Techniques for efficient and effective decision-making.

Public Administration

Want more information about Public Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Commerce Officer
  • Employment Counsellor
  • Immigration Officer
  • Civil Servant
  • Social Worker
The Public Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 620-5143

The University of Prince Edward Island, through the School of Business, offers an interdisciplinary program of studies leading to a Certificate and a Diploma in Public Administration. The program is intended for working federal, provincial, and municipal public servants who wish to prepare themselves for higher administrative and management positions. Others with similar interests may apply. Every effort is made to schedule the compulsory and elective courses for the program at times convenient for those employed.

Objectives

The UPEI Public Administration program has three basic objectives:

  • to develop, along with specific skills, an understanding of the interpersonal and interorganizational roles of an individual within the public service;
  • to assist in the training and development of individuals for policy and administrative positions in the public service; and
  • to equip individuals with knowledge and techniques for efficient and effective decision making.

"With required courses that give the student knowledge of a number of different areas, and complemented by relevant electives, the Public Administration program has proven successful for both full-time students and professionals. The Public Administration programs are a great opportunity for working professionals to earn a post-secondary credential. The program is designed for current and aspiring public servants to enhance their understanding of public administration and enable them to fulfill their career aspirations. I have had the good fortune of teaching several of the required courses for the Public Administration programs and I am always impressed by the calibre of individuals who devote their professional lives to public service."

Susan Graham, BBA, MBA, MPA, EDD
Co-ordinator, UPEI Public Administration Program
Want more information about Public Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Commerce Officer
  • Employment Counsellor
  • Immigration Officer
  • Civil Servant
  • Social Worker
The Public Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 620-5143

The Certificate program is designed and intended for advancement to the middle management in the public service. To qualify for a Certificate, a student must complete ten (10) three semester-hour courses for a total of thirty (30) semester hours. Eight (8) of the three semester hour courses are compulsory and two (2) are chosen from the list of approved electives.

COMPULSORY CERTIFICATE COURSES

  • Organizational Behaviour - Business 171
  • Introductory Microeconomics - Economics 101
  • Introductory Macroeconomics - Economics 102
  • UPEI 101 and a writing intensive course
  • Professional Writing - English 381
  • Canadian Politics I: Government - Political Science 201
  • Law Politics and the Judicial Process I - Political Science 211
  • Canadian Public Administration - Political Science 311
Want more information about Public Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Commerce Officer
  • Employment Counsellor
  • Immigration Officer
  • Civil Servant
  • Social Worker
The Public Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 620-5143

The Diploma program is designed and intended for more advanced Public Administration education. To qualify for a Diploma, a student must complete an additional ten (10) three semester hour courses beyond the Certificate. Six (6) of the additional three semester hour courses are compulsory and four (4) are chosen from the list of approved electives. In addition, candidates for the Diploma in Public Administration must satisfy the Co-ordinator that they have completed a public service work experience of four months, full-time, in a public administration environment.

Compulsory Diploma Courses

  • Human Resource Management  – Business 272
  • Communications – Business 461
  • Organizational Development and Change – Business 471
  • Canadian Economic Problems – Economics 304
  • Canadian Federalism – Political Science 302
  • Canadian Public Policy – Political Science 314

Approved Electives

Electives from the following list may be selected for either the Certificate or the Diploma requirement but an elective cannot be used for both Certificate and Diploma.

Certificate and Diploma Electives

  • Management Information Systems – Business 241
  • Industrial Relations – Business 372
  • Business Law I – Business 301
  • Business Law II – Business 302
  • Prince Edward Island in the 20th Century – History 489
  • The Canadian Experience – Canadian Studies 301 and 302
  • Public Finance  – Economics 412
  • Politics and Government of Prince Edward Island – Political Science 202
  • Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II – Political Science 212
  • Canadian Provincial Politics: A Comparative Perspective – Political Science 322
  • Public Policy in Small Island Jurisdictions – Political Science 414

Any one of the following statistics courses:

  • Introductory Statistics I  – Statistics 221 (formerly Mathematics 221)
  • Statistics and Research Design I – Psychology 278
  • Methodology and Research I – Sociology 331
  • Management Science I – Business 251

The substitution of one university credit course not now in the listing of elective courses which is directly related to the present work of the applicant may be permitted with the approval of the program co-ordinator.

Want more information about Public Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Commerce Officer
  • Employment Counsellor
  • Immigration Officer
  • Civil Servant
  • Social Worker
The Public Administration program is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 620-5143

The Public Administration Coordinating Committtee is comprised of one nominee from each of the following:

  • School of Business Administration
  • Department of Political Science
  • Department of Economics
  • The Federal Public Service in Prince Edward Island
  • The Public Service of Prince Edward Island
  • The PEI Regional Group of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC)
Overview

The University of Prince Edward Island, through the School of Business, offers an interdisciplinary program of studies leading to a Certificate and a Diploma in Public Administration. The program is intended for working federal, provincial, and municipal public servants who wish to prepare themselves for higher administrative and management positions. Others with similar interests may apply. Every effort is made to schedule the compulsory and elective courses for the program at times convenient for those employed.

Objectives

The UPEI Public Administration program has three basic objectives:

  • to develop, along with specific skills, an understanding of the interpersonal and interorganizational roles of an individual within the public service;
  • to assist in the training and development of individuals for policy and administrative positions in the public service; and
  • to equip individuals with knowledge and techniques for efficient and effective decision making.

"With required courses that give the student knowledge of a number of different areas, and complemented by relevant electives, the Public Administration program has proven successful for both full-time students and professionals. The Public Administration programs are a great opportunity for working professionals to earn a post-secondary credential. The program is designed for current and aspiring public servants to enhance their understanding of public administration and enable them to fulfill their career aspirations. I have had the good fortune of teaching several of the required courses for the Public Administration programs and I am always impressed by the calibre of individuals who devote their professional lives to public service."

Co-ordinator, UPEI Public Administration Program
Susan Graham, BBA, MBA, MPA, EDD
Certificate

The Certificate program is designed and intended for advancement to the middle management in the public service. To qualify for a Certificate, a student must complete ten (10) three semester-hour courses for a total of thirty (30) semester hours. Eight (8) of the three semester hour courses are compulsory and two (2) are chosen from the list of approved electives.

COMPULSORY CERTIFICATE COURSES

  • Organizational Behaviour - Business 171
  • Introductory Microeconomics - Economics 101
  • Introductory Macroeconomics - Economics 102
  • UPEI 101 and a writing intensive course
  • Professional Writing - English 381
  • Canadian Politics I: Government - Political Science 201
  • Law Politics and the Judicial Process I - Political Science 211
  • Canadian Public Administration - Political Science 311
Diploma

The Diploma program is designed and intended for more advanced Public Administration education. To qualify for a Diploma, a student must complete an additional ten (10) three semester hour courses beyond the Certificate. Six (6) of the additional three semester hour courses are compulsory and four (4) are chosen from the list of approved electives. In addition, candidates for the Diploma in Public Administration must satisfy the Co-ordinator that they have completed a public service work experience of four months, full-time, in a public administration environment.

Compulsory Diploma Courses

  • Human Resource Management  – Business 272
  • Communications – Business 461
  • Organizational Development and Change – Business 471
  • Canadian Economic Problems – Economics 304
  • Canadian Federalism – Political Science 302
  • Canadian Public Policy – Political Science 314

Approved Electives

Electives from the following list may be selected for either the Certificate or the Diploma requirement but an elective cannot be used for both Certificate and Diploma.

Certificate and Diploma Electives

  • Management Information Systems – Business 241
  • Industrial Relations – Business 372
  • Business Law I – Business 301
  • Business Law II – Business 302
  • Prince Edward Island in the 20th Century – History 489
  • The Canadian Experience – Canadian Studies 301 and 302
  • Public Finance  – Economics 412
  • Politics and Government of Prince Edward Island – Political Science 202
  • Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II – Political Science 212
  • Canadian Provincial Politics: A Comparative Perspective – Political Science 322
  • Public Policy in Small Island Jurisdictions – Political Science 414

Any one of the following statistics courses:

  • Introductory Statistics I  – Statistics 221 (formerly Mathematics 221)
  • Statistics and Research Design I – Psychology 278
  • Methodology and Research I – Sociology 331
  • Management Science I – Business 251

The substitution of one university credit course not now in the listing of elective courses which is directly related to the present work of the applicant may be permitted with the approval of the program co-ordinator.

Coordinating Committee

The Public Administration Coordinating Committtee is comprised of one nominee from each of the following:

  • School of Business Administration
  • Department of Political Science
  • Department of Economics
  • The Federal Public Service in Prince Edward Island
  • The Public Service of Prince Edward Island
  • The PEI Regional Group of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC)

Overview

The University of Prince Edward Island, through the School of Business, offers an interdisciplinary program of studies leading to a Certificate and a Diploma in Public Administration. The program is intended for working federal, provincial, and municipal public servants who wish to prepare themselves for higher administrative and management positions. Others with similar interests may apply. Every effort is made to schedule the compulsory and elective courses for the program at times convenient for those employed.

Objectives

The UPEI Public Administration program has three basic objectives:

  • to develop, along with specific skills, an understanding of the interpersonal and interorganizational roles of an individual within the public service;
  • to assist in the training and development of individuals for policy and administrative positions in the public service; and
  • to equip individuals with knowledge and techniques for efficient and effective decision making.

"With required courses that give the student knowledge of a number of different areas, and complemented by relevant electives, the Public Administration program has proven successful for both full-time students and professionals. The Public Administration programs are a great opportunity for working professionals to earn a post-secondary credential. The program is designed for current and aspiring public servants to enhance their understanding of public administration and enable them to fulfill their career aspirations. I have had the good fortune of teaching several of the required courses for the Public Administration programs and I am always impressed by the calibre of individuals who devote their professional lives to public service."

Susan Graham, BBA, MBA, MPA, EDD
Co-ordinator, UPEI Public Administration Program

Certificate

The Certificate program is designed and intended for advancement to the middle management in the public service. To qualify for a Certificate, a student must complete ten (10) three semester-hour courses for a total of thirty (30) semester hours. Eight (8) of the three semester hour courses are compulsory and two (2) are chosen from the list of approved electives.

COMPULSORY CERTIFICATE COURSES

  • Organizational Behaviour - Business 171
  • Introductory Microeconomics - Economics 101
  • Introductory Macroeconomics - Economics 102
  • UPEI 101 and a writing intensive course
  • Professional Writing - English 381
  • Canadian Politics I: Government - Political Science 201
  • Law Politics and the Judicial Process I - Political Science 211
  • Canadian Public Administration - Political Science 311

Diploma

The Diploma program is designed and intended for more advanced Public Administration education. To qualify for a Diploma, a student must complete an additional ten (10) three semester hour courses beyond the Certificate. Six (6) of the additional three semester hour courses are compulsory and four (4) are chosen from the list of approved electives. In addition, candidates for the Diploma in Public Administration must satisfy the Co-ordinator that they have completed a public service work experience of four months, full-time, in a public administration environment.

Compulsory Diploma Courses

  • Human Resource Management  – Business 272
  • Communications – Business 461
  • Organizational Development and Change – Business 471
  • Canadian Economic Problems – Economics 304
  • Canadian Federalism – Political Science 302
  • Canadian Public Policy – Political Science 314

Approved Electives

Electives from the following list may be selected for either the Certificate or the Diploma requirement but an elective cannot be used for both Certificate and Diploma.

Certificate and Diploma Electives

  • Management Information Systems – Business 241
  • Industrial Relations – Business 372
  • Business Law I – Business 301
  • Business Law II – Business 302
  • Prince Edward Island in the 20th Century – History 489
  • The Canadian Experience – Canadian Studies 301 and 302
  • Public Finance  – Economics 412
  • Politics and Government of Prince Edward Island – Political Science 202
  • Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II – Political Science 212
  • Canadian Provincial Politics: A Comparative Perspective – Political Science 322
  • Public Policy in Small Island Jurisdictions – Political Science 414

Any one of the following statistics courses:

  • Introductory Statistics I  – Statistics 221 (formerly Mathematics 221)
  • Statistics and Research Design I – Psychology 278
  • Methodology and Research I – Sociology 331
  • Management Science I – Business 251

The substitution of one university credit course not now in the listing of elective courses which is directly related to the present work of the applicant may be permitted with the approval of the program co-ordinator.

Coordinating Committee

The Public Administration Coordinating Committtee is comprised of one nominee from each of the following:

  • School of Business Administration
  • Department of Political Science
  • Department of Economics
  • The Federal Public Service in Prince Edward Island
  • The Public Service of Prince Edward Island
  • The PEI Regional Group of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC)
Want more information about Public Administration? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Commerce Officer
Employment Counsellor
Immigration Officer
Civil Servant
Social Worker
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

EC101 INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS
This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of consumer and producer behaviour. Of particular concern is the role of the market in the allocation of resources and the distribution of income, and how these outcomes are affected by imperfections in the market system and by government policy.
Three hours a week.

EC102 INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS
An introduction to the development, tools and application of macroeconomic analysis in the Canadian economy. Topics discussed will include inflation, unemployment, monetary policy, fiscal policy as well as others.
Three hours a week.

GI151 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING
This foundational writing course provides an interdisciplinary approach to contemporary communications skills through the lens of current global issues. Students develop skills to write effectively, think critically, and communicate clearly in a variety of contexts. NOTE: This course is a graduation requirement for all first time first-entry undergraduate students beginning September 2008 EXCEPT for DVM, BEd, transfer students and students who have passed English 101.
Three hours a week

BUS171 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizational characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness.
Three hours a week

 

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

PST201 CANADIAN POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT
This course introduces and surveys the basic constitutional components of Canadian politics: Parliament (including the Crown, the House of Commons, the Senate, Cabinet, courts, and the bureaucracy), federalism (including the distribution of legislative authority, inter-governmental decision making, and fiscal federalism), and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Constitutional principles and actual practices of government are discussed. Lecture: Three hours a week.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST211 LAW, POLITICS & THE JUDICIAL PROCESS I
This course is designed to acquaint interested students with the nature of law. It has a Canadian focus with special reference to Prince Edward Island. The areas covered in this semester include sources of law, interests protected by the law, and fundamental legal and political concepts. Major areas of concentration are constitutional and civil law.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST212 LAW, POLITICS & THE JUDICIAL PROCESS II
In this course, students examine various areas of civil law. The politics of Prince Edward Island are used to illustrate the relationships between legal and political systems. 
Lecture: Three hours a week.

MATH221 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS I
The main objective of this course is to introduce the basic concepts of descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and the use of statistical software such as MINITAB to students in any discipline. More time is spent on statistical inference than on descriptive statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, rules of probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, one- and two-tail tests of hypotheses, and correlation and linear regression.
Three lecture hours a week.
Note: Credit will not be allowed for Mathematics 221 if a student has received credit for any of the following courses: Business 251, Education 481, Psychology271 and Sociology 332.

BUS241 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction and understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation and management decision-making. It concentrates on providing an understanding
of the tools and basic terminology needed to understand information systems and their role in the business environment. Topics include information systems concepts, a review of information technology concepts, the fundamentals of e-business, planning and development of information systems, and the management of these systems.

BUS252 MANAGEMENT SCIENCE II

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

BUS301 BUSINESS LAW
This course offers students a basic introduction to the legal system and, in particular, the areas of tort, property, and contract law. A major portion of the course is devoted to the study of the legal implications of contractual issues in business endeavours. Legal cases are used, when applicable, to illustrate principles of law.
Three hours a week.

PST302 CANADIAN FEDERALISM
This is a seminar course on the theory and practice of divided political authority. The aim is to understand the logic and attraction of federalism as a political theory and the problems of working out that idea in Canadian government, politics, and society. This course examines the constitution as a fundamental contract for shared rule between Ottawa and the provinces and traces federalism in intergovernmental relations and public policy. The course concludes with an overview of the important approaches and schools of thought in this field.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

BUS302 BUSINESS LAW II
This course expands on the basic concepts introduced in Business 301 and discusses some areas of law, not previously covered, which impact on business. The course work includes some written assignments regarding legal problems as well as a midterm and final exam.
Three hours a week.

EC304 CANADIAN ECONOMIC PROBLEMS
This course examines selected contemporary problems of the Canadian economy by focusing on the formulation and analysis of economic policies designed tod eal with these problems.
Three hours a week.

PST311 CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
This course introduces the study of public administration. It examines the theories, practices, and politics that shape decision-making and management in the Canadian public sector. Among the topics explored are theories of decision-making, organization, motivation, and democracy influencing public administration; the policy-making and political role of public servants; the growth and expansion of the Canadian state; and the evolution of financial and personnel management systems.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST314 CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY 
This course examines the evolution, nature, instruments, and consequences of Canadian public policy, particularly that of the Federal Government. In the first half of the course, students discuss the tools and frameworks used in public policy research and analysis and review the broad structure of Canadian public policy. In the second half of the course, students research areas or issues in Canadian public policy and present their findings in seminars and essays.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

SOC331 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH I

An examination and practical experience in current data-gathering techniques including experimental
and quasi-experimental designs, surveys and interviewing, the use of available documents, and
participant observation. Also covered are large scale sampling techniques, coding and procedures,
composite and simple measures, and panel analysis. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and
332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
Three hours a week.

BUS372 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

ENG381 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for
effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following:
analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions,
business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations.
Assignments, designed for the students particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the
goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve
these goals.
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

BUS441 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Human Resource Management (HRM) has become a strategic function for both private and public
organizations. This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and practical aspects of HRM.
It focuses on the personnel processes involved in the procurement, development and maintenance of
human resources, such as staffing, training and compensation. The course also includes a critical
examination of current personnel issues and trends.
Three hours a week

Calendar Courses

EC101 INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS
This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of consumer and producer behaviour. Of particular concern is the role of the market in the allocation of resources and the distribution of income, and how these outcomes are affected by imperfections in the market system and by government policy.
Three hours a week.

EC102 INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS
An introduction to the development, tools and application of macroeconomic analysis in the Canadian economy. Topics discussed will include inflation, unemployment, monetary policy, fiscal policy as well as others.
Three hours a week.

GI151 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING
This foundational writing course provides an interdisciplinary approach to contemporary communications skills through the lens of current global issues. Students develop skills to write effectively, think critically, and communicate clearly in a variety of contexts. NOTE: This course is a graduation requirement for all first time first-entry undergraduate students beginning September 2008 EXCEPT for DVM, BEd, transfer students and students who have passed English 101.
Three hours a week

BUS171 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizational characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness.
Three hours a week

 

PST201 CANADIAN POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT
This course introduces and surveys the basic constitutional components of Canadian politics: Parliament (including the Crown, the House of Commons, the Senate, Cabinet, courts, and the bureaucracy), federalism (including the distribution of legislative authority, inter-governmental decision making, and fiscal federalism), and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Constitutional principles and actual practices of government are discussed. Lecture: Three hours a week.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST211 LAW, POLITICS & THE JUDICIAL PROCESS I
This course is designed to acquaint interested students with the nature of law. It has a Canadian focus with special reference to Prince Edward Island. The areas covered in this semester include sources of law, interests protected by the law, and fundamental legal and political concepts. Major areas of concentration are constitutional and civil law.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST212 LAW, POLITICS & THE JUDICIAL PROCESS II
In this course, students examine various areas of civil law. The politics of Prince Edward Island are used to illustrate the relationships between legal and political systems. 
Lecture: Three hours a week.

MATH221 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS I
The main objective of this course is to introduce the basic concepts of descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and the use of statistical software such as MINITAB to students in any discipline. More time is spent on statistical inference than on descriptive statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, rules of probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, one- and two-tail tests of hypotheses, and correlation and linear regression.
Three lecture hours a week.
Note: Credit will not be allowed for Mathematics 221 if a student has received credit for any of the following courses: Business 251, Education 481, Psychology271 and Sociology 332.

BUS241 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction and understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation and management decision-making. It concentrates on providing an understanding
of the tools and basic terminology needed to understand information systems and their role in the business environment. Topics include information systems concepts, a review of information technology concepts, the fundamentals of e-business, planning and development of information systems, and the management of these systems.

BUS252 MANAGEMENT SCIENCE II

BUS301 BUSINESS LAW
This course offers students a basic introduction to the legal system and, in particular, the areas of tort, property, and contract law. A major portion of the course is devoted to the study of the legal implications of contractual issues in business endeavours. Legal cases are used, when applicable, to illustrate principles of law.
Three hours a week.

PST302 CANADIAN FEDERALISM
This is a seminar course on the theory and practice of divided political authority. The aim is to understand the logic and attraction of federalism as a political theory and the problems of working out that idea in Canadian government, politics, and society. This course examines the constitution as a fundamental contract for shared rule between Ottawa and the provinces and traces federalism in intergovernmental relations and public policy. The course concludes with an overview of the important approaches and schools of thought in this field.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

BUS302 BUSINESS LAW II
This course expands on the basic concepts introduced in Business 301 and discusses some areas of law, not previously covered, which impact on business. The course work includes some written assignments regarding legal problems as well as a midterm and final exam.
Three hours a week.

EC304 CANADIAN ECONOMIC PROBLEMS
This course examines selected contemporary problems of the Canadian economy by focusing on the formulation and analysis of economic policies designed tod eal with these problems.
Three hours a week.

PST311 CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
This course introduces the study of public administration. It examines the theories, practices, and politics that shape decision-making and management in the Canadian public sector. Among the topics explored are theories of decision-making, organization, motivation, and democracy influencing public administration; the policy-making and political role of public servants; the growth and expansion of the Canadian state; and the evolution of financial and personnel management systems.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST314 CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY 
This course examines the evolution, nature, instruments, and consequences of Canadian public policy, particularly that of the Federal Government. In the first half of the course, students discuss the tools and frameworks used in public policy research and analysis and review the broad structure of Canadian public policy. In the second half of the course, students research areas or issues in Canadian public policy and present their findings in seminars and essays.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

SOC331 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH I

An examination and practical experience in current data-gathering techniques including experimental
and quasi-experimental designs, surveys and interviewing, the use of available documents, and
participant observation. Also covered are large scale sampling techniques, coding and procedures,
composite and simple measures, and panel analysis. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and
332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
Three hours a week.

BUS372 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

ENG381 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for
effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following:
analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions,
business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations.
Assignments, designed for the students particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the
goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve
these goals.
Three hours a week

BUS441 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Human Resource Management (HRM) has become a strategic function for both private and public
organizations. This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and practical aspects of HRM.
It focuses on the personnel processes involved in the procurement, development and maintenance of
human resources, such as staffing, training and compensation. The course also includes a critical
examination of current personnel issues and trends.
Three hours a week

Calendar Courses

100 Level

EC101 INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS
This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of consumer and producer behaviour. Of particular concern is the role of the market in the allocation of resources and the distribution of income, and how these outcomes are affected by imperfections in the market system and by government policy.
Three hours a week.

EC102 INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS
An introduction to the development, tools and application of macroeconomic analysis in the Canadian economy. Topics discussed will include inflation, unemployment, monetary policy, fiscal policy as well as others.
Three hours a week.

GI151 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING
This foundational writing course provides an interdisciplinary approach to contemporary communications skills through the lens of current global issues. Students develop skills to write effectively, think critically, and communicate clearly in a variety of contexts. NOTE: This course is a graduation requirement for all first time first-entry undergraduate students beginning September 2008 EXCEPT for DVM, BEd, transfer students and students who have passed English 101.
Three hours a week

BUS171 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizational characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness.
Three hours a week

 

200 Level

PST201 CANADIAN POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT
This course introduces and surveys the basic constitutional components of Canadian politics: Parliament (including the Crown, the House of Commons, the Senate, Cabinet, courts, and the bureaucracy), federalism (including the distribution of legislative authority, inter-governmental decision making, and fiscal federalism), and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Constitutional principles and actual practices of government are discussed. Lecture: Three hours a week.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST211 LAW, POLITICS & THE JUDICIAL PROCESS I
This course is designed to acquaint interested students with the nature of law. It has a Canadian focus with special reference to Prince Edward Island. The areas covered in this semester include sources of law, interests protected by the law, and fundamental legal and political concepts. Major areas of concentration are constitutional and civil law.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST212 LAW, POLITICS & THE JUDICIAL PROCESS II
In this course, students examine various areas of civil law. The politics of Prince Edward Island are used to illustrate the relationships between legal and political systems. 
Lecture: Three hours a week.

MATH221 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS I
The main objective of this course is to introduce the basic concepts of descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and the use of statistical software such as MINITAB to students in any discipline. More time is spent on statistical inference than on descriptive statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, rules of probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, one- and two-tail tests of hypotheses, and correlation and linear regression.
Three lecture hours a week.
Note: Credit will not be allowed for Mathematics 221 if a student has received credit for any of the following courses: Business 251, Education 481, Psychology271 and Sociology 332.

BUS241 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction and understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation and management decision-making. It concentrates on providing an understanding
of the tools and basic terminology needed to understand information systems and their role in the business environment. Topics include information systems concepts, a review of information technology concepts, the fundamentals of e-business, planning and development of information systems, and the management of these systems.

BUS252 MANAGEMENT SCIENCE II

300 Level

BUS301 BUSINESS LAW
This course offers students a basic introduction to the legal system and, in particular, the areas of tort, property, and contract law. A major portion of the course is devoted to the study of the legal implications of contractual issues in business endeavours. Legal cases are used, when applicable, to illustrate principles of law.
Three hours a week.

PST302 CANADIAN FEDERALISM
This is a seminar course on the theory and practice of divided political authority. The aim is to understand the logic and attraction of federalism as a political theory and the problems of working out that idea in Canadian government, politics, and society. This course examines the constitution as a fundamental contract for shared rule between Ottawa and the provinces and traces federalism in intergovernmental relations and public policy. The course concludes with an overview of the important approaches and schools of thought in this field.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

BUS302 BUSINESS LAW II
This course expands on the basic concepts introduced in Business 301 and discusses some areas of law, not previously covered, which impact on business. The course work includes some written assignments regarding legal problems as well as a midterm and final exam.
Three hours a week.

EC304 CANADIAN ECONOMIC PROBLEMS
This course examines selected contemporary problems of the Canadian economy by focusing on the formulation and analysis of economic policies designed tod eal with these problems.
Three hours a week.

PST311 CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
This course introduces the study of public administration. It examines the theories, practices, and politics that shape decision-making and management in the Canadian public sector. Among the topics explored are theories of decision-making, organization, motivation, and democracy influencing public administration; the policy-making and political role of public servants; the growth and expansion of the Canadian state; and the evolution of financial and personnel management systems.
Lecture: Three hours a week.

PST314 CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY 
This course examines the evolution, nature, instruments, and consequences of Canadian public policy, particularly that of the Federal Government. In the first half of the course, students discuss the tools and frameworks used in public policy research and analysis and review the broad structure of Canadian public policy. In the second half of the course, students research areas or issues in Canadian public policy and present their findings in seminars and essays.
Seminar: Three hours a week.

SOC331 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH I

An examination and practical experience in current data-gathering techniques including experimental
and quasi-experimental designs, surveys and interviewing, the use of available documents, and
participant observation. Also covered are large scale sampling techniques, coding and procedures,
composite and simple measures, and panel analysis. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and
332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
Three hours a week.

BUS372 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

ENG381 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for
effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following:
analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions,
business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations.
Assignments, designed for the students particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the
goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve
these goals.
Three hours a week

400 Level

BUS441 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Human Resource Management (HRM) has become a strategic function for both private and public
organizations. This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and practical aspects of HRM.
It focuses on the personnel processes involved in the procurement, development and maintenance of
human resources, such as staffing, training and compensation. The course also includes a critical
examination of current personnel issues and trends.
Three hours a week

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