High quality, integrated business education.

Bachelor of Business Administration

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First Name:
Last Name:
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Careers:
  • A business degree can lead to a career in almost any industry with a wide range of job opportunities and career paths open to graduates.
The Bachelor of Business Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353

The School of Business Administration is committed to providing students with a high quality, integrated business education in a personalized learning environment. It is structured to provide the broad-based, cross-functional business education required for leaders of business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. The School’s personalized learning environment provides opportunities for extensive interaction between students, faculty and practitioners.

The School of Business Administration holds a unique position within the province’s education system. As the only university school of business, it is committed to intellectual leadership, and to excellence in developing new knowledge and conveying that knowledge to its students and to the public. In order to attract, develop and retain students, faculty and staff, the School recognizes that it must sustain an intellectually stimulating environment.

The School views its students not as customers, but rather as partners in the development of a high quality business education. Graduates are expected to have developed competency in integrating the core functional business disciplines; ethical, social, historical and global awareness; critical thinking and problem solving; quantitative analysis; communication skills and leadership; team work as well as personal initiative; technological application in business; and using business research to support evidence-informed practice.

The degree program in the School of Business Administration is designed to fulfill this mission and to provide the educational breadth and depth needed by business leaders.

ACCOUNTING AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The School of Business maintains a close liaison with the Chartered Professional Accountants of Prince Edward Island, and students who satisfactorily complete designated university courses are given broad exemptions by this professional organization. Students interested in pursuing a professional accounting designation should contact the Dean’s office prior to enrolling in their third year. These students should not enrol in Business electives other than those that are designated as accounting exemptions. Students not pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree may register for the Certificate in Accounting.

 

Want more information about Bachelor of Business Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • A business degree can lead to a career in almost any industry with a wide range of job opportunities and career paths open to graduates.
The Bachelor of Business Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353

The School of Business introduced changes to the BBA degree requirements effective September 2014. The most important changes were the following:

  • The new curriculum added four new specializations - namely finance, marketing, organizational management, and tourism & hospitality.  These new specializations are in addition to the three specializations that had previously existed:  accounting, entrepreneurship and international.
  • The required courses for the BBA were modified, and several course numbers were changed to reflect the schedule of the new curriculum.

The new curriculum applies to all students who began the program in September 2014 and to all students who begin the program after that date. However, students who began their BBA degree before September 2014 may be able to benefit from these changes too. 

Read more about the transition

Want more information about Bachelor of Business Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • A business degree can lead to a career in almost any industry with a wide range of job opportunities and career paths open to graduates.
The Bachelor of Business Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353

The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree is a four-year degree consisting of 120 semester hours.

REQUIRED COURSES

100-Level Courses:

  • Accounting 101 (Introduction to Financial Accounting) (formerly 201)
  • Business 141 (Marketing) 
  • Business 171 (Organizational Behaviour)
  • Economics 101 (Introductory Microeconomics)
  • Economics 102 (Introductory Macroeconomics)
  • Math 111 (Finite Mathematics)
  • UPEI 101 (Writing Studies) (see note 3)

200-Level Courses:

  • Accounting 221 (Managerial Accounting) 
  • Business 212 (Business Presentations and Communications)
  • Business 231 (Corporate Finance) 
  • Business 241 (Management Information Systems)
  • Business 251 (Introduction to Management Science)
  • Business 272 (Human Resource Management) 
  • Business 288 (Research and Evidence-Based Management)
  • [Though English 381 is a 300-level course, it is recommended that students take this course in their second year.]

300-Level Courses:

  • Business 301 (Business Law – Part I)
  • Business 333 (Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance) OR Business 334 (formerly 421) (Personal Finance)
  • Business 343 (Integrated Cases in Marketing) 
  • Business 351 (Operations Management)
  • Business 371 (Entrepreneurship and New Ventures)
  • Business 391 (Strategic Management)
  • English 381 (Professional Writing) [recommended to be taken in Year 2]

400-Level Courses:

  • Business 485 (Developing Management Skills)
  • Business 495 (Business Research I)

ELECTIVE COURSES

In addition to the 23 required courses, students must take 17 elective courses. At least three electives must be business courses and at least eight electives must be non-business courses. The other six electives (“free electives”) may be either business or non-business courses.

For students pursuing one of the seven specializations, the courses prescribed for the particular specialization will fulfill electives on the degree.

Students must obtain at least 60% in at least 14 of the 18 required business courses in order to qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration.

NOTES:

  1. Accounting courses are considered to be business courses.
  2. All courses will not necessarily be offered each year.  Students should consult the current timetable before registration.
  3. The completion of UPEI 101 is a required course for the BBA, but the course also meets the general UPEI requirement of taking UPEI 101, 102 or 103.

Required courses in Accounting are listed on the Accounting specialization page.

 

Want more information about Bachelor of Business Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • A business degree can lead to a career in almost any industry with a wide range of job opportunities and career paths open to graduates.
The Bachelor of Business Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353

An Honours concentration in Business Administration provides an opportunity for BBA students to pursue advanced studies in Business. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies in Business at the postgraduate level, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be of value.

ADMISSION

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all previous courses. Permission of the School is required and is contingent on the student finding a faculty supervisor. Students interested in pursuing the Honours program should seek admission as early as possible, not later than the end of the third year.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

A total of 126 semester hours of credit is required for the BBA Honours.  In addition to the requirements of the regular BBA, Honours students must complete Honours Thesis 510 (six semester hours). This thesis would normally be completed in the semester following Business Research 495. A committee of three faculty members, including the supervisor, will review the Honours thesis. An oral examination conducted by the committee will also be included in the evaluation process. A minimum average of 75% must be maintained to remain in the Honours program.

Want more information about Bachelor of Business Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • A business degree can lead to a career in almost any industry with a wide range of job opportunities and career paths open to graduates.
The Bachelor of Business Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353
  • Juergen Krause, Dean, Professor
  • Tim Carroll, Associate Professor
  • Reuben Domike, Associate Professor
  • Gary Evans, Associate Professor
  • Adam Fenech, Associate Professor
  • Blake Jelley, Associate Professor
  • Tarek Mady, Associate Professor
  • Don Wagner, Associate Professor
  • Andrew Carrothers, Assistant Professor
  • Mike Cassidy, Assistant Professor
  • Debbie Good, Assistant Professor
  • Susan Graham, Assistant Professor
  • Melissa MacEachern, Assistant Professor
  • Amy MacFarlane, Assistant Professor
  • Tina Saksida, Assistant Professor
  • Karen Wight, Assistant Professor
Overview

The School of Business Administration is committed to providing students with a high quality, integrated business education in a personalized learning environment. It is structured to provide the broad-based, cross-functional business education required for leaders of business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. The School’s personalized learning environment provides opportunities for extensive interaction between students, faculty and practitioners.

The School of Business Administration holds a unique position within the province’s education system. As the only university school of business, it is committed to intellectual leadership, and to excellence in developing new knowledge and conveying that knowledge to its students and to the public. In order to attract, develop and retain students, faculty and staff, the School recognizes that it must sustain an intellectually stimulating environment.

The School views its students not as customers, but rather as partners in the development of a high quality business education. Graduates are expected to have developed competency in integrating the core functional business disciplines; ethical, social, historical and global awareness; critical thinking and problem solving; quantitative analysis; communication skills and leadership; team work as well as personal initiative; technological application in business; and using business research to support evidence-informed practice.

The degree program in the School of Business Administration is designed to fulfill this mission and to provide the educational breadth and depth needed by business leaders.

ACCOUNTING AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The School of Business maintains a close liaison with the Chartered Professional Accountants of Prince Edward Island, and students who satisfactorily complete designated university courses are given broad exemptions by this professional organization. Students interested in pursuing a professional accounting designation should contact the Dean’s office prior to enrolling in their third year. These students should not enrol in Business electives other than those that are designated as accounting exemptions. Students not pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree may register for the Certificate in Accounting.

 

Curriculum Transition

The School of Business introduced changes to the BBA degree requirements effective September 2014. The most important changes were the following:

  • The new curriculum added four new specializations - namely finance, marketing, organizational management, and tourism & hospitality.  These new specializations are in addition to the three specializations that had previously existed:  accounting, entrepreneurship and international.
  • The required courses for the BBA were modified, and several course numbers were changed to reflect the schedule of the new curriculum.

The new curriculum applies to all students who began the program in September 2014 and to all students who begin the program after that date. However, students who began their BBA degree before September 2014 may be able to benefit from these changes too. 

Read more about the transition

Course Structure

The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree is a four-year degree consisting of 120 semester hours.

REQUIRED COURSES

100-Level Courses:

  • Accounting 101 (Introduction to Financial Accounting) (formerly 201)
  • Business 141 (Marketing) 
  • Business 171 (Organizational Behaviour)
  • Economics 101 (Introductory Microeconomics)
  • Economics 102 (Introductory Macroeconomics)
  • Math 111 (Finite Mathematics)
  • UPEI 101 (Writing Studies) (see note 3)

200-Level Courses:

  • Accounting 221 (Managerial Accounting) 
  • Business 212 (Business Presentations and Communications)
  • Business 231 (Corporate Finance) 
  • Business 241 (Management Information Systems)
  • Business 251 (Introduction to Management Science)
  • Business 272 (Human Resource Management) 
  • Business 288 (Research and Evidence-Based Management)
  • [Though English 381 is a 300-level course, it is recommended that students take this course in their second year.]

300-Level Courses:

  • Business 301 (Business Law – Part I)
  • Business 333 (Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance) OR Business 334 (formerly 421) (Personal Finance)
  • Business 343 (Integrated Cases in Marketing) 
  • Business 351 (Operations Management)
  • Business 371 (Entrepreneurship and New Ventures)
  • Business 391 (Strategic Management)
  • English 381 (Professional Writing) [recommended to be taken in Year 2]

400-Level Courses:

  • Business 485 (Developing Management Skills)
  • Business 495 (Business Research I)

ELECTIVE COURSES

In addition to the 23 required courses, students must take 17 elective courses. At least three electives must be business courses and at least eight electives must be non-business courses. The other six electives (“free electives”) may be either business or non-business courses.

For students pursuing one of the seven specializations, the courses prescribed for the particular specialization will fulfill electives on the degree.

Students must obtain at least 60% in at least 14 of the 18 required business courses in order to qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration.

NOTES:

  1. Accounting courses are considered to be business courses.
  2. All courses will not necessarily be offered each year.  Students should consult the current timetable before registration.
  3. The completion of UPEI 101 is a required course for the BBA, but the course also meets the general UPEI requirement of taking UPEI 101, 102 or 103.

Required courses in Accounting are listed on the Accounting specialization page.

 

Honours

An Honours concentration in Business Administration provides an opportunity for BBA students to pursue advanced studies in Business. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies in Business at the postgraduate level, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be of value.

ADMISSION

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all previous courses. Permission of the School is required and is contingent on the student finding a faculty supervisor. Students interested in pursuing the Honours program should seek admission as early as possible, not later than the end of the third year.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

A total of 126 semester hours of credit is required for the BBA Honours.  In addition to the requirements of the regular BBA, Honours students must complete Honours Thesis 510 (six semester hours). This thesis would normally be completed in the semester following Business Research 495. A committee of three faculty members, including the supervisor, will review the Honours thesis. An oral examination conducted by the committee will also be included in the evaluation process. A minimum average of 75% must be maintained to remain in the Honours program.

Faculty
  • Juergen Krause, Dean, Professor
  • Tim Carroll, Associate Professor
  • Reuben Domike, Associate Professor
  • Gary Evans, Associate Professor
  • Adam Fenech, Associate Professor
  • Blake Jelley, Associate Professor
  • Tarek Mady, Associate Professor
  • Don Wagner, Associate Professor
  • Andrew Carrothers, Assistant Professor
  • Mike Cassidy, Assistant Professor
  • Debbie Good, Assistant Professor
  • Susan Graham, Assistant Professor
  • Melissa MacEachern, Assistant Professor
  • Amy MacFarlane, Assistant Professor
  • Tina Saksida, Assistant Professor
  • Karen Wight, Assistant Professor

Overview

The School of Business Administration is committed to providing students with a high quality, integrated business education in a personalized learning environment. It is structured to provide the broad-based, cross-functional business education required for leaders of business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. The School’s personalized learning environment provides opportunities for extensive interaction between students, faculty and practitioners.

The School of Business Administration holds a unique position within the province’s education system. As the only university school of business, it is committed to intellectual leadership, and to excellence in developing new knowledge and conveying that knowledge to its students and to the public. In order to attract, develop and retain students, faculty and staff, the School recognizes that it must sustain an intellectually stimulating environment.

The School views its students not as customers, but rather as partners in the development of a high quality business education. Graduates are expected to have developed competency in integrating the core functional business disciplines; ethical, social, historical and global awareness; critical thinking and problem solving; quantitative analysis; communication skills and leadership; team work as well as personal initiative; technological application in business; and using business research to support evidence-informed practice.

The degree program in the School of Business Administration is designed to fulfill this mission and to provide the educational breadth and depth needed by business leaders.

ACCOUNTING AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The School of Business maintains a close liaison with the Chartered Professional Accountants of Prince Edward Island, and students who satisfactorily complete designated university courses are given broad exemptions by this professional organization. Students interested in pursuing a professional accounting designation should contact the Dean’s office prior to enrolling in their third year. These students should not enrol in Business electives other than those that are designated as accounting exemptions. Students not pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree may register for the Certificate in Accounting.

 

Curriculum Transition

The School of Business introduced changes to the BBA degree requirements effective September 2014. The most important changes were the following:

  • The new curriculum added four new specializations - namely finance, marketing, organizational management, and tourism & hospitality.  These new specializations are in addition to the three specializations that had previously existed:  accounting, entrepreneurship and international.
  • The required courses for the BBA were modified, and several course numbers were changed to reflect the schedule of the new curriculum.

The new curriculum applies to all students who began the program in September 2014 and to all students who begin the program after that date. However, students who began their BBA degree before September 2014 may be able to benefit from these changes too. 

Read more about the transition

Course Structure

The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree is a four-year degree consisting of 120 semester hours.

REQUIRED COURSES

100-Level Courses:

  • Accounting 101 (Introduction to Financial Accounting) (formerly 201)
  • Business 141 (Marketing) 
  • Business 171 (Organizational Behaviour)
  • Economics 101 (Introductory Microeconomics)
  • Economics 102 (Introductory Macroeconomics)
  • Math 111 (Finite Mathematics)
  • UPEI 101 (Writing Studies) (see note 3)

200-Level Courses:

  • Accounting 221 (Managerial Accounting) 
  • Business 212 (Business Presentations and Communications)
  • Business 231 (Corporate Finance) 
  • Business 241 (Management Information Systems)
  • Business 251 (Introduction to Management Science)
  • Business 272 (Human Resource Management) 
  • Business 288 (Research and Evidence-Based Management)
  • [Though English 381 is a 300-level course, it is recommended that students take this course in their second year.]

300-Level Courses:

  • Business 301 (Business Law – Part I)
  • Business 333 (Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance) OR Business 334 (formerly 421) (Personal Finance)
  • Business 343 (Integrated Cases in Marketing) 
  • Business 351 (Operations Management)
  • Business 371 (Entrepreneurship and New Ventures)
  • Business 391 (Strategic Management)
  • English 381 (Professional Writing) [recommended to be taken in Year 2]

400-Level Courses:

  • Business 485 (Developing Management Skills)
  • Business 495 (Business Research I)

ELECTIVE COURSES

In addition to the 23 required courses, students must take 17 elective courses. At least three electives must be business courses and at least eight electives must be non-business courses. The other six electives (“free electives”) may be either business or non-business courses.

For students pursuing one of the seven specializations, the courses prescribed for the particular specialization will fulfill electives on the degree.

Students must obtain at least 60% in at least 14 of the 18 required business courses in order to qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration.

NOTES:

  1. Accounting courses are considered to be business courses.
  2. All courses will not necessarily be offered each year.  Students should consult the current timetable before registration.
  3. The completion of UPEI 101 is a required course for the BBA, but the course also meets the general UPEI requirement of taking UPEI 101, 102 or 103.

Required courses in Accounting are listed on the Accounting specialization page.

 

Honours

An Honours concentration in Business Administration provides an opportunity for BBA students to pursue advanced studies in Business. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies in Business at the postgraduate level, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be of value.

ADMISSION

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all previous courses. Permission of the School is required and is contingent on the student finding a faculty supervisor. Students interested in pursuing the Honours program should seek admission as early as possible, not later than the end of the third year.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

A total of 126 semester hours of credit is required for the BBA Honours.  In addition to the requirements of the regular BBA, Honours students must complete Honours Thesis 510 (six semester hours). This thesis would normally be completed in the semester following Business Research 495. A committee of three faculty members, including the supervisor, will review the Honours thesis. An oral examination conducted by the committee will also be included in the evaluation process. A minimum average of 75% must be maintained to remain in the Honours program.

Faculty

  • Juergen Krause, Dean, Professor
  • Tim Carroll, Associate Professor
  • Reuben Domike, Associate Professor
  • Gary Evans, Associate Professor
  • Adam Fenech, Associate Professor
  • Blake Jelley, Associate Professor
  • Tarek Mady, Associate Professor
  • Don Wagner, Associate Professor
  • Andrew Carrothers, Assistant Professor
  • Mike Cassidy, Assistant Professor
  • Debbie Good, Assistant Professor
  • Susan Graham, Assistant Professor
  • Melissa MacEachern, Assistant Professor
  • Amy MacFarlane, Assistant Professor
  • Tina Saksida, Assistant Professor
  • Karen Wight, Assistant Professor
Want more information about Bachelor of Business Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
A business degree can lead to a career in almost any industry with a wide range of job opportunities and career paths open to graduates.
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

101 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course introduces the accounting model and basic accounting concepts and principles needed to read, analyze and interpret financial statements.  An understanding of the role of accounting in society will be explored.  Sound ethical judgment for financial decision-making will be stressed.  Emphasis is on accounting from a “user’s” perspective.
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
An introduction to the functional areas of business. Topics to be covered include business organizations, marketing, finance, accounting, production, and personnel. Much emphasis will be placed on the development of both written and oral communication skills in a business context. Case studies will be used to reinforce theoretical concepts discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP program
Three hours a week

141 MARKETING
This course presents the basic concepts of marketing. It introduces the marketing function, marketing systems and the marketing concept and then focuses on the development of marketing strategies, target markets, and the marketing mix in a decision‐making context.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program. 
Three hours a week

171 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizational characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

202 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course focuses on understanding and applying the accounting equation, recording transactions and preparing financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  Differences between International Financial Reporting Standards and Accounting Standards for Private Enterprises will be highlighted.  Sound ethical judgment for financial statement preparation will be stressed.  Emphasis is on accounting from a “preparer’s” perspective.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101 and a minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program in the School of Business or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

221 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
The emphasis throughout this course is on the uses of accounting and other financial tools in the management of a business. Topics include inventory costing methods, cost allocation, cost behaviour, the contribution approach, pricing, and budgeting.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

211 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
This course focuses on developing students’ writing and presentation skills in a business environment. Students will learn techniques to help them communicate with professionalism, clarity and persuasiveness in a variety of business contexts.
PREREQUISITES: English 101 or UPEI 102, or UPEI 103, and must be registered in Business with a 2nd year standing
Three hours a week

212 BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS
This course develops students’ presentation skills in a business context.  The course emphasizes professionalism and the use of evidence and analysis to support recommendations in order to make a compelling case.
PREREQUISITES:  English 101 or UPEI 101. Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

213 BUSINESS ETHICS
(See Philosophy 205)

231 CORPORATE FINANCE
Finance is concerned with the planning for, acquisition, and utilization of funds. The major topics discussed in this course include the time value of money, analysis of financial projections, of financial markets, sources of corporate financing, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and working capital management. 
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101
Three hours a week

241 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction and understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation and management decision-making. It concentrates on providing an understanding of the tools and basic terminology needed to understand information systems and their role in the business environment. Topics include information systems concepts, a review of information technology concepts, the fundamentals of e-business, planning and development of information systems, and the management of these systems.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week.

251 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
This course is designed to provide business students with an introductory survey of the many business applications of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of location and dispersion, basic probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling methods and sampling distributions, sample size, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and forecasting. 
PREREQUISITE:  Math 111or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week
NOTE: This is a required course for Business students and credit for Statistics 221, Education 481, Psychology 271, 278 or 279, Sociology 331, and Sociology 332 will not be allowed.

265 INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
This course provides an overview of setting up and managing a small business.  Topics include an overview of entrepreneurship, starting a new firm, uncovering business opportunities, challenges faced by entrepreneurs, and exploring entrepreneurship business models.  The course benefits from guest speakers from the local community of small-business owners and culminates in the building of a formal business plan.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week 

272 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Human Resource Management (HRM) has become a strategic function for both private and public organizations. This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and practical aspects of HRM. It focuses on the personnel processes involved in the procurement, development and maintenance of human resources, such as staffing, training and compensation. The course also includes a critical examination of current personnel issues and trends.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171
Three hours a week

275 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY
This course is an overview of the biotechnology and life sciences industry, including discovery and development, regulatory and marketing requirements, management, intellectual property requirements, types and sources of innovation, and key issues in technology strategy. No advanced scientific knowledge is presumed or required; a scientific “primer” provides deeper understanding of some of the reading materials and discussions. The class consists of lectures, discussion, and examination of several current topics in the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industry.
PREREQUISITE: 2nd year standing as a Business or Science student, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

285 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is an introductory course in Business Administration on various topics for students who are interested in pursuing a Business degree. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

287 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
This course examines the basic issues involved in the internationalization of business, which includes the impact of international focus on business and how firms establish and conduct transactions with organizations from other countries. More specifically, the course examines the basic models of involvement in international business and the conditions appropriate for each. Class sessions will combine seminars and case discussions requiring active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 and 171
Three hours a week

288 RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT
Evidence-based management considers ethics and stakeholder concerns, practitioner judgment and expertise, local data and experimentation, and principles derived through formal research to inform decision-making.  This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative perspectives and methods for conducting and evaluating business research. Students develop information literacy as they learn to question assumptions and think critically about the nature of evidence and claims made about organizational phenomena.  Problems in and prospects for improved managerial decision-making are included. 
PREREQUISITE:   Minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

292 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS I
This course offers introductory career skills training to prepare co-op students for their first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 284 (Mathematical and Computational Sciences 284)
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance into the co-op program.
0 semester hours

293 CO-OP WORK TERM I
This course is co-op students’ first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 292 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education.
Three semester hours of credit

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

301 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course provides in-depth coverage of the accounting standards required for corporate financial reporting for both public and private enterprises.  It introduces students to the Canadian accounting environment and the concepts and principles from which Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) have grown.  Specific emphasis is given to the major asset categories found on corporate balance sheets through extensive coverage of cash, accounts receivable, inventories, capital assets and investments.  Other topics covered in detail include current liabilities, revenue and expense recognition, and the statement of cash flows.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 202 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program in the School of Business or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course continues the examination of balance sheet items with extensive coverage of the accounting and reporting issues related to liabilities and shareholders’ equity, including complex debt and equity instruments, corporate income taxes, leases, pensions and other post-employment benefits, earnings per share, and restatements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 301 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

312 (formerly 412) COST ACCOUNTING
Topics include standard costing, budgets, flexible budgets, variance analysis, pricing, relevance and decentralization, and transfer pricing. This course will also incorporate case studies to highlight the application of methodology.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum of 60% in Accounting 221 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor

BUSINESS COURSES:

301 BUSINESS LAW—Part I
This course offers students a basic introduction to the legal system and, in particular, the areas of tort, property, and contract law. A major portion of the course is devoted to the study of the legal implications of contractual issues in business endeavours. Legal cases are used, when applicable, to illustrate principles of law.
Three hours a week

302 BUSINESS LAW—Part II
This course expands on the concepts introduced in Business 301, and addresses some additional areas of law.  Topics include securities legislation, landlord and tenant law, real estate law, environmental law, wills and estates, family law, and other business-related areas of law.
PREREQUISITE: Business 301
Three hours a week

333 INTEGRATED CASES IN CORPORATE FINANCE
The main focus of the course is the application of financial concepts to realistic business situations through the use of business cases. The principal areas covered will be financial analysis, financial forecasting, valuation, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, and derivative securities. 
PREREQUISITE: Business 231
Three hours a week

334 (formerly 421) PERSONAL FINANCE
This course provides students with theoretical and practical information regarding personal financial planning including budgeting, personal taxation principles, the use and cost of credit, the importance of saving, investment strategies, retirement planning, estate planning, real estate and mortgages, and the use of property and life insurance.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

343 INTEGRATED CASES IN MARKETING
This course shows how basic marketing concepts are applied and integrated with other business functions in contemporary business situations. The main focus of the course is on marketing management, planning, executing, and controlling marketing programs. Other topics include international marketing, marketing research, and the social responsibility of marketing managers. The course considers the relationships between these topics and the other business functions. There is extensive use of case method teaching and students are expected to develop the written and oral communication skills necessary for problem solving in marketing.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

351 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 
This course covers an analysis of the nature and problems of production and operations management. Emphasis is given to a number of topics including quality management and SPC, product and service design, processes and technology, capacity and facilities, supply chain management, scheduling and distribution, inventory management and sales and operations planning. The intent is to take a broad view of the subject material as opposed to developing significant in-depth expertise in one or more areas.
PREREQUISITE: Business 251 
Three hours a week

365 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
This course will cover a range of topics to address various aspects of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship and how to identify and analyze compelling opportunities. The first part of the course will consider innovation strategy and management, including culture, motivation and commercialization. The course will be an active learning experience that helps to map what it takes to grow a business to its full potential. Topics will include assessing opportunities; managing different forms of start-ups; evaluating founding team expertise; considering resource needs; venture financing; marketing and strategic considerations. The course will include a combination of seminars, cases, speakers, and hands-on project work.
PREREQUISITES: Business 141, 171, 265, Accounting 101 
Three hours a week

366 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE
This course explores the dynamic challenges faced by entrepreneurial firms in securing financial backing to support start-up, development, and growth. The course is organized around the evolution of entrepreneurial companies emphasizing the dynamic nature of the issues confronting these firms. The financial factors that affect entrepreneurial firms at various stages through to the exit decision are considered. Specific topics include the viability of proposed start-up ventures, the potential sources of financing for entrepreneurial firms, financial distress, and the harvesting decision. The key decisions of firms at various phases of their life cycle are examined. A mix of interactive lectures and case discussions is used.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

371 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURES
This course is a study of the nature and background of entrepreneurship and the process involved from idea to opportunity to new business venture. Students are expected to study the environment in which entrepreneurship flourishes from both the perspective of the entrepreneur and of the economic system. The generation of ideas and opportunities is discussed, as well as the subsequent transformation of an opportunity into a formal business plan. The course concludes with an examination of the process of implementation of the business plan and the management of the new business which results. Extensive case analysis is required.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101, Business 141 and 231
Three hours a week

372 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
In this course students study the relationship between the labour force and management in the modern organization. Particular attention is given to the nature and role of trade unionism and collective bargaining. A basic objective of the course is to explore the conditions for effective industrial relations in the process of management.
PREREQUISITE: Business 272 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

373 TOURISM MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the management of the world’s largest industry—tourism. The course examines key elements of the industry including its scope, the role of transportation, accommodations and attractions, culture and other travel motivators, tourism research and marketing, and the development and distribution of tourism products. The course assesses Prince Edward Island’s experience with tourism and its impact on the local economy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

385 SPECIAL TOPICS
An intermediate course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

386 INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE TERM
Students who go on an international exchange term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization.  This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE:  Approval from the School of Business’ Director of International Programs. 
0 semester hours

387 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ELECTIVE
This course number is reserved for courses transferred in from other universities that qualify as electives for the Specialization in International Business. 
Three hours a week

391 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the concepts of strategic thinking, analysis, and planning. It integrates the functional and process areas studied in the degree program and utilizes cases to give students experience in crafting business strategy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141, 231 and 272
Three hours a week

392 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS II
This course offers career skills training to strengthen co-op students’ readiness for their second work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 384 (Mathematical and Computational Sciences 384)
PREREQUISITE:  Business 293
0 semester hours

393 CO-OP WORK TERM II
This course is co-op students’ second work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 392 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education. 
Three semester hours of credit

394 INTERNATIONAL CO-OP PLACEMENT
Students who go on an international work term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization.  This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE:  Approval by the School of Business’ Director of International Programs. 
0 semester hours

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

401 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course covers the study of mergers and acquisitions using the purchase method, and accounting for intercompany transactions and their elimination to arrive at consolidated financial statements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

402 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING— Part II
This course covers the accounting for partnerships, municipal governments, not-for-profit organizations, trusts and estates, and foreign exchange transactions.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 401 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

415 AUDITING
This course provides an introduction to the auditing profession and specifically the external audit of financial statements.  This course focuses on the three phases of the audit process – risk assessment, risk response and reporting.  The role of ethics and independence within the auditing profession will be emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

416 AUDITING, ACCOUNTING AND SOCIETY
The main focus of this course will be the application and extension of auditing and accounting concepts to realistic scenarios through the use of case analysis.  This advanced course will also focus on the role of auditors and accountants in society.  Topics include the financial reporting environment, the standard-setting process, regulatory influences on the profession, corporate governance, ethics and professionalism, and emerging issues in the profession.
PREREQUISITE:  A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 415 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

431 INCOME TAXATION
This course introduces students to income tax law for both individuals and corporations. The course is designed for students pursuing a professional accounting designation or a career requiring an advanced knowledge of tax.
PREREQUISITE:  A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

407 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT
An advanced course in organizational management on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business.  
Three hours a week

432 APPLIED INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT
This course examines the various investment assets available to the individual, with a focus on the practical aspects of investing, and also considers important theoretical concepts necessary for a full appreciation of investment management. Major topics include the financial markets, financial intermediaries, types of investments, the purpose of a stock exchange, and market theories. Students undertake a fundamental analysis of a public company’s common shares and present an investment recommendation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

439 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
This course examines international finance and applications from a business perspective. Some of the key topics include foreign exchange markets, world capital markets (including banking), the use of derivatives, risk management, globalization, and foreign direct investment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 333 or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

443 CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
This course explores the consumer buying process and the ways in which marketers can influence and shape the attitudes and actions of consumers through strategic marketing initiatives to cultivate consumer and organization satisfaction. 
PREREQUISITE:  Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

444 MARKET RESEARCH
This course will introduce students to the practice of market research. Specifically, students will understand the role and importance of market research in evidence-based decision making, will practice evidence-based market research, and will develop the skills to develop and report on evidence-based market research plans.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

445 BRAND MANAGEMENT
This course will provide students with an overview of strategic brand development and management as a means of connecting with consumers and establishing a market differentiation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

446 PERSONAL SELLING AND SALES
This course will examine the principles and practices of personal selling as a strategic part of an overall marketing plan.  Specifically, the course will look at customer relationship management, developing sales pitches, and business-to-business sales strategies.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

454 TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the elements of tourism and hospitality:  facility and accommodation, food and beverage, travel, tourism activities and the economic impact of tourism.  A creative problem-solving approach is applied to the development and design of these elements.  The course stresses critical thinking techniques as well as writing and presentation skills.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101, Business 343, and Business 272, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

455 SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT
This course critically examines sustainable and responsible tourism development practices at both the micro and macro levels of the industry.  Case study analysis is an integral component of the course.  A major focus will be on benefits and impacts associated with tourism development, as well as the strategies for maximizing benefits and minimizing adverse effects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

461 COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines behavioural concepts associated with the communication process. Each section of the course is designed to help students acquire a sensitivity to the communication process. Students are expected to acquire an awareness of techniques of effective communication through readings, cases and simulations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

465 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Project Management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements. The course emphasizes the design, scheduling, budgeting, and management of projects from a variety of fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 351
Three hours a week

468 SELF EMPLOYMENT – BEHIND THE SCENE
This is a very practical course looking inside the world of small to medium size businesses.   Witness self employment and management first hand through guest speakers, field trips and class discussion.  Gain valuable insight into strategizing and executing a business idea.
PREREQUISITES:  Business 371, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

471 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE
For organizations to survive and thrive they must adapt to changes in their environments as well as engage proactively to improve.  Change can be planned or reactive and include major paradigm shifts as well as smaller adjustments.  This course considers the nature of organizational change and strategies for managing change and improving organizations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 272 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week 

475 E-COMMERCE
This course surveys a variety of e-business models through the use of case studies. Students are introduced to strategic, legal, and technology issues that businesses face when changing business processes in an electronic commerce environment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 333 and 343, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

476 INTERCULTURAL MANAGEMENT
This course examines the complex challenges that culture poses in international business. Topics covered include cultural influences on conducting business, values and communications, managing multicultural teams, international negotiations, and conflict resolution. The course aims to develop intercultural management knowledge and skills for working globally.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

477 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
This course addresses global issues that confront today’s international marketer and presents concepts relevant to all international marketers. The focus is to develop a managerial understanding of international marketing and the competitiveness of Canadian and Island businesses in the global market. It provides a view of world markets, their respective consumers and environments, and the marketing management required to meet the demands of dynamic international settings.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

479 SELECTED TOPICS IN MARKETING
This course deals with selected topics in marketing such as advertising, sales management, retailing, business marketing, tourism, and contemporary marketing issues. The course includes a range of active learning approaches, such as case discussions, computer simulations, and projects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343
Three hours a week

481 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines how consumer decision-making processes form the basis for promotions. In this context, the course deals with principles for developing advertising campaigns, trade and consumer promotion techniques, and methods for relating optimal advertising and a consistent message across all audiences while maximizing budgets.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

482 SPECIAL TOPICS
An advanced course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Readings and/or research will be under-taken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

484 DIRECTED STUDIES
This is an upper level course that does not have a prescribed curriculum.   In consultation with the course professor, the student chooses a specific topic and then undertakes an in-depth study of this topic.  The course professor must approve all directed-study activities before registration can occur. 
Three hours a week

485 DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP SKILLS
In this course, learners are provided with tools and exercises that are used to develop self-awareness, creativity, conflict resolution, and empowerment skills. Learners begin a process of self-assessment which can continue to serve their development as managers after the course is completed.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141, 231 and 272, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

486 CURRENT ISSUES IN BUSINESS
This course offers students a program of study on a number of topics judged by faculty to be current, and likely to have a long-term impact on business management. Such topics may include, but are not limited to, changing employment structures, information technology uses in business, re-engineering, evolving regulatory environments, comparative business environments, and sustainable development.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171, 333 or 343
Three hours a week

488 MANAGEMENT IN PERSPECTIVE
This course examines the emergence and evolution of management and management education. Class sessions follow a seminar format and students are required to complete an independent research paper. Students critically examine historical or contemporary topics about management, management education, and related fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

489 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY AND FINANCE
This course examines issues important to international business management. Some of the key topics include international trade, foreign investment, foreign exchange markets and international strategy. The course includes seminars and case studies, and requires active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITES: Business 141, 231, 351, or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

492 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS III
This course offers career skills training to strengthen co-op students’ readiness for their third work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 484 (Mathematical and Computational Science 484)
PREREQUISITE:  Business 393 
0 semester hours

493 CO-OP WORK TERM III
This course is co-op students’ third work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 492 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education. 
Three semester hours of credit.

495 BUSINESS RESEARCH I
This required course examines the general methodology of conducting business research. The student will use the principles acquired in class to prepare and present a substantial paper on a research topic chosen in consultation with a faculty supervisor.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 and 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

496 BUSINESS RESEARCH II
This course allows students to pursue a research project in further depth.
PREREQUISITE: Business 495 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

497 BUSINESS CASE COMPETITION
The UPEI Case Competition class is an intensive case-based, experiential learning course that trains students to compete in national and international case competitions. Students work in teams and work with a coach to engage in self-motivated, self-directed studies. They build upon their business skills and knowledge by sourcing and learning current, relevant business theory and implementing it into their case solutions. Students focus on constructing logical, evidence-based, clear solutions for business cases while practicing public speaking, presenting and business writing. Cases cover many areas of business: strategy, marketing, ethics, accounting, human resource management, and finance, across many industries and topics. The course includes weekly mock case competitions as well as regional, national, and international case competitions.
PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor only
Three hours a week
Note:  Can substitute for Business 495

Course Level: 
500 Level
Courses: 

510 HONOURS THESIS
This course is aimed at students interested in pursuing an extensive research project. It is a required course in the BBA Honours Program.
PREREQUISITE: Business 495 and permission of the instructor
Six hours a week

593 CO-OP WORK TERM IV
This optional course is available to co-op students who elect to do a fourth work term.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 493
0 semester hours

594 CO-OP WORK TERM V
This optional course is available to co-op students who elect to do a fifth work term.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 593
0 semester hours

Calendar Courses

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

101 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course introduces the accounting model and basic accounting concepts and principles needed to read, analyze and interpret financial statements.  An understanding of the role of accounting in society will be explored.  Sound ethical judgment for financial decision-making will be stressed.  Emphasis is on accounting from a “user’s” perspective.
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
An introduction to the functional areas of business. Topics to be covered include business organizations, marketing, finance, accounting, production, and personnel. Much emphasis will be placed on the development of both written and oral communication skills in a business context. Case studies will be used to reinforce theoretical concepts discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP program
Three hours a week

141 MARKETING
This course presents the basic concepts of marketing. It introduces the marketing function, marketing systems and the marketing concept and then focuses on the development of marketing strategies, target markets, and the marketing mix in a decision‐making context.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program. 
Three hours a week

171 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizational characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program
Three hours a week

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

202 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course focuses on understanding and applying the accounting equation, recording transactions and preparing financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  Differences between International Financial Reporting Standards and Accounting Standards for Private Enterprises will be highlighted.  Sound ethical judgment for financial statement preparation will be stressed.  Emphasis is on accounting from a “preparer’s” perspective.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101 and a minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program in the School of Business or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

221 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
The emphasis throughout this course is on the uses of accounting and other financial tools in the management of a business. Topics include inventory costing methods, cost allocation, cost behaviour, the contribution approach, pricing, and budgeting.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

211 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
This course focuses on developing students’ writing and presentation skills in a business environment. Students will learn techniques to help them communicate with professionalism, clarity and persuasiveness in a variety of business contexts.
PREREQUISITES: English 101 or UPEI 102, or UPEI 103, and must be registered in Business with a 2nd year standing
Three hours a week

212 BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS
This course develops students’ presentation skills in a business context.  The course emphasizes professionalism and the use of evidence and analysis to support recommendations in order to make a compelling case.
PREREQUISITES:  English 101 or UPEI 101. Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

213 BUSINESS ETHICS
(See Philosophy 205)

231 CORPORATE FINANCE
Finance is concerned with the planning for, acquisition, and utilization of funds. The major topics discussed in this course include the time value of money, analysis of financial projections, of financial markets, sources of corporate financing, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and working capital management. 
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101
Three hours a week

241 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction and understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation and management decision-making. It concentrates on providing an understanding of the tools and basic terminology needed to understand information systems and their role in the business environment. Topics include information systems concepts, a review of information technology concepts, the fundamentals of e-business, planning and development of information systems, and the management of these systems.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week.

251 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
This course is designed to provide business students with an introductory survey of the many business applications of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of location and dispersion, basic probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling methods and sampling distributions, sample size, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and forecasting. 
PREREQUISITE:  Math 111or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week
NOTE: This is a required course for Business students and credit for Statistics 221, Education 481, Psychology 271, 278 or 279, Sociology 331, and Sociology 332 will not be allowed.

265 INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
This course provides an overview of setting up and managing a small business.  Topics include an overview of entrepreneurship, starting a new firm, uncovering business opportunities, challenges faced by entrepreneurs, and exploring entrepreneurship business models.  The course benefits from guest speakers from the local community of small-business owners and culminates in the building of a formal business plan.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week 

272 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Human Resource Management (HRM) has become a strategic function for both private and public organizations. This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and practical aspects of HRM. It focuses on the personnel processes involved in the procurement, development and maintenance of human resources, such as staffing, training and compensation. The course also includes a critical examination of current personnel issues and trends.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171
Three hours a week

275 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY
This course is an overview of the biotechnology and life sciences industry, including discovery and development, regulatory and marketing requirements, management, intellectual property requirements, types and sources of innovation, and key issues in technology strategy. No advanced scientific knowledge is presumed or required; a scientific “primer” provides deeper understanding of some of the reading materials and discussions. The class consists of lectures, discussion, and examination of several current topics in the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industry.
PREREQUISITE: 2nd year standing as a Business or Science student, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

285 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is an introductory course in Business Administration on various topics for students who are interested in pursuing a Business degree. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

287 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
This course examines the basic issues involved in the internationalization of business, which includes the impact of international focus on business and how firms establish and conduct transactions with organizations from other countries. More specifically, the course examines the basic models of involvement in international business and the conditions appropriate for each. Class sessions will combine seminars and case discussions requiring active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 and 171
Three hours a week

288 RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT
Evidence-based management considers ethics and stakeholder concerns, practitioner judgment and expertise, local data and experimentation, and principles derived through formal research to inform decision-making.  This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative perspectives and methods for conducting and evaluating business research. Students develop information literacy as they learn to question assumptions and think critically about the nature of evidence and claims made about organizational phenomena.  Problems in and prospects for improved managerial decision-making are included. 
PREREQUISITE:   Minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

292 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS I
This course offers introductory career skills training to prepare co-op students for their first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 284 (Mathematical and Computational Sciences 284)
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance into the co-op program.
0 semester hours

293 CO-OP WORK TERM I
This course is co-op students’ first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 292 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education.
Three semester hours of credit

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

301 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course provides in-depth coverage of the accounting standards required for corporate financial reporting for both public and private enterprises.  It introduces students to the Canadian accounting environment and the concepts and principles from which Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) have grown.  Specific emphasis is given to the major asset categories found on corporate balance sheets through extensive coverage of cash, accounts receivable, inventories, capital assets and investments.  Other topics covered in detail include current liabilities, revenue and expense recognition, and the statement of cash flows.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 202 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program in the School of Business or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course continues the examination of balance sheet items with extensive coverage of the accounting and reporting issues related to liabilities and shareholders’ equity, including complex debt and equity instruments, corporate income taxes, leases, pensions and other post-employment benefits, earnings per share, and restatements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 301 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

312 (formerly 412) COST ACCOUNTING
Topics include standard costing, budgets, flexible budgets, variance analysis, pricing, relevance and decentralization, and transfer pricing. This course will also incorporate case studies to highlight the application of methodology.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum of 60% in Accounting 221 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor

BUSINESS COURSES:

301 BUSINESS LAW—Part I
This course offers students a basic introduction to the legal system and, in particular, the areas of tort, property, and contract law. A major portion of the course is devoted to the study of the legal implications of contractual issues in business endeavours. Legal cases are used, when applicable, to illustrate principles of law.
Three hours a week

302 BUSINESS LAW—Part II
This course expands on the concepts introduced in Business 301, and addresses some additional areas of law.  Topics include securities legislation, landlord and tenant law, real estate law, environmental law, wills and estates, family law, and other business-related areas of law.
PREREQUISITE: Business 301
Three hours a week

333 INTEGRATED CASES IN CORPORATE FINANCE
The main focus of the course is the application of financial concepts to realistic business situations through the use of business cases. The principal areas covered will be financial analysis, financial forecasting, valuation, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, and derivative securities. 
PREREQUISITE: Business 231
Three hours a week

334 (formerly 421) PERSONAL FINANCE
This course provides students with theoretical and practical information regarding personal financial planning including budgeting, personal taxation principles, the use and cost of credit, the importance of saving, investment strategies, retirement planning, estate planning, real estate and mortgages, and the use of property and life insurance.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

343 INTEGRATED CASES IN MARKETING
This course shows how basic marketing concepts are applied and integrated with other business functions in contemporary business situations. The main focus of the course is on marketing management, planning, executing, and controlling marketing programs. Other topics include international marketing, marketing research, and the social responsibility of marketing managers. The course considers the relationships between these topics and the other business functions. There is extensive use of case method teaching and students are expected to develop the written and oral communication skills necessary for problem solving in marketing.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

351 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 
This course covers an analysis of the nature and problems of production and operations management. Emphasis is given to a number of topics including quality management and SPC, product and service design, processes and technology, capacity and facilities, supply chain management, scheduling and distribution, inventory management and sales and operations planning. The intent is to take a broad view of the subject material as opposed to developing significant in-depth expertise in one or more areas.
PREREQUISITE: Business 251 
Three hours a week

365 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
This course will cover a range of topics to address various aspects of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship and how to identify and analyze compelling opportunities. The first part of the course will consider innovation strategy and management, including culture, motivation and commercialization. The course will be an active learning experience that helps to map what it takes to grow a business to its full potential. Topics will include assessing opportunities; managing different forms of start-ups; evaluating founding team expertise; considering resource needs; venture financing; marketing and strategic considerations. The course will include a combination of seminars, cases, speakers, and hands-on project work.
PREREQUISITES: Business 141, 171, 265, Accounting 101 
Three hours a week

366 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE
This course explores the dynamic challenges faced by entrepreneurial firms in securing financial backing to support start-up, development, and growth. The course is organized around the evolution of entrepreneurial companies emphasizing the dynamic nature of the issues confronting these firms. The financial factors that affect entrepreneurial firms at various stages through to the exit decision are considered. Specific topics include the viability of proposed start-up ventures, the potential sources of financing for entrepreneurial firms, financial distress, and the harvesting decision. The key decisions of firms at various phases of their life cycle are examined. A mix of interactive lectures and case discussions is used.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

371 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURES
This course is a study of the nature and background of entrepreneurship and the process involved from idea to opportunity to new business venture. Students are expected to study the environment in which entrepreneurship flourishes from both the perspective of the entrepreneur and of the economic system. The generation of ideas and opportunities is discussed, as well as the subsequent transformation of an opportunity into a formal business plan. The course concludes with an examination of the process of implementation of the business plan and the management of the new business which results. Extensive case analysis is required.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101, Business 141 and 231
Three hours a week

372 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
In this course students study the relationship between the labour force and management in the modern organization. Particular attention is given to the nature and role of trade unionism and collective bargaining. A basic objective of the course is to explore the conditions for effective industrial relations in the process of management.
PREREQUISITE: Business 272 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

373 TOURISM MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the management of the world’s largest industry—tourism. The course examines key elements of the industry including its scope, the role of transportation, accommodations and attractions, culture and other travel motivators, tourism research and marketing, and the development and distribution of tourism products. The course assesses Prince Edward Island’s experience with tourism and its impact on the local economy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

385 SPECIAL TOPICS
An intermediate course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

386 INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE TERM
Students who go on an international exchange term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization.  This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE:  Approval from the School of Business’ Director of International Programs. 
0 semester hours

387 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ELECTIVE
This course number is reserved for courses transferred in from other universities that qualify as electives for the Specialization in International Business. 
Three hours a week

391 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the concepts of strategic thinking, analysis, and planning. It integrates the functional and process areas studied in the degree program and utilizes cases to give students experience in crafting business strategy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141, 231 and 272
Three hours a week

392 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS II
This course offers career skills training to strengthen co-op students’ readiness for their second work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 384 (Mathematical and Computational Sciences 384)
PREREQUISITE:  Business 293
0 semester hours

393 CO-OP WORK TERM II
This course is co-op students’ second work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 392 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education. 
Three semester hours of credit

394 INTERNATIONAL CO-OP PLACEMENT
Students who go on an international work term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization.  This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE:  Approval by the School of Business’ Director of International Programs. 
0 semester hours

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

401 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course covers the study of mergers and acquisitions using the purchase method, and accounting for intercompany transactions and their elimination to arrive at consolidated financial statements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

402 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING— Part II
This course covers the accounting for partnerships, municipal governments, not-for-profit organizations, trusts and estates, and foreign exchange transactions.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 401 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

415 AUDITING
This course provides an introduction to the auditing profession and specifically the external audit of financial statements.  This course focuses on the three phases of the audit process – risk assessment, risk response and reporting.  The role of ethics and independence within the auditing profession will be emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

416 AUDITING, ACCOUNTING AND SOCIETY
The main focus of this course will be the application and extension of auditing and accounting concepts to realistic scenarios through the use of case analysis.  This advanced course will also focus on the role of auditors and accountants in society.  Topics include the financial reporting environment, the standard-setting process, regulatory influences on the profession, corporate governance, ethics and professionalism, and emerging issues in the profession.
PREREQUISITE:  A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 415 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

431 INCOME TAXATION
This course introduces students to income tax law for both individuals and corporations. The course is designed for students pursuing a professional accounting designation or a career requiring an advanced knowledge of tax.
PREREQUISITE:  A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

407 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT
An advanced course in organizational management on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business.  
Three hours a week

432 APPLIED INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT
This course examines the various investment assets available to the individual, with a focus on the practical aspects of investing, and also considers important theoretical concepts necessary for a full appreciation of investment management. Major topics include the financial markets, financial intermediaries, types of investments, the purpose of a stock exchange, and market theories. Students undertake a fundamental analysis of a public company’s common shares and present an investment recommendation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

439 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
This course examines international finance and applications from a business perspective. Some of the key topics include foreign exchange markets, world capital markets (including banking), the use of derivatives, risk management, globalization, and foreign direct investment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 333 or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

443 CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
This course explores the consumer buying process and the ways in which marketers can influence and shape the attitudes and actions of consumers through strategic marketing initiatives to cultivate consumer and organization satisfaction. 
PREREQUISITE:  Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

444 MARKET RESEARCH
This course will introduce students to the practice of market research. Specifically, students will understand the role and importance of market research in evidence-based decision making, will practice evidence-based market research, and will develop the skills to develop and report on evidence-based market research plans.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

445 BRAND MANAGEMENT
This course will provide students with an overview of strategic brand development and management as a means of connecting with consumers and establishing a market differentiation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

446 PERSONAL SELLING AND SALES
This course will examine the principles and practices of personal selling as a strategic part of an overall marketing plan.  Specifically, the course will look at customer relationship management, developing sales pitches, and business-to-business sales strategies.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

454 TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the elements of tourism and hospitality:  facility and accommodation, food and beverage, travel, tourism activities and the economic impact of tourism.  A creative problem-solving approach is applied to the development and design of these elements.  The course stresses critical thinking techniques as well as writing and presentation skills.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101, Business 343, and Business 272, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

455 SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT
This course critically examines sustainable and responsible tourism development practices at both the micro and macro levels of the industry.  Case study analysis is an integral component of the course.  A major focus will be on benefits and impacts associated with tourism development, as well as the strategies for maximizing benefits and minimizing adverse effects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

461 COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines behavioural concepts associated with the communication process. Each section of the course is designed to help students acquire a sensitivity to the communication process. Students are expected to acquire an awareness of techniques of effective communication through readings, cases and simulations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

465 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Project Management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements. The course emphasizes the design, scheduling, budgeting, and management of projects from a variety of fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 351
Three hours a week

468 SELF EMPLOYMENT – BEHIND THE SCENE
This is a very practical course looking inside the world of small to medium size businesses.   Witness self employment and management first hand through guest speakers, field trips and class discussion.  Gain valuable insight into strategizing and executing a business idea.
PREREQUISITES:  Business 371, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

471 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE
For organizations to survive and thrive they must adapt to changes in their environments as well as engage proactively to improve.  Change can be planned or reactive and include major paradigm shifts as well as smaller adjustments.  This course considers the nature of organizational change and strategies for managing change and improving organizations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 272 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week 

475 E-COMMERCE
This course surveys a variety of e-business models through the use of case studies. Students are introduced to strategic, legal, and technology issues that businesses face when changing business processes in an electronic commerce environment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 333 and 343, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

476 INTERCULTURAL MANAGEMENT
This course examines the complex challenges that culture poses in international business. Topics covered include cultural influences on conducting business, values and communications, managing multicultural teams, international negotiations, and conflict resolution. The course aims to develop intercultural management knowledge and skills for working globally.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

477 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
This course addresses global issues that confront today’s international marketer and presents concepts relevant to all international marketers. The focus is to develop a managerial understanding of international marketing and the competitiveness of Canadian and Island businesses in the global market. It provides a view of world markets, their respective consumers and environments, and the marketing management required to meet the demands of dynamic international settings.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

479 SELECTED TOPICS IN MARKETING
This course deals with selected topics in marketing such as advertising, sales management, retailing, business marketing, tourism, and contemporary marketing issues. The course includes a range of active learning approaches, such as case discussions, computer simulations, and projects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343
Three hours a week

481 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines how consumer decision-making processes form the basis for promotions. In this context, the course deals with principles for developing advertising campaigns, trade and consumer promotion techniques, and methods for relating optimal advertising and a consistent message across all audiences while maximizing budgets.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

482 SPECIAL TOPICS
An advanced course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Readings and/or research will be under-taken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

484 DIRECTED STUDIES
This is an upper level course that does not have a prescribed curriculum.   In consultation with the course professor, the student chooses a specific topic and then undertakes an in-depth study of this topic.  The course professor must approve all directed-study activities before registration can occur. 
Three hours a week

485 DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP SKILLS
In this course, learners are provided with tools and exercises that are used to develop self-awareness, creativity, conflict resolution, and empowerment skills. Learners begin a process of self-assessment which can continue to serve their development as managers after the course is completed.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141, 231 and 272, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

486 CURRENT ISSUES IN BUSINESS
This course offers students a program of study on a number of topics judged by faculty to be current, and likely to have a long-term impact on business management. Such topics may include, but are not limited to, changing employment structures, information technology uses in business, re-engineering, evolving regulatory environments, comparative business environments, and sustainable development.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171, 333 or 343
Three hours a week

488 MANAGEMENT IN PERSPECTIVE
This course examines the emergence and evolution of management and management education. Class sessions follow a seminar format and students are required to complete an independent research paper. Students critically examine historical or contemporary topics about management, management education, and related fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

489 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY AND FINANCE
This course examines issues important to international business management. Some of the key topics include international trade, foreign investment, foreign exchange markets and international strategy. The course includes seminars and case studies, and requires active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITES: Business 141, 231, 351, or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

492 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS III
This course offers career skills training to strengthen co-op students’ readiness for their third work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 484 (Mathematical and Computational Science 484)
PREREQUISITE:  Business 393 
0 semester hours

493 CO-OP WORK TERM III
This course is co-op students’ third work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 492 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education. 
Three semester hours of credit.

495 BUSINESS RESEARCH I
This required course examines the general methodology of conducting business research. The student will use the principles acquired in class to prepare and present a substantial paper on a research topic chosen in consultation with a faculty supervisor.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 and 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

496 BUSINESS RESEARCH II
This course allows students to pursue a research project in further depth.
PREREQUISITE: Business 495 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

497 BUSINESS CASE COMPETITION
The UPEI Case Competition class is an intensive case-based, experiential learning course that trains students to compete in national and international case competitions. Students work in teams and work with a coach to engage in self-motivated, self-directed studies. They build upon their business skills and knowledge by sourcing and learning current, relevant business theory and implementing it into their case solutions. Students focus on constructing logical, evidence-based, clear solutions for business cases while practicing public speaking, presenting and business writing. Cases cover many areas of business: strategy, marketing, ethics, accounting, human resource management, and finance, across many industries and topics. The course includes weekly mock case competitions as well as regional, national, and international case competitions.
PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor only
Three hours a week
Note:  Can substitute for Business 495

510 HONOURS THESIS
This course is aimed at students interested in pursuing an extensive research project. It is a required course in the BBA Honours Program.
PREREQUISITE: Business 495 and permission of the instructor
Six hours a week

593 CO-OP WORK TERM IV
This optional course is available to co-op students who elect to do a fourth work term.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 493
0 semester hours

594 CO-OP WORK TERM V
This optional course is available to co-op students who elect to do a fifth work term.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 593
0 semester hours

Calendar Courses

100 Level

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

101 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course introduces the accounting model and basic accounting concepts and principles needed to read, analyze and interpret financial statements.  An understanding of the role of accounting in society will be explored.  Sound ethical judgment for financial decision-making will be stressed.  Emphasis is on accounting from a “user’s” perspective.
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
An introduction to the functional areas of business. Topics to be covered include business organizations, marketing, finance, accounting, production, and personnel. Much emphasis will be placed on the development of both written and oral communication skills in a business context. Case studies will be used to reinforce theoretical concepts discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP program
Three hours a week

141 MARKETING
This course presents the basic concepts of marketing. It introduces the marketing function, marketing systems and the marketing concept and then focuses on the development of marketing strategies, target markets, and the marketing mix in a decision‐making context.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program. 
Three hours a week

171 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizational characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program
Three hours a week

200 Level

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

202 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course focuses on understanding and applying the accounting equation, recording transactions and preparing financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  Differences between International Financial Reporting Standards and Accounting Standards for Private Enterprises will be highlighted.  Sound ethical judgment for financial statement preparation will be stressed.  Emphasis is on accounting from a “preparer’s” perspective.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101 and a minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program in the School of Business or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

221 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
The emphasis throughout this course is on the uses of accounting and other financial tools in the management of a business. Topics include inventory costing methods, cost allocation, cost behaviour, the contribution approach, pricing, and budgeting.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

211 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
This course focuses on developing students’ writing and presentation skills in a business environment. Students will learn techniques to help them communicate with professionalism, clarity and persuasiveness in a variety of business contexts.
PREREQUISITES: English 101 or UPEI 102, or UPEI 103, and must be registered in Business with a 2nd year standing
Three hours a week

212 BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS
This course develops students’ presentation skills in a business context.  The course emphasizes professionalism and the use of evidence and analysis to support recommendations in order to make a compelling case.
PREREQUISITES:  English 101 or UPEI 101. Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

213 BUSINESS ETHICS
(See Philosophy 205)

231 CORPORATE FINANCE
Finance is concerned with the planning for, acquisition, and utilization of funds. The major topics discussed in this course include the time value of money, analysis of financial projections, of financial markets, sources of corporate financing, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and working capital management. 
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101
Three hours a week

241 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction and understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation and management decision-making. It concentrates on providing an understanding of the tools and basic terminology needed to understand information systems and their role in the business environment. Topics include information systems concepts, a review of information technology concepts, the fundamentals of e-business, planning and development of information systems, and the management of these systems.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week.

251 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
This course is designed to provide business students with an introductory survey of the many business applications of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of location and dispersion, basic probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling methods and sampling distributions, sample size, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and forecasting. 
PREREQUISITE:  Math 111or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week
NOTE: This is a required course for Business students and credit for Statistics 221, Education 481, Psychology 271, 278 or 279, Sociology 331, and Sociology 332 will not be allowed.

265 INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
This course provides an overview of setting up and managing a small business.  Topics include an overview of entrepreneurship, starting a new firm, uncovering business opportunities, challenges faced by entrepreneurs, and exploring entrepreneurship business models.  The course benefits from guest speakers from the local community of small-business owners and culminates in the building of a formal business plan.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week 

272 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Human Resource Management (HRM) has become a strategic function for both private and public organizations. This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and practical aspects of HRM. It focuses on the personnel processes involved in the procurement, development and maintenance of human resources, such as staffing, training and compensation. The course also includes a critical examination of current personnel issues and trends.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171
Three hours a week

275 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY
This course is an overview of the biotechnology and life sciences industry, including discovery and development, regulatory and marketing requirements, management, intellectual property requirements, types and sources of innovation, and key issues in technology strategy. No advanced scientific knowledge is presumed or required; a scientific “primer” provides deeper understanding of some of the reading materials and discussions. The class consists of lectures, discussion, and examination of several current topics in the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industry.
PREREQUISITE: 2nd year standing as a Business or Science student, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

285 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is an introductory course in Business Administration on various topics for students who are interested in pursuing a Business degree. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

287 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
This course examines the basic issues involved in the internationalization of business, which includes the impact of international focus on business and how firms establish and conduct transactions with organizations from other countries. More specifically, the course examines the basic models of involvement in international business and the conditions appropriate for each. Class sessions will combine seminars and case discussions requiring active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 and 171
Three hours a week

288 RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT
Evidence-based management considers ethics and stakeholder concerns, practitioner judgment and expertise, local data and experimentation, and principles derived through formal research to inform decision-making.  This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative perspectives and methods for conducting and evaluating business research. Students develop information literacy as they learn to question assumptions and think critically about the nature of evidence and claims made about organizational phenomena.  Problems in and prospects for improved managerial decision-making are included. 
PREREQUISITE:   Minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

292 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS I
This course offers introductory career skills training to prepare co-op students for their first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 284 (Mathematical and Computational Sciences 284)
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance into the co-op program.
0 semester hours

293 CO-OP WORK TERM I
This course is co-op students’ first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 292 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education.
Three semester hours of credit

300 Level

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

301 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course provides in-depth coverage of the accounting standards required for corporate financial reporting for both public and private enterprises.  It introduces students to the Canadian accounting environment and the concepts and principles from which Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) have grown.  Specific emphasis is given to the major asset categories found on corporate balance sheets through extensive coverage of cash, accounts receivable, inventories, capital assets and investments.  Other topics covered in detail include current liabilities, revenue and expense recognition, and the statement of cash flows.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 202 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program in the School of Business or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course continues the examination of balance sheet items with extensive coverage of the accounting and reporting issues related to liabilities and shareholders’ equity, including complex debt and equity instruments, corporate income taxes, leases, pensions and other post-employment benefits, earnings per share, and restatements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 301 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

312 (formerly 412) COST ACCOUNTING
Topics include standard costing, budgets, flexible budgets, variance analysis, pricing, relevance and decentralization, and transfer pricing. This course will also incorporate case studies to highlight the application of methodology.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum of 60% in Accounting 221 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor

BUSINESS COURSES:

301 BUSINESS LAW—Part I
This course offers students a basic introduction to the legal system and, in particular, the areas of tort, property, and contract law. A major portion of the course is devoted to the study of the legal implications of contractual issues in business endeavours. Legal cases are used, when applicable, to illustrate principles of law.
Three hours a week

302 BUSINESS LAW—Part II
This course expands on the concepts introduced in Business 301, and addresses some additional areas of law.  Topics include securities legislation, landlord and tenant law, real estate law, environmental law, wills and estates, family law, and other business-related areas of law.
PREREQUISITE: Business 301
Three hours a week

333 INTEGRATED CASES IN CORPORATE FINANCE
The main focus of the course is the application of financial concepts to realistic business situations through the use of business cases. The principal areas covered will be financial analysis, financial forecasting, valuation, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, and derivative securities. 
PREREQUISITE: Business 231
Three hours a week

334 (formerly 421) PERSONAL FINANCE
This course provides students with theoretical and practical information regarding personal financial planning including budgeting, personal taxation principles, the use and cost of credit, the importance of saving, investment strategies, retirement planning, estate planning, real estate and mortgages, and the use of property and life insurance.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

343 INTEGRATED CASES IN MARKETING
This course shows how basic marketing concepts are applied and integrated with other business functions in contemporary business situations. The main focus of the course is on marketing management, planning, executing, and controlling marketing programs. Other topics include international marketing, marketing research, and the social responsibility of marketing managers. The course considers the relationships between these topics and the other business functions. There is extensive use of case method teaching and students are expected to develop the written and oral communication skills necessary for problem solving in marketing.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

351 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 
This course covers an analysis of the nature and problems of production and operations management. Emphasis is given to a number of topics including quality management and SPC, product and service design, processes and technology, capacity and facilities, supply chain management, scheduling and distribution, inventory management and sales and operations planning. The intent is to take a broad view of the subject material as opposed to developing significant in-depth expertise in one or more areas.
PREREQUISITE: Business 251 
Three hours a week

365 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
This course will cover a range of topics to address various aspects of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship and how to identify and analyze compelling opportunities. The first part of the course will consider innovation strategy and management, including culture, motivation and commercialization. The course will be an active learning experience that helps to map what it takes to grow a business to its full potential. Topics will include assessing opportunities; managing different forms of start-ups; evaluating founding team expertise; considering resource needs; venture financing; marketing and strategic considerations. The course will include a combination of seminars, cases, speakers, and hands-on project work.
PREREQUISITES: Business 141, 171, 265, Accounting 101 
Three hours a week

366 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE
This course explores the dynamic challenges faced by entrepreneurial firms in securing financial backing to support start-up, development, and growth. The course is organized around the evolution of entrepreneurial companies emphasizing the dynamic nature of the issues confronting these firms. The financial factors that affect entrepreneurial firms at various stages through to the exit decision are considered. Specific topics include the viability of proposed start-up ventures, the potential sources of financing for entrepreneurial firms, financial distress, and the harvesting decision. The key decisions of firms at various phases of their life cycle are examined. A mix of interactive lectures and case discussions is used.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

371 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURES
This course is a study of the nature and background of entrepreneurship and the process involved from idea to opportunity to new business venture. Students are expected to study the environment in which entrepreneurship flourishes from both the perspective of the entrepreneur and of the economic system. The generation of ideas and opportunities is discussed, as well as the subsequent transformation of an opportunity into a formal business plan. The course concludes with an examination of the process of implementation of the business plan and the management of the new business which results. Extensive case analysis is required.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101, Business 141 and 231
Three hours a week

372 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
In this course students study the relationship between the labour force and management in the modern organization. Particular attention is given to the nature and role of trade unionism and collective bargaining. A basic objective of the course is to explore the conditions for effective industrial relations in the process of management.
PREREQUISITE: Business 272 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

373 TOURISM MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the management of the world’s largest industry—tourism. The course examines key elements of the industry including its scope, the role of transportation, accommodations and attractions, culture and other travel motivators, tourism research and marketing, and the development and distribution of tourism products. The course assesses Prince Edward Island’s experience with tourism and its impact on the local economy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

385 SPECIAL TOPICS
An intermediate course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

386 INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE TERM
Students who go on an international exchange term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization.  This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE:  Approval from the School of Business’ Director of International Programs. 
0 semester hours

387 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ELECTIVE
This course number is reserved for courses transferred in from other universities that qualify as electives for the Specialization in International Business. 
Three hours a week

391 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the concepts of strategic thinking, analysis, and planning. It integrates the functional and process areas studied in the degree program and utilizes cases to give students experience in crafting business strategy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141, 231 and 272
Three hours a week

392 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS II
This course offers career skills training to strengthen co-op students’ readiness for their second work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 384 (Mathematical and Computational Sciences 384)
PREREQUISITE:  Business 293
0 semester hours

393 CO-OP WORK TERM II
This course is co-op students’ second work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 392 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education. 
Three semester hours of credit

394 INTERNATIONAL CO-OP PLACEMENT
Students who go on an international work term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization.  This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE:  Approval by the School of Business’ Director of International Programs. 
0 semester hours

400 Level

ACCOUNTING COURSES:

401 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course covers the study of mergers and acquisitions using the purchase method, and accounting for intercompany transactions and their elimination to arrive at consolidated financial statements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

402 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING— Part II
This course covers the accounting for partnerships, municipal governments, not-for-profit organizations, trusts and estates, and foreign exchange transactions.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 401 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

415 AUDITING
This course provides an introduction to the auditing profession and specifically the external audit of financial statements.  This course focuses on the three phases of the audit process – risk assessment, risk response and reporting.  The role of ethics and independence within the auditing profession will be emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

416 AUDITING, ACCOUNTING AND SOCIETY
The main focus of this course will be the application and extension of auditing and accounting concepts to realistic scenarios through the use of case analysis.  This advanced course will also focus on the role of auditors and accountants in society.  Topics include the financial reporting environment, the standard-setting process, regulatory influences on the profession, corporate governance, ethics and professionalism, and emerging issues in the profession.
PREREQUISITE:  A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 415 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

431 INCOME TAXATION
This course introduces students to income tax law for both individuals and corporations. The course is designed for students pursuing a professional accounting designation or a career requiring an advanced knowledge of tax.
PREREQUISITE:  A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 302 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES:

407 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT
An advanced course in organizational management on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business.  
Three hours a week

432 APPLIED INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT
This course examines the various investment assets available to the individual, with a focus on the practical aspects of investing, and also considers important theoretical concepts necessary for a full appreciation of investment management. Major topics include the financial markets, financial intermediaries, types of investments, the purpose of a stock exchange, and market theories. Students undertake a fundamental analysis of a public company’s common shares and present an investment recommendation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

439 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
This course examines international finance and applications from a business perspective. Some of the key topics include foreign exchange markets, world capital markets (including banking), the use of derivatives, risk management, globalization, and foreign direct investment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 333 or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

443 CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
This course explores the consumer buying process and the ways in which marketers can influence and shape the attitudes and actions of consumers through strategic marketing initiatives to cultivate consumer and organization satisfaction. 
PREREQUISITE:  Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

444 MARKET RESEARCH
This course will introduce students to the practice of market research. Specifically, students will understand the role and importance of market research in evidence-based decision making, will practice evidence-based market research, and will develop the skills to develop and report on evidence-based market research plans.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

445 BRAND MANAGEMENT
This course will provide students with an overview of strategic brand development and management as a means of connecting with consumers and establishing a market differentiation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

446 PERSONAL SELLING AND SALES
This course will examine the principles and practices of personal selling as a strategic part of an overall marketing plan.  Specifically, the course will look at customer relationship management, developing sales pitches, and business-to-business sales strategies.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor 
Three hours a week

454 TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the elements of tourism and hospitality:  facility and accommodation, food and beverage, travel, tourism activities and the economic impact of tourism.  A creative problem-solving approach is applied to the development and design of these elements.  The course stresses critical thinking techniques as well as writing and presentation skills.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 101, Business 343, and Business 272, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

455 SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT
This course critically examines sustainable and responsible tourism development practices at both the micro and macro levels of the industry.  Case study analysis is an integral component of the course.  A major focus will be on benefits and impacts associated with tourism development, as well as the strategies for maximizing benefits and minimizing adverse effects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

461 COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines behavioural concepts associated with the communication process. Each section of the course is designed to help students acquire a sensitivity to the communication process. Students are expected to acquire an awareness of techniques of effective communication through readings, cases and simulations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

465 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Project Management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements. The course emphasizes the design, scheduling, budgeting, and management of projects from a variety of fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 351
Three hours a week

468 SELF EMPLOYMENT – BEHIND THE SCENE
This is a very practical course looking inside the world of small to medium size businesses.   Witness self employment and management first hand through guest speakers, field trips and class discussion.  Gain valuable insight into strategizing and executing a business idea.
PREREQUISITES:  Business 371, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

471 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE
For organizations to survive and thrive they must adapt to changes in their environments as well as engage proactively to improve.  Change can be planned or reactive and include major paradigm shifts as well as smaller adjustments.  This course considers the nature of organizational change and strategies for managing change and improving organizations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 272 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week 

475 E-COMMERCE
This course surveys a variety of e-business models through the use of case studies. Students are introduced to strategic, legal, and technology issues that businesses face when changing business processes in an electronic commerce environment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 333 and 343, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

476 INTERCULTURAL MANAGEMENT
This course examines the complex challenges that culture poses in international business. Topics covered include cultural influences on conducting business, values and communications, managing multicultural teams, international negotiations, and conflict resolution. The course aims to develop intercultural management knowledge and skills for working globally.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

477 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
This course addresses global issues that confront today’s international marketer and presents concepts relevant to all international marketers. The focus is to develop a managerial understanding of international marketing and the competitiveness of Canadian and Island businesses in the global market. It provides a view of world markets, their respective consumers and environments, and the marketing management required to meet the demands of dynamic international settings.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

479 SELECTED TOPICS IN MARKETING
This course deals with selected topics in marketing such as advertising, sales management, retailing, business marketing, tourism, and contemporary marketing issues. The course includes a range of active learning approaches, such as case discussions, computer simulations, and projects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343
Three hours a week

481 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines how consumer decision-making processes form the basis for promotions. In this context, the course deals with principles for developing advertising campaigns, trade and consumer promotion techniques, and methods for relating optimal advertising and a consistent message across all audiences while maximizing budgets.
PREREQUISITE: Business 343 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

482 SPECIAL TOPICS
An advanced course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Readings and/or research will be under-taken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of the School of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

484 DIRECTED STUDIES
This is an upper level course that does not have a prescribed curriculum.   In consultation with the course professor, the student chooses a specific topic and then undertakes an in-depth study of this topic.  The course professor must approve all directed-study activities before registration can occur. 
Three hours a week

485 DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP SKILLS
In this course, learners are provided with tools and exercises that are used to develop self-awareness, creativity, conflict resolution, and empowerment skills. Learners begin a process of self-assessment which can continue to serve their development as managers after the course is completed.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141, 231 and 272, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

486 CURRENT ISSUES IN BUSINESS
This course offers students a program of study on a number of topics judged by faculty to be current, and likely to have a long-term impact on business management. Such topics may include, but are not limited to, changing employment structures, information technology uses in business, re-engineering, evolving regulatory environments, comparative business environments, and sustainable development.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171, 333 or 343
Three hours a week

488 MANAGEMENT IN PERSPECTIVE
This course examines the emergence and evolution of management and management education. Class sessions follow a seminar format and students are required to complete an independent research paper. Students critically examine historical or contemporary topics about management, management education, and related fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 171, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

489 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY AND FINANCE
This course examines issues important to international business management. Some of the key topics include international trade, foreign investment, foreign exchange markets and international strategy. The course includes seminars and case studies, and requires active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITES: Business 141, 231, 351, or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

492 CO-OP CAREER SKILLS III
This course offers career skills training to strengthen co-op students’ readiness for their third work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
Cross-listed with MCS 484 (Mathematical and Computational Science 484)
PREREQUISITE:  Business 393 
0 semester hours

493 CO-OP WORK TERM III
This course is co-op students’ third work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 492 or permission of the Academic Director of Co-operative Education. 
Three semester hours of credit.

495 BUSINESS RESEARCH I
This required course examines the general methodology of conducting business research. The student will use the principles acquired in class to prepare and present a substantial paper on a research topic chosen in consultation with a faculty supervisor.
PREREQUISITE: Business 141 and 231 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

496 BUSINESS RESEARCH II
This course allows students to pursue a research project in further depth.
PREREQUISITE: Business 495 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

497 BUSINESS CASE COMPETITION
The UPEI Case Competition class is an intensive case-based, experiential learning course that trains students to compete in national and international case competitions. Students work in teams and work with a coach to engage in self-motivated, self-directed studies. They build upon their business skills and knowledge by sourcing and learning current, relevant business theory and implementing it into their case solutions. Students focus on constructing logical, evidence-based, clear solutions for business cases while practicing public speaking, presenting and business writing. Cases cover many areas of business: strategy, marketing, ethics, accounting, human resource management, and finance, across many industries and topics. The course includes weekly mock case competitions as well as regional, national, and international case competitions.
PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor only
Three hours a week
Note:  Can substitute for Business 495

500 Level

510 HONOURS THESIS
This course is aimed at students interested in pursuing an extensive research project. It is a required course in the BBA Honours Program.
PREREQUISITE: Business 495 and permission of the instructor
Six hours a week

593 CO-OP WORK TERM IV
This optional course is available to co-op students who elect to do a fourth work term.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 493
0 semester hours

594 CO-OP WORK TERM V
This optional course is available to co-op students who elect to do a fifth work term.
PREREQUISITE:  Business 593
0 semester hours