accomplished through a design stream core which relies heavily on inquiry-based learning supported by traditional lecture-based knowledge. The progression in complex thinking skills occurs over the duration of the four-year program and beyond through appreciation of lifelong learning and professional development.

An integrated, stream of project-based design clinic courses through all four-years of the program provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills through working on real community and industry-based projects.  Traditional content courses are delivered via an integrated and timely approach so that professional practice skills are developed in a simulated workplace environment. This program emphasizes design as an essential element of engineering as reflected in the Community Design Program (Year 1), and the Junior Design (Year 2) and Senior Design (Years 3 and 4) Clinics.

The following core design courses must be taken in succession to support the students' developing skills.

Community Design Program (Program Year 1) 

1. Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
2. Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis 

Junior Design Clinic (Program Year 2)

3. Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
4. Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II 

Senior Design Clinics (Program Years 3 and 4) 

5. Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
6. Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
7. Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
8. Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV 

Want more information about Sustainable Design Engineering? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Automotive Engineer
  • Energy Engineer
  • Product Designer
  • Developer
  • Mechanical Engineer

Students are strongly encouraged to meet with a faculty advisor early in the program to review course selection. Please refer to the first-year advisement information to help with first-year registration, and the four-year degree course matrix, five-year degree course matrix and the five-year degree course matrix (Winter start) for planning.

The following is the course sequence for the four-year degree. A five-year degree sequence is also available. Please note that a 60% minimum grade is required in each of the following courses to proceed to the next course: Engineering 1210, 1220, 2210, 2220, 3710, 3720 and 4710.

Program Year 1—Term 1 

  • Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
  • Engineering 1230—Engineering Mechanics I: Statics
  • Engineering 1410—Sustainability in Engineering Design
  • Chemistry 1110—General Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 1910—Single Variable Calculus I
  • UPEI 1010—Writing Studies 

Program Year 1—Term 2 

  • Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis
  • Engineering 1250—Materials Science
  • Engineering 1310—Computer Programming with Engineering Applications
  • Engineering 1340 – Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics
  • Mathematics 1920—Single Variable Calculus II
  • One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses)

Program Year 2—Term 3 

  • Engineering 2110—Statistics for Engineering Applications
  • Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
  • Engineering 2310—Strength of Materials
  • Engineering 2610—Thermo Fluids I: Thermodynamics
  • Engineering 2810—Electric Circuits
  • Mathematics 2910—Multivariable and Vector Calculus 

Program Year 2—Term 4 

  • Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II
  • Engineering 2360—Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing
  • Engineering 2620—Thermo Fluids II: Fluid Mechanics
  • Engineering 2830—Digital Logic Design
  • Mathematics 2610—Linear Algebra
  • Mathematics 3010—Differential Equations 

Program Year 3—Term 5 

  • Engineering 3220—Engineering Measurements
  • Engineering 3630—Thermo Fluids III: Heat Transfer and Thermodynamic Cycles
  • Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
  • Engineering 3810—Systems Engineering
  • One (1) introductory engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 3—Term 6 

  • Engineering 3430—Technology Management and Entrepreneurship
  • Engineering 3270—Machines & Automatic Controls
  • Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
  • Engineering 3820—System Dynamics with Simulation
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 4—Term 7 

  • Engineering 4210—Facilitated Study & Experimental Practice
  • Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
  • Engineering 4850—Computational Methods for Engineering Design
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 4—Term 8 

  • Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective*
  • One (1) science or business elective
  • One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses) 

Students should consult with a faculty advisor before choosing electives. 

*Four engineering focus area electives are required. The first of these (Program Year 3, Term 5) must be the introductory elective course in either mechatronics, sustainable energy, or bio-resources:

  • Engineering 3340—Introduction to Mechatronics Engineering
  • Engineering 3440—Introduction to Sustainable Energy Engineering
  • Engineering 3540—Introduction to Bioresources Engineering

The remaining three engineering focus area electives, in Terms 6, 7 and 8, can be selected from any of the following courses. At least one of the engineering focus area electives must be at the 4000 level. 

  • Engineering 3370—Mechatronic System Integration and Interface Design
  • Engineering 3380—Real-time Embedded Systems
  • Engineering 3390—Introduction to Mechatronic Computer-Aided Product Development, Modelling and Simulation
  • Engineering 3450—Wind and Water Power
  • Engineering 3460—Solar Energy and Electricity Storage 
  • Engineering 3490—Chemical Energy Conversion 
  • Engineering 3570—Engineering Applications of Biological Materials 
  • Engineering 3580—Soil Mechanics 
  • Engineering 4310—Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing 
  • Engineering 4320—Control System Design 
  • Engineering 4330—Innovations in Biomedical Engineering 
  • Engineering 4350—Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control 
  • Engineering 4370—Fluid Power Control 
  • Engineering 4410—Macro Energy Systems 
  • Engineering 4440—Advanced Energy Storage 
  • Engineering 4450—Fluid Loads on Energy Structures 
  • Engineering 4470—Micro Grids 
  • Engineering 4510—Geoinformatics in Bioresources 
  • Engineering 4530—Fundamentals of Agricultural Machinery 
  • Engineering 4550—Biotechnological Processes
  • Engineering 4830—Biomedical Signal Processing
Overview

The Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering at UPEI offers a progressive and innovative four-year Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Design Engineering degree which recognizes the need for a broad and balanced engineering education. The program follows current trends in engineering education and focuses on student outcomes. Small class sizes within an activity-based learning environment allow faculty and staff to be student-centric and to provide specific and timely input to individual students.

Students are exposed to a broad base of knowledge and skills in engineering science, natural science, mathematics, and complementary studies in concert with an applied project-based design stream simulating the engineering profession. Students entering the degree program will be actively engaged in the profession of engineering from day one, providing creative and sustainable solutions to society’s problems. The degree program is designed to provide a highly flexible learning environment that is responsive to the dynamic needs of students and the industries that employ them.

In addition to fundamental science, engineering science and mathematics courses, students are required to develop skills in engineering design, communication, analysis, project management, professional ethics and more. With a solid grounding in these fundamentals, students in Program Years 3 and 4 can enhance their technical knowledge by choosing an engineering focus area:

  • renewable energy
  • bioresources
  • sensors, optics, and imaging
  • robotics and industrial automation
  • advanced manufacturing
Engineered by Design

It is increasingly recognized that understanding basic science and mathematics are only two of the many areas that are essential to professional engineering practice. Engineering students in this program must make responsible decisions based on good judgment and an ability to justify decisions within a structured analytical framework. Based on this generalist philosophy, this program is designed to develop a student’s ability to think. This fundamental requirement of engineers to think critically in response to ever-changing and complex situations is accomplished through a design stream core which relies heavily on inquiry-based learning supported by traditional lecture-based knowledge. The progression in complex thinking skills occurs over the duration of the four-year program and beyond through appreciation of lifelong learning and professional development.

An integrated, stream of project-based design clinic courses through all four-years of the program provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills through working on real community and industry-based projects.  Traditional content courses are delivered via an integrated and timely approach so that professional practice skills are developed in a simulated workplace environment. This program emphasizes design as an essential element of engineering as reflected in the Community Design Program (Year 1), and the Junior Design (Year 2) and Senior Design (Years 3 and 4) Clinics.

The following core design courses must be taken in succession to support the students' developing skills.

Community Design Program (Program Year 1) 

1. Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
2. Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis 

Junior Design Clinic (Program Year 2)

3. Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
4. Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II 

Senior Design Clinics (Program Years 3 and 4) 

5. Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
6. Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
7. Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
8. Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV 

Degree

Students are strongly encouraged to meet with a faculty advisor early in the program to review course selection. Please refer to the first-year advisement information to help with first-year registration, and the four-year degree course matrix, five-year degree course matrix and the five-year degree course matrix (Winter start) for planning.

The following is the course sequence for the four-year degree. A five-year degree sequence is also available. Please note that a 60% minimum grade is required in each of the following courses to proceed to the next course: Engineering 1210, 1220, 2210, 2220, 3710, 3720 and 4710.

Program Year 1—Term 1 

  • Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
  • Engineering 1230—Engineering Mechanics I: Statics
  • Engineering 1410—Sustainability in Engineering Design
  • Chemistry 1110—General Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 1910—Single Variable Calculus I
  • UPEI 1010—Writing Studies 

Program Year 1—Term 2 

  • Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis
  • Engineering 1250—Materials Science
  • Engineering 1310—Computer Programming with Engineering Applications
  • Engineering 1340 – Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics
  • Mathematics 1920—Single Variable Calculus II
  • One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses)

Program Year 2—Term 3 

  • Engineering 2110—Statistics for Engineering Applications
  • Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
  • Engineering 2310—Strength of Materials
  • Engineering 2610—Thermo Fluids I: Thermodynamics
  • Engineering 2810—Electric Circuits
  • Mathematics 2910—Multivariable and Vector Calculus 

Program Year 2—Term 4 

  • Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II
  • Engineering 2360—Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing
  • Engineering 2620—Thermo Fluids II: Fluid Mechanics
  • Engineering 2830—Digital Logic Design
  • Mathematics 2610—Linear Algebra
  • Mathematics 3010—Differential Equations 

Program Year 3—Term 5 

  • Engineering 3220—Engineering Measurements
  • Engineering 3630—Thermo Fluids III: Heat Transfer and Thermodynamic Cycles
  • Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
  • Engineering 3810—Systems Engineering
  • One (1) introductory engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 3—Term 6 

  • Engineering 3430—Technology Management and Entrepreneurship
  • Engineering 3270—Machines & Automatic Controls
  • Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
  • Engineering 3820—System Dynamics with Simulation
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 4—Term 7 

  • Engineering 4210—Facilitated Study & Experimental Practice
  • Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
  • Engineering 4850—Computational Methods for Engineering Design
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 4—Term 8 

  • Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective*
  • One (1) science or business elective
  • One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses) 

Students should consult with a faculty advisor before choosing electives. 

*Four engineering focus area electives are required. The first of these (Program Year 3, Term 5) must be the introductory elective course in either mechatronics, sustainable energy, or bio-resources:

  • Engineering 3340—Introduction to Mechatronics Engineering
  • Engineering 3440—Introduction to Sustainable Energy Engineering
  • Engineering 3540—Introduction to Bioresources Engineering

The remaining three engineering focus area electives, in Terms 6, 7 and 8, can be selected from any of the following courses. At least one of the engineering focus area electives must be at the 4000 level. 

  • Engineering 3370—Mechatronic System Integration and Interface Design
  • Engineering 3380—Real-time Embedded Systems
  • Engineering 3390—Introduction to Mechatronic Computer-Aided Product Development, Modelling and Simulation
  • Engineering 3450—Wind and Water Power
  • Engineering 3460—Solar Energy and Electricity Storage 
  • Engineering 3490—Chemical Energy Conversion 
  • Engineering 3570—Engineering Applications of Biological Materials 
  • Engineering 3580—Soil Mechanics 
  • Engineering 4310—Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing 
  • Engineering 4320—Control System Design 
  • Engineering 4330—Innovations in Biomedical Engineering 
  • Engineering 4350—Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control 
  • Engineering 4370—Fluid Power Control 
  • Engineering 4410—Macro Energy Systems 
  • Engineering 4440—Advanced Energy Storage 
  • Engineering 4450—Fluid Loads on Energy Structures 
  • Engineering 4470—Micro Grids 
  • Engineering 4510—Geoinformatics in Bioresources 
  • Engineering 4530—Fundamentals of Agricultural Machinery 
  • Engineering 4550—Biotechnological Processes
  • Engineering 4830—Biomedical Signal Processing

Overview

The Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering at UPEI offers a progressive and innovative four-year Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Design Engineering degree which recognizes the need for a broad and balanced engineering education. The program follows current trends in engineering education and focuses on student outcomes. Small class sizes within an activity-based learning environment allow faculty and staff to be student-centric and to provide specific and timely input to individual students.

Students are exposed to a broad base of knowledge and skills in engineering science, natural science, mathematics, and complementary studies in concert with an applied project-based design stream simulating the engineering profession. Students entering the degree program will be actively engaged in the profession of engineering from day one, providing creative and sustainable solutions to society’s problems. The degree program is designed to provide a highly flexible learning environment that is responsive to the dynamic needs of students and the industries that employ them.

In addition to fundamental science, engineering science and mathematics courses, students are required to develop skills in engineering design, communication, analysis, project management, professional ethics and more. With a solid grounding in these fundamentals, students in Program Years 3 and 4 can enhance their technical knowledge by choosing an engineering focus area:

  • renewable energy
  • bioresources
  • sensors, optics, and imaging
  • robotics and industrial automation
  • advanced manufacturing

Engineered by Design

It is increasingly recognized that understanding basic science and mathematics are only two of the many areas that are essential to professional engineering practice. Engineering students in this program must make responsible decisions based on good judgment and an ability to justify decisions within a structured analytical framework. Based on this generalist philosophy, this program is designed to develop a student’s ability to think. This fundamental requirement of engineers to think critically in response to ever-changing and complex situations is accomplished through a design stream core which relies heavily on inquiry-based learning supported by traditional lecture-based knowledge. The progression in complex thinking skills occurs over the duration of the four-year program and beyond through appreciation of lifelong learning and professional development.

An integrated, stream of project-based design clinic courses through all four-years of the program provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills through working on real community and industry-based projects.  Traditional content courses are delivered via an integrated and timely approach so that professional practice skills are developed in a simulated workplace environment. This program emphasizes design as an essential element of engineering as reflected in the Community Design Program (Year 1), and the Junior Design (Year 2) and Senior Design (Years 3 and 4) Clinics.

The following core design courses must be taken in succession to support the students' developing skills.

Community Design Program (Program Year 1) 

1. Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
2. Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis 

Junior Design Clinic (Program Year 2)

3. Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
4. Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II 

Senior Design Clinics (Program Years 3 and 4) 

5. Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
6. Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
7. Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
8. Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV 

Degree

Students are strongly encouraged to meet with a faculty advisor early in the program to review course selection. Please refer to the first-year advisement information to help with first-year registration, and the four-year degree course matrix, five-year degree course matrix and the five-year degree course matrix (Winter start) for planning.

The following is the course sequence for the four-year degree. A five-year degree sequence is also available. Please note that a 60% minimum grade is required in each of the following courses to proceed to the next course: Engineering 1210, 1220, 2210, 2220, 3710, 3720 and 4710.

Program Year 1—Term 1 

  • Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
  • Engineering 1230—Engineering Mechanics I: Statics
  • Engineering 1410—Sustainability in Engineering Design
  • Chemistry 1110—General Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 1910—Single Variable Calculus I
  • UPEI 1010—Writing Studies 

Program Year 1—Term 2 

  • Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis
  • Engineering 1250—Materials Science
  • Engineering 1310—Computer Programming with Engineering Applications
  • Engineering 1340 – Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics
  • Mathematics 1920—Single Variable Calculus II
  • One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses)

Program Year 2—Term 3 

  • Engineering 2110—Statistics for Engineering Applications
  • Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
  • Engineering 2310—Strength of Materials
  • Engineering 2610—Thermo Fluids I: Thermodynamics
  • Engineering 2810—Electric Circuits
  • Mathematics 2910—Multivariable and Vector Calculus 

Program Year 2—Term 4 

  • Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II
  • Engineering 2360—Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing
  • Engineering 2620—Thermo Fluids II: Fluid Mechanics
  • Engineering 2830—Digital Logic Design
  • Mathematics 2610—Linear Algebra
  • Mathematics 3010—Differential Equations 

Program Year 3—Term 5 

  • Engineering 3220—Engineering Measurements
  • Engineering 3630—Thermo Fluids III: Heat Transfer and Thermodynamic Cycles
  • Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
  • Engineering 3810—Systems Engineering
  • One (1) introductory engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 3—Term 6 

  • Engineering 3430—Technology Management and Entrepreneurship
  • Engineering 3270—Machines & Automatic Controls
  • Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
  • Engineering 3820—System Dynamics with Simulation
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 4—Term 7 

  • Engineering 4210—Facilitated Study & Experimental Practice
  • Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
  • Engineering 4850—Computational Methods for Engineering Design
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective* 

Program Year 4—Term 8 

  • Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV
  • One (1) engineering focus area elective*
  • One (1) science or business elective
  • One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses) 

Students should consult with a faculty advisor before choosing electives. 

*Four engineering focus area electives are required. The first of these (Program Year 3, Term 5) must be the introductory elective course in either mechatronics, sustainable energy, or bio-resources:

  • Engineering 3340—Introduction to Mechatronics Engineering
  • Engineering 3440—Introduction to Sustainable Energy Engineering
  • Engineering 3540—Introduction to Bioresources Engineering

The remaining three engineering focus area electives, in Terms 6, 7 and 8, can be selected from any of the following courses. At least one of the engineering focus area electives must be at the 4000 level. 

  • Engineering 3370—Mechatronic System Integration and Interface Design
  • Engineering 3380—Real-time Embedded Systems
  • Engineering 3390—Introduction to Mechatronic Computer-Aided Product Development, Modelling and Simulation
  • Engineering 3450—Wind and Water Power
  • Engineering 3460—Solar Energy and Electricity Storage 
  • Engineering 3490—Chemical Energy Conversion 
  • Engineering 3570—Engineering Applications of Biological Materials 
  • Engineering 3580—Soil Mechanics 
  • Engineering 4310—Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing 
  • Engineering 4320—Control System Design 
  • Engineering 4330—Innovations in Biomedical Engineering 
  • Engineering 4350—Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control 
  • Engineering 4370—Fluid Power Control 
  • Engineering 4410—Macro Energy Systems 
  • Engineering 4440—Advanced Energy Storage 
  • Engineering 4450—Fluid Loads on Energy Structures 
  • Engineering 4470—Micro Grids 
  • Engineering 4510—Geoinformatics in Bioresources 
  • Engineering 4530—Fundamentals of Agricultural Machinery 
  • Engineering 4550—Biotechnological Processes
  • Engineering 4830—Biomedical Signal Processing
Want more information about Sustainable Design Engineering? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Automotive Engineer
Energy Engineer
Product Designer
Developer
Mechanical Engineer
Course Level: 
1000 Level
Courses: 
ENGN-1210 Engineering Communications
This course is the first in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer. It provides a basic introduction to the profession, to the design process, and to the way that engineers communicate through drawing, writing, speaking, and presenting. Students learn about the engineering design process by completing simple engineering design projects in a team-based environment. There is a strong focus on writing and computer-aided drawing. Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week.
REQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program, Math 1910 and ENGN-1410
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1210L
3 hours credit
ENGN-1220 Engineering Analysis
This course is the second in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer. It further introduces the engineering design process through team-based engineering design projects. Additionally, emphasis is placed on the development of a structured problem-solving and analysis ability that can be applied to most engineering applications. Analysis topics include: basic concepts of electricity; estimation; statistics; graphing; and regression. Computer-aided tools, such as Excel and MatLab are introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours of design studio per week
REQUISITE: ENGN-1310
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1220L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1210 with a grade of at least 60%.
3 hours credit
ENGN-1230 Engineering Mechanics I: Statics
This course focuses on the equilibrium conditions for the state of rest of particles and rigid bodies subject to forces and moments. Topics to be discussed include vector operations, equilibrium conditions, free-body diagrams, moments and couples, distributed loadings, support reactions, truss analysis, centroids, moments of inertia, products of inertia, shear and bending moment diagrams, and friction. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
REQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program, Math-1910
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1230L
3 hours credit
ENGN-1250 Materials Science
(formerly 2250) This course focuses on the fundamental principles of chemistry as they relate to the properties and behaviour of materials in application to engineering systems. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order is emphasized. The characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids, i.e. that of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites are introduced. Knowledge of materials phenomena, including chemical equilibrium and kinetics, diffusion, electrochemistry, and phase transformations will be gained through experiential labs and lecture. Examples from industrial practice and emerging technologies will be used to illustrate the materials science concepts in this course. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
REQUISITE: Math-1920
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1250 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Chem-1110
3 hours credit
ENGN-1310 Computer Programming with Engineering Applications
This introductory course in computer programming is specifically designed for engineering students with no previous programming experience. The learning objectives are twofold: 1) to gain the ability to write scripts and solve basic engineering problems using the Matlab numerical computing environment, 2) to introduce embedded systems and the fundamentals of interfacing and real-time programming using the Arduino open-source platform. Topics include problem solving, algorithm design, modular programming, data types and number systems, operators, functions, decision statements, loops, and arrays. The latter part of the course deals with the fundamentals of interfacing peripheral devices including sensors and actuators to design small embedded systems. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Restriction: Acceptance into the Engineering Program
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1310 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-1340 Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics
(formerly 2340) This course is a study of mechanics concerned with the state of motion of rigid bodies that are subject to the action of forces. The course considers the kinematics and kinetics of motion applied particles and rigid bodies particularly as it relates to engineering applications and design. Topics include rectilinear and curvilinear motions, normal and tangential coordinates, dependent motion, Newton's Laws of Motion, energy and momentum methods. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
REQUISITE: Math-1920
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1340 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1230
3 hours credit
ENGN-1410 Sustainability in Engineering Design
This course introduces the principles of sustainability in engineering design as they relate to the interactions among humans, living systems, the natural environment and the engineered world. Physical, chemical, biological, ecological, social, economic and life-cycle concepts, and their relevance to sustainable engineering design, are emphasized. 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1410L;
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
2000 Level
Courses: 
ENGN-2120 Geology for Engineers
This course provides a basic overview of key geological processes and principles with emphasis on practical aspects of geology as they apply to engineering and related disciplines. Topics include rock types, rock formation, plate tectonics, glaciation, erosion, earth materials, geological mapping, stratigraphy and structural geology. An appreciation for ore forming processes, mineral resources, geothermal energy, environmental geology, and groundwater resources is also development. Laboratory activities focus on basic mineral and rock identification, and interpretation of topographic and geological maps. Three lecture hours per week
3 hours credit
ENGN-2130 Statistics for Engineering Applications
This course provides an introduction to statistics through its application to engineering in the areas of reliability and experimentation. Basic statistical concepts, such as probability, descriptive measures, population distributions, and hypothesis testing will be taught in the context of engineering reliability and experimentation scenarios. Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts of reliability, such as failure and repairability rates, and analysis techniques such as reliability block diagrams and fault tree analysis. Student will also learn the basics of experimental design, including one-factor-at-a-time and factorial testing, and get hands on experience with the design, execution, analysis and interpretation of experimental results. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2130L
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2210 Engineering Projects I
Combined with Engineering 2220, this course provides a complete community/industry design project experience. Emphasis is placed on strong technical design knowledge and team dynamics to facilitate learning and critical thinking. Students are encouraged to develop and apply CAD, economics, sustainability, social justice, and ethics concepts in their own community/industry design projects. Students are required to research and analyze the client's situation (internal/external) and develop detailed analytical proposals and conceptual design options. Innovative project management tools and communication skills (team/client) are also introduced to achieve project deliverables in an effective manner. Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week.
REQUISITE: ENGN-2310 ENGN-2610 ENGN-2810
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2210L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1220 with a grade of at least 60%. , English 1010 or UPEI 1010
3 hours credit
ENGN-2220 Engineering Projects II
Building on the work in Engineering 2210, students will complete detailed designs of their concepts, in-depth engineering analyses and develop a physical model or demonstration to support the recommended design solution. Working closely with community/industry partners and faculty, students learn how to manage a complex client oriented project, supported by accurate numerical analysis and professional documentation. Emphasis is placed on hands-on activities in a team-oriented environment to achieve an optimal working prototype, keeping in view the concepts of practicality, adoptability, economics and sustainability. Three hours of lecture and three hours of design studio per week
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2210 with a grade of at least 60%
3 hours credit
ENGN-2240 Introduction to Structural Engineering
This course is an introduction to the field of structural analysis as an applied discipline. Building on deflection and truss analysis from previous mechanics courses, students are exposed to concepts of influence, flexibility, stiffness, impact and other analytical techniques and dynamic loading in rigid structures. The National Building Code and material resistance is also introduced. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2240 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
3 hours credit
ENGN-2310 Strength of Materials
This course is an introduction to the study of stress, strain and deformation of a solid body subjected to static forces. Topics include elastic and plastic stress, strain, Mohr's circle, torsion, behaviour of beams and columns. Computer applications and hands-on laboratory experiments are used. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2310 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1230 and Math 1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2350 Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines
This course introduces fundamental concepts in the analysis of linkages and other aspects of complex machinery. Using graphical and analytical methods and relying on static and dynamic principles previously learned, students are exposed to a variety of cams, gears and trains in an applied context. Simple gyroscopic effects are also introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2350 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2340 and Math 1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2360 Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing
This course advances the fundamental knowledge of materials science to focus on materials processing and industrial manufacturing techniques for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Knowledge of heat treatment and various metallurgical processes, as well as cold-working, subtractive and additive manufacturing, corrosion and fatigue, will be linked to an evaluation of materials properties, materials performance and mechanical behavior, and microstructure. Students will apply the materials life cycle and use various tools to assess quality and integrity to predefined specifications and tolerances. The materials phenomena and manufacturing techniques discussed in lecture will be demonstrated through experiential labs. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2360 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
3 hours credit
ENGN-2430 Engineering Economics
This course provides students with the fundamentals of engineering economics and finance financial aspects in the context of professional engineering practice. Topics include the time value of money, project screening, cost estimation, and discounting analysis techniques. Economic analysis of depreciation, maintenance, replacement and upgrading and the impact of taxes, inflation and time on infrastructure development. Relevant software and projects are used. Three hours lecture and three-hour tutorial per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2430 Tutorial Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-2520 Fundamentals of Process Engineering
The main objective of this course is to develop the student's ability to perform mass and energy balances on reactive and non-reactive processes. Introductory topics include systems of units and a study of process variables such as temperature, pressure, and flowrate. Also covered are fundamental properties of multiphase systems: phase equilibrium, vapour pressure, phase rule, Raoult's and Henry's Laws, and colligative properties. Emphasis is placed on developing problem-solving skills. Three lecture hours and two tutorial hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2520 Tutorial Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610
3 hours credit
ENGN-2610 Thermo Fluids I: Thermodynamics
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of thermodynamics (first and second laws) and the application of these principles to engineering problems. Topics included are: the nature and forms of energy; basic concepts of systems, properties, states and processes; energy transfer as work and heat; energy and The First Law of Thermodynamics; entropy and The Second Law of Thermodynamics; and heat engine cycles. The analysis of various systems for power generation or refrigeration is also included. Three hours lecture and three lab hours per week
REQUISITE: Chem-1110
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2610 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2620 Thermo Fluids II: Fluid Mechanics
This course is an introduction to the field of fluid mechanics. Topics covered include properties of fluids, forces on submerged surfaces, stability of floating objects, ideal fluid flow, and momentum and energy methods. Concepts of similitude are introduced and fundamental scaling parameters in real fluids. Turbulence is introduced; pipe flow problems and lift/drag problems are solved. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2620 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610 and Math 2910
3 hours credit
ENGN-2810 Electric Circuits
This course is a study of topics such as: voltage, current, resistance, power, Ohm's laws, Kirchoff 's laws, sources, voltage and current division, nodal and mesh analysis, linearity and superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, capacitance and inductance, RL and RC circuits. Concepts of electric charge, force and field are also introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2810L
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2820 Electric Circuits II
This course is a continuation of Engineering 2810, expanding upon concepts introduced in the first course. This will include two port networks, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, Bode and Polar plots, and Filters. Three hours lecture and two hours tutorial per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2820 Tutorial Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810
3 hours credit
ENGN-2830 Digital Logic Design
This course is a study of topics such as: digital and binary systems, Boolean algebra, combinational logic, sequential logic, minimization, registers and counters, clocks and synchronization, state machines, and programmable logic devices. Ladder logic and programmable logic controllers are also introduced. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2830L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1310 ENGN-2810
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
3000 Level
Courses: 
ENGN-3220 Engineering Measurements
This course covers the basic types of measurement of many fundamental physical phenomena, including time, distance, displacements, speed, rates, force, flow, temperature, pressure, stress and strain, and frequency. An introduction to digital and analog electronics is a component of the course, but the focus is on understanding ways to sense physical parameters. This course has a significant field component. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3220 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810 and Math 3010
3 hours credit
ENGN-3270 Machines and Automatic Control
This course introduces students to the complexity of automating machines. Building on previous machine design and electric circuit's courses, students will investigate and experiment with all aspects of electrical systems, mechanical systems and automatic control. Topics covered include: history of machines, how machines work, concept of control, human interaction, instruments and measurements, control schematics, AC/DC machines and transformers, programmable technology, power electronics, electric motors, protection systems, and industrial safety. Labs involve reverse engineering exercises and industrial field trips are used to enhance understanding. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3270 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3220 and Engineering 2810
3 hours credit
ENGN-3340 Introduction to Mechatronics Engineering
This course covers fundamental skills associated with the development of computer-controlled intelligent systems and processes. Following a modern approach to mechanical engineering design, students will attempt synergistic integration of electronics, control systems, and mechanical components in a controlled laboratory environment. Students must demonstrate skills related to the selection, integration and/or calibration of sensors, actuators, signal conditioning, control algorithms, computer software, and hardware systems used to manage complexity, uncertainty, and communication in robotic systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3370 Mechatronic System Integration and Interface Design
This course focuses on the fundamentals of human and mechatronic system interaction and a systematic approach to its interface design. Signal generation, transmission, and interface design are the main topics of this course. Integration of the Mechatronics system focuses on the use of embedded electronics to control and monitor mechanical behavior in a mechatronic system. Following a user-centered design and observational philosophy, students will learn to evaluate the execution efficiency of typical voice, command and graphical(GUI)user interfaces to interact with the mechatronic system with the specific aim of monitoring and control. Topics include: transducers, motors and actuators I/O and signaling, signal transmission philosophy and design, conducting user studies, evaluation techniques, information structure, and programming for interactive systems. Labview and Simulink interface software development packages are used. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3370 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 or Engineering 3440, or Engineering 3540.
3 hours credit
ENGN-3380 Real-Time Embedded Systems
This course will provide students with an overview of how different hardware components are inter-connected and how embedded systems are programmed. Students will learn how to determine the functions of given function units, and construct small scale logic circuits based on their functional specifications. Students will also learn to explain the stages involved in decoding and executing instructions, to illustrate basic concepts of interfacing to external devices, and to compare different set architectures. Students will study how to do programming for real-time embedded systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3380L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340, or Engineering 3440 or Engineering 3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3390 Mechatronics Computer-Aided Product Development, Modelling, and Simulation
This course reinforces students' skills in solid modelling and expands into computational simulation. Utilizing advanced CAD/CAM/CAE simulation software such as SolidWorks, CATIA, Altair Hyperworks, ANSYS Workbench, and Stratsys Insight 3D printing software, and in a controlled environment, students engage in developing skills required to work in today's industrial and integrated computer-aided product development. The course focuses on a hands-on approach to product innovation and the effective use of computational simulation technology. The course covers aspects of structural and mechanical CAE/FEA as well as thermal management CAE/CFD simulations when designing intelligent mechatronics products. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3390 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 or Engineering 3440 or Engineering 3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3430 Technology Management & Entrepreneurship
(formerly 4230) This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company. Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, business feasibility studies, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, marketing, operational and human resource management. The focus will be on students as engineers-entrepreneurs with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators. This course will use problem-based and experiential learning strategies to develop new ventures. Students who produce a well-developed business idea from this course may be considered for approval to use this as the basis for their final year engineering design project. (Cross-listed with Computer Science 3840 and SDE 8230) Three lecture hours per week.
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710 must be completed or taken concurrently.
3 hours credit
ENGN-3440 Introduction to Sustainable Energy Engineering
This introductory course considers current and promising future energy systems. Topics introduced include available resources, energy conversion technologies and end use applications and technologies. An emphasis is placed on meeting the needs of a future of global energy supply and its associated challenges. Students will develop a technical and analytical framework with which they can evaluate energy supply alternatives in the context of political, economic, environmentaland social goals. Life cycle analysis is also considered. Topics introduced in this course may be covered in greater depth in other sustainable energy focus-area electives. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3440 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3450 Wind and Water Power
This course explores the engineering of wind- and water-based renewable energy conversion technologies such as wind turbines, tidal turbines, wave energy converters, and hydroelectric dams. Students will develop an understanding of the current state of technology and gain an appreciation for related issues of resource assessment, stakeholder engagement, and environmental impact. The underlying fluid mechanics principles will be emphasized to appreciate device operating principles and performance drivers. The challenge of satisfying energy demand with intermittent supply will be reviewed to further contextualize the different resource potentials, and related fluid-based storage technologies will be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3450L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3460 Solar Energy and Electricity Storage
This course covers the fundamentals of solar power generation and associated energy storage systems. Course emphasis surrounds the electrical nature of solar photovoltaic energy generation associated energy/power conversion and storage systems. Students will develop a technical understanding of the underlying core technologies as well as how the technologies are productized. Topics covered may include: Solar photovoltaic (PV)generation, electric power converters for solar PV, battery storage technology, off-grid solar power conversion systems and small solar home systems. Lab projects may consist of studying various scales of PV power products and technologies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3460L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3490 Chemical Energy Conversion
This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermochemical and thermomechanical,processes as seen in existing power and transportation systems, and ways these processes may be improved in the future. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, biofuels, hydrogen, and other chemical energy sources over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, combustion, thermal power cycles, fuel cells and catalysis. The course also deals with combustion emissions and environmental impacts,optimal source utilization and fuel-life cycle analysis. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3490 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3540 Introduction to Bioresources Engineering
Growing environmental problems created by unsustainable use of fossil resources is forcing us to move from a synthetic-based economy to a bio-based one. This introductory course will provide the fundamental skills in developing environmental technologies to enable students to pursue career opportunities in a range of industries. Looking into different resources available within the biosphere, students will learn to apply engineering knowledge for its sustainable use. Concepts of a bio-refinery will be introduced for developing fundamental understanding of integrated conversion processes (thermal, chemical and biological). Understanding the concepts of enzymatic and cellular kinetics, students will learn to design bioreactors. This course will also review the fundamental concepts of life-cycle analysis and explore the application of it to selected environmental projects. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3540 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3570 Engineering Applications of Biological Materials
This course will focus on the understanding of the basic molecular structures of biological materials, such as wood, bioplastics, biocomposites and biofuels, and their engineering applications. It will develop the fundamental understanding of relationships between composition, structure and properties of various materials of biological origin. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3570 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3580 Soil Mechanics
This course explores the fundamentals of soil mechanics and their applications in engineering practice. Students will develop an understanding about the physical properties of soils, and will examine the behavior of soil masses subjected to various forces. The list of topics to be covered in this course include: soil composition and texture, physical properties of soils, classification of soils, permeability and seepage, consolidation, settlement, shear strength, vertical stresses in soils, soil exploration, bearing capacity and slope stability of soils. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-3580L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3630 Thermo Fluids III: Heat Transfer and Thermodynamic Cycles
This course advances student knowledge across the related fields of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer with an emphasis on engineering applications. Heat transfer topics include: flows with friction and heat exchange, steady and unsteady heat conduction, convection and radiation phenomena; and heat exchanger analysis. Thermodynamic cycles topics include: internal combustion as it applies to power generation; air standard and vapour cycles; gas turbines; jet engine; and steam power plants. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3630 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-2620
3 hours credit
ENGN-3710 Project-Based Professional Practice I
Building on the work in previous design courses, this course is the first of a series of upper-year courses which simulates the practice of a professional engineer. Following a design-build-test approach, students work in a team-based environment to deliver design solutions to real-world industrial clients. Following best practices in project management and sustainability, students develop detailed project proposals, conceptual designs, and proofs of concepts within the ethical and safety considerations that are fundamental to the profession. Concepts are further developed into operational prototypes in Engineering 3720. Six lecture hours and six hours of design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3710 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 2360, Engineering 1340, Engineering 2620,and Engineering 2830
6 hours credit
ENGN-3720 Project-Based Professional Practice II
Continuing the work in Engineering 3710 and working closely with their external clients, students complete detailed designs of their concepts, build full-scale operational prototypes(where possible); carry out testing and validation of solutions in controlled laboratory and/or industrial environments(where possible), and present their final design solutions to their clients. Six lecture hours and six hours design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3720 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710 with a grade of at least 60%
6 hours credit
ENGN-3810 Systems Engineering
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of systems engineering and a systems approach to analyzing complex problems. Specific subjects covered include: logistics,reliability, safety, performance,and risk management. Open-ended problems are used and students are expected to classify, categorize, and illustrate physical and functional relationships using schematic diagramming techniques. Modeling of performance is introduced, but is covered in greater depth in the systems dynamics course to follow. Systems considered in the course include human, ecological, transportation, communication, mechanical, electrical, and mechatronic. This course utilizes a problem-based experiential teaching method with a significant field component. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3810 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220
3 hours credit
ENGN-3820 System Dynamics With Simulation
This course introduces the analysis and control of dynamic systems, with concepts and examples drawn from all disciplines. It includes development and analysis of differential equation models for mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid systems, including some sensors. Systems are primarily analyzed using Laplace transforms and computer simulation methods. Analysis concepts cover first, second, and higher order differential equations, transient characteristics, transfer functions, stability, dominance, and frequency response. Properties of systems include time constant, natural and damped frequency, and damping ratio. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3820 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3810 and Engineering 3220
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
4000 Level
Courses: 
ENGN-4210 Facilitated Study and Experimental Practice
This course provides an individual assessment of the students' engineering knowledge to date in the context of their assigned industry-sponsored project. Students in consultation with faculty will determine knowledge and skill requirements of their project and develop a study and experimentation plan to fill gaps in the students' knowledge and experience. The content of the course will be customized to each student and his or her individual needs.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 must be taken concurrently.
3 hours credit
ENGN-4310 Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
This course concentrates on manufacturing knowledge with a focus on advanced fabrication techniques (AFT) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). Students will expand their knowledge of traditional processes including CAD/CAM, forming, welding, milling, etc. leading into innovative advanced fabrication techniques in additive and precision manufacturing, next generation electronics, robotics and smart automation (CIM), and sustainable and green manufacturing modeling and simulation in the manufacturing process developed through lectures and labs. Integration of CIM into supply chain design and management is emphasized based on synergistic application of mechatronics approach and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4310 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-2360
3 hours credit
ENGN-4320 Control System Design
This course will provide students with an overview of system modelling and control methodologies of single/multiple input/output systems, e.g., energy transport control, reactor control, heat exchanger control, power production, and mechatronic systems. Students will learn classical control methods e.g., feedforward, feedbacks, cascade, decoupling to modern control methods, LQR, predictive control, optimal and robust control. Students will be equipped with knowledge and skills for analyzing stability, controllability and observability of state-space representation modelled systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4320L
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-3820
3 hours credit
ENGN-4330 Innovations in Biomedical Engineering
This course introduces the study of medicine by focusing on innovations in medical devices, and future trends in materials, especially the increasing use of bio-resources, informatics, and mechatronics engineering applications in orthopedic, rehabilitation, simulation and education technologies. In its broader context, this course focuses on four areas of biotechnology, biomechanics, biomaterials and biosignals. Through a hands-on approach, the course focuses on innovative product development related to bio-signal, instrumentation, sensing, and image processing. Students will also gain an appreciation for the collaborative, interdisciplinary nature of engineering in medicine and its potential impact on society. (Cross-listed with SDE-8330). Graduate project will be defined). Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4330 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710
3 hours credit
ENGN-4350 Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control
This course advances the fundamentals of robotics through exposure to in-depth knowledge and understanding of kinematics, dynamics, control and trajectory with applications to autonomous vehicles, automated manufacturing and processing and mobile robotics. Areas of interest include: position transformation and control, rigid body motion, kinematic control, compliance and force control. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4350 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4370 Fluid Power Control
This course covers the analysis and design of basic hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems. Topics include a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics including flow through valves, fittings, and pipe; classification of hydrostatic pumps and motors; control valves; hydraulic accumulators; sizing of practical hydraulic circuits; thermal and energy considerations; electrohydraulic control and modeling of hydraulic control systems. The latter part of the course focuses on pneumatic systems including pneumatic cylinders and motors, control valves, and compressor technology. The application of Programmable Logic Controls (PLCs) to industrial automation and the sequential control of pneumatic actuators is also addressed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4370L
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-3820
3 hours credit
ENGN-4410 Macro Energy Systems
This course covers methods for analyzing energy supply, conversion processes, and end-use at the system level. Aspects considered include the dynamics of energy supply and demand, efficiencies of energy conversion, characteristics of energy currencies, and energy needs across different sectors. Students will characterize methods of delivering energy services such as heat, light, industrial power and transportation. Energy analysis will be introduced and used to build a quantitative framework for integrating techno-economic analysis of energy system components, with emphasis on elements such as fossil fuels and nuclear power. Students will gain an enhanced, quantitative appreciation for the sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity aspects of energy services delivery. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4410L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4440 Advanced Energy Storage
This course considers advanced technical analysis of energy storage systems. A comprehensive overview of all industrially relevant energy storage systems is reviewed and emphasis is placed on promising energy storage technologies of the future. Chemical, thermal and kinetic storage technologies will be discussed in detail. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4440L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4450 Fluid Loads on Energy Structures
This course is an introduction to the loads applied on structures from wind, waves, and currents, and their heightened relevance to structures designed for energy conversion. Phenomena to be discussed include lift and drag, boundary layers, vortex-induced vibrations, wakes, hydrostatic loading, and water waves. A selection of engineering methods will be introduced and brought to bear on these topics, such as potential flow theory, blade-element theory, Airy wave theory and Morison's equation. Dimensional analysis will be introduced to characterize flow problems. Design implications will be discussed for a selection of relevant energy conversion structures such as aircraft wings, wind turbines, breakwaters, marine vessels, and offshore energy platforms. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4450L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4470 Micro Grids
This course focuses on the concept, operation and optimization of renewable-energy-based micro-grids. Concepts introduced and considered include renewable energy resources, integration technologies, grid-connected operation, islanded grid operation, energy storage integration and the optimal dimensioning and mixing of multiple energy sources where some are stochastic in nature and some are dispatchable. Existing and future energy storage technologies will be also be discussed. This course is based on energy flow analysis and makes extensive use of software simulation tools. Students will develop a framework for performing techno-economic assessments of micro-grid architectures and designs. A strong background in electrical power systems is not necessarily required. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4470L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4510 Geoinformatics in Bioresources
This course covers the theory and practice of geoinformatics and their applications to problems in bioresources using digital mapping and spatial analysis. Hands on laboratories will provide students with an experience to collect georeferenced data using differential global positioning system, followed by mapping and analysis in geographical information system. Topics include datums, map projections and transformations, vector and raster data, geo-spatial analysis, geo-statistics and interpolation techniques. This course will also cover the fundamentals of remote sensing, data collection with sensors, and spatial and temporal aspects of the bio-resources attributes. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4510L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4530 Fundamentals of Agriculture Machinery
This course highlights the fundamentals of mechanized agriculture machinery from soil preparation, planting, and crop management to mechanical harvesting. The machines and their unit operation are analyzed with respect functions, work rates, material flow and power usage. The machine performance relating to work quality and environmental effects will also be evaluated. The labs will emphasize on safety, basic maintenance, adjustment, calibrations of equipment and performance testing. This course also covers the variable rate applicators for site-specific application of inputs, auto guidance system, data acquisition and management for intelligent decision making for machines, and precision agriculture technologies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4530L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4550 Biotechnological Processes
The basic topics covered in this course may include fermentation, engineering of reactor, natural products purification and their applications in biotechnology sector. The students will learn basic concepts of chemical and biochemical techniques required for the development and purification of materials in biotechnological, biochemical and pharmaceutical industries. The design of fermenters and biological reactors and their modification to improve the industrial applications will be discussed. The design of reactors in context of mass and energy balances will be evaluated and downstream unit processes involved in product recovery will be presented. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4550L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4710 Project-Based Professional Practice III
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of analysis, simulation and modeling in engineering design. Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design. Six lecture hours and six design studio hours per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 Lab Section , Engineering 3720 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 3270, Engineering 3630, Engineering 3820, Engineering 3230. Engineering 4210 must be taken concurrently.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3720 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 3270, Engineering 3630, Engineering 3430 and Engineering 3820. Engineering 4210 must be taken concurrently.
6 hours credit
ENGN-4720 Project-Based Professional Practice IV
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of prototyping and manufacturing, testing and verification, design of experiments, optimization and feasibility. Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design. Six hours of lecture and six hours of design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4720 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 with a grade of at least 60%
6 hours credit
ENGN-4810 Directed Studies in Engineering
Available to advanced engineering students at the discretion of the department. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Engineering
3 hours credit
ENGN-4820 Directed Studies in Engineering
Available to advanced engineering students at the discretion of the department. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Engineering
3 hours credit
ENGN-4830 Biomedical Signal Processing
This course is an introduction to the basics of viewing, processing, and analyzing of biosignals, or signals originating from living beings. Biosignals may be characterized as bioelectrical signals which can be composed of both electrical and non-electrical parts. Topics include both linear and nonlinear systems, signal conditioning or filtering, improving signal quality (signal-to-noise ratio) through averaging techniques, and signal representations in both the time and frequency domains. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-4830L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3220
3 hours credit
ENGN-4850 Computational Methods for Engineering Design
This course covers the numerical methods that form the basis of many engineering techniques and applies these methods to quantitative engineering design. The fundamentals of numerical approaches are reviewed, including iteration, approximation, and numerical errors. Methods are presented for numerical integration, differentiation, and nonlinear equation solving. Numerical approaches to solving differential equations are examined and their applications to numerical modelling, including finite-element analysis and computation fluid dynamics, are explored. Computational approaches to frequency-domain analysis using discrete Fourier transforms are introduced, along with related topics such as digital filtering and numerical convolution. Algorithms are presented for array and matrix computation, solving systems of equations, regression, curve fitting, and numerical optimization. Finally, these computational techniques are brought to bear on the topic of design optimization, emphasizing the transformation of real-world engineering design problems into quantitative formulations to which computational design optimization techniques can be applied. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-4850L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1310 Math-3010
3 hours credit
ENGN-4910 Special Topics in Engineering
This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in engineering. The course content and its offering in any one semester will be at the discretion of the Department. Interested students should contact the Department to confirm the details of the course and its offering.
3 hours credit
ENGN-4920 Special Topics in Engineering
This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in engineering. The course content and its offering in any one semester will be at the discretion of the Department. Interested students should contact the Department to confirm the details of the course and its offering.
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

ENGN-1210 Engineering Communications
This course is the first in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer. It provides a basic introduction to the profession, to the design process, and to the way that engineers communicate through drawing, writing, speaking, and presenting. Students learn about the engineering design process by completing simple engineering design projects in a team-based environment. There is a strong focus on writing and computer-aided drawing. Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week.
REQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program, Math 1910 and ENGN-1410
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1210L
3 hours credit
ENGN-1220 Engineering Analysis
This course is the second in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer. It further introduces the engineering design process through team-based engineering design projects. Additionally, emphasis is placed on the development of a structured problem-solving and analysis ability that can be applied to most engineering applications. Analysis topics include: basic concepts of electricity; estimation; statistics; graphing; and regression. Computer-aided tools, such as Excel and MatLab are introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours of design studio per week
REQUISITE: ENGN-1310
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1220L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1210 with a grade of at least 60%.
3 hours credit
ENGN-1230 Engineering Mechanics I: Statics
This course focuses on the equilibrium conditions for the state of rest of particles and rigid bodies subject to forces and moments. Topics to be discussed include vector operations, equilibrium conditions, free-body diagrams, moments and couples, distributed loadings, support reactions, truss analysis, centroids, moments of inertia, products of inertia, shear and bending moment diagrams, and friction. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
REQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program, Math-1910
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1230L
3 hours credit
ENGN-1250 Materials Science
(formerly 2250) This course focuses on the fundamental principles of chemistry as they relate to the properties and behaviour of materials in application to engineering systems. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order is emphasized. The characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids, i.e. that of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites are introduced. Knowledge of materials phenomena, including chemical equilibrium and kinetics, diffusion, electrochemistry, and phase transformations will be gained through experiential labs and lecture. Examples from industrial practice and emerging technologies will be used to illustrate the materials science concepts in this course. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
REQUISITE: Math-1920
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1250 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Chem-1110
3 hours credit
ENGN-1310 Computer Programming with Engineering Applications
This introductory course in computer programming is specifically designed for engineering students with no previous programming experience. The learning objectives are twofold: 1) to gain the ability to write scripts and solve basic engineering problems using the Matlab numerical computing environment, 2) to introduce embedded systems and the fundamentals of interfacing and real-time programming using the Arduino open-source platform. Topics include problem solving, algorithm design, modular programming, data types and number systems, operators, functions, decision statements, loops, and arrays. The latter part of the course deals with the fundamentals of interfacing peripheral devices including sensors and actuators to design small embedded systems. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Restriction: Acceptance into the Engineering Program
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1310 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-1340 Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics
(formerly 2340) This course is a study of mechanics concerned with the state of motion of rigid bodies that are subject to the action of forces. The course considers the kinematics and kinetics of motion applied particles and rigid bodies particularly as it relates to engineering applications and design. Topics include rectilinear and curvilinear motions, normal and tangential coordinates, dependent motion, Newton's Laws of Motion, energy and momentum methods. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
REQUISITE: Math-1920
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1340 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1230
3 hours credit
ENGN-1410 Sustainability in Engineering Design
This course introduces the principles of sustainability in engineering design as they relate to the interactions among humans, living systems, the natural environment and the engineered world. Physical, chemical, biological, ecological, social, economic and life-cycle concepts, and their relevance to sustainable engineering design, are emphasized. 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1410L;
3 hours credit
ENGN-2120 Geology for Engineers
This course provides a basic overview of key geological processes and principles with emphasis on practical aspects of geology as they apply to engineering and related disciplines. Topics include rock types, rock formation, plate tectonics, glaciation, erosion, earth materials, geological mapping, stratigraphy and structural geology. An appreciation for ore forming processes, mineral resources, geothermal energy, environmental geology, and groundwater resources is also development. Laboratory activities focus on basic mineral and rock identification, and interpretation of topographic and geological maps. Three lecture hours per week
3 hours credit
ENGN-2130 Statistics for Engineering Applications
This course provides an introduction to statistics through its application to engineering in the areas of reliability and experimentation. Basic statistical concepts, such as probability, descriptive measures, population distributions, and hypothesis testing will be taught in the context of engineering reliability and experimentation scenarios. Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts of reliability, such as failure and repairability rates, and analysis techniques such as reliability block diagrams and fault tree analysis. Student will also learn the basics of experimental design, including one-factor-at-a-time and factorial testing, and get hands on experience with the design, execution, analysis and interpretation of experimental results. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2130L
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2210 Engineering Projects I
Combined with Engineering 2220, this course provides a complete community/industry design project experience. Emphasis is placed on strong technical design knowledge and team dynamics to facilitate learning and critical thinking. Students are encouraged to develop and apply CAD, economics, sustainability, social justice, and ethics concepts in their own community/industry design projects. Students are required to research and analyze the client's situation (internal/external) and develop detailed analytical proposals and conceptual design options. Innovative project management tools and communication skills (team/client) are also introduced to achieve project deliverables in an effective manner. Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week.
REQUISITE: ENGN-2310 ENGN-2610 ENGN-2810
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2210L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1220 with a grade of at least 60%. , English 1010 or UPEI 1010
3 hours credit
ENGN-2220 Engineering Projects II
Building on the work in Engineering 2210, students will complete detailed designs of their concepts, in-depth engineering analyses and develop a physical model or demonstration to support the recommended design solution. Working closely with community/industry partners and faculty, students learn how to manage a complex client oriented project, supported by accurate numerical analysis and professional documentation. Emphasis is placed on hands-on activities in a team-oriented environment to achieve an optimal working prototype, keeping in view the concepts of practicality, adoptability, economics and sustainability. Three hours of lecture and three hours of design studio per week
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2210 with a grade of at least 60%
3 hours credit
ENGN-2240 Introduction to Structural Engineering
This course is an introduction to the field of structural analysis as an applied discipline. Building on deflection and truss analysis from previous mechanics courses, students are exposed to concepts of influence, flexibility, stiffness, impact and other analytical techniques and dynamic loading in rigid structures. The National Building Code and material resistance is also introduced. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2240 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
3 hours credit
ENGN-2310 Strength of Materials
This course is an introduction to the study of stress, strain and deformation of a solid body subjected to static forces. Topics include elastic and plastic stress, strain, Mohr's circle, torsion, behaviour of beams and columns. Computer applications and hands-on laboratory experiments are used. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2310 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1230 and Math 1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2350 Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines
This course introduces fundamental concepts in the analysis of linkages and other aspects of complex machinery. Using graphical and analytical methods and relying on static and dynamic principles previously learned, students are exposed to a variety of cams, gears and trains in an applied context. Simple gyroscopic effects are also introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2350 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2340 and Math 1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2360 Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing
This course advances the fundamental knowledge of materials science to focus on materials processing and industrial manufacturing techniques for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Knowledge of heat treatment and various metallurgical processes, as well as cold-working, subtractive and additive manufacturing, corrosion and fatigue, will be linked to an evaluation of materials properties, materials performance and mechanical behavior, and microstructure. Students will apply the materials life cycle and use various tools to assess quality and integrity to predefined specifications and tolerances. The materials phenomena and manufacturing techniques discussed in lecture will be demonstrated through experiential labs. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2360 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
3 hours credit
ENGN-2430 Engineering Economics
This course provides students with the fundamentals of engineering economics and finance financial aspects in the context of professional engineering practice. Topics include the time value of money, project screening, cost estimation, and discounting analysis techniques. Economic analysis of depreciation, maintenance, replacement and upgrading and the impact of taxes, inflation and time on infrastructure development. Relevant software and projects are used. Three hours lecture and three-hour tutorial per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2430 Tutorial Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-2520 Fundamentals of Process Engineering
The main objective of this course is to develop the student's ability to perform mass and energy balances on reactive and non-reactive processes. Introductory topics include systems of units and a study of process variables such as temperature, pressure, and flowrate. Also covered are fundamental properties of multiphase systems: phase equilibrium, vapour pressure, phase rule, Raoult's and Henry's Laws, and colligative properties. Emphasis is placed on developing problem-solving skills. Three lecture hours and two tutorial hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2520 Tutorial Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610
3 hours credit
ENGN-2610 Thermo Fluids I: Thermodynamics
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of thermodynamics (first and second laws) and the application of these principles to engineering problems. Topics included are: the nature and forms of energy; basic concepts of systems, properties, states and processes; energy transfer as work and heat; energy and The First Law of Thermodynamics; entropy and The Second Law of Thermodynamics; and heat engine cycles. The analysis of various systems for power generation or refrigeration is also included. Three hours lecture and three lab hours per week
REQUISITE: Chem-1110
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2610 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2620 Thermo Fluids II: Fluid Mechanics
This course is an introduction to the field of fluid mechanics. Topics covered include properties of fluids, forces on submerged surfaces, stability of floating objects, ideal fluid flow, and momentum and energy methods. Concepts of similitude are introduced and fundamental scaling parameters in real fluids. Turbulence is introduced; pipe flow problems and lift/drag problems are solved. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2620 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610 and Math 2910
3 hours credit
ENGN-2810 Electric Circuits
This course is a study of topics such as: voltage, current, resistance, power, Ohm's laws, Kirchoff 's laws, sources, voltage and current division, nodal and mesh analysis, linearity and superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, capacitance and inductance, RL and RC circuits. Concepts of electric charge, force and field are also introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2810L
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2820 Electric Circuits II
This course is a continuation of Engineering 2810, expanding upon concepts introduced in the first course. This will include two port networks, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, Bode and Polar plots, and Filters. Three hours lecture and two hours tutorial per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2820 Tutorial Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810
3 hours credit
ENGN-2830 Digital Logic Design
This course is a study of topics such as: digital and binary systems, Boolean algebra, combinational logic, sequential logic, minimization, registers and counters, clocks and synchronization, state machines, and programmable logic devices. Ladder logic and programmable logic controllers are also introduced. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2830L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1310 ENGN-2810
3 hours credit
ENGN-3220 Engineering Measurements
This course covers the basic types of measurement of many fundamental physical phenomena, including time, distance, displacements, speed, rates, force, flow, temperature, pressure, stress and strain, and frequency. An introduction to digital and analog electronics is a component of the course, but the focus is on understanding ways to sense physical parameters. This course has a significant field component. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3220 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810 and Math 3010
3 hours credit
ENGN-3270 Machines and Automatic Control
This course introduces students to the complexity of automating machines. Building on previous machine design and electric circuit's courses, students will investigate and experiment with all aspects of electrical systems, mechanical systems and automatic control. Topics covered include: history of machines, how machines work, concept of control, human interaction, instruments and measurements, control schematics, AC/DC machines and transformers, programmable technology, power electronics, electric motors, protection systems, and industrial safety. Labs involve reverse engineering exercises and industrial field trips are used to enhance understanding. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3270 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3220 and Engineering 2810
3 hours credit
ENGN-3340 Introduction to Mechatronics Engineering
This course covers fundamental skills associated with the development of computer-controlled intelligent systems and processes. Following a modern approach to mechanical engineering design, students will attempt synergistic integration of electronics, control systems, and mechanical components in a controlled laboratory environment. Students must demonstrate skills related to the selection, integration and/or calibration of sensors, actuators, signal conditioning, control algorithms, computer software, and hardware systems used to manage complexity, uncertainty, and communication in robotic systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3370 Mechatronic System Integration and Interface Design
This course focuses on the fundamentals of human and mechatronic system interaction and a systematic approach to its interface design. Signal generation, transmission, and interface design are the main topics of this course. Integration of the Mechatronics system focuses on the use of embedded electronics to control and monitor mechanical behavior in a mechatronic system. Following a user-centered design and observational philosophy, students will learn to evaluate the execution efficiency of typical voice, command and graphical(GUI)user interfaces to interact with the mechatronic system with the specific aim of monitoring and control. Topics include: transducers, motors and actuators I/O and signaling, signal transmission philosophy and design, conducting user studies, evaluation techniques, information structure, and programming for interactive systems. Labview and Simulink interface software development packages are used. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3370 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 or Engineering 3440, or Engineering 3540.
3 hours credit
ENGN-3380 Real-Time Embedded Systems
This course will provide students with an overview of how different hardware components are inter-connected and how embedded systems are programmed. Students will learn how to determine the functions of given function units, and construct small scale logic circuits based on their functional specifications. Students will also learn to explain the stages involved in decoding and executing instructions, to illustrate basic concepts of interfacing to external devices, and to compare different set architectures. Students will study how to do programming for real-time embedded systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3380L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340, or Engineering 3440 or Engineering 3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3390 Mechatronics Computer-Aided Product Development, Modelling, and Simulation
This course reinforces students' skills in solid modelling and expands into computational simulation. Utilizing advanced CAD/CAM/CAE simulation software such as SolidWorks, CATIA, Altair Hyperworks, ANSYS Workbench, and Stratsys Insight 3D printing software, and in a controlled environment, students engage in developing skills required to work in today's industrial and integrated computer-aided product development. The course focuses on a hands-on approach to product innovation and the effective use of computational simulation technology. The course covers aspects of structural and mechanical CAE/FEA as well as thermal management CAE/CFD simulations when designing intelligent mechatronics products. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3390 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 or Engineering 3440 or Engineering 3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3430 Technology Management & Entrepreneurship
(formerly 4230) This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company. Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, business feasibility studies, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, marketing, operational and human resource management. The focus will be on students as engineers-entrepreneurs with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators. This course will use problem-based and experiential learning strategies to develop new ventures. Students who produce a well-developed business idea from this course may be considered for approval to use this as the basis for their final year engineering design project. (Cross-listed with Computer Science 3840 and SDE 8230) Three lecture hours per week.
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710 must be completed or taken concurrently.
3 hours credit
ENGN-3440 Introduction to Sustainable Energy Engineering
This introductory course considers current and promising future energy systems. Topics introduced include available resources, energy conversion technologies and end use applications and technologies. An emphasis is placed on meeting the needs of a future of global energy supply and its associated challenges. Students will develop a technical and analytical framework with which they can evaluate energy supply alternatives in the context of political, economic, environmentaland social goals. Life cycle analysis is also considered. Topics introduced in this course may be covered in greater depth in other sustainable energy focus-area electives. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3440 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3450 Wind and Water Power
This course explores the engineering of wind- and water-based renewable energy conversion technologies such as wind turbines, tidal turbines, wave energy converters, and hydroelectric dams. Students will develop an understanding of the current state of technology and gain an appreciation for related issues of resource assessment, stakeholder engagement, and environmental impact. The underlying fluid mechanics principles will be emphasized to appreciate device operating principles and performance drivers. The challenge of satisfying energy demand with intermittent supply will be reviewed to further contextualize the different resource potentials, and related fluid-based storage technologies will be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3450L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3460 Solar Energy and Electricity Storage
This course covers the fundamentals of solar power generation and associated energy storage systems. Course emphasis surrounds the electrical nature of solar photovoltaic energy generation associated energy/power conversion and storage systems. Students will develop a technical understanding of the underlying core technologies as well as how the technologies are productized. Topics covered may include: Solar photovoltaic (PV)generation, electric power converters for solar PV, battery storage technology, off-grid solar power conversion systems and small solar home systems. Lab projects may consist of studying various scales of PV power products and technologies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3460L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3490 Chemical Energy Conversion
This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermochemical and thermomechanical,processes as seen in existing power and transportation systems, and ways these processes may be improved in the future. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, biofuels, hydrogen, and other chemical energy sources over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, combustion, thermal power cycles, fuel cells and catalysis. The course also deals with combustion emissions and environmental impacts,optimal source utilization and fuel-life cycle analysis. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3490 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3540 Introduction to Bioresources Engineering
Growing environmental problems created by unsustainable use of fossil resources is forcing us to move from a synthetic-based economy to a bio-based one. This introductory course will provide the fundamental skills in developing environmental technologies to enable students to pursue career opportunities in a range of industries. Looking into different resources available within the biosphere, students will learn to apply engineering knowledge for its sustainable use. Concepts of a bio-refinery will be introduced for developing fundamental understanding of integrated conversion processes (thermal, chemical and biological). Understanding the concepts of enzymatic and cellular kinetics, students will learn to design bioreactors. This course will also review the fundamental concepts of life-cycle analysis and explore the application of it to selected environmental projects. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3540 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3570 Engineering Applications of Biological Materials
This course will focus on the understanding of the basic molecular structures of biological materials, such as wood, bioplastics, biocomposites and biofuels, and their engineering applications. It will develop the fundamental understanding of relationships between composition, structure and properties of various materials of biological origin. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3570 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3580 Soil Mechanics
This course explores the fundamentals of soil mechanics and their applications in engineering practice. Students will develop an understanding about the physical properties of soils, and will examine the behavior of soil masses subjected to various forces. The list of topics to be covered in this course include: soil composition and texture, physical properties of soils, classification of soils, permeability and seepage, consolidation, settlement, shear strength, vertical stresses in soils, soil exploration, bearing capacity and slope stability of soils. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-3580L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3630 Thermo Fluids III: Heat Transfer and Thermodynamic Cycles
This course advances student knowledge across the related fields of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer with an emphasis on engineering applications. Heat transfer topics include: flows with friction and heat exchange, steady and unsteady heat conduction, convection and radiation phenomena; and heat exchanger analysis. Thermodynamic cycles topics include: internal combustion as it applies to power generation; air standard and vapour cycles; gas turbines; jet engine; and steam power plants. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3630 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-2620
3 hours credit
ENGN-3710 Project-Based Professional Practice I
Building on the work in previous design courses, this course is the first of a series of upper-year courses which simulates the practice of a professional engineer. Following a design-build-test approach, students work in a team-based environment to deliver design solutions to real-world industrial clients. Following best practices in project management and sustainability, students develop detailed project proposals, conceptual designs, and proofs of concepts within the ethical and safety considerations that are fundamental to the profession. Concepts are further developed into operational prototypes in Engineering 3720. Six lecture hours and six hours of design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3710 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 2360, Engineering 1340, Engineering 2620,and Engineering 2830
6 hours credit
ENGN-3720 Project-Based Professional Practice II
Continuing the work in Engineering 3710 and working closely with their external clients, students complete detailed designs of their concepts, build full-scale operational prototypes(where possible); carry out testing and validation of solutions in controlled laboratory and/or industrial environments(where possible), and present their final design solutions to their clients. Six lecture hours and six hours design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3720 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710 with a grade of at least 60%
6 hours credit
ENGN-3810 Systems Engineering
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of systems engineering and a systems approach to analyzing complex problems. Specific subjects covered include: logistics,reliability, safety, performance,and risk management. Open-ended problems are used and students are expected to classify, categorize, and illustrate physical and functional relationships using schematic diagramming techniques. Modeling of performance is introduced, but is covered in greater depth in the systems dynamics course to follow. Systems considered in the course include human, ecological, transportation, communication, mechanical, electrical, and mechatronic. This course utilizes a problem-based experiential teaching method with a significant field component. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3810 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220
3 hours credit
ENGN-3820 System Dynamics With Simulation
This course introduces the analysis and control of dynamic systems, with concepts and examples drawn from all disciplines. It includes development and analysis of differential equation models for mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid systems, including some sensors. Systems are primarily analyzed using Laplace transforms and computer simulation methods. Analysis concepts cover first, second, and higher order differential equations, transient characteristics, transfer functions, stability, dominance, and frequency response. Properties of systems include time constant, natural and damped frequency, and damping ratio. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3820 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3810 and Engineering 3220
3 hours credit
ENGN-4210 Facilitated Study and Experimental Practice
This course provides an individual assessment of the students' engineering knowledge to date in the context of their assigned industry-sponsored project. Students in consultation with faculty will determine knowledge and skill requirements of their project and develop a study and experimentation plan to fill gaps in the students' knowledge and experience. The content of the course will be customized to each student and his or her individual needs.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 must be taken concurrently.
3 hours credit
ENGN-4310 Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
This course concentrates on manufacturing knowledge with a focus on advanced fabrication techniques (AFT) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). Students will expand their knowledge of traditional processes including CAD/CAM, forming, welding, milling, etc. leading into innovative advanced fabrication techniques in additive and precision manufacturing, next generation electronics, robotics and smart automation (CIM), and sustainable and green manufacturing modeling and simulation in the manufacturing process developed through lectures and labs. Integration of CIM into supply chain design and management is emphasized based on synergistic application of mechatronics approach and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4310 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-2360
3 hours credit
ENGN-4320 Control System Design
This course will provide students with an overview of system modelling and control methodologies of single/multiple input/output systems, e.g., energy transport control, reactor control, heat exchanger control, power production, and mechatronic systems. Students will learn classical control methods e.g., feedforward, feedbacks, cascade, decoupling to modern control methods, LQR, predictive control, optimal and robust control. Students will be equipped with knowledge and skills for analyzing stability, controllability and observability of state-space representation modelled systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4320L
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-3820
3 hours credit
ENGN-4330 Innovations in Biomedical Engineering
This course introduces the study of medicine by focusing on innovations in medical devices, and future trends in materials, especially the increasing use of bio-resources, informatics, and mechatronics engineering applications in orthopedic, rehabilitation, simulation and education technologies. In its broader context, this course focuses on four areas of biotechnology, biomechanics, biomaterials and biosignals. Through a hands-on approach, the course focuses on innovative product development related to bio-signal, instrumentation, sensing, and image processing. Students will also gain an appreciation for the collaborative, interdisciplinary nature of engineering in medicine and its potential impact on society. (Cross-listed with SDE-8330). Graduate project will be defined). Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4330 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710
3 hours credit
ENGN-4350 Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control
This course advances the fundamentals of robotics through exposure to in-depth knowledge and understanding of kinematics, dynamics, control and trajectory with applications to autonomous vehicles, automated manufacturing and processing and mobile robotics. Areas of interest include: position transformation and control, rigid body motion, kinematic control, compliance and force control. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4350 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4370 Fluid Power Control
This course covers the analysis and design of basic hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems. Topics include a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics including flow through valves, fittings, and pipe; classification of hydrostatic pumps and motors; control valves; hydraulic accumulators; sizing of practical hydraulic circuits; thermal and energy considerations; electrohydraulic control and modeling of hydraulic control systems. The latter part of the course focuses on pneumatic systems including pneumatic cylinders and motors, control valves, and compressor technology. The application of Programmable Logic Controls (PLCs) to industrial automation and the sequential control of pneumatic actuators is also addressed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4370L
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-3820
3 hours credit
ENGN-4410 Macro Energy Systems
This course covers methods for analyzing energy supply, conversion processes, and end-use at the system level. Aspects considered include the dynamics of energy supply and demand, efficiencies of energy conversion, characteristics of energy currencies, and energy needs across different sectors. Students will characterize methods of delivering energy services such as heat, light, industrial power and transportation. Energy analysis will be introduced and used to build a quantitative framework for integrating techno-economic analysis of energy system components, with emphasis on elements such as fossil fuels and nuclear power. Students will gain an enhanced, quantitative appreciation for the sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity aspects of energy services delivery. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4410L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4440 Advanced Energy Storage
This course considers advanced technical analysis of energy storage systems. A comprehensive overview of all industrially relevant energy storage systems is reviewed and emphasis is placed on promising energy storage technologies of the future. Chemical, thermal and kinetic storage technologies will be discussed in detail. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4440L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4450 Fluid Loads on Energy Structures
This course is an introduction to the loads applied on structures from wind, waves, and currents, and their heightened relevance to structures designed for energy conversion. Phenomena to be discussed include lift and drag, boundary layers, vortex-induced vibrations, wakes, hydrostatic loading, and water waves. A selection of engineering methods will be introduced and brought to bear on these topics, such as potential flow theory, blade-element theory, Airy wave theory and Morison's equation. Dimensional analysis will be introduced to characterize flow problems. Design implications will be discussed for a selection of relevant energy conversion structures such as aircraft wings, wind turbines, breakwaters, marine vessels, and offshore energy platforms. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4450L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4470 Micro Grids
This course focuses on the concept, operation and optimization of renewable-energy-based micro-grids. Concepts introduced and considered include renewable energy resources, integration technologies, grid-connected operation, islanded grid operation, energy storage integration and the optimal dimensioning and mixing of multiple energy sources where some are stochastic in nature and some are dispatchable. Existing and future energy storage technologies will be also be discussed. This course is based on energy flow analysis and makes extensive use of software simulation tools. Students will develop a framework for performing techno-economic assessments of micro-grid architectures and designs. A strong background in electrical power systems is not necessarily required. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4470L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4510 Geoinformatics in Bioresources
This course covers the theory and practice of geoinformatics and their applications to problems in bioresources using digital mapping and spatial analysis. Hands on laboratories will provide students with an experience to collect georeferenced data using differential global positioning system, followed by mapping and analysis in geographical information system. Topics include datums, map projections and transformations, vector and raster data, geo-spatial analysis, geo-statistics and interpolation techniques. This course will also cover the fundamentals of remote sensing, data collection with sensors, and spatial and temporal aspects of the bio-resources attributes. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4510L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4530 Fundamentals of Agriculture Machinery
This course highlights the fundamentals of mechanized agriculture machinery from soil preparation, planting, and crop management to mechanical harvesting. The machines and their unit operation are analyzed with respect functions, work rates, material flow and power usage. The machine performance relating to work quality and environmental effects will also be evaluated. The labs will emphasize on safety, basic maintenance, adjustment, calibrations of equipment and performance testing. This course also covers the variable rate applicators for site-specific application of inputs, auto guidance system, data acquisition and management for intelligent decision making for machines, and precision agriculture technologies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4530L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4550 Biotechnological Processes
The basic topics covered in this course may include fermentation, engineering of reactor, natural products purification and their applications in biotechnology sector. The students will learn basic concepts of chemical and biochemical techniques required for the development and purification of materials in biotechnological, biochemical and pharmaceutical industries. The design of fermenters and biological reactors and their modification to improve the industrial applications will be discussed. The design of reactors in context of mass and energy balances will be evaluated and downstream unit processes involved in product recovery will be presented. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4550L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4710 Project-Based Professional Practice III
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of analysis, simulation and modeling in engineering design. Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design. Six lecture hours and six design studio hours per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 Lab Section , Engineering 3720 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 3270, Engineering 3630, Engineering 3820, Engineering 3230. Engineering 4210 must be taken concurrently.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3720 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 3270, Engineering 3630, Engineering 3430 and Engineering 3820. Engineering 4210 must be taken concurrently.
6 hours credit
ENGN-4720 Project-Based Professional Practice IV
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of prototyping and manufacturing, testing and verification, design of experiments, optimization and feasibility. Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design. Six hours of lecture and six hours of design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4720 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 with a grade of at least 60%
6 hours credit
ENGN-4810 Directed Studies in Engineering
Available to advanced engineering students at the discretion of the department. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Engineering
3 hours credit
ENGN-4820 Directed Studies in Engineering
Available to advanced engineering students at the discretion of the department. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Engineering
3 hours credit
ENGN-4830 Biomedical Signal Processing
This course is an introduction to the basics of viewing, processing, and analyzing of biosignals, or signals originating from living beings. Biosignals may be characterized as bioelectrical signals which can be composed of both electrical and non-electrical parts. Topics include both linear and nonlinear systems, signal conditioning or filtering, improving signal quality (signal-to-noise ratio) through averaging techniques, and signal representations in both the time and frequency domains. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-4830L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3220
3 hours credit
ENGN-4850 Computational Methods for Engineering Design
This course covers the numerical methods that form the basis of many engineering techniques and applies these methods to quantitative engineering design. The fundamentals of numerical approaches are reviewed, including iteration, approximation, and numerical errors. Methods are presented for numerical integration, differentiation, and nonlinear equation solving. Numerical approaches to solving differential equations are examined and their applications to numerical modelling, including finite-element analysis and computation fluid dynamics, are explored. Computational approaches to frequency-domain analysis using discrete Fourier transforms are introduced, along with related topics such as digital filtering and numerical convolution. Algorithms are presented for array and matrix computation, solving systems of equations, regression, curve fitting, and numerical optimization. Finally, these computational techniques are brought to bear on the topic of design optimization, emphasizing the transformation of real-world engineering design problems into quantitative formulations to which computational design optimization techniques can be applied. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-4850L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1310 Math-3010
3 hours credit
ENGN-4910 Special Topics in Engineering
This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in engineering. The course content and its offering in any one semester will be at the discretion of the Department. Interested students should contact the Department to confirm the details of the course and its offering.
3 hours credit
ENGN-4920 Special Topics in Engineering
This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in engineering. The course content and its offering in any one semester will be at the discretion of the Department. Interested students should contact the Department to confirm the details of the course and its offering.
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

1000 Level

ENGN-1210 Engineering Communications
This course is the first in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer. It provides a basic introduction to the profession, to the design process, and to the way that engineers communicate through drawing, writing, speaking, and presenting. Students learn about the engineering design process by completing simple engineering design projects in a team-based environment. There is a strong focus on writing and computer-aided drawing. Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week.
REQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program, Math 1910 and ENGN-1410
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1210L
3 hours credit
ENGN-1220 Engineering Analysis
This course is the second in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer. It further introduces the engineering design process through team-based engineering design projects. Additionally, emphasis is placed on the development of a structured problem-solving and analysis ability that can be applied to most engineering applications. Analysis topics include: basic concepts of electricity; estimation; statistics; graphing; and regression. Computer-aided tools, such as Excel and MatLab are introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours of design studio per week
REQUISITE: ENGN-1310
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1220L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1210 with a grade of at least 60%.
3 hours credit
ENGN-1230 Engineering Mechanics I: Statics
This course focuses on the equilibrium conditions for the state of rest of particles and rigid bodies subject to forces and moments. Topics to be discussed include vector operations, equilibrium conditions, free-body diagrams, moments and couples, distributed loadings, support reactions, truss analysis, centroids, moments of inertia, products of inertia, shear and bending moment diagrams, and friction. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
REQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program, Math-1910
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1230L
3 hours credit
ENGN-1250 Materials Science
(formerly 2250) This course focuses on the fundamental principles of chemistry as they relate to the properties and behaviour of materials in application to engineering systems. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order is emphasized. The characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids, i.e. that of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites are introduced. Knowledge of materials phenomena, including chemical equilibrium and kinetics, diffusion, electrochemistry, and phase transformations will be gained through experiential labs and lecture. Examples from industrial practice and emerging technologies will be used to illustrate the materials science concepts in this course. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
REQUISITE: Math-1920
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1250 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Chem-1110
3 hours credit
ENGN-1310 Computer Programming with Engineering Applications
This introductory course in computer programming is specifically designed for engineering students with no previous programming experience. The learning objectives are twofold: 1) to gain the ability to write scripts and solve basic engineering problems using the Matlab numerical computing environment, 2) to introduce embedded systems and the fundamentals of interfacing and real-time programming using the Arduino open-source platform. Topics include problem solving, algorithm design, modular programming, data types and number systems, operators, functions, decision statements, loops, and arrays. The latter part of the course deals with the fundamentals of interfacing peripheral devices including sensors and actuators to design small embedded systems. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Restriction: Acceptance into the Engineering Program
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1310 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-1340 Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics
(formerly 2340) This course is a study of mechanics concerned with the state of motion of rigid bodies that are subject to the action of forces. The course considers the kinematics and kinetics of motion applied particles and rigid bodies particularly as it relates to engineering applications and design. Topics include rectilinear and curvilinear motions, normal and tangential coordinates, dependent motion, Newton's Laws of Motion, energy and momentum methods. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
REQUISITE: Math-1920
COREQUISITE: Engineering 1340 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1230
3 hours credit
ENGN-1410 Sustainability in Engineering Design
This course introduces the principles of sustainability in engineering design as they relate to the interactions among humans, living systems, the natural environment and the engineered world. Physical, chemical, biological, ecological, social, economic and life-cycle concepts, and their relevance to sustainable engineering design, are emphasized. 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-1410L;
3 hours credit

2000 Level

ENGN-2120 Geology for Engineers
This course provides a basic overview of key geological processes and principles with emphasis on practical aspects of geology as they apply to engineering and related disciplines. Topics include rock types, rock formation, plate tectonics, glaciation, erosion, earth materials, geological mapping, stratigraphy and structural geology. An appreciation for ore forming processes, mineral resources, geothermal energy, environmental geology, and groundwater resources is also development. Laboratory activities focus on basic mineral and rock identification, and interpretation of topographic and geological maps. Three lecture hours per week
3 hours credit
ENGN-2130 Statistics for Engineering Applications
This course provides an introduction to statistics through its application to engineering in the areas of reliability and experimentation. Basic statistical concepts, such as probability, descriptive measures, population distributions, and hypothesis testing will be taught in the context of engineering reliability and experimentation scenarios. Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts of reliability, such as failure and repairability rates, and analysis techniques such as reliability block diagrams and fault tree analysis. Student will also learn the basics of experimental design, including one-factor-at-a-time and factorial testing, and get hands on experience with the design, execution, analysis and interpretation of experimental results. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2130L
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2210 Engineering Projects I
Combined with Engineering 2220, this course provides a complete community/industry design project experience. Emphasis is placed on strong technical design knowledge and team dynamics to facilitate learning and critical thinking. Students are encouraged to develop and apply CAD, economics, sustainability, social justice, and ethics concepts in their own community/industry design projects. Students are required to research and analyze the client's situation (internal/external) and develop detailed analytical proposals and conceptual design options. Innovative project management tools and communication skills (team/client) are also introduced to achieve project deliverables in an effective manner. Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week.
REQUISITE: ENGN-2310 ENGN-2610 ENGN-2810
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2210L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1220 with a grade of at least 60%. , English 1010 or UPEI 1010
3 hours credit
ENGN-2220 Engineering Projects II
Building on the work in Engineering 2210, students will complete detailed designs of their concepts, in-depth engineering analyses and develop a physical model or demonstration to support the recommended design solution. Working closely with community/industry partners and faculty, students learn how to manage a complex client oriented project, supported by accurate numerical analysis and professional documentation. Emphasis is placed on hands-on activities in a team-oriented environment to achieve an optimal working prototype, keeping in view the concepts of practicality, adoptability, economics and sustainability. Three hours of lecture and three hours of design studio per week
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2210 with a grade of at least 60%
3 hours credit
ENGN-2240 Introduction to Structural Engineering
This course is an introduction to the field of structural analysis as an applied discipline. Building on deflection and truss analysis from previous mechanics courses, students are exposed to concepts of influence, flexibility, stiffness, impact and other analytical techniques and dynamic loading in rigid structures. The National Building Code and material resistance is also introduced. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2240 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
3 hours credit
ENGN-2310 Strength of Materials
This course is an introduction to the study of stress, strain and deformation of a solid body subjected to static forces. Topics include elastic and plastic stress, strain, Mohr's circle, torsion, behaviour of beams and columns. Computer applications and hands-on laboratory experiments are used. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2310 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1230 and Math 1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2350 Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines
This course introduces fundamental concepts in the analysis of linkages and other aspects of complex machinery. Using graphical and analytical methods and relying on static and dynamic principles previously learned, students are exposed to a variety of cams, gears and trains in an applied context. Simple gyroscopic effects are also introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2350 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2340 and Math 1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2360 Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing
This course advances the fundamental knowledge of materials science to focus on materials processing and industrial manufacturing techniques for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Knowledge of heat treatment and various metallurgical processes, as well as cold-working, subtractive and additive manufacturing, corrosion and fatigue, will be linked to an evaluation of materials properties, materials performance and mechanical behavior, and microstructure. Students will apply the materials life cycle and use various tools to assess quality and integrity to predefined specifications and tolerances. The materials phenomena and manufacturing techniques discussed in lecture will be demonstrated through experiential labs. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2360 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
3 hours credit
ENGN-2430 Engineering Economics
This course provides students with the fundamentals of engineering economics and finance financial aspects in the context of professional engineering practice. Topics include the time value of money, project screening, cost estimation, and discounting analysis techniques. Economic analysis of depreciation, maintenance, replacement and upgrading and the impact of taxes, inflation and time on infrastructure development. Relevant software and projects are used. Three hours lecture and three-hour tutorial per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2430 Tutorial Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-2520 Fundamentals of Process Engineering
The main objective of this course is to develop the student's ability to perform mass and energy balances on reactive and non-reactive processes. Introductory topics include systems of units and a study of process variables such as temperature, pressure, and flowrate. Also covered are fundamental properties of multiphase systems: phase equilibrium, vapour pressure, phase rule, Raoult's and Henry's Laws, and colligative properties. Emphasis is placed on developing problem-solving skills. Three lecture hours and two tutorial hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2520 Tutorial Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610
3 hours credit
ENGN-2610 Thermo Fluids I: Thermodynamics
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of thermodynamics (first and second laws) and the application of these principles to engineering problems. Topics included are: the nature and forms of energy; basic concepts of systems, properties, states and processes; energy transfer as work and heat; energy and The First Law of Thermodynamics; entropy and The Second Law of Thermodynamics; and heat engine cycles. The analysis of various systems for power generation or refrigeration is also included. Three hours lecture and three lab hours per week
REQUISITE: Chem-1110
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2610 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2620 Thermo Fluids II: Fluid Mechanics
This course is an introduction to the field of fluid mechanics. Topics covered include properties of fluids, forces on submerged surfaces, stability of floating objects, ideal fluid flow, and momentum and energy methods. Concepts of similitude are introduced and fundamental scaling parameters in real fluids. Turbulence is introduced; pipe flow problems and lift/drag problems are solved. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2620 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610 and Math 2910
3 hours credit
ENGN-2810 Electric Circuits
This course is a study of topics such as: voltage, current, resistance, power, Ohm's laws, Kirchoff 's laws, sources, voltage and current division, nodal and mesh analysis, linearity and superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, capacitance and inductance, RL and RC circuits. Concepts of electric charge, force and field are also introduced. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2810L
PREREQUISITE: Math-1920
3 hours credit
ENGN-2820 Electric Circuits II
This course is a continuation of Engineering 2810, expanding upon concepts introduced in the first course. This will include two port networks, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, Bode and Polar plots, and Filters. Three hours lecture and two hours tutorial per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 2820 Tutorial Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810
3 hours credit
ENGN-2830 Digital Logic Design
This course is a study of topics such as: digital and binary systems, Boolean algebra, combinational logic, sequential logic, minimization, registers and counters, clocks and synchronization, state machines, and programmable logic devices. Ladder logic and programmable logic controllers are also introduced. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-2830L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1310 ENGN-2810
3 hours credit

3000 Level

ENGN-3220 Engineering Measurements
This course covers the basic types of measurement of many fundamental physical phenomena, including time, distance, displacements, speed, rates, force, flow, temperature, pressure, stress and strain, and frequency. An introduction to digital and analog electronics is a component of the course, but the focus is on understanding ways to sense physical parameters. This course has a significant field component. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3220 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810 and Math 3010
3 hours credit
ENGN-3270 Machines and Automatic Control
This course introduces students to the complexity of automating machines. Building on previous machine design and electric circuit's courses, students will investigate and experiment with all aspects of electrical systems, mechanical systems and automatic control. Topics covered include: history of machines, how machines work, concept of control, human interaction, instruments and measurements, control schematics, AC/DC machines and transformers, programmable technology, power electronics, electric motors, protection systems, and industrial safety. Labs involve reverse engineering exercises and industrial field trips are used to enhance understanding. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3270 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3220 and Engineering 2810
3 hours credit
ENGN-3340 Introduction to Mechatronics Engineering
This course covers fundamental skills associated with the development of computer-controlled intelligent systems and processes. Following a modern approach to mechanical engineering design, students will attempt synergistic integration of electronics, control systems, and mechanical components in a controlled laboratory environment. Students must demonstrate skills related to the selection, integration and/or calibration of sensors, actuators, signal conditioning, control algorithms, computer software, and hardware systems used to manage complexity, uncertainty, and communication in robotic systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3370 Mechatronic System Integration and Interface Design
This course focuses on the fundamentals of human and mechatronic system interaction and a systematic approach to its interface design. Signal generation, transmission, and interface design are the main topics of this course. Integration of the Mechatronics system focuses on the use of embedded electronics to control and monitor mechanical behavior in a mechatronic system. Following a user-centered design and observational philosophy, students will learn to evaluate the execution efficiency of typical voice, command and graphical(GUI)user interfaces to interact with the mechatronic system with the specific aim of monitoring and control. Topics include: transducers, motors and actuators I/O and signaling, signal transmission philosophy and design, conducting user studies, evaluation techniques, information structure, and programming for interactive systems. Labview and Simulink interface software development packages are used. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3370 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 or Engineering 3440, or Engineering 3540.
3 hours credit
ENGN-3380 Real-Time Embedded Systems
This course will provide students with an overview of how different hardware components are inter-connected and how embedded systems are programmed. Students will learn how to determine the functions of given function units, and construct small scale logic circuits based on their functional specifications. Students will also learn to explain the stages involved in decoding and executing instructions, to illustrate basic concepts of interfacing to external devices, and to compare different set architectures. Students will study how to do programming for real-time embedded systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3380L
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340, or Engineering 3440 or Engineering 3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3390 Mechatronics Computer-Aided Product Development, Modelling, and Simulation
This course reinforces students' skills in solid modelling and expands into computational simulation. Utilizing advanced CAD/CAM/CAE simulation software such as SolidWorks, CATIA, Altair Hyperworks, ANSYS Workbench, and Stratsys Insight 3D printing software, and in a controlled environment, students engage in developing skills required to work in today's industrial and integrated computer-aided product development. The course focuses on a hands-on approach to product innovation and the effective use of computational simulation technology. The course covers aspects of structural and mechanical CAE/FEA as well as thermal management CAE/CFD simulations when designing intelligent mechatronics products. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3390 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3340 or Engineering 3440 or Engineering 3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3430 Technology Management & Entrepreneurship
(formerly 4230) This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company. Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, business feasibility studies, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, marketing, operational and human resource management. The focus will be on students as engineers-entrepreneurs with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators. This course will use problem-based and experiential learning strategies to develop new ventures. Students who produce a well-developed business idea from this course may be considered for approval to use this as the basis for their final year engineering design project. (Cross-listed with Computer Science 3840 and SDE 8230) Three lecture hours per week.
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710 must be completed or taken concurrently.
3 hours credit
ENGN-3440 Introduction to Sustainable Energy Engineering
This introductory course considers current and promising future energy systems. Topics introduced include available resources, energy conversion technologies and end use applications and technologies. An emphasis is placed on meeting the needs of a future of global energy supply and its associated challenges. Students will develop a technical and analytical framework with which they can evaluate energy supply alternatives in the context of political, economic, environmentaland social goals. Life cycle analysis is also considered. Topics introduced in this course may be covered in greater depth in other sustainable energy focus-area electives. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3440 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3450 Wind and Water Power
This course explores the engineering of wind- and water-based renewable energy conversion technologies such as wind turbines, tidal turbines, wave energy converters, and hydroelectric dams. Students will develop an understanding of the current state of technology and gain an appreciation for related issues of resource assessment, stakeholder engagement, and environmental impact. The underlying fluid mechanics principles will be emphasized to appreciate device operating principles and performance drivers. The challenge of satisfying energy demand with intermittent supply will be reviewed to further contextualize the different resource potentials, and related fluid-based storage technologies will be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3450L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3460 Solar Energy and Electricity Storage
This course covers the fundamentals of solar power generation and associated energy storage systems. Course emphasis surrounds the electrical nature of solar photovoltaic energy generation associated energy/power conversion and storage systems. Students will develop a technical understanding of the underlying core technologies as well as how the technologies are productized. Topics covered may include: Solar photovoltaic (PV)generation, electric power converters for solar PV, battery storage technology, off-grid solar power conversion systems and small solar home systems. Lab projects may consist of studying various scales of PV power products and technologies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 3460L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3490 Chemical Energy Conversion
This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermochemical and thermomechanical,processes as seen in existing power and transportation systems, and ways these processes may be improved in the future. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, biofuels, hydrogen, and other chemical energy sources over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, combustion, thermal power cycles, fuel cells and catalysis. The course also deals with combustion emissions and environmental impacts,optimal source utilization and fuel-life cycle analysis. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3490 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3540 Introduction to Bioresources Engineering
Growing environmental problems created by unsustainable use of fossil resources is forcing us to move from a synthetic-based economy to a bio-based one. This introductory course will provide the fundamental skills in developing environmental technologies to enable students to pursue career opportunities in a range of industries. Looking into different resources available within the biosphere, students will learn to apply engineering knowledge for its sustainable use. Concepts of a bio-refinery will be introduced for developing fundamental understanding of integrated conversion processes (thermal, chemical and biological). Understanding the concepts of enzymatic and cellular kinetics, students will learn to design bioreactors. This course will also review the fundamental concepts of life-cycle analysis and explore the application of it to selected environmental projects. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
REQUISITE: Engineering 3710
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3540 Lab Section
3 hours credit
ENGN-3570 Engineering Applications of Biological Materials
This course will focus on the understanding of the basic molecular structures of biological materials, such as wood, bioplastics, biocomposites and biofuels, and their engineering applications. It will develop the fundamental understanding of relationships between composition, structure and properties of various materials of biological origin. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3570 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3580 Soil Mechanics
This course explores the fundamentals of soil mechanics and their applications in engineering practice. Students will develop an understanding about the physical properties of soils, and will examine the behavior of soil masses subjected to various forces. The list of topics to be covered in this course include: soil composition and texture, physical properties of soils, classification of soils, permeability and seepage, consolidation, settlement, shear strength, vertical stresses in soils, soil exploration, bearing capacity and slope stability of soils. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN-3580L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-3630 Thermo Fluids III: Heat Transfer and Thermodynamic Cycles
This course advances student knowledge across the related fields of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer with an emphasis on engineering applications. Heat transfer topics include: flows with friction and heat exchange, steady and unsteady heat conduction, convection and radiation phenomena; and heat exchanger analysis. Thermodynamic cycles topics include: internal combustion as it applies to power generation; air standard and vapour cycles; gas turbines; jet engine; and steam power plants. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3630 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-2620
3 hours credit
ENGN-3710 Project-Based Professional Practice I
Building on the work in previous design courses, this course is the first of a series of upper-year courses which simulates the practice of a professional engineer. Following a design-build-test approach, students work in a team-based environment to deliver design solutions to real-world industrial clients. Following best practices in project management and sustainability, students develop detailed project proposals, conceptual designs, and proofs of concepts within the ethical and safety considerations that are fundamental to the profession. Concepts are further developed into operational prototypes in Engineering 3720. Six lecture hours and six hours of design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3710 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 2360, Engineering 1340, Engineering 2620,and Engineering 2830
6 hours credit
ENGN-3720 Project-Based Professional Practice II
Continuing the work in Engineering 3710 and working closely with their external clients, students complete detailed designs of their concepts, build full-scale operational prototypes(where possible); carry out testing and validation of solutions in controlled laboratory and/or industrial environments(where possible), and present their final design solutions to their clients. Six lecture hours and six hours design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3720 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710 with a grade of at least 60%
6 hours credit
ENGN-3810 Systems Engineering
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of systems engineering and a systems approach to analyzing complex problems. Specific subjects covered include: logistics,reliability, safety, performance,and risk management. Open-ended problems are used and students are expected to classify, categorize, and illustrate physical and functional relationships using schematic diagramming techniques. Modeling of performance is introduced, but is covered in greater depth in the systems dynamics course to follow. Systems considered in the course include human, ecological, transportation, communication, mechanical, electrical, and mechatronic. This course utilizes a problem-based experiential teaching method with a significant field component. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3810 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220
3 hours credit
ENGN-3820 System Dynamics With Simulation
This course introduces the analysis and control of dynamic systems, with concepts and examples drawn from all disciplines. It includes development and analysis of differential equation models for mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid systems, including some sensors. Systems are primarily analyzed using Laplace transforms and computer simulation methods. Analysis concepts cover first, second, and higher order differential equations, transient characteristics, transfer functions, stability, dominance, and frequency response. Properties of systems include time constant, natural and damped frequency, and damping ratio. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 3820 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3810 and Engineering 3220
3 hours credit

4000 Level

ENGN-4210 Facilitated Study and Experimental Practice
This course provides an individual assessment of the students' engineering knowledge to date in the context of their assigned industry-sponsored project. Students in consultation with faculty will determine knowledge and skill requirements of their project and develop a study and experimentation plan to fill gaps in the students' knowledge and experience. The content of the course will be customized to each student and his or her individual needs.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 must be taken concurrently.
3 hours credit
ENGN-4310 Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
This course concentrates on manufacturing knowledge with a focus on advanced fabrication techniques (AFT) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). Students will expand their knowledge of traditional processes including CAD/CAM, forming, welding, milling, etc. leading into innovative advanced fabrication techniques in additive and precision manufacturing, next generation electronics, robotics and smart automation (CIM), and sustainable and green manufacturing modeling and simulation in the manufacturing process developed through lectures and labs. Integration of CIM into supply chain design and management is emphasized based on synergistic application of mechatronics approach and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4310 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-2360
3 hours credit
ENGN-4320 Control System Design
This course will provide students with an overview of system modelling and control methodologies of single/multiple input/output systems, e.g., energy transport control, reactor control, heat exchanger control, power production, and mechatronic systems. Students will learn classical control methods e.g., feedforward, feedbacks, cascade, decoupling to modern control methods, LQR, predictive control, optimal and robust control. Students will be equipped with knowledge and skills for analyzing stability, controllability and observability of state-space representation modelled systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4320L
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-3820
3 hours credit
ENGN-4330 Innovations in Biomedical Engineering
This course introduces the study of medicine by focusing on innovations in medical devices, and future trends in materials, especially the increasing use of bio-resources, informatics, and mechatronics engineering applications in orthopedic, rehabilitation, simulation and education technologies. In its broader context, this course focuses on four areas of biotechnology, biomechanics, biomaterials and biosignals. Through a hands-on approach, the course focuses on innovative product development related to bio-signal, instrumentation, sensing, and image processing. Students will also gain an appreciation for the collaborative, interdisciplinary nature of engineering in medicine and its potential impact on society. (Cross-listed with SDE-8330). Graduate project will be defined). Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4330 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710
3 hours credit
ENGN-4350 Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control
This course advances the fundamentals of robotics through exposure to in-depth knowledge and understanding of kinematics, dynamics, control and trajectory with applications to autonomous vehicles, automated manufacturing and processing and mobile robotics. Areas of interest include: position transformation and control, rigid body motion, kinematic control, compliance and force control. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4350 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4370 Fluid Power Control
This course covers the analysis and design of basic hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems. Topics include a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics including flow through valves, fittings, and pipe; classification of hydrostatic pumps and motors; control valves; hydraulic accumulators; sizing of practical hydraulic circuits; thermal and energy considerations; electrohydraulic control and modeling of hydraulic control systems. The latter part of the course focuses on pneumatic systems including pneumatic cylinders and motors, control valves, and compressor technology. The application of Programmable Logic Controls (PLCs) to industrial automation and the sequential control of pneumatic actuators is also addressed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4370L
PREREQUISITE: Engn-3340 Or Engn-3440 Or Engn-3540 and Engn-3820
3 hours credit
ENGN-4410 Macro Energy Systems
This course covers methods for analyzing energy supply, conversion processes, and end-use at the system level. Aspects considered include the dynamics of energy supply and demand, efficiencies of energy conversion, characteristics of energy currencies, and energy needs across different sectors. Students will characterize methods of delivering energy services such as heat, light, industrial power and transportation. Energy analysis will be introduced and used to build a quantitative framework for integrating techno-economic analysis of energy system components, with emphasis on elements such as fossil fuels and nuclear power. Students will gain an enhanced, quantitative appreciation for the sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity aspects of energy services delivery. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4410L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4440 Advanced Energy Storage
This course considers advanced technical analysis of energy storage systems. A comprehensive overview of all industrially relevant energy storage systems is reviewed and emphasis is placed on promising energy storage technologies of the future. Chemical, thermal and kinetic storage technologies will be discussed in detail. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4440L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4450 Fluid Loads on Energy Structures
This course is an introduction to the loads applied on structures from wind, waves, and currents, and their heightened relevance to structures designed for energy conversion. Phenomena to be discussed include lift and drag, boundary layers, vortex-induced vibrations, wakes, hydrostatic loading, and water waves. A selection of engineering methods will be introduced and brought to bear on these topics, such as potential flow theory, blade-element theory, Airy wave theory and Morison's equation. Dimensional analysis will be introduced to characterize flow problems. Design implications will be discussed for a selection of relevant energy conversion structures such as aircraft wings, wind turbines, breakwaters, marine vessels, and offshore energy platforms. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4450L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4470 Micro Grids
This course focuses on the concept, operation and optimization of renewable-energy-based micro-grids. Concepts introduced and considered include renewable energy resources, integration technologies, grid-connected operation, islanded grid operation, energy storage integration and the optimal dimensioning and mixing of multiple energy sources where some are stochastic in nature and some are dispatchable. Existing and future energy storage technologies will be also be discussed. This course is based on energy flow analysis and makes extensive use of software simulation tools. Students will develop a framework for performing techno-economic assessments of micro-grid architectures and designs. A strong background in electrical power systems is not necessarily required. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4470L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4510 Geoinformatics in Bioresources
This course covers the theory and practice of geoinformatics and their applications to problems in bioresources using digital mapping and spatial analysis. Hands on laboratories will provide students with an experience to collect georeferenced data using differential global positioning system, followed by mapping and analysis in geographical information system. Topics include datums, map projections and transformations, vector and raster data, geo-spatial analysis, geo-statistics and interpolation techniques. This course will also cover the fundamentals of remote sensing, data collection with sensors, and spatial and temporal aspects of the bio-resources attributes. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4510L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4530 Fundamentals of Agriculture Machinery
This course highlights the fundamentals of mechanized agriculture machinery from soil preparation, planting, and crop management to mechanical harvesting. The machines and their unit operation are analyzed with respect functions, work rates, material flow and power usage. The machine performance relating to work quality and environmental effects will also be evaluated. The labs will emphasize on safety, basic maintenance, adjustment, calibrations of equipment and performance testing. This course also covers the variable rate applicators for site-specific application of inputs, auto guidance system, data acquisition and management for intelligent decision making for machines, and precision agriculture technologies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4530L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4550 Biotechnological Processes
The basic topics covered in this course may include fermentation, engineering of reactor, natural products purification and their applications in biotechnology sector. The students will learn basic concepts of chemical and biochemical techniques required for the development and purification of materials in biotechnological, biochemical and pharmaceutical industries. The design of fermenters and biological reactors and their modification to improve the industrial applications will be discussed. The design of reactors in context of mass and energy balances will be evaluated and downstream unit processes involved in product recovery will be presented. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week
COREQUISITE: ENGN 4550L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3340 or ENGN-3440 or ENGN-3540
3 hours credit
ENGN-4710 Project-Based Professional Practice III
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of analysis, simulation and modeling in engineering design. Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design. Six lecture hours and six design studio hours per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 Lab Section , Engineering 3720 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 3270, Engineering 3630, Engineering 3820, Engineering 3230. Engineering 4210 must be taken concurrently.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3720 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 3270, Engineering 3630, Engineering 3430 and Engineering 3820. Engineering 4210 must be taken concurrently.
6 hours credit
ENGN-4720 Project-Based Professional Practice IV
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of prototyping and manufacturing, testing and verification, design of experiments, optimization and feasibility. Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design. Six hours of lecture and six hours of design studio per week.
COREQUISITE: Engineering 4720 Lab Section
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 with a grade of at least 60%
6 hours credit
ENGN-4810 Directed Studies in Engineering
Available to advanced engineering students at the discretion of the department. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Engineering
3 hours credit
ENGN-4820 Directed Studies in Engineering
Available to advanced engineering students at the discretion of the department. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Engineering
3 hours credit
ENGN-4830 Biomedical Signal Processing
This course is an introduction to the basics of viewing, processing, and analyzing of biosignals, or signals originating from living beings. Biosignals may be characterized as bioelectrical signals which can be composed of both electrical and non-electrical parts. Topics include both linear and nonlinear systems, signal conditioning or filtering, improving signal quality (signal-to-noise ratio) through averaging techniques, and signal representations in both the time and frequency domains. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-4830L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-3220
3 hours credit
ENGN-4850 Computational Methods for Engineering Design
This course covers the numerical methods that form the basis of many engineering techniques and applies these methods to quantitative engineering design. The fundamentals of numerical approaches are reviewed, including iteration, approximation, and numerical errors. Methods are presented for numerical integration, differentiation, and nonlinear equation solving. Numerical approaches to solving differential equations are examined and their applications to numerical modelling, including finite-element analysis and computation fluid dynamics, are explored. Computational approaches to frequency-domain analysis using discrete Fourier transforms are introduced, along with related topics such as digital filtering and numerical convolution. Algorithms are presented for array and matrix computation, solving systems of equations, regression, curve fitting, and numerical optimization. Finally, these computational techniques are brought to bear on the topic of design optimization, emphasizing the transformation of real-world engineering design problems into quantitative formulations to which computational design optimization techniques can be applied. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.
COREQUISITE: ENGN-4850L
PREREQUISITE: ENGN-1310 Math-3010
3 hours credit
ENGN-4910 Special Topics in Engineering
This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in engineering. The course content and its offering in any one semester will be at the discretion of the Department. Interested students should contact the Department to confirm the details of the course and its offering.
3 hours credit
ENGN-4920 Special Topics in Engineering
This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in engineering. The course content and its offering in any one semester will be at the discretion of the Department. Interested students should contact the Department to confirm the details of the course and its offering.
3 hours credit
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