Social Studies of Science Minor

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The Social Studies of Science program is located in SDU Main Building

UPEI’s Social Studies of Science is an interdisciplinary minor whose primary purpose is to reconsider science from the perspective of the humanities. Students enrolled in the minor examine science through the lens of anthropology, history, gender, sociology, philosophy and culture. This includes assessing how science was and is practiced, how science shapes and is shaped by the professionals who practice it, how science is represented in the media and other public arenas, and how various technosciences blur the boundaries between nature and society.

The Social Studies of Science minor is especially well suited to Arts students who wish to evaluate the powerful role of science in society, and to Science students who wish to explore more thoroughly how their field of study relates to the broader societal concerns about science. Social Studies of Science minors learn to think critically and creatively about how we define science, the multiple roles of science in society, and how science has become such a convincing way of understanding the world. This program strengthens students’ capacity to pursue careers in public policy, the health sciences, engineering, science journalism, and law.

Want more information about Social Studies of Science Minor? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
The Social Studies of Science program is located in SDU Main Building

The minor’s structure consists of 21 semester hours of credit as follows:

a) taking EITHER SSS/History 2220 ‘Science and Society in Historical Perspective’ OR SSS/SocAnth 2660 ‘Science, Culture, and Society’ as a mandatory core course in the program;
b) taking at least one additional SSS course at the 2000-level, with SSS 2220 or SSS 2660 as the prerequisite;
c) taking at least two 3000-level courses, with SSS 2220 or SSS 2660 as the prerequisite;
d) taking at least two 4000-level courses, with at least one 3000-level SSS course as the prerequisite;
e) the remaining course at the 2000- 3000-, or 4000- level.

Below is a preliminary list of courses instructors/departments have agreed to cross list into the minor. (Some additional courses are still in the process of being developed).

  • DSJS 4120 - Theories of the Body
  • SOC 4120 - Sociology of Health
  • SOC/ANTH 2660 - Science, Culture, and Society
  • PHIL 2030 - Environmental Philosophy
  • PHIL 2040 - Bio-medical Ethics
  • PHIL 3010 - Philosophy of Science
  • PHIL 3630 - Philosophy of Biology
  • HIST 2220 - Science and Society in Historical Perspective
  • HIST 3110 - Science, Magic, Witchcraft, and the Occult in Premodern Europe
  • HIST 3330 - Health Care and North American Society in Historical Perspective
  • HIST 4340 - Madness and Society
  • ENG 2240 - Science Fiction
  • ANTH 4010 - Medical Anthropology
  • ANTH 4030 - Cybercultures

Additional courses not on the above list may be applied to the minor with permission of the Program Co-ordinator and the course instructor.

 

Want more information about Social Studies of Science Minor? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
The Social Studies of Science program is located in SDU Main Building
  • James Moran, Co-ordinator (History)
  • Udo Krautwurst, Co-ordinator (Sociology and Anthropology)
Overview

UPEI’s Social Studies of Science is an interdisciplinary minor whose primary purpose is to reconsider science from the perspective of the humanities. Students enrolled in the minor examine science through the lens of anthropology, history, gender, sociology, philosophy and culture. This includes assessing how science was and is practiced, how science shapes and is shaped by the professionals who practice it, how science is represented in the media and other public arenas, and how various technosciences blur the boundaries between nature and society.

The Social Studies of Science minor is especially well suited to Arts students who wish to evaluate the powerful role of science in society, and to Science students who wish to explore more thoroughly how their field of study relates to the broader societal concerns about science. Social Studies of Science minors learn to think critically and creatively about how we define science, the multiple roles of science in society, and how science has become such a convincing way of understanding the world. This program strengthens students’ capacity to pursue careers in public policy, the health sciences, engineering, science journalism, and law.

Minor

The minor’s structure consists of 21 semester hours of credit as follows:

a) taking EITHER SSS/History 2220 ‘Science and Society in Historical Perspective’ OR SSS/SocAnth 2660 ‘Science, Culture, and Society’ as a mandatory core course in the program;
b) taking at least one additional SSS course at the 2000-level, with SSS 2220 or SSS 2660 as the prerequisite;
c) taking at least two 3000-level courses, with SSS 2220 or SSS 2660 as the prerequisite;
d) taking at least two 4000-level courses, with at least one 3000-level SSS course as the prerequisite;
e) the remaining course at the 2000- 3000-, or 4000- level.

Below is a preliminary list of courses instructors/departments have agreed to cross list into the minor. (Some additional courses are still in the process of being developed).

  • DSJS 4120 - Theories of the Body
  • SOC 4120 - Sociology of Health
  • SOC/ANTH 2660 - Science, Culture, and Society
  • PHIL 2030 - Environmental Philosophy
  • PHIL 2040 - Bio-medical Ethics
  • PHIL 3010 - Philosophy of Science
  • PHIL 3630 - Philosophy of Biology
  • HIST 2220 - Science and Society in Historical Perspective
  • HIST 3110 - Science, Magic, Witchcraft, and the Occult in Premodern Europe
  • HIST 3330 - Health Care and North American Society in Historical Perspective
  • HIST 4340 - Madness and Society
  • ENG 2240 - Science Fiction
  • ANTH 4010 - Medical Anthropology
  • ANTH 4030 - Cybercultures

Additional courses not on the above list may be applied to the minor with permission of the Program Co-ordinator and the course instructor.

 

Faculty
  • James Moran, Co-ordinator (History)
  • Udo Krautwurst, Co-ordinator (Sociology and Anthropology)

Overview

UPEI’s Social Studies of Science is an interdisciplinary minor whose primary purpose is to reconsider science from the perspective of the humanities. Students enrolled in the minor examine science through the lens of anthropology, history, gender, sociology, philosophy and culture. This includes assessing how science was and is practiced, how science shapes and is shaped by the professionals who practice it, how science is represented in the media and other public arenas, and how various technosciences blur the boundaries between nature and society.

The Social Studies of Science minor is especially well suited to Arts students who wish to evaluate the powerful role of science in society, and to Science students who wish to explore more thoroughly how their field of study relates to the broader societal concerns about science. Social Studies of Science minors learn to think critically and creatively about how we define science, the multiple roles of science in society, and how science has become such a convincing way of understanding the world. This program strengthens students’ capacity to pursue careers in public policy, the health sciences, engineering, science journalism, and law.

Minor

The minor’s structure consists of 21 semester hours of credit as follows:

a) taking EITHER SSS/History 2220 ‘Science and Society in Historical Perspective’ OR SSS/SocAnth 2660 ‘Science, Culture, and Society’ as a mandatory core course in the program;
b) taking at least one additional SSS course at the 2000-level, with SSS 2220 or SSS 2660 as the prerequisite;
c) taking at least two 3000-level courses, with SSS 2220 or SSS 2660 as the prerequisite;
d) taking at least two 4000-level courses, with at least one 3000-level SSS course as the prerequisite;
e) the remaining course at the 2000- 3000-, or 4000- level.

Below is a preliminary list of courses instructors/departments have agreed to cross list into the minor. (Some additional courses are still in the process of being developed).

  • DSJS 4120 - Theories of the Body
  • SOC 4120 - Sociology of Health
  • SOC/ANTH 2660 - Science, Culture, and Society
  • PHIL 2030 - Environmental Philosophy
  • PHIL 2040 - Bio-medical Ethics
  • PHIL 3010 - Philosophy of Science
  • PHIL 3630 - Philosophy of Biology
  • HIST 2220 - Science and Society in Historical Perspective
  • HIST 3110 - Science, Magic, Witchcraft, and the Occult in Premodern Europe
  • HIST 3330 - Health Care and North American Society in Historical Perspective
  • HIST 4340 - Madness and Society
  • ENG 2240 - Science Fiction
  • ANTH 4010 - Medical Anthropology
  • ANTH 4030 - Cybercultures

Additional courses not on the above list may be applied to the minor with permission of the Program Co-ordinator and the course instructor.

 

Faculty

  • James Moran, Co-ordinator (History)
  • Udo Krautwurst, Co-ordinator (Sociology and Anthropology)
Want more information about Social Studies of Science Minor? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

PHIL 203 ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
This course explores the contours of contemporary environmental thought and the diversity of approaches to environmental ethics. Emphasis is on critically understanding historical, cultural and ideological diversity while exploring the moral contours of human-nature interactions, both locally and globally. Topics may include the question of values in nature; environmental movements; aboriginal and postcolonial perspectives; social justice as related to the environment; spirituality; sustainability and consumption; the privatization of environmental morality; inhabiting vs. residing; place, art and environmental education.
Lecture: Three hours a week

PHIL 204 BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS
This course explores questions in health care that require philosophical clarification and appraisal in addition to medical knowledge. Topics such as reproductive decision-making, contract motherhood, allocation of scarce resources, conditions for the withdrawal of treatment, rights to health care, euthanasia, AIDS, eugenics and consent are discussed. The emphasis is on evaluating competing arguments.
Lectures: Three hours a week

ENG 224 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

HIST 222 FROM MAGIC TO THE DOUBLE HELIX: SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course evaluates the history of science from the scientific revolution to late twentieth century. It also evaluates how science has been understood differently from one period to the next, how science has been grounded in cultural, social, and political currents, and how scientific understandings and perceptions have influenced how we see the world around us. This survey includes the study of major changes in scientific outlook brought about by thinkers like Isaac Newton, Auguste Comte, Louis Pasteur, Charles Darwin, Marie Curie and Albert Einstein. Important technological developments and the professionalization of scientific knowledge are also considered.
3 semester hours

SOC/ANTH 266 SCIENCE, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY
This course considers three centuries of modern Western science as it has been imagined and practised in Europe, initially, and eventually the rest of the globe. It especially considers the relationships between contemporary science and its socio-cultural contexts; discrepancies between the ideal of Science and its actual practice; the role of gender, class, and race in the production of scientific knowledge; and some important debates within the field of science studies, such as the place of subjectivity and objectivity, or whether science is universal or dependant on time, place and field of study.
REGULAR PREREQUISITES
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

PHIL 301 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Science involves a set of attitudes, a system of beliefs, and a group of activities oriented to explaining the natural world. This course examines both the classical positivist accounts of scientific theory and practice and the more recent accounts of development and change in the global scientific culture.
PREREQUISITE: One course in Philosophy or permission of the instructor
Lectures: Three hours a week

PHIL 363 PHILOSOPHY OF BIOLOGY
Students explore how biology informs our philosophical conceptions of nature and our place in it. Topics include evolutionary theory, human nature, adaptation, development, units of selection, function, species, altruism, the human genome project, conceptions of progress, and creationism.
Lecture: Three hours a week

HIST 311 SCIENCE, MAGIC, WITCHCRAFT AND THE OCCULT IN PREMODERN EUROPE
This course investigates how men and women sought to understand, explain, control and manipulate the natural world in the early modern period. Topics include medieval cosmology and astrology; alchemy and learned magic; changing views of the role of the devil in the natural world; witch belief and witch hunting. Particular attention is paid to how the traditions of learned magic informed the development of science in the seventeenth century.
PREREQUISITE: History 201 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

HIST 333 HEALTH CARE AND NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course explores the history of health, disease and medicine, focussing on North America from the time of contact between Native Peoples and Europeans, to the present. The course is organized around four major themes in the history of health and illness: historical epidemiology, social and political responses to health and disease, the rise of modern medicine and other health care groups, and the recent challenges to regular medical practice by alternative health care providers. Particular attention is paid to the effects of shifting systems of medical practice on patient experience.
PREREQUISITE: None.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

DSJS 412 THEORIES OF THE BODY
This course introduces students to what is often called “body studies,” exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions.
PREREQUISITE: At least one Diversity and Social Justice Studies course, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week.

SOC 412 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH
Students adopt a salutogenic (health promotion and illness prevention) approach to examine the relationship between social factors (lifestyle, environment, and organization of the health care system) and health. Health is posited as a multi-dimensional construct. The implications of adopting a mainstream theoretical view of the relationship between social factors and health are investigated, i.e., how adopting a certain theoretical perspective can help to explain further or to hinder our understanding of the effect of social factors on health.
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and two 300-400 level courses in Sociology, Sociology/Anthropology, or Anthropology, and permission of the professor.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

HIST 434 MADNESS AND SOCIETY
This course examines the history of madness in comparative context from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present with a focus on Europe and North America. Topics include major historical developments in the understanding of madness such as traditional responses to unsoundness of mind, the development of asylums, the rise of professional psychiatry, scientific models of mental illness, and the community care movement. Pivotal theorists, including Freud, Kraepelin, Foucault, and Szasz are discussed.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

ANTH 401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being. The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (c.f. DSJS 401).
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and Anthropology 361 or any two 300-400 level courses; or permission of the instructor.  For Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) students, need two 300 or 400 level DSJS courses, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

ANTH 403 CYBERCULTURES
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (c.f. DSJS 402).
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and any two 300-400 level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology. For Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) students, need two 300 or 400 level DSJS courses, or permission of the instructor.

Calendar Courses

PHIL 203 ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
This course explores the contours of contemporary environmental thought and the diversity of approaches to environmental ethics. Emphasis is on critically understanding historical, cultural and ideological diversity while exploring the moral contours of human-nature interactions, both locally and globally. Topics may include the question of values in nature; environmental movements; aboriginal and postcolonial perspectives; social justice as related to the environment; spirituality; sustainability and consumption; the privatization of environmental morality; inhabiting vs. residing; place, art and environmental education.
Lecture: Three hours a week

PHIL 204 BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS
This course explores questions in health care that require philosophical clarification and appraisal in addition to medical knowledge. Topics such as reproductive decision-making, contract motherhood, allocation of scarce resources, conditions for the withdrawal of treatment, rights to health care, euthanasia, AIDS, eugenics and consent are discussed. The emphasis is on evaluating competing arguments.
Lectures: Three hours a week

ENG 224 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

HIST 222 FROM MAGIC TO THE DOUBLE HELIX: SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course evaluates the history of science from the scientific revolution to late twentieth century. It also evaluates how science has been understood differently from one period to the next, how science has been grounded in cultural, social, and political currents, and how scientific understandings and perceptions have influenced how we see the world around us. This survey includes the study of major changes in scientific outlook brought about by thinkers like Isaac Newton, Auguste Comte, Louis Pasteur, Charles Darwin, Marie Curie and Albert Einstein. Important technological developments and the professionalization of scientific knowledge are also considered.
3 semester hours

SOC/ANTH 266 SCIENCE, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY
This course considers three centuries of modern Western science as it has been imagined and practised in Europe, initially, and eventually the rest of the globe. It especially considers the relationships between contemporary science and its socio-cultural contexts; discrepancies between the ideal of Science and its actual practice; the role of gender, class, and race in the production of scientific knowledge; and some important debates within the field of science studies, such as the place of subjectivity and objectivity, or whether science is universal or dependant on time, place and field of study.
REGULAR PREREQUISITES
Three hours a week

PHIL 301 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Science involves a set of attitudes, a system of beliefs, and a group of activities oriented to explaining the natural world. This course examines both the classical positivist accounts of scientific theory and practice and the more recent accounts of development and change in the global scientific culture.
PREREQUISITE: One course in Philosophy or permission of the instructor
Lectures: Three hours a week

PHIL 363 PHILOSOPHY OF BIOLOGY
Students explore how biology informs our philosophical conceptions of nature and our place in it. Topics include evolutionary theory, human nature, adaptation, development, units of selection, function, species, altruism, the human genome project, conceptions of progress, and creationism.
Lecture: Three hours a week

HIST 311 SCIENCE, MAGIC, WITCHCRAFT AND THE OCCULT IN PREMODERN EUROPE
This course investigates how men and women sought to understand, explain, control and manipulate the natural world in the early modern period. Topics include medieval cosmology and astrology; alchemy and learned magic; changing views of the role of the devil in the natural world; witch belief and witch hunting. Particular attention is paid to how the traditions of learned magic informed the development of science in the seventeenth century.
PREREQUISITE: History 201 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

HIST 333 HEALTH CARE AND NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course explores the history of health, disease and medicine, focussing on North America from the time of contact between Native Peoples and Europeans, to the present. The course is organized around four major themes in the history of health and illness: historical epidemiology, social and political responses to health and disease, the rise of modern medicine and other health care groups, and the recent challenges to regular medical practice by alternative health care providers. Particular attention is paid to the effects of shifting systems of medical practice on patient experience.
PREREQUISITE: None.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

DSJS 412 THEORIES OF THE BODY
This course introduces students to what is often called “body studies,” exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions.
PREREQUISITE: At least one Diversity and Social Justice Studies course, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week.

SOC 412 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH
Students adopt a salutogenic (health promotion and illness prevention) approach to examine the relationship between social factors (lifestyle, environment, and organization of the health care system) and health. Health is posited as a multi-dimensional construct. The implications of adopting a mainstream theoretical view of the relationship between social factors and health are investigated, i.e., how adopting a certain theoretical perspective can help to explain further or to hinder our understanding of the effect of social factors on health.
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and two 300-400 level courses in Sociology, Sociology/Anthropology, or Anthropology, and permission of the professor.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

HIST 434 MADNESS AND SOCIETY
This course examines the history of madness in comparative context from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present with a focus on Europe and North America. Topics include major historical developments in the understanding of madness such as traditional responses to unsoundness of mind, the development of asylums, the rise of professional psychiatry, scientific models of mental illness, and the community care movement. Pivotal theorists, including Freud, Kraepelin, Foucault, and Szasz are discussed.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

ANTH 401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being. The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (c.f. DSJS 401).
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and Anthropology 361 or any two 300-400 level courses; or permission of the instructor.  For Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) students, need two 300 or 400 level DSJS courses, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

ANTH 403 CYBERCULTURES
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (c.f. DSJS 402).
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and any two 300-400 level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology. For Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) students, need two 300 or 400 level DSJS courses, or permission of the instructor.

Calendar Courses

200 Level

PHIL 203 ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
This course explores the contours of contemporary environmental thought and the diversity of approaches to environmental ethics. Emphasis is on critically understanding historical, cultural and ideological diversity while exploring the moral contours of human-nature interactions, both locally and globally. Topics may include the question of values in nature; environmental movements; aboriginal and postcolonial perspectives; social justice as related to the environment; spirituality; sustainability and consumption; the privatization of environmental morality; inhabiting vs. residing; place, art and environmental education.
Lecture: Three hours a week

PHIL 204 BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS
This course explores questions in health care that require philosophical clarification and appraisal in addition to medical knowledge. Topics such as reproductive decision-making, contract motherhood, allocation of scarce resources, conditions for the withdrawal of treatment, rights to health care, euthanasia, AIDS, eugenics and consent are discussed. The emphasis is on evaluating competing arguments.
Lectures: Three hours a week

ENG 224 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

HIST 222 FROM MAGIC TO THE DOUBLE HELIX: SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course evaluates the history of science from the scientific revolution to late twentieth century. It also evaluates how science has been understood differently from one period to the next, how science has been grounded in cultural, social, and political currents, and how scientific understandings and perceptions have influenced how we see the world around us. This survey includes the study of major changes in scientific outlook brought about by thinkers like Isaac Newton, Auguste Comte, Louis Pasteur, Charles Darwin, Marie Curie and Albert Einstein. Important technological developments and the professionalization of scientific knowledge are also considered.
3 semester hours

SOC/ANTH 266 SCIENCE, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY
This course considers three centuries of modern Western science as it has been imagined and practised in Europe, initially, and eventually the rest of the globe. It especially considers the relationships between contemporary science and its socio-cultural contexts; discrepancies between the ideal of Science and its actual practice; the role of gender, class, and race in the production of scientific knowledge; and some important debates within the field of science studies, such as the place of subjectivity and objectivity, or whether science is universal or dependant on time, place and field of study.
REGULAR PREREQUISITES
Three hours a week

300 Level

PHIL 301 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Science involves a set of attitudes, a system of beliefs, and a group of activities oriented to explaining the natural world. This course examines both the classical positivist accounts of scientific theory and practice and the more recent accounts of development and change in the global scientific culture.
PREREQUISITE: One course in Philosophy or permission of the instructor
Lectures: Three hours a week

PHIL 363 PHILOSOPHY OF BIOLOGY
Students explore how biology informs our philosophical conceptions of nature and our place in it. Topics include evolutionary theory, human nature, adaptation, development, units of selection, function, species, altruism, the human genome project, conceptions of progress, and creationism.
Lecture: Three hours a week

HIST 311 SCIENCE, MAGIC, WITCHCRAFT AND THE OCCULT IN PREMODERN EUROPE
This course investigates how men and women sought to understand, explain, control and manipulate the natural world in the early modern period. Topics include medieval cosmology and astrology; alchemy and learned magic; changing views of the role of the devil in the natural world; witch belief and witch hunting. Particular attention is paid to how the traditions of learned magic informed the development of science in the seventeenth century.
PREREQUISITE: History 201 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

HIST 333 HEALTH CARE AND NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course explores the history of health, disease and medicine, focussing on North America from the time of contact between Native Peoples and Europeans, to the present. The course is organized around four major themes in the history of health and illness: historical epidemiology, social and political responses to health and disease, the rise of modern medicine and other health care groups, and the recent challenges to regular medical practice by alternative health care providers. Particular attention is paid to the effects of shifting systems of medical practice on patient experience.
PREREQUISITE: None.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

400 Level

DSJS 412 THEORIES OF THE BODY
This course introduces students to what is often called “body studies,” exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions.
PREREQUISITE: At least one Diversity and Social Justice Studies course, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week.

SOC 412 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH
Students adopt a salutogenic (health promotion and illness prevention) approach to examine the relationship between social factors (lifestyle, environment, and organization of the health care system) and health. Health is posited as a multi-dimensional construct. The implications of adopting a mainstream theoretical view of the relationship between social factors and health are investigated, i.e., how adopting a certain theoretical perspective can help to explain further or to hinder our understanding of the effect of social factors on health.
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and two 300-400 level courses in Sociology, Sociology/Anthropology, or Anthropology, and permission of the professor.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

HIST 434 MADNESS AND SOCIETY
This course examines the history of madness in comparative context from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present with a focus on Europe and North America. Topics include major historical developments in the understanding of madness such as traditional responses to unsoundness of mind, the development of asylums, the rise of professional psychiatry, scientific models of mental illness, and the community care movement. Pivotal theorists, including Freud, Kraepelin, Foucault, and Szasz are discussed.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

ANTH 401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being. The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (c.f. DSJS 401).
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and Anthropology 361 or any two 300-400 level courses; or permission of the instructor.  For Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) students, need two 300 or 400 level DSJS courses, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

ANTH 403 CYBERCULTURES
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (c.f. DSJS 402).
REGULAR PREREQUISITES and any two 300-400 level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology. For Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) students, need two 300 or 400 level DSJS courses, or permission of the instructor.

Contact UPEI