Emotion, behaviour, and the human mind.

Psychology

Want more information about Psychology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • There are many career options for undergraduate psychology students, as well as focused graduate studies opportunities.
The department of Psychology is located in Memorial Hall.

We encourage our students to fully engage in the process of liberal education. We encourage work across a broad range of elective courses in the arts and sciences, so that psychology study is enriched by a diverse context of academic disciplines and ways of experiencing, enquiring into, and making sense of our world.  Our students build skills in critical and creative thinking, effective reading, writing, and oral communication, research, and independent and collaborative problem solving.

In addition to teaching students in a wide range of psychology courses, members of our faculty have exciting programmes of research, often engaging both UPEI students and colleagues from across Canada and the world.  Our faculty members include award winning teachers and scholars, and people committed to service in the university and the broader community.  


 

Dr. Jason Doiron, PhD - Chair
Department of Psychology
Want more information about Psychology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • There are many career options for undergraduate psychology students, as well as focused graduate studies opportunities.
The department of Psychology is located in Memorial Hall.

Course Requirements

Eighteen (18) semester courses (54 semester hours) in Psychology which must include Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 4800 (Honours Literature Review) and Psychology 4900 (Honours Thesis). Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BA with a major in Psychology. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BSc with a major in Psychology. To graduate with an Honours degree requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

The Honours Thesis

The Honours Thesis will consist of a paper written in the format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association. The thesis will most typically report a small research project, but other alternatives include: (a) a review paper that includes an original theoretical overview of the topic, or (b) a critique of the theory, research, or practice of psychology. The thesis is evaluated by a committee of at least three faculty members including the student’s supervisor.  There is an oral defence of the thesis. The deadlines for Honours applications are September 1, January 3, and May 1 annually.

Admission Requirements

  1. A student must be a Psychology major.
  2. A student must have an overall average of at least 70% in all prior courses.  To remain in the program, a student must maintain an overall average of 70% in all courses and an average of 75% in Psychology courses.
  3. A student must formally apply to the Department of Psychology for admission.  The first step is to contact the Honours Co-ordinator or another member of the Psychology faculty who will advise the student of the steps in the application process.  This initial contact will normally occur during the first half of the Third Year. Students will be required to fill out an application form, and to provide an updated transcript.

Students will be expected to have selected an area of study, and to provide a preliminary proposal for an Honours Thesis before proceeding with the formal application process. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources, not all applicants who meet the formal requirements will be accepted. The completed Honours application should be submitted to the prospective Honours Thesis supervisor, who will then submit it to the Department for review.

OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE HONOURS PROGRAM

Because of the extra course requirements and the extra time consumed by the process of producing an Honours Thesis, early planning is important. Students may be required to pay part or all of the expenses to produce the Honours Thesis. The Department of Psychology intends to provide some financial support for students, but the amount will depend on (a) the funding the Department receives, and (b) the number of students in the program.

 

Want more information about Psychology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • There are many career options for undergraduate psychology students, as well as focused graduate studies opportunities.
The department of Psychology is located in Memorial Hall.

Requirements for a Major in Psychology

Students may declare a major in Psychology at any time. Majors are expected to take four required courses, Psychology 1010, 1020, 2780, and 2790 in their first two years. A formal review of each student's performance is conducted upon completion of the four core courses. Continuation of the program will be based upon a 70% average with no mark below 60% in the four core courses.

Bachelor of Arts

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Psychology must take at least fourteen semester courses (42 semester hours). In selecting these 14 courses, students must satisfy the following course selection criteria:

1. Majors are required to take:

  • Psychology 1010 Introduction to Psychology—Part I
  • Psychology 1020 Introduction to Psychology—Part II
  • Psychology 2780 Statistics and Research Design I
  • Psychology 2790 Statistics and Research Design II

2. Majors are required to take at least one (1) course in six (6) of the seven areas listed below.

3. Majors must take at least two (2) courses selected at the 3000-level or above.

4. Majors must take at least one (1) course selected at the 4000-level.

NOTE 1: Completion of Psychology 2780-2790 satisfies the Research Methods and Statistics area requirement.

NOTE 2: Criteria (3) and (4) may be met in the process of satisfying criterion (2). That is, a course may satisfy both an area and a level requirement.

NOTE 3: Other courses may satisfy an area requirement at the discretion of the Chair (e.g. Directed Studies courses).

NOTE 4: Other electives may be drawn from all other courses in Psychology including Directed Studies Courses (Psychology 4310-4320), cross-listed courses offered by other Departments, and summer session courses in Psychology.

NOTE 5: Psychology 4800 and 4900 are honours thesis courses and do not satisfy this requirement.

Behavioural Neuroscience

  • 2120 Drugs and Behaviour
  • 3110 Physiological Psychology
  • 3120 Brain and Behaviour
  • 3130 Introduction to Neuropsychology
  • 3210 Learning and Motivation: Basic Processes
  • 4030 Issues in Developmental Psychopharmacology

Clinical and Applied

  • 3520 Abnormal Psychology
  • 3530 Childhood Psychological Disorders
  • 3620 Ergonomics
  • 3930 Health Psychology
  • 4410 Existential – Phenomenological Psychology
  • 4530 Human Services: Integrating Theory and Practice
  • 4610 Psychological Assessment
  • 4620 Psychotherapy

Critical and Historical Perspectives

  • 2020 Introduction to History and Theory of Psychology
  • 3010 “Psychology” from the Ancient to the Modern World
  • 3020 The Emergence of Modern Psychology
  • 3330 Ecopsychology
  • 3850 Cultural Psychology
  • 3910 Psychology of Women
  • 3950 Gender and Violence
  • 4350 Gender and Sexuality
  • 4630 Critical Issues for Contemporary Psychology
  • 4720 Social Justice in Psychology

Developmental

  • 2010 Developmental Psychology—General
  • 3030 Psychology of Aging
  • 3050 Adolescent Development and Adjustment
  • 3080 Child Development
  • 3090 Adult Development

Personality and Social

  • 2220 Psychology of Personal Experience
  • 2420 Introduction to Social Psychology
  • 2910 Contemporary Psychoanalytic Thought
  • 3310 Creativity
  • 3420 Intimate Relationships
  • 3510 Theories of Personality

Perception and Cognition

  • 2610 Sensation and Perception I
  • 2620 Sensation and Perception II
  • 3810 Human Learning and Memory
  • 3820 Cognitive Psychology
  • 3830 Psycholinguistics
  • 4110 Consciousness
  • 4120 Music Cognition

Research Methods and Statistics

  • 2710 Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences I
  • 2780 Statistics and Research Design I
  • 2790 Statistics and Research Design II
  • 3220 Advanced Research Methods in Social Psychology
  • 3710 Advanced Statistics
  • 3740 Advanced Qualitative Research

Bachelor of Science

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Psychology will complete the Psychology course requirements as described above for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students seeking a BSc will also be required to complete a minimum of eight semester courses (24 semester hours) of course work in the Faculty of Science. Credit in each of the following courses is required

  1. Biology 1310 and 1320
  2. Mathematics 1120
  3. Chemistry 1110 and 1120 OR Physics 1210 and 1220
  4. Two courses which have laboratory components at the 2000-level or above in one of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Foods and Nutrition.  Both courses must be in the same discipline area.

 

Want more information about Psychology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • There are many career options for undergraduate psychology students, as well as focused graduate studies opportunities.
The department of Psychology is located in Memorial Hall.

Students may declare a minor in Psychology at any time. Minors complete the following core courses, preferably in their first two years: Psychology 1010-1020 (Introduction to Psychology I and II) and either Psychology 2780-2790 (Statistics and Research Design I and II) or Psychology 2510 (Thinking Critically About Psychological Research).  A formal review of each student’s performance is conducted upon completion of the core courses.  Continuation in the program requires a 70% average in the core courses with no mark below 60% in the core courses.

Students considering whether to take 2780-2790 or 2510 are advised that many upper-level courses are open only to students who have completed 2780-2790.  Students planning a minor, but wanting the option to change from a minor to a major in Psychology within the same degree, are advised that the major requires 2780-2790, and that 2510 does not count as one of the 14 Psychology courses required for a major (but would count as a non-Psychology elective for someone who becomes a major). Students completing a minor in Psychology complete at least seven Psychology courses, including the core courses, and including at least one course at the 3000- or 4000-level.
 

Want more information about Psychology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • There are many career options for undergraduate psychology students, as well as focused graduate studies opportunities.
The department of Psychology is located in Memorial Hall.
  • Thomy Nilsson, Professor Emeritus
  • Jason Doiron, Associate Professor, Chair
  • Annabel J. Cohen, Professor
  • Catherine L. Ryan, Professor
  • Philip B. Smith, Professor
  • Michael Arfken, Associate Professor
  • Scott Greer, Associate Professor
  • Stacey MacKinnon, Associate Professor
  • Colleen MacQuarrie, Associate Professor
  • Tracy Doucette, Assistant Professor
  • Nia Phillips, Assistant Professor
  • Vickie A Johnston, Lecturer
Overview

We encourage our students to fully engage in the process of liberal education. We encourage work across a broad range of elective courses in the arts and sciences, so that psychology study is enriched by a diverse context of academic disciplines and ways of experiencing, enquiring into, and making sense of our world.  Our students build skills in critical and creative thinking, effective reading, writing, and oral communication, research, and independent and collaborative problem solving.

In addition to teaching students in a wide range of psychology courses, members of our faculty have exciting programmes of research, often engaging both UPEI students and colleagues from across Canada and the world.  Our faculty members include award winning teachers and scholars, and people committed to service in the university and the broader community.  


 

Department of Psychology
Dr. Jason Doiron, PhD - Chair
Honours

Course Requirements

Eighteen (18) semester courses (54 semester hours) in Psychology which must include Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 4800 (Honours Literature Review) and Psychology 4900 (Honours Thesis). Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BA with a major in Psychology. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BSc with a major in Psychology. To graduate with an Honours degree requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

The Honours Thesis

The Honours Thesis will consist of a paper written in the format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association. The thesis will most typically report a small research project, but other alternatives include: (a) a review paper that includes an original theoretical overview of the topic, or (b) a critique of the theory, research, or practice of psychology. The thesis is evaluated by a committee of at least three faculty members including the student’s supervisor.  There is an oral defence of the thesis. The deadlines for Honours applications are September 1, January 3, and May 1 annually.

Admission Requirements

  1. A student must be a Psychology major.
  2. A student must have an overall average of at least 70% in all prior courses.  To remain in the program, a student must maintain an overall average of 70% in all courses and an average of 75% in Psychology courses.
  3. A student must formally apply to the Department of Psychology for admission.  The first step is to contact the Honours Co-ordinator or another member of the Psychology faculty who will advise the student of the steps in the application process.  This initial contact will normally occur during the first half of the Third Year. Students will be required to fill out an application form, and to provide an updated transcript.

Students will be expected to have selected an area of study, and to provide a preliminary proposal for an Honours Thesis before proceeding with the formal application process. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources, not all applicants who meet the formal requirements will be accepted. The completed Honours application should be submitted to the prospective Honours Thesis supervisor, who will then submit it to the Department for review.

OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE HONOURS PROGRAM

Because of the extra course requirements and the extra time consumed by the process of producing an Honours Thesis, early planning is important. Students may be required to pay part or all of the expenses to produce the Honours Thesis. The Department of Psychology intends to provide some financial support for students, but the amount will depend on (a) the funding the Department receives, and (b) the number of students in the program.

 

Major

Requirements for a Major in Psychology

Students may declare a major in Psychology at any time. Majors are expected to take four required courses, Psychology 1010, 1020, 2780, and 2790 in their first two years. A formal review of each student's performance is conducted upon completion of the four core courses. Continuation of the program will be based upon a 70% average with no mark below 60% in the four core courses.

Bachelor of Arts

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Psychology must take at least fourteen semester courses (42 semester hours). In selecting these 14 courses, students must satisfy the following course selection criteria:

1. Majors are required to take:

  • Psychology 1010 Introduction to Psychology—Part I
  • Psychology 1020 Introduction to Psychology—Part II
  • Psychology 2780 Statistics and Research Design I
  • Psychology 2790 Statistics and Research Design II

2. Majors are required to take at least one (1) course in six (6) of the seven areas listed below.

3. Majors must take at least two (2) courses selected at the 3000-level or above.

4. Majors must take at least one (1) course selected at the 4000-level.

NOTE 1: Completion of Psychology 2780-2790 satisfies the Research Methods and Statistics area requirement.

NOTE 2: Criteria (3) and (4) may be met in the process of satisfying criterion (2). That is, a course may satisfy both an area and a level requirement.

NOTE 3: Other courses may satisfy an area requirement at the discretion of the Chair (e.g. Directed Studies courses).

NOTE 4: Other electives may be drawn from all other courses in Psychology including Directed Studies Courses (Psychology 4310-4320), cross-listed courses offered by other Departments, and summer session courses in Psychology.

NOTE 5: Psychology 4800 and 4900 are honours thesis courses and do not satisfy this requirement.

Behavioural Neuroscience

  • 2120 Drugs and Behaviour
  • 3110 Physiological Psychology
  • 3120 Brain and Behaviour
  • 3130 Introduction to Neuropsychology
  • 3210 Learning and Motivation: Basic Processes
  • 4030 Issues in Developmental Psychopharmacology

Clinical and Applied

  • 3520 Abnormal Psychology
  • 3530 Childhood Psychological Disorders
  • 3620 Ergonomics
  • 3930 Health Psychology
  • 4410 Existential – Phenomenological Psychology
  • 4530 Human Services: Integrating Theory and Practice
  • 4610 Psychological Assessment
  • 4620 Psychotherapy

Critical and Historical Perspectives

  • 2020 Introduction to History and Theory of Psychology
  • 3010 “Psychology” from the Ancient to the Modern World
  • 3020 The Emergence of Modern Psychology
  • 3330 Ecopsychology
  • 3850 Cultural Psychology
  • 3910 Psychology of Women
  • 3950 Gender and Violence
  • 4350 Gender and Sexuality
  • 4630 Critical Issues for Contemporary Psychology
  • 4720 Social Justice in Psychology

Developmental

  • 2010 Developmental Psychology—General
  • 3030 Psychology of Aging
  • 3050 Adolescent Development and Adjustment
  • 3080 Child Development
  • 3090 Adult Development

Personality and Social

  • 2220 Psychology of Personal Experience
  • 2420 Introduction to Social Psychology
  • 2910 Contemporary Psychoanalytic Thought
  • 3310 Creativity
  • 3420 Intimate Relationships
  • 3510 Theories of Personality

Perception and Cognition

  • 2610 Sensation and Perception I
  • 2620 Sensation and Perception II
  • 3810 Human Learning and Memory
  • 3820 Cognitive Psychology
  • 3830 Psycholinguistics
  • 4110 Consciousness
  • 4120 Music Cognition

Research Methods and Statistics

  • 2710 Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences I
  • 2780 Statistics and Research Design I
  • 2790 Statistics and Research Design II
  • 3220 Advanced Research Methods in Social Psychology
  • 3710 Advanced Statistics
  • 3740 Advanced Qualitative Research

Bachelor of Science

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Psychology will complete the Psychology course requirements as described above for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students seeking a BSc will also be required to complete a minimum of eight semester courses (24 semester hours) of course work in the Faculty of Science. Credit in each of the following courses is required

  1. Biology 1310 and 1320
  2. Mathematics 1120
  3. Chemistry 1110 and 1120 OR Physics 1210 and 1220
  4. Two courses which have laboratory components at the 2000-level or above in one of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Foods and Nutrition.  Both courses must be in the same discipline area.

 

Minor

Students may declare a minor in Psychology at any time. Minors complete the following core courses, preferably in their first two years: Psychology 1010-1020 (Introduction to Psychology I and II) and either Psychology 2780-2790 (Statistics and Research Design I and II) or Psychology 2510 (Thinking Critically About Psychological Research).  A formal review of each student’s performance is conducted upon completion of the core courses.  Continuation in the program requires a 70% average in the core courses with no mark below 60% in the core courses.

Students considering whether to take 2780-2790 or 2510 are advised that many upper-level courses are open only to students who have completed 2780-2790.  Students planning a minor, but wanting the option to change from a minor to a major in Psychology within the same degree, are advised that the major requires 2780-2790, and that 2510 does not count as one of the 14 Psychology courses required for a major (but would count as a non-Psychology elective for someone who becomes a major). Students completing a minor in Psychology complete at least seven Psychology courses, including the core courses, and including at least one course at the 3000- or 4000-level.
 

Faculty
  • Thomy Nilsson, Professor Emeritus
  • Jason Doiron, Associate Professor, Chair
  • Annabel J. Cohen, Professor
  • Catherine L. Ryan, Professor
  • Philip B. Smith, Professor
  • Michael Arfken, Associate Professor
  • Scott Greer, Associate Professor
  • Stacey MacKinnon, Associate Professor
  • Colleen MacQuarrie, Associate Professor
  • Tracy Doucette, Assistant Professor
  • Nia Phillips, Assistant Professor
  • Vickie A Johnston, Lecturer

Overview

We encourage our students to fully engage in the process of liberal education. We encourage work across a broad range of elective courses in the arts and sciences, so that psychology study is enriched by a diverse context of academic disciplines and ways of experiencing, enquiring into, and making sense of our world.  Our students build skills in critical and creative thinking, effective reading, writing, and oral communication, research, and independent and collaborative problem solving.

In addition to teaching students in a wide range of psychology courses, members of our faculty have exciting programmes of research, often engaging both UPEI students and colleagues from across Canada and the world.  Our faculty members include award winning teachers and scholars, and people committed to service in the university and the broader community.  


 

Dr. Jason Doiron, PhD - Chair
Department of Psychology

Honours

Course Requirements

Eighteen (18) semester courses (54 semester hours) in Psychology which must include Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 4800 (Honours Literature Review) and Psychology 4900 (Honours Thesis). Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BA with a major in Psychology. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BSc with a major in Psychology. To graduate with an Honours degree requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

The Honours Thesis

The Honours Thesis will consist of a paper written in the format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association. The thesis will most typically report a small research project, but other alternatives include: (a) a review paper that includes an original theoretical overview of the topic, or (b) a critique of the theory, research, or practice of psychology. The thesis is evaluated by a committee of at least three faculty members including the student’s supervisor.  There is an oral defence of the thesis. The deadlines for Honours applications are September 1, January 3, and May 1 annually.

Admission Requirements

  1. A student must be a Psychology major.
  2. A student must have an overall average of at least 70% in all prior courses.  To remain in the program, a student must maintain an overall average of 70% in all courses and an average of 75% in Psychology courses.
  3. A student must formally apply to the Department of Psychology for admission.  The first step is to contact the Honours Co-ordinator or another member of the Psychology faculty who will advise the student of the steps in the application process.  This initial contact will normally occur during the first half of the Third Year. Students will be required to fill out an application form, and to provide an updated transcript.

Students will be expected to have selected an area of study, and to provide a preliminary proposal for an Honours Thesis before proceeding with the formal application process. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources, not all applicants who meet the formal requirements will be accepted. The completed Honours application should be submitted to the prospective Honours Thesis supervisor, who will then submit it to the Department for review.

OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE HONOURS PROGRAM

Because of the extra course requirements and the extra time consumed by the process of producing an Honours Thesis, early planning is important. Students may be required to pay part or all of the expenses to produce the Honours Thesis. The Department of Psychology intends to provide some financial support for students, but the amount will depend on (a) the funding the Department receives, and (b) the number of students in the program.

 

Major

Requirements for a Major in Psychology

Students may declare a major in Psychology at any time. Majors are expected to take four required courses, Psychology 1010, 1020, 2780, and 2790 in their first two years. A formal review of each student's performance is conducted upon completion of the four core courses. Continuation of the program will be based upon a 70% average with no mark below 60% in the four core courses.

Bachelor of Arts

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Psychology must take at least fourteen semester courses (42 semester hours). In selecting these 14 courses, students must satisfy the following course selection criteria:

1. Majors are required to take:

  • Psychology 1010 Introduction to Psychology—Part I
  • Psychology 1020 Introduction to Psychology—Part II
  • Psychology 2780 Statistics and Research Design I
  • Psychology 2790 Statistics and Research Design II

2. Majors are required to take at least one (1) course in six (6) of the seven areas listed below.

3. Majors must take at least two (2) courses selected at the 3000-level or above.

4. Majors must take at least one (1) course selected at the 4000-level.

NOTE 1: Completion of Psychology 2780-2790 satisfies the Research Methods and Statistics area requirement.

NOTE 2: Criteria (3) and (4) may be met in the process of satisfying criterion (2). That is, a course may satisfy both an area and a level requirement.

NOTE 3: Other courses may satisfy an area requirement at the discretion of the Chair (e.g. Directed Studies courses).

NOTE 4: Other electives may be drawn from all other courses in Psychology including Directed Studies Courses (Psychology 4310-4320), cross-listed courses offered by other Departments, and summer session courses in Psychology.

NOTE 5: Psychology 4800 and 4900 are honours thesis courses and do not satisfy this requirement.

Behavioural Neuroscience

  • 2120 Drugs and Behaviour
  • 3110 Physiological Psychology
  • 3120 Brain and Behaviour
  • 3130 Introduction to Neuropsychology
  • 3210 Learning and Motivation: Basic Processes
  • 4030 Issues in Developmental Psychopharmacology

Clinical and Applied

  • 3520 Abnormal Psychology
  • 3530 Childhood Psychological Disorders
  • 3620 Ergonomics
  • 3930 Health Psychology
  • 4410 Existential – Phenomenological Psychology
  • 4530 Human Services: Integrating Theory and Practice
  • 4610 Psychological Assessment
  • 4620 Psychotherapy

Critical and Historical Perspectives

  • 2020 Introduction to History and Theory of Psychology
  • 3010 “Psychology” from the Ancient to the Modern World
  • 3020 The Emergence of Modern Psychology
  • 3330 Ecopsychology
  • 3850 Cultural Psychology
  • 3910 Psychology of Women
  • 3950 Gender and Violence
  • 4350 Gender and Sexuality
  • 4630 Critical Issues for Contemporary Psychology
  • 4720 Social Justice in Psychology

Developmental

  • 2010 Developmental Psychology—General
  • 3030 Psychology of Aging
  • 3050 Adolescent Development and Adjustment
  • 3080 Child Development
  • 3090 Adult Development

Personality and Social

  • 2220 Psychology of Personal Experience
  • 2420 Introduction to Social Psychology
  • 2910 Contemporary Psychoanalytic Thought
  • 3310 Creativity
  • 3420 Intimate Relationships
  • 3510 Theories of Personality

Perception and Cognition

  • 2610 Sensation and Perception I
  • 2620 Sensation and Perception II
  • 3810 Human Learning and Memory
  • 3820 Cognitive Psychology
  • 3830 Psycholinguistics
  • 4110 Consciousness
  • 4120 Music Cognition

Research Methods and Statistics

  • 2710 Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences I
  • 2780 Statistics and Research Design I
  • 2790 Statistics and Research Design II
  • 3220 Advanced Research Methods in Social Psychology
  • 3710 Advanced Statistics
  • 3740 Advanced Qualitative Research

Bachelor of Science

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Psychology will complete the Psychology course requirements as described above for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students seeking a BSc will also be required to complete a minimum of eight semester courses (24 semester hours) of course work in the Faculty of Science. Credit in each of the following courses is required

  1. Biology 1310 and 1320
  2. Mathematics 1120
  3. Chemistry 1110 and 1120 OR Physics 1210 and 1220
  4. Two courses which have laboratory components at the 2000-level or above in one of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Foods and Nutrition.  Both courses must be in the same discipline area.

 

Minor

Students may declare a minor in Psychology at any time. Minors complete the following core courses, preferably in their first two years: Psychology 1010-1020 (Introduction to Psychology I and II) and either Psychology 2780-2790 (Statistics and Research Design I and II) or Psychology 2510 (Thinking Critically About Psychological Research).  A formal review of each student’s performance is conducted upon completion of the core courses.  Continuation in the program requires a 70% average in the core courses with no mark below 60% in the core courses.

Students considering whether to take 2780-2790 or 2510 are advised that many upper-level courses are open only to students who have completed 2780-2790.  Students planning a minor, but wanting the option to change from a minor to a major in Psychology within the same degree, are advised that the major requires 2780-2790, and that 2510 does not count as one of the 14 Psychology courses required for a major (but would count as a non-Psychology elective for someone who becomes a major). Students completing a minor in Psychology complete at least seven Psychology courses, including the core courses, and including at least one course at the 3000- or 4000-level.
 

Faculty

  • Thomy Nilsson, Professor Emeritus
  • Jason Doiron, Associate Professor, Chair
  • Annabel J. Cohen, Professor
  • Catherine L. Ryan, Professor
  • Philip B. Smith, Professor
  • Michael Arfken, Associate Professor
  • Scott Greer, Associate Professor
  • Stacey MacKinnon, Associate Professor
  • Colleen MacQuarrie, Associate Professor
  • Tracy Doucette, Assistant Professor
  • Nia Phillips, Assistant Professor
  • Vickie A Johnston, Lecturer
Want more information about Psychology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Award-winning Faculty: 
4
Careers: 
There are many career options for undergraduate psychology students, as well as focused graduate studies opportunities.
Course Level: 
1000 Level
Courses: 
PSY-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY: Part I A general introductory survey of theory and research on basic psychological processes: research methodology in psychology, biological basis of behaviour, sensation and perception, learning and motivation, memory and cognition. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
PSY-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY: Part II An introduction to psychological theory in the form of application of the basic processes (Psychology 1010) to the individual in a social context. Areas include developmental psychology, personality theory and testing, emotion, personal adjustment and problems in living, therapies, and social psychology. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
2000 Level
Courses: 
PSY-2010 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (offered in both semesters) This survey course examines human development across the life span through physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional domains. The course includes discussions surrounding applications of developmental theory in various contexts, including public policy, education, counselling, and health domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research papers are designed to encourage students to evaluate developmental change critically and to apply their knowledge to their communities. NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Psychology 2010 if a student has already received credit for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2020 - INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY AND THEORY OF PSYCHOLOGY This course offers an introduction to the history of psychology, beginning with the early modern period. We examine Enlightenment philosophy, Darwin and the naturalization of the mind, and the experimental revolution of the 19th Century. These developments lead to the main focus for the course: the founding of psychology as a separate discipline. The origins of psychology in North America are contrasted with the development of German psychology, and the impact of the different social and cultural contexts is explored. Students also learn about the first schools of psychology in the early 20th Century, the social and historical construction of "normal" and "abnormal", the role of psychological testing in the professionalization of psychology, and the emergence of various systems in psychology, such as psychoanalysis, behaviourism, humanistic, and cognitive psychologies. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2120 - DRUGS AND BEHAVIOUR This introduction to psychopharmacology examines drugs which act on the nervous system and their subsequent impact on behaviour. Topics include basic neurophysiology and mechanisms of drug addiction, tolerance and withdrawal. Discussion focuses on the effects and underlying mechanisms of several drug types including antidepressants, antipsychotics, alcohol, cocaine, hallucinogens, nicotine, and caffeine. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2220 - PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL EXPERIENCE This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideas in Humanistic and Existential psychologies, and involves applying and integrating psychological theory to personal experience. Students learn about theorists such as Jung, Rogers, Maslow, May, and Frankl, and the ways in which meaning, purpose, choice, and consciousness are fundamental to existence. The development of humanistic psychology from phenomenological and existential approaches is considered, and the differences from experimental psychologies are discussed. As ways of comprehending our lives, themes of personal ('self ') and interpersonal ('self-in-relation') experience will be explored within a larger sociocultural context. Topics may include: being/becoming, intentionality, authenticity, values, growth, agency, identity, anxiety, and transcendent experience. Since this course focuses on finding ways for students to apply psychological insights to their every day lives, experiential learning, personal reflection and class discussion will be emphasized. Active class participation is therefore essential for this course, and may involve journals, small group work, written responses to the readings, or other opportunities for personal reflection, both inside and outside of class. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Psychology at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
PSY-2420 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (offered in both semesters) This course focuses on the ways in which an individual's thoughts, feelings, and actions are influenced by the social environment. It provides an introduction to major theories, principles, methods and findings of the discipline. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, gender, attraction, aggression, helping, conformity, obedience, group interaction, and cultural influences. Through a variety of assignments students are encouraged to attend to the operation of social psychological principles in daily living. The course includes both lectures and participation in group experiences. Cross-listed with Sociology and Family Science (cf. Sociology 2820 and Family Science 2430) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and/or Sociology 1010
3 hours credit
PSY-2510 - THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH Designed for non-Psychology majors, this course develops their abilities as consumers of psychological research. Students learn about paradigms of research and knowledge, consider key assumptions in both quantitative and qualitative research, and explore how quantitative and qualitative perspectives influence the construction of knowledge. Students apply critical thinking strategies within the context of psychological research and develop skills to evaluate claims made about psychological phenomena in the popular media and professional literature. Concepts explored include understanding and prediction, description and inference, biases in research conduct and communication, representativeness, evaluating testimonials, correlation and causation, multiple causation, operational definitions, placebo effects, experimental control, and probability. NOTE: This course is not open to students who already have earned credit for Psychology 2780 or 2790, or who are currently enrolled in Psychology 2780 or 2790. This course cannot be counted as one of the 14 courses required to earn a major in Psychology.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2610 - SENSATION AND PERCEPTION I This course examines how we see the world around us. It considers principles and theories of how visual information is received, and how it is processed and combined to produce visual images. Starting with optics of the eye, the course proceeds to the conversion of light information into nerve impulses which convey the information to the brain. The course also explains how that information is processed to produce sensations of brightness, shape, color and motion. This course also considers how these sensations are combined into an image of the world. Additional topics include aspects of light measurement, clinical aspects of optometry, and visual aesthetic perception. Three hours per week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2620 - SENSATION AND PERCEPTION II This course examines how the more basic senses work and how they contribute to our awareness of the world. The sense of touch seems to give us direct contact with the world. The abilities to sense chemicals in the food we eat and the air we breathe guide not only what we eat but also our emotions. Sensing vibrations in air enables us to detect events out of sight and to receive both verbal and musical communications from others. These vastly different sources of information-mechanical, chemical and gravitational, as well as the electromagnetic basis of vision are sensed by specialized biological receptors that transform the information into nerve impulses. This course examines how the principles used by the brain to interpret the diverse information are surprisingly similar. Three hours per week
3 hours credit
PSY-2710 - STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES I (offered first semester) This course is an introduction to applied statistics as used by behavioural scientists in measurement, data, analysis, and design of experiments. This course stresses both an understanding of the rationale governing the selection of appropriate designs or techniques as well as practical experience in calculation. Topics include: scaling, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, means test (z and t), correlational techniques, chi-square and other non-parametric techniques, and analysis of variance. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and enrolment in the School of Nursing, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-2780 - STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN I (offered in first semester) This course introduces qualitative and quantitative paradigms, which frame distinctive ways of knowing the world, and create divergent approaches to research. Qualitative methods emphasize how psychological concepts have various meanings across culture and time and include observations and interviews as well as analytical techniques to create meaning from the research. Quantitative methods emphasize how various statistical and experimental orientations to the world form a distinctive perspective for research and assumptions about reality. Key concepts include operational definitions, descriptive statistics, normal distribution, z scores, probability, graphing, and the creation of tables. The course includes communication of research findings using APA format, and consideration of research ethics within both paradigms.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020; Psychology 2780L
3 hours credit
PSY-2790 - STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN II (offered second semester) Building on the foundation created in Psychology 2780, this course examines quantitative research methods for observation based on measurements, emphasizing efforts to control observation conditions. Research design paradigms include within-participant experiments, between-participant experiments, and quasi-experiments, which can be analyzed in terms of probability theory to enable using inferential statistics. The steps to statistical hypothesis testing will teach approaches and assumptions for chi-square, correlation, t-tests, and one-way ANOVA. Reflections on the limitations inherent in the methodologies revisit the concepts of paradigms, assumptions, and their implications. The course includes communication of research findings using the APA format, and consideration of research ethics. Three hours a week class; one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780 with a minimum grade of 60% ; Psychology 2790L
3 hours credit
PSY-2910 - CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOANALYTIC THOUGHT This course is devoted to exploring the work of Sigmund Freud, with special attention paid to his theory of mind and its emphasis on the unconscious and sexuality. We also consider some of Freud's case studies, his emphasis on narrative, his controversial theory of women, and an overview of his considerable legacy in psychology, psychiatry, and Western culture, including some examples of his reception in music, film, and art.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
3000 Level
Courses: 
PSY-3010 - "PSYCHOLOGY" FROM THE ANCIENT TO THE MODERN WORLD Students begin by considering the question "What is history?" and the issues of historiography. Special attention is paid to the early Greek philosophers and the foundational ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The emphasis on a 'soul' by early Christian writers is examined, and various philosophies of mind from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the social and political context in the construction of knowledge, and an appreciation of this context is fostered through the reading of original texts. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3020 - MODERN PSYCHOLOGICAL CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE The focus for this course is the historical evolution of various contemporary psychological concepts and practices. It begins with a general introduction to the intersection of psychology, historiography, and philosophy of science. Then, unlike the traditional "grand narrative" history, students learn about the history of psychological concepts and methods by starting with the present and then investigating their more proximate influences. Topics will vary year to year but may include: the history of statistics, the development of psychotherapy, and the history of introspection and its use as a psychological method; other topics include the history of consciousness, behaviour, memory, the self, race, gender, and sexuality. Debates over how research should proceed with regard to these topics will also be addressed. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510; Psychology 2020
3 hours credit
PSY-3030 - PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING This course is designed to examine the psychology of aging from a variety of perspectives, theories, and research themes applicable to the later part of adulthood. Situating the psychology of aging within the broader discipline of gerontological studies, this course examines historical and current conceptions of aging along with contemporary research topics ranging across the physical to the psycho-social domains of aging. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to engage students in a critical analysis of gerontological concepts, research directions, and practices. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3030). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3050 - ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND ADJUSTMENT This course examines both the research and theoretical perspectives in areas that are integral to an understanding of the period of adolescence and of adolescents themselves. We address the following areas: puberty and psychobiology; the development of cognition and social cognition; the formation of identity, including career options, and the development of sexuality and a system of values, factors that influence the formation of identity, such as the family, the peer group, and the media, the school experience; and issues in adolescent development such as some aspects of psychopathology, juvenile justice, and the problems encountered by indigenous youth. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3050). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3080 - CHILD DEVELOPMENT This course explores children's development in depth by focussing on the various domains of change from birth to adolescence. Themes of change and stability throughout childhood are examined using analytical and descriptive theories of development. Implications of developmental approaches are examined for practice and public policy domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to assess critically these developmental changes and to apply that understanding to other contexts. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3080). Three hours a week NOTE: Students who have taken either 3040 or 3410 will not be eligible to enrol in 3080 without the instructor's permission.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3090 - ADULT DEVELOPMENT The purpose of this course is to better understand adult development by focussing on themes of change and stability from young adulthood through to older adulthood. Students use analytical and descriptive theories of adult development to explore how adults negotiate physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to evaluate critically the contemporary research in adult development and to apply their understanding of adult development to a wide array of contexts and policy environments. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3100). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3110 - PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY This course focuses on the nervous system as the basis of all experience and behaviour. It examines how a biological perspective of the brain developed, how neuroanatomy defines brain function, how neurons transmit information, how body movement is controlled, and how touch, pain, sleep and arousal work. Three hours a week, two hours a week laboratory. Note: Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120, Psychology 2780-2790 or Biology 2040, or permission of instructor ; Psychology 3110L
3 hours credit
PSY-3120 - BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR This course builds on Psychology 311 to explore how far human behaviour can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Topics include: the operation of basic motivational mechanisms that regulate breathing, temperature, hunger and thirst; arousal, sleep and sexual behaviour; emotion, brain pathology and mental disorder; learning and memory. Three hours a week class, two hours laboratory a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3110 or Biology 2210, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3130 - INTRODUCTION TO NEUROPSYCHOLOGY This course explores current concepts of the function of the human forebrain as revealed through cortical damage and degenerative diseases. The course addresses basic principles of cortical organization and function and how these relate to issues of localization of function, hemispheric dominance, and sex differences in brain and behaviour. These principles are then applied to discussions of the cause and diagnosis of specific language, memory, and sensory dysfunctions resulting from developmental disorders, head trauma, and degenerative diseases. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120, Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 3110, or permission of instructor. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor; Psychology 3130L
3 hours credit
PSY-3210 - LEARNING AND MOTIVATION: BASIC PROCESSES This course provides a survey of learning theories presented by Thorndike, Pavlov, Hull, Skinner and others. It will concentrate on some of the controversial issues between the S-R and cognitive approaches, and explore some of the findings relating to the fundamental principles of learning, motivation, reinforcement, incentives, effects of punishment and the problem of generalization and discrimination in learning. The applicability of some of the basic principles discovered in the animal laboratory to the everyday behaviour of people will also be examined. Three hours a week class, two hours laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-3220 - ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY This seminar course is designed to expand your knowledge concerning advanced research methods used in social psychology. In this course, students will think critically about experimental research methods in social psychology and acquire hands-on experience designing and conducting social psychological research in collaboration with others (specific topics will vary from year to year). In addition, students will develop their skills in orally presenting research proposals/ results and extend their skills in writing APA format research papers. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and Psychology 2420
3 hours credit
PSY-3310 - CREATIVITY This course examines the nature of creativity as viewed from the psychoanalytic, cognitive problem solving, and humanistic existential perspectives. Topics include personality correlates of creative people, criteria and methods for judging creativity, the creative process, and the facilitation of creative potential. Small group participation is required. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Psychology at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
PSY-3330 - ECOPSYCHOLOGY This seminar-style course examines the important role of the human relationship with nature in order to better understand psychological experience and ecological issues. It explores a variety of factors that may contribute to human disconnection from nature (such as technology, consumerism, psychological views of health and of the self) and ways of developing more sustainable relationships and deepening personal connections with nature (such as direct experience in nature, environmental restoration and activism, nature-based worldviews and psychotherapies, and systems theory). Some "field work" is required. Three hours a week seminar, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 2510.
3 hours credit
PSY-3420 - INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS This course is designed to examine a variety of areas of study within the field of intimate relationships. Through in-class discussion of the major theoretical frameworks of the discipline and by designing their own original relationship research proposals, students will gain an increased understanding of the multifaceted nature of intimate relationships. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: attraction, social cognition, interdependency, conflict, and love. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3440)
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2420 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510.
3 hours credit
PSY-3510 - THEORIES OF PERSONALITY The purpose of the course is to survey, compare and evaluate different approaches to the study of personality. Relevant personality theory and research will be reviewed within a broad framework including the perspectives of the psychodynamic, behaviour theory, cognitive, and humanistic approaches. The processes of personality organization and disorganization will be examined from different theoretical perspectives. The emphasis will be placed on current personality theory and its relevance to the student as a person as well as its relevance to other psychological theories. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3520 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY A critical review of theories and research in psychopathology and psychotherapy. Special emphasis will be placed on a discussion of what constitutes abnormality and normality, and on the various models of deviance developed by the psychoanalytic, learning, existential-phenomenological and social-interpersonal approaches. Attention will be directed to a study of how these models are generated and the social consequences of designating an individual deviant. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3530 - CHILDHOOD PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS This course examines developmental, behavioural, emotional, and social disorders in childhood. Those considered include autism, mental disability, conduct disorders, childhood depression, fears and anxieties, problems in social relationships, and health-related problems. Students explore the implications of various models for understanding the definitions, origins, and treatments of disorders. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and Psychology 3520
3 hours credit
PSY-3620 - ERGONOMICS This course in applied psychology explains how to take into account human abilities and requirements in regard to tasks, equipment, facilities, and environment with an emphasis on improving satisfaction, performance, efficiency, and safety. Included for study are examples of jobs, tools, information, and buildings. An individually-designed project provides an opportunity for students to apply ergonomic principles. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, or Engineering 1210 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3710 - ADVANCED STATISTICS A more advanced course in applied statistics as used by behavioural scientists in designing and analyzing experiments and field studies. The major concentration of the course is analysis of variance and linear regression. In addition students are introduced to a variety of topics in multivariate statistics, including multiple regression and correlation, discriminant analysis, Hotelling's T2 and multivariate analysis of variance. NOTE: Psychology 3710 and Mathematics 3120 may not be double credited without the permission of theDean and the Chair of the Department in which the second credit is being sought.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790. Students majoring in areas other than psychology may enrol with permission of the instructor, provided they have completed an introductory statistics course; Psychology 3710L
3 hours credit
PSY-3740 - ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH The purpose of this course is to help students gain a theoretical, practical and critical understanding of qualitative research methodology, and to teach skills for the execution of research projects based upon qualitative data. Qualitative research is research that focuses upon understanding, rather than predicting or controlling phenomena. Nine different paradigms of qualitative research methodology, their implications, and applications, are examined in this course. These paradigms are: data display, grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, psychobiography and historiography, psychoanalytic approaches, narrative psychology, hermeneutics and textual deconstruction, and social constructivism. Political and ethical issues are also highlighted in order to problematize and promote more critically informed inquiry. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3740) Lecture/Tutorial: Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790
3 hours credit
PSY-3810 - HUMAN LEARNING AND MEMORY This course provides a survey of contemporary approaches to the problem of human learning and memory. It involves an examination of theories and research relating to the structure and content of human memory, information encoding, and retrieval processes. A variety of related topics including mental imagery, mnemonics, the structure of intelligence tests, and the effects of drugs on memory may also be included. Laboratory exercises will involve work with human subjects. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.; Psychology 3810L
3 hours credit
PSY-3820 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY This course examines recent developments in cognitive psychology with special emphasis on the study of thinking, problem solving and decision making. Its topics include theories and research in inductive and deductive reasoning, information processing approaches to thinking and problem solving, and the implications of the cognitive perspective for our understanding of intelligence, creativity and mental development. A lab will provide students with the opportunity to perform problem solving demonstrations, test representative phenomena, analyze their own data, and examine the results in terms of current theories. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3830 - PSYCHOLINGUISTICS This course reviews the psychology of language from the perspectives of sensation, perception, cognition, and interpersonal processes. Topics include the nature of speech production and perception, the nature of grammatical and lexical knowledge, semantics and pragmatics, language acquisition, the social bases of human communication, and computer systems for language understanding. Three hours a week class, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3850 - CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY This course investigates how culture shapes human thought, behaviour, and the field of psychology broadly. The course begins with discussion of theoretical foundations and research methods in cultural psychology, followed by the application of a cultural perspective to psychological concepts including: self and identity, relationships, development, morality and justice, emotions, cognition, and physical and psychological health. Lectures, discussion, and in-class assignments challenge students to consider the sizeable impact of culture on human life. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3840).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3910 - PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN This course will focus on women's development throughout the life span. Topics will include: views of the nature of women, biological influences, the socialization process and its consequences at the individual, interpersonal relationship, and societal levels, as well as recent alternative views of the psychology of women. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3910) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3930 - HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY This course examines how psychological, social, and biological factors interact to influence health and illness. Students explore the systematic application of psychology to health promotion and maintenance, illness prevention and treatment, the determinants of health and illness, health care systems, and health policy. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3950 - GENDER AND VIOLENCE This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies and Family Science (cf. DSJS 3950 and Family Science 3950).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
4000 Level
Courses: 
PSY-4030 - ISSUES IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY (offered in alternating years) This is an advanced course in drugs and behaviour focusing primarily on issues of developmental differences in drug action and drug effects. Because many drug effects are determined by the maturity of the brain, some time is spent on developmental aspects of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. A large part of the course focuses on factors which determine, or contribute to, developmental deficits/effects consequent to early (pre-and perinatal) drug exposure. Within this developmental framework, current pharmacological models, and debates surrounding pharmacological-based causes and treatments of disorders, such as hyperactivity and Alzheimer's disease, are discussed. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120 and Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of the instructor. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4110 - CONSCIOUSNESS This course focuses on what is arguably the most profound issue to humankind: Consciousness. It is more than our experience of the world around us as compiled by the brain from various sense organs. Also compiled are nerve impulses from within that tell us about our body and our past. We use it to plan what we do both in the next few seconds and for as far ahead as we can envision a future. Consciousness is what and who we are. Until the 1990s the word was almost taboo in psychology - not used by respectable scientists. Yet as cognitive psychology burst forth in the 1970s, the study of consciousness soon followed it into respectability, aided by ever more sophisticated methods of studying the brain. This course reviews the philosophical ideas that preceded and then accompanied the science. It examines the current state of what we know about the operations of the brain that produce consciousness.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4120 - MUSIC COGNITION This course focuses on the mental processes underlying music perception, performance and composition. Following a discussion of basic hearing mechanisms, students examine research on perception of musical elements (e.g., tone, interval, triad, harmony and rhythm) and then proceed to broader issues (e.g., musical memory, meaning, aesthetics and intelligence). Music cognition is also compared to other kinds of cognition. Students conduct experimental research. NOTE: While students with musical background would be especially interested in this course, there is no need for prior formal training or knowledge of music. Cross-listed with Music (cf. Music 4120) Three hours a week class, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4310 - DIRECTED STUDIES These courses may take at least two different forms: (1) Directed Readings in Psychology, (2) Directed Research in Psychology. Three hours a week Directed Readings is a course of supervised readings for individual students on advanced or specialized topics. Selected topics in the student's area of interest are submitted to and discussed with a faculty member. Reading will involve critical evaluation of the literature. Students will be evaluated on the basis of either oral or written performance. Directed Research provides an opportunity for students, with the help of a faculty supervisor, to design and carry out research in Psychology. Students will be expected to write up their study according to the accepted format for publication. This course is recommended for students who intend to do post-graduate work in Psychology. NOTE: Students should meet with a professor in the Psychology Department well in advance of registration to discuss the nature, design and content of the course. No one will be allowed to register for the course unless he/she has made arrangements with a professor in the Department. In accordance with present Senate regulations, no student shall take a total of more than 12 semester hours of Directed Studies courses in any one Department. (See Academic Regulation #9 for regulations governing Directed Studies).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Special Topics are courses offered by individual members of the Psychology faculty, or visiting instructors, which provide advanced instruction in specialized areas of study, and supplement the general program of courses in Psychology. NOTE: Students may receive repeated credit for 4320 so long as the course topic varies. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4350 - GENDER AND SEXUALITY This course provides a critical examination of gender and sexuality. It explores the individual, interpersonal, and societal constructions of gender and sexuality within varying biological, cultural, and historical contexts; and uses psychological theory and research to analyze experiences and representations of gender and sexuality. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 4350) Three hours a week seminar
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2420, Psychology 2780-2790, and one of Psychology 3010, Psychology 3020 or Psychology 3910
3 hours credit
PSY-4410 - EXISTENTIAL - PHENOMENOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY This is an inquiry into a psychology of the experience of the person. This part of the course is an attempt to understand the personal world through a critical examination of the problems of becoming a person in our time. The approach to be taken is problem-centred with the person as a focal point. Each student is encouraged to formulate questions by which his/her inquiry will be guided. Extensive reading lists on existential themes will be provided. Possible topics include alienation, values, meanings, and identity.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2220 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4530 - HUMAN SERVICES: INTEGRATING THEORY AND PRACTICE This course focuses on the connections between theories about human behaviour, cognition, and emotion, and the experience of clients and workers in human service settings. Students participate in service provision at an assigned agency and independently study and write about theoretical perspectives in psychology relevant to their field placement. Discussions include ethical issues in human services. One hour a week class, three to four hours field placement
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4610 - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychological assessment with an emphasis on psychometric issues. The major approaches within the process are examined within multiple contexts such as clinical, school, and forensic settings. Students also gain experience in the application of fundamental assessment-related skills such as active listening, interviewing, and test administration. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3520 and permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4620 - PSYCHOTHERAPY This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychological treatment of mental health problems. In addition to learning about the dominant contemporary approaches to psychotherapy, students are expected to continue to build on the fundamental skills introduced in Psychology 4610 as they relate to psychotherapy. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3520, Psychology 4610 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4630 - CRITICAL ISSUES FOR CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY This course focuses on some of the fundamental assumptions and questions in contemporary psychology. It begins with a discussion of psychological methods as forms of social practice, and the resulting product/knowledge of these practices as situated within a socio-historical context. We then discuss the importance of metaphor, and language in general, for psychological description and explanation, and the historicity this language displays. These issues lead to a review of the most foundational challenge to contemporary psychology: its reception of and reaction to postmodernism. This includes readings and discussion on social constructionist thought, feminist epistemologies, critical psychology, hermeneutics, and qualitative (vs. quantitative) research. The last portion of the course is devoted to student seminars, where students select a topic from class discussion and develop a presentation. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510.; Psychology 2020 or Psychology 3020
3 hours credit
PSY-4720 - SOCIAL JUSTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY This course examines the praxis (practice and theory) of social justice through psychologies of liberation and decolonization. The focus is on a critical understanding of radical moments of theorizing and action and will examine psychologies created to resist broad social systems of colonization and control. Students interrogate contemporary issues of inequity embedded within systems of privilege and how these systems create as much as reflect psychological phenomena. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 4720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and either Psychology 3330 or Psychology 3910, or permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4800 - HONOURS LITERATURE REVIEW Under the supervisor's direction, the student seeks out and studies reports of previous research and theoretical essays that relate to the conducting of a research project for an Honours degree in Psychology. Evaluation is based on the student's written review of the literature. Six semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted into the Psychology Honours Program.
6 hours credit
PSY-4900 - HONOURS THESIS This is a course that offers selected students the opportunity to conduct a research project and to write a thesis on that subject under the direction of a faculty supervisor. The topic of this project is established through consultation with one or more faculty members who have agreed to supervise the student in pursuing an Honours degree. The thesis is to be written in the professional format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association. The thesis is evaluated by a committee of at least three faculty members including the student's supervisor. Six semester hours of credit
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 4800
6 hours credit

Calendar Courses

PSY-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY: Part I A general introductory survey of theory and research on basic psychological processes: research methodology in psychology, biological basis of behaviour, sensation and perception, learning and motivation, memory and cognition. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
PSY-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY: Part II An introduction to psychological theory in the form of application of the basic processes (Psychology 1010) to the individual in a social context. Areas include developmental psychology, personality theory and testing, emotion, personal adjustment and problems in living, therapies, and social psychology. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010
3 hours credit
PSY-2010 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (offered in both semesters) This survey course examines human development across the life span through physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional domains. The course includes discussions surrounding applications of developmental theory in various contexts, including public policy, education, counselling, and health domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research papers are designed to encourage students to evaluate developmental change critically and to apply their knowledge to their communities. NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Psychology 2010 if a student has already received credit for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2020 - INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY AND THEORY OF PSYCHOLOGY This course offers an introduction to the history of psychology, beginning with the early modern period. We examine Enlightenment philosophy, Darwin and the naturalization of the mind, and the experimental revolution of the 19th Century. These developments lead to the main focus for the course: the founding of psychology as a separate discipline. The origins of psychology in North America are contrasted with the development of German psychology, and the impact of the different social and cultural contexts is explored. Students also learn about the first schools of psychology in the early 20th Century, the social and historical construction of "normal" and "abnormal", the role of psychological testing in the professionalization of psychology, and the emergence of various systems in psychology, such as psychoanalysis, behaviourism, humanistic, and cognitive psychologies. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2120 - DRUGS AND BEHAVIOUR This introduction to psychopharmacology examines drugs which act on the nervous system and their subsequent impact on behaviour. Topics include basic neurophysiology and mechanisms of drug addiction, tolerance and withdrawal. Discussion focuses on the effects and underlying mechanisms of several drug types including antidepressants, antipsychotics, alcohol, cocaine, hallucinogens, nicotine, and caffeine. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2220 - PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL EXPERIENCE This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideas in Humanistic and Existential psychologies, and involves applying and integrating psychological theory to personal experience. Students learn about theorists such as Jung, Rogers, Maslow, May, and Frankl, and the ways in which meaning, purpose, choice, and consciousness are fundamental to existence. The development of humanistic psychology from phenomenological and existential approaches is considered, and the differences from experimental psychologies are discussed. As ways of comprehending our lives, themes of personal ('self ') and interpersonal ('self-in-relation') experience will be explored within a larger sociocultural context. Topics may include: being/becoming, intentionality, authenticity, values, growth, agency, identity, anxiety, and transcendent experience. Since this course focuses on finding ways for students to apply psychological insights to their every day lives, experiential learning, personal reflection and class discussion will be emphasized. Active class participation is therefore essential for this course, and may involve journals, small group work, written responses to the readings, or other opportunities for personal reflection, both inside and outside of class. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Psychology at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
PSY-2420 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (offered in both semesters) This course focuses on the ways in which an individual's thoughts, feelings, and actions are influenced by the social environment. It provides an introduction to major theories, principles, methods and findings of the discipline. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, gender, attraction, aggression, helping, conformity, obedience, group interaction, and cultural influences. Through a variety of assignments students are encouraged to attend to the operation of social psychological principles in daily living. The course includes both lectures and participation in group experiences. Cross-listed with Sociology and Family Science (cf. Sociology 2820 and Family Science 2430) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and/or Sociology 1010
3 hours credit
PSY-2510 - THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH Designed for non-Psychology majors, this course develops their abilities as consumers of psychological research. Students learn about paradigms of research and knowledge, consider key assumptions in both quantitative and qualitative research, and explore how quantitative and qualitative perspectives influence the construction of knowledge. Students apply critical thinking strategies within the context of psychological research and develop skills to evaluate claims made about psychological phenomena in the popular media and professional literature. Concepts explored include understanding and prediction, description and inference, biases in research conduct and communication, representativeness, evaluating testimonials, correlation and causation, multiple causation, operational definitions, placebo effects, experimental control, and probability. NOTE: This course is not open to students who already have earned credit for Psychology 2780 or 2790, or who are currently enrolled in Psychology 2780 or 2790. This course cannot be counted as one of the 14 courses required to earn a major in Psychology.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2610 - SENSATION AND PERCEPTION I This course examines how we see the world around us. It considers principles and theories of how visual information is received, and how it is processed and combined to produce visual images. Starting with optics of the eye, the course proceeds to the conversion of light information into nerve impulses which convey the information to the brain. The course also explains how that information is processed to produce sensations of brightness, shape, color and motion. This course also considers how these sensations are combined into an image of the world. Additional topics include aspects of light measurement, clinical aspects of optometry, and visual aesthetic perception. Three hours per week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2620 - SENSATION AND PERCEPTION II This course examines how the more basic senses work and how they contribute to our awareness of the world. The sense of touch seems to give us direct contact with the world. The abilities to sense chemicals in the food we eat and the air we breathe guide not only what we eat but also our emotions. Sensing vibrations in air enables us to detect events out of sight and to receive both verbal and musical communications from others. These vastly different sources of information-mechanical, chemical and gravitational, as well as the electromagnetic basis of vision are sensed by specialized biological receptors that transform the information into nerve impulses. This course examines how the principles used by the brain to interpret the diverse information are surprisingly similar. Three hours per week
3 hours credit
PSY-2710 - STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES I (offered first semester) This course is an introduction to applied statistics as used by behavioural scientists in measurement, data, analysis, and design of experiments. This course stresses both an understanding of the rationale governing the selection of appropriate designs or techniques as well as practical experience in calculation. Topics include: scaling, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, means test (z and t), correlational techniques, chi-square and other non-parametric techniques, and analysis of variance. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and enrolment in the School of Nursing, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-2780 - STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN I (offered in first semester) This course introduces qualitative and quantitative paradigms, which frame distinctive ways of knowing the world, and create divergent approaches to research. Qualitative methods emphasize how psychological concepts have various meanings across culture and time and include observations and interviews as well as analytical techniques to create meaning from the research. Quantitative methods emphasize how various statistical and experimental orientations to the world form a distinctive perspective for research and assumptions about reality. Key concepts include operational definitions, descriptive statistics, normal distribution, z scores, probability, graphing, and the creation of tables. The course includes communication of research findings using APA format, and consideration of research ethics within both paradigms.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020; Psychology 2780L
3 hours credit
PSY-2790 - STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN II (offered second semester) Building on the foundation created in Psychology 2780, this course examines quantitative research methods for observation based on measurements, emphasizing efforts to control observation conditions. Research design paradigms include within-participant experiments, between-participant experiments, and quasi-experiments, which can be analyzed in terms of probability theory to enable using inferential statistics. The steps to statistical hypothesis testing will teach approaches and assumptions for chi-square, correlation, t-tests, and one-way ANOVA. Reflections on the limitations inherent in the methodologies revisit the concepts of paradigms, assumptions, and their implications. The course includes communication of research findings using the APA format, and consideration of research ethics. Three hours a week class; one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780 with a minimum grade of 60% ; Psychology 2790L
3 hours credit
PSY-2910 - CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOANALYTIC THOUGHT This course is devoted to exploring the work of Sigmund Freud, with special attention paid to his theory of mind and its emphasis on the unconscious and sexuality. We also consider some of Freud's case studies, his emphasis on narrative, his controversial theory of women, and an overview of his considerable legacy in psychology, psychiatry, and Western culture, including some examples of his reception in music, film, and art.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-3010 - "PSYCHOLOGY" FROM THE ANCIENT TO THE MODERN WORLD Students begin by considering the question "What is history?" and the issues of historiography. Special attention is paid to the early Greek philosophers and the foundational ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The emphasis on a 'soul' by early Christian writers is examined, and various philosophies of mind from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the social and political context in the construction of knowledge, and an appreciation of this context is fostered through the reading of original texts. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3020 - MODERN PSYCHOLOGICAL CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE The focus for this course is the historical evolution of various contemporary psychological concepts and practices. It begins with a general introduction to the intersection of psychology, historiography, and philosophy of science. Then, unlike the traditional "grand narrative" history, students learn about the history of psychological concepts and methods by starting with the present and then investigating their more proximate influences. Topics will vary year to year but may include: the history of statistics, the development of psychotherapy, and the history of introspection and its use as a psychological method; other topics include the history of consciousness, behaviour, memory, the self, race, gender, and sexuality. Debates over how research should proceed with regard to these topics will also be addressed. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510; Psychology 2020
3 hours credit
PSY-3030 - PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING This course is designed to examine the psychology of aging from a variety of perspectives, theories, and research themes applicable to the later part of adulthood. Situating the psychology of aging within the broader discipline of gerontological studies, this course examines historical and current conceptions of aging along with contemporary research topics ranging across the physical to the psycho-social domains of aging. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to engage students in a critical analysis of gerontological concepts, research directions, and practices. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3030). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3050 - ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND ADJUSTMENT This course examines both the research and theoretical perspectives in areas that are integral to an understanding of the period of adolescence and of adolescents themselves. We address the following areas: puberty and psychobiology; the development of cognition and social cognition; the formation of identity, including career options, and the development of sexuality and a system of values, factors that influence the formation of identity, such as the family, the peer group, and the media, the school experience; and issues in adolescent development such as some aspects of psychopathology, juvenile justice, and the problems encountered by indigenous youth. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3050). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3080 - CHILD DEVELOPMENT This course explores children's development in depth by focussing on the various domains of change from birth to adolescence. Themes of change and stability throughout childhood are examined using analytical and descriptive theories of development. Implications of developmental approaches are examined for practice and public policy domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to assess critically these developmental changes and to apply that understanding to other contexts. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3080). Three hours a week NOTE: Students who have taken either 3040 or 3410 will not be eligible to enrol in 3080 without the instructor's permission.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3090 - ADULT DEVELOPMENT The purpose of this course is to better understand adult development by focussing on themes of change and stability from young adulthood through to older adulthood. Students use analytical and descriptive theories of adult development to explore how adults negotiate physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to evaluate critically the contemporary research in adult development and to apply their understanding of adult development to a wide array of contexts and policy environments. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3100). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3110 - PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY This course focuses on the nervous system as the basis of all experience and behaviour. It examines how a biological perspective of the brain developed, how neuroanatomy defines brain function, how neurons transmit information, how body movement is controlled, and how touch, pain, sleep and arousal work. Three hours a week, two hours a week laboratory. Note: Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120, Psychology 2780-2790 or Biology 2040, or permission of instructor ; Psychology 3110L
3 hours credit
PSY-3120 - BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR This course builds on Psychology 311 to explore how far human behaviour can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Topics include: the operation of basic motivational mechanisms that regulate breathing, temperature, hunger and thirst; arousal, sleep and sexual behaviour; emotion, brain pathology and mental disorder; learning and memory. Three hours a week class, two hours laboratory a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3110 or Biology 2210, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3130 - INTRODUCTION TO NEUROPSYCHOLOGY This course explores current concepts of the function of the human forebrain as revealed through cortical damage and degenerative diseases. The course addresses basic principles of cortical organization and function and how these relate to issues of localization of function, hemispheric dominance, and sex differences in brain and behaviour. These principles are then applied to discussions of the cause and diagnosis of specific language, memory, and sensory dysfunctions resulting from developmental disorders, head trauma, and degenerative diseases. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120, Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 3110, or permission of instructor. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor; Psychology 3130L
3 hours credit
PSY-3210 - LEARNING AND MOTIVATION: BASIC PROCESSES This course provides a survey of learning theories presented by Thorndike, Pavlov, Hull, Skinner and others. It will concentrate on some of the controversial issues between the S-R and cognitive approaches, and explore some of the findings relating to the fundamental principles of learning, motivation, reinforcement, incentives, effects of punishment and the problem of generalization and discrimination in learning. The applicability of some of the basic principles discovered in the animal laboratory to the everyday behaviour of people will also be examined. Three hours a week class, two hours laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-3220 - ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY This seminar course is designed to expand your knowledge concerning advanced research methods used in social psychology. In this course, students will think critically about experimental research methods in social psychology and acquire hands-on experience designing and conducting social psychological research in collaboration with others (specific topics will vary from year to year). In addition, students will develop their skills in orally presenting research proposals/ results and extend their skills in writing APA format research papers. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and Psychology 2420
3 hours credit
PSY-3310 - CREATIVITY This course examines the nature of creativity as viewed from the psychoanalytic, cognitive problem solving, and humanistic existential perspectives. Topics include personality correlates of creative people, criteria and methods for judging creativity, the creative process, and the facilitation of creative potential. Small group participation is required. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Psychology at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
PSY-3330 - ECOPSYCHOLOGY This seminar-style course examines the important role of the human relationship with nature in order to better understand psychological experience and ecological issues. It explores a variety of factors that may contribute to human disconnection from nature (such as technology, consumerism, psychological views of health and of the self) and ways of developing more sustainable relationships and deepening personal connections with nature (such as direct experience in nature, environmental restoration and activism, nature-based worldviews and psychotherapies, and systems theory). Some "field work" is required. Three hours a week seminar, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 2510.
3 hours credit
PSY-3420 - INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS This course is designed to examine a variety of areas of study within the field of intimate relationships. Through in-class discussion of the major theoretical frameworks of the discipline and by designing their own original relationship research proposals, students will gain an increased understanding of the multifaceted nature of intimate relationships. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: attraction, social cognition, interdependency, conflict, and love. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3440)
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2420 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510.
3 hours credit
PSY-3510 - THEORIES OF PERSONALITY The purpose of the course is to survey, compare and evaluate different approaches to the study of personality. Relevant personality theory and research will be reviewed within a broad framework including the perspectives of the psychodynamic, behaviour theory, cognitive, and humanistic approaches. The processes of personality organization and disorganization will be examined from different theoretical perspectives. The emphasis will be placed on current personality theory and its relevance to the student as a person as well as its relevance to other psychological theories. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3520 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY A critical review of theories and research in psychopathology and psychotherapy. Special emphasis will be placed on a discussion of what constitutes abnormality and normality, and on the various models of deviance developed by the psychoanalytic, learning, existential-phenomenological and social-interpersonal approaches. Attention will be directed to a study of how these models are generated and the social consequences of designating an individual deviant. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3530 - CHILDHOOD PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS This course examines developmental, behavioural, emotional, and social disorders in childhood. Those considered include autism, mental disability, conduct disorders, childhood depression, fears and anxieties, problems in social relationships, and health-related problems. Students explore the implications of various models for understanding the definitions, origins, and treatments of disorders. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and Psychology 3520
3 hours credit
PSY-3620 - ERGONOMICS This course in applied psychology explains how to take into account human abilities and requirements in regard to tasks, equipment, facilities, and environment with an emphasis on improving satisfaction, performance, efficiency, and safety. Included for study are examples of jobs, tools, information, and buildings. An individually-designed project provides an opportunity for students to apply ergonomic principles. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, or Engineering 1210 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3710 - ADVANCED STATISTICS A more advanced course in applied statistics as used by behavioural scientists in designing and analyzing experiments and field studies. The major concentration of the course is analysis of variance and linear regression. In addition students are introduced to a variety of topics in multivariate statistics, including multiple regression and correlation, discriminant analysis, Hotelling's T2 and multivariate analysis of variance. NOTE: Psychology 3710 and Mathematics 3120 may not be double credited without the permission of theDean and the Chair of the Department in which the second credit is being sought.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790. Students majoring in areas other than psychology may enrol with permission of the instructor, provided they have completed an introductory statistics course; Psychology 3710L
3 hours credit
PSY-3740 - ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH The purpose of this course is to help students gain a theoretical, practical and critical understanding of qualitative research methodology, and to teach skills for the execution of research projects based upon qualitative data. Qualitative research is research that focuses upon understanding, rather than predicting or controlling phenomena. Nine different paradigms of qualitative research methodology, their implications, and applications, are examined in this course. These paradigms are: data display, grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, psychobiography and historiography, psychoanalytic approaches, narrative psychology, hermeneutics and textual deconstruction, and social constructivism. Political and ethical issues are also highlighted in order to problematize and promote more critically informed inquiry. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3740) Lecture/Tutorial: Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790
3 hours credit
PSY-3810 - HUMAN LEARNING AND MEMORY This course provides a survey of contemporary approaches to the problem of human learning and memory. It involves an examination of theories and research relating to the structure and content of human memory, information encoding, and retrieval processes. A variety of related topics including mental imagery, mnemonics, the structure of intelligence tests, and the effects of drugs on memory may also be included. Laboratory exercises will involve work with human subjects. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.; Psychology 3810L
3 hours credit
PSY-3820 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY This course examines recent developments in cognitive psychology with special emphasis on the study of thinking, problem solving and decision making. Its topics include theories and research in inductive and deductive reasoning, information processing approaches to thinking and problem solving, and the implications of the cognitive perspective for our understanding of intelligence, creativity and mental development. A lab will provide students with the opportunity to perform problem solving demonstrations, test representative phenomena, analyze their own data, and examine the results in terms of current theories. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3830 - PSYCHOLINGUISTICS This course reviews the psychology of language from the perspectives of sensation, perception, cognition, and interpersonal processes. Topics include the nature of speech production and perception, the nature of grammatical and lexical knowledge, semantics and pragmatics, language acquisition, the social bases of human communication, and computer systems for language understanding. Three hours a week class, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3850 - CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY This course investigates how culture shapes human thought, behaviour, and the field of psychology broadly. The course begins with discussion of theoretical foundations and research methods in cultural psychology, followed by the application of a cultural perspective to psychological concepts including: self and identity, relationships, development, morality and justice, emotions, cognition, and physical and psychological health. Lectures, discussion, and in-class assignments challenge students to consider the sizeable impact of culture on human life. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3840).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3910 - PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN This course will focus on women's development throughout the life span. Topics will include: views of the nature of women, biological influences, the socialization process and its consequences at the individual, interpersonal relationship, and societal levels, as well as recent alternative views of the psychology of women. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3910) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3930 - HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY This course examines how psychological, social, and biological factors interact to influence health and illness. Students explore the systematic application of psychology to health promotion and maintenance, illness prevention and treatment, the determinants of health and illness, health care systems, and health policy. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3950 - GENDER AND VIOLENCE This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies and Family Science (cf. DSJS 3950 and Family Science 3950).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-4030 - ISSUES IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY (offered in alternating years) This is an advanced course in drugs and behaviour focusing primarily on issues of developmental differences in drug action and drug effects. Because many drug effects are determined by the maturity of the brain, some time is spent on developmental aspects of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. A large part of the course focuses on factors which determine, or contribute to, developmental deficits/effects consequent to early (pre-and perinatal) drug exposure. Within this developmental framework, current pharmacological models, and debates surrounding pharmacological-based causes and treatments of disorders, such as hyperactivity and Alzheimer's disease, are discussed. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120 and Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of the instructor. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4110 - CONSCIOUSNESS This course focuses on what is arguably the most profound issue to humankind: Consciousness. It is more than our experience of the world around us as compiled by the brain from various sense organs. Also compiled are nerve impulses from within that tell us about our body and our past. We use it to plan what we do both in the next few seconds and for as far ahead as we can envision a future. Consciousness is what and who we are. Until the 1990s the word was almost taboo in psychology - not used by respectable scientists. Yet as cognitive psychology burst forth in the 1970s, the study of consciousness soon followed it into respectability, aided by ever more sophisticated methods of studying the brain. This course reviews the philosophical ideas that preceded and then accompanied the science. It examines the current state of what we know about the operations of the brain that produce consciousness.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4120 - MUSIC COGNITION This course focuses on the mental processes underlying music perception, performance and composition. Following a discussion of basic hearing mechanisms, students examine research on perception of musical elements (e.g., tone, interval, triad, harmony and rhythm) and then proceed to broader issues (e.g., musical memory, meaning, aesthetics and intelligence). Music cognition is also compared to other kinds of cognition. Students conduct experimental research. NOTE: While students with musical background would be especially interested in this course, there is no need for prior formal training or knowledge of music. Cross-listed with Music (cf. Music 4120) Three hours a week class, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4310 - DIRECTED STUDIES These courses may take at least two different forms: (1) Directed Readings in Psychology, (2) Directed Research in Psychology. Three hours a week Directed Readings is a course of supervised readings for individual students on advanced or specialized topics. Selected topics in the student's area of interest are submitted to and discussed with a faculty member. Reading will involve critical evaluation of the literature. Students will be evaluated on the basis of either oral or written performance. Directed Research provides an opportunity for students, with the help of a faculty supervisor, to design and carry out research in Psychology. Students will be expected to write up their study according to the accepted format for publication. This course is recommended for students who intend to do post-graduate work in Psychology. NOTE: Students should meet with a professor in the Psychology Department well in advance of registration to discuss the nature, design and content of the course. No one will be allowed to register for the course unless he/she has made arrangements with a professor in the Department. In accordance with present Senate regulations, no student shall take a total of more than 12 semester hours of Directed Studies courses in any one Department. (See Academic Regulation #9 for regulations governing Directed Studies).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Special Topics are courses offered by individual members of the Psychology faculty, or visiting instructors, which provide advanced instruction in specialized areas of study, and supplement the general program of courses in Psychology. NOTE: Students may receive repeated credit for 4320 so long as the course topic varies. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4350 - GENDER AND SEXUALITY This course provides a critical examination of gender and sexuality. It explores the individual, interpersonal, and societal constructions of gender and sexuality within varying biological, cultural, and historical contexts; and uses psychological theory and research to analyze experiences and representations of gender and sexuality. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 4350) Three hours a week seminar
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2420, Psychology 2780-2790, and one of Psychology 3010, Psychology 3020 or Psychology 3910
3 hours credit
PSY-4410 - EXISTENTIAL - PHENOMENOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY This is an inquiry into a psychology of the experience of the person. This part of the course is an attempt to understand the personal world through a critical examination of the problems of becoming a person in our time. The approach to be taken is problem-centred with the person as a focal point. Each student is encouraged to formulate questions by which his/her inquiry will be guided. Extensive reading lists on existential themes will be provided. Possible topics include alienation, values, meanings, and identity.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2220 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4530 - HUMAN SERVICES: INTEGRATING THEORY AND PRACTICE This course focuses on the connections between theories about human behaviour, cognition, and emotion, and the experience of clients and workers in human service settings. Students participate in service provision at an assigned agency and independently study and write about theoretical perspectives in psychology relevant to their field placement. Discussions include ethical issues in human services. One hour a week class, three to four hours field placement
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4610 - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychological assessment with an emphasis on psychometric issues. The major approaches within the process are examined within multiple contexts such as clinical, school, and forensic settings. Students also gain experience in the application of fundamental assessment-related skills such as active listening, interviewing, and test administration. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3520 and permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4620 - PSYCHOTHERAPY This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychological treatment of mental health problems. In addition to learning about the dominant contemporary approaches to psychotherapy, students are expected to continue to build on the fundamental skills introduced in Psychology 4610 as they relate to psychotherapy. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3520, Psychology 4610 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4630 - CRITICAL ISSUES FOR CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY This course focuses on some of the fundamental assumptions and questions in contemporary psychology. It begins with a discussion of psychological methods as forms of social practice, and the resulting product/knowledge of these practices as situated within a socio-historical context. We then discuss the importance of metaphor, and language in general, for psychological description and explanation, and the historicity this language displays. These issues lead to a review of the most foundational challenge to contemporary psychology: its reception of and reaction to postmodernism. This includes readings and discussion on social constructionist thought, feminist epistemologies, critical psychology, hermeneutics, and qualitative (vs. quantitative) research. The last portion of the course is devoted to student seminars, where students select a topic from class discussion and develop a presentation. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510.; Psychology 2020 or Psychology 3020
3 hours credit
PSY-4720 - SOCIAL JUSTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY This course examines the praxis (practice and theory) of social justice through psychologies of liberation and decolonization. The focus is on a critical understanding of radical moments of theorizing and action and will examine psychologies created to resist broad social systems of colonization and control. Students interrogate contemporary issues of inequity embedded within systems of privilege and how these systems create as much as reflect psychological phenomena. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 4720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and either Psychology 3330 or Psychology 3910, or permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4800 - HONOURS LITERATURE REVIEW Under the supervisor's direction, the student seeks out and studies reports of previous research and theoretical essays that relate to the conducting of a research project for an Honours degree in Psychology. Evaluation is based on the student's written review of the literature. Six semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted into the Psychology Honours Program.
6 hours credit
PSY-4900 - HONOURS THESIS This is a course that offers selected students the opportunity to conduct a research project and to write a thesis on that subject under the direction of a faculty supervisor. The topic of this project is established through consultation with one or more faculty members who have agreed to supervise the student in pursuing an Honours degree. The thesis is to be written in the professional format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association. The thesis is evaluated by a committee of at least three faculty members including the student's supervisor. Six semester hours of credit
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 4800
6 hours credit

Calendar Courses

1000 Level

PSY-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY: Part I A general introductory survey of theory and research on basic psychological processes: research methodology in psychology, biological basis of behaviour, sensation and perception, learning and motivation, memory and cognition. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
PSY-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY: Part II An introduction to psychological theory in the form of application of the basic processes (Psychology 1010) to the individual in a social context. Areas include developmental psychology, personality theory and testing, emotion, personal adjustment and problems in living, therapies, and social psychology. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010
3 hours credit

2000 Level

PSY-2010 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (offered in both semesters) This survey course examines human development across the life span through physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional domains. The course includes discussions surrounding applications of developmental theory in various contexts, including public policy, education, counselling, and health domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research papers are designed to encourage students to evaluate developmental change critically and to apply their knowledge to their communities. NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Psychology 2010 if a student has already received credit for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2020 - INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY AND THEORY OF PSYCHOLOGY This course offers an introduction to the history of psychology, beginning with the early modern period. We examine Enlightenment philosophy, Darwin and the naturalization of the mind, and the experimental revolution of the 19th Century. These developments lead to the main focus for the course: the founding of psychology as a separate discipline. The origins of psychology in North America are contrasted with the development of German psychology, and the impact of the different social and cultural contexts is explored. Students also learn about the first schools of psychology in the early 20th Century, the social and historical construction of "normal" and "abnormal", the role of psychological testing in the professionalization of psychology, and the emergence of various systems in psychology, such as psychoanalysis, behaviourism, humanistic, and cognitive psychologies. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2120 - DRUGS AND BEHAVIOUR This introduction to psychopharmacology examines drugs which act on the nervous system and their subsequent impact on behaviour. Topics include basic neurophysiology and mechanisms of drug addiction, tolerance and withdrawal. Discussion focuses on the effects and underlying mechanisms of several drug types including antidepressants, antipsychotics, alcohol, cocaine, hallucinogens, nicotine, and caffeine. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2220 - PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL EXPERIENCE This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideas in Humanistic and Existential psychologies, and involves applying and integrating psychological theory to personal experience. Students learn about theorists such as Jung, Rogers, Maslow, May, and Frankl, and the ways in which meaning, purpose, choice, and consciousness are fundamental to existence. The development of humanistic psychology from phenomenological and existential approaches is considered, and the differences from experimental psychologies are discussed. As ways of comprehending our lives, themes of personal ('self ') and interpersonal ('self-in-relation') experience will be explored within a larger sociocultural context. Topics may include: being/becoming, intentionality, authenticity, values, growth, agency, identity, anxiety, and transcendent experience. Since this course focuses on finding ways for students to apply psychological insights to their every day lives, experiential learning, personal reflection and class discussion will be emphasized. Active class participation is therefore essential for this course, and may involve journals, small group work, written responses to the readings, or other opportunities for personal reflection, both inside and outside of class. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Psychology at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
PSY-2420 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (offered in both semesters) This course focuses on the ways in which an individual's thoughts, feelings, and actions are influenced by the social environment. It provides an introduction to major theories, principles, methods and findings of the discipline. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, gender, attraction, aggression, helping, conformity, obedience, group interaction, and cultural influences. Through a variety of assignments students are encouraged to attend to the operation of social psychological principles in daily living. The course includes both lectures and participation in group experiences. Cross-listed with Sociology and Family Science (cf. Sociology 2820 and Family Science 2430) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and/or Sociology 1010
3 hours credit
PSY-2510 - THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH Designed for non-Psychology majors, this course develops their abilities as consumers of psychological research. Students learn about paradigms of research and knowledge, consider key assumptions in both quantitative and qualitative research, and explore how quantitative and qualitative perspectives influence the construction of knowledge. Students apply critical thinking strategies within the context of psychological research and develop skills to evaluate claims made about psychological phenomena in the popular media and professional literature. Concepts explored include understanding and prediction, description and inference, biases in research conduct and communication, representativeness, evaluating testimonials, correlation and causation, multiple causation, operational definitions, placebo effects, experimental control, and probability. NOTE: This course is not open to students who already have earned credit for Psychology 2780 or 2790, or who are currently enrolled in Psychology 2780 or 2790. This course cannot be counted as one of the 14 courses required to earn a major in Psychology.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2610 - SENSATION AND PERCEPTION I This course examines how we see the world around us. It considers principles and theories of how visual information is received, and how it is processed and combined to produce visual images. Starting with optics of the eye, the course proceeds to the conversion of light information into nerve impulses which convey the information to the brain. The course also explains how that information is processed to produce sensations of brightness, shape, color and motion. This course also considers how these sensations are combined into an image of the world. Additional topics include aspects of light measurement, clinical aspects of optometry, and visual aesthetic perception. Three hours per week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit
PSY-2620 - SENSATION AND PERCEPTION II This course examines how the more basic senses work and how they contribute to our awareness of the world. The sense of touch seems to give us direct contact with the world. The abilities to sense chemicals in the food we eat and the air we breathe guide not only what we eat but also our emotions. Sensing vibrations in air enables us to detect events out of sight and to receive both verbal and musical communications from others. These vastly different sources of information-mechanical, chemical and gravitational, as well as the electromagnetic basis of vision are sensed by specialized biological receptors that transform the information into nerve impulses. This course examines how the principles used by the brain to interpret the diverse information are surprisingly similar. Three hours per week
3 hours credit
PSY-2710 - STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES I (offered first semester) This course is an introduction to applied statistics as used by behavioural scientists in measurement, data, analysis, and design of experiments. This course stresses both an understanding of the rationale governing the selection of appropriate designs or techniques as well as practical experience in calculation. Topics include: scaling, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, means test (z and t), correlational techniques, chi-square and other non-parametric techniques, and analysis of variance. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and enrolment in the School of Nursing, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-2780 - STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN I (offered in first semester) This course introduces qualitative and quantitative paradigms, which frame distinctive ways of knowing the world, and create divergent approaches to research. Qualitative methods emphasize how psychological concepts have various meanings across culture and time and include observations and interviews as well as analytical techniques to create meaning from the research. Quantitative methods emphasize how various statistical and experimental orientations to the world form a distinctive perspective for research and assumptions about reality. Key concepts include operational definitions, descriptive statistics, normal distribution, z scores, probability, graphing, and the creation of tables. The course includes communication of research findings using APA format, and consideration of research ethics within both paradigms.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020; Psychology 2780L
3 hours credit
PSY-2790 - STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN II (offered second semester) Building on the foundation created in Psychology 2780, this course examines quantitative research methods for observation based on measurements, emphasizing efforts to control observation conditions. Research design paradigms include within-participant experiments, between-participant experiments, and quasi-experiments, which can be analyzed in terms of probability theory to enable using inferential statistics. The steps to statistical hypothesis testing will teach approaches and assumptions for chi-square, correlation, t-tests, and one-way ANOVA. Reflections on the limitations inherent in the methodologies revisit the concepts of paradigms, assumptions, and their implications. The course includes communication of research findings using the APA format, and consideration of research ethics. Three hours a week class; one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780 with a minimum grade of 60% ; Psychology 2790L
3 hours credit
PSY-2910 - CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOANALYTIC THOUGHT This course is devoted to exploring the work of Sigmund Freud, with special attention paid to his theory of mind and its emphasis on the unconscious and sexuality. We also consider some of Freud's case studies, his emphasis on narrative, his controversial theory of women, and an overview of his considerable legacy in psychology, psychiatry, and Western culture, including some examples of his reception in music, film, and art.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020
3 hours credit

3000 Level

PSY-3010 - "PSYCHOLOGY" FROM THE ANCIENT TO THE MODERN WORLD Students begin by considering the question "What is history?" and the issues of historiography. Special attention is paid to the early Greek philosophers and the foundational ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The emphasis on a 'soul' by early Christian writers is examined, and various philosophies of mind from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the social and political context in the construction of knowledge, and an appreciation of this context is fostered through the reading of original texts. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3020 - MODERN PSYCHOLOGICAL CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE The focus for this course is the historical evolution of various contemporary psychological concepts and practices. It begins with a general introduction to the intersection of psychology, historiography, and philosophy of science. Then, unlike the traditional "grand narrative" history, students learn about the history of psychological concepts and methods by starting with the present and then investigating their more proximate influences. Topics will vary year to year but may include: the history of statistics, the development of psychotherapy, and the history of introspection and its use as a psychological method; other topics include the history of consciousness, behaviour, memory, the self, race, gender, and sexuality. Debates over how research should proceed with regard to these topics will also be addressed. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510; Psychology 2020
3 hours credit
PSY-3030 - PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING This course is designed to examine the psychology of aging from a variety of perspectives, theories, and research themes applicable to the later part of adulthood. Situating the psychology of aging within the broader discipline of gerontological studies, this course examines historical and current conceptions of aging along with contemporary research topics ranging across the physical to the psycho-social domains of aging. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to engage students in a critical analysis of gerontological concepts, research directions, and practices. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3030). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3050 - ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND ADJUSTMENT This course examines both the research and theoretical perspectives in areas that are integral to an understanding of the period of adolescence and of adolescents themselves. We address the following areas: puberty and psychobiology; the development of cognition and social cognition; the formation of identity, including career options, and the development of sexuality and a system of values, factors that influence the formation of identity, such as the family, the peer group, and the media, the school experience; and issues in adolescent development such as some aspects of psychopathology, juvenile justice, and the problems encountered by indigenous youth. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3050). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3080 - CHILD DEVELOPMENT This course explores children's development in depth by focussing on the various domains of change from birth to adolescence. Themes of change and stability throughout childhood are examined using analytical and descriptive theories of development. Implications of developmental approaches are examined for practice and public policy domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to assess critically these developmental changes and to apply that understanding to other contexts. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3080). Three hours a week NOTE: Students who have taken either 3040 or 3410 will not be eligible to enrol in 3080 without the instructor's permission.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3090 - ADULT DEVELOPMENT The purpose of this course is to better understand adult development by focussing on themes of change and stability from young adulthood through to older adulthood. Students use analytical and descriptive theories of adult development to explore how adults negotiate physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to evaluate critically the contemporary research in adult development and to apply their understanding of adult development to a wide array of contexts and policy environments. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3100). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3110 - PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY This course focuses on the nervous system as the basis of all experience and behaviour. It examines how a biological perspective of the brain developed, how neuroanatomy defines brain function, how neurons transmit information, how body movement is controlled, and how touch, pain, sleep and arousal work. Three hours a week, two hours a week laboratory. Note: Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120, Psychology 2780-2790 or Biology 2040, or permission of instructor ; Psychology 3110L
3 hours credit
PSY-3120 - BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR This course builds on Psychology 311 to explore how far human behaviour can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Topics include: the operation of basic motivational mechanisms that regulate breathing, temperature, hunger and thirst; arousal, sleep and sexual behaviour; emotion, brain pathology and mental disorder; learning and memory. Three hours a week class, two hours laboratory a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3110 or Biology 2210, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3130 - INTRODUCTION TO NEUROPSYCHOLOGY This course explores current concepts of the function of the human forebrain as revealed through cortical damage and degenerative diseases. The course addresses basic principles of cortical organization and function and how these relate to issues of localization of function, hemispheric dominance, and sex differences in brain and behaviour. These principles are then applied to discussions of the cause and diagnosis of specific language, memory, and sensory dysfunctions resulting from developmental disorders, head trauma, and degenerative diseases. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120, Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 3110, or permission of instructor. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor; Psychology 3130L
3 hours credit
PSY-3210 - LEARNING AND MOTIVATION: BASIC PROCESSES This course provides a survey of learning theories presented by Thorndike, Pavlov, Hull, Skinner and others. It will concentrate on some of the controversial issues between the S-R and cognitive approaches, and explore some of the findings relating to the fundamental principles of learning, motivation, reinforcement, incentives, effects of punishment and the problem of generalization and discrimination in learning. The applicability of some of the basic principles discovered in the animal laboratory to the everyday behaviour of people will also be examined. Three hours a week class, two hours laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-3220 - ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY This seminar course is designed to expand your knowledge concerning advanced research methods used in social psychology. In this course, students will think critically about experimental research methods in social psychology and acquire hands-on experience designing and conducting social psychological research in collaboration with others (specific topics will vary from year to year). In addition, students will develop their skills in orally presenting research proposals/ results and extend their skills in writing APA format research papers. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and Psychology 2420
3 hours credit
PSY-3310 - CREATIVITY This course examines the nature of creativity as viewed from the psychoanalytic, cognitive problem solving, and humanistic existential perspectives. Topics include personality correlates of creative people, criteria and methods for judging creativity, the creative process, and the facilitation of creative potential. Small group participation is required. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Psychology at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
PSY-3330 - ECOPSYCHOLOGY This seminar-style course examines the important role of the human relationship with nature in order to better understand psychological experience and ecological issues. It explores a variety of factors that may contribute to human disconnection from nature (such as technology, consumerism, psychological views of health and of the self) and ways of developing more sustainable relationships and deepening personal connections with nature (such as direct experience in nature, environmental restoration and activism, nature-based worldviews and psychotherapies, and systems theory). Some "field work" is required. Three hours a week seminar, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 2510.
3 hours credit
PSY-3420 - INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS This course is designed to examine a variety of areas of study within the field of intimate relationships. Through in-class discussion of the major theoretical frameworks of the discipline and by designing their own original relationship research proposals, students will gain an increased understanding of the multifaceted nature of intimate relationships. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: attraction, social cognition, interdependency, conflict, and love. Cross-listed with Family Science (cf. Family Science 3440)
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2420 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510.
3 hours credit
PSY-3510 - THEORIES OF PERSONALITY The purpose of the course is to survey, compare and evaluate different approaches to the study of personality. Relevant personality theory and research will be reviewed within a broad framework including the perspectives of the psychodynamic, behaviour theory, cognitive, and humanistic approaches. The processes of personality organization and disorganization will be examined from different theoretical perspectives. The emphasis will be placed on current personality theory and its relevance to the student as a person as well as its relevance to other psychological theories. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3520 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY A critical review of theories and research in psychopathology and psychotherapy. Special emphasis will be placed on a discussion of what constitutes abnormality and normality, and on the various models of deviance developed by the psychoanalytic, learning, existential-phenomenological and social-interpersonal approaches. Attention will be directed to a study of how these models are generated and the social consequences of designating an individual deviant. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3530 - CHILDHOOD PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS This course examines developmental, behavioural, emotional, and social disorders in childhood. Those considered include autism, mental disability, conduct disorders, childhood depression, fears and anxieties, problems in social relationships, and health-related problems. Students explore the implications of various models for understanding the definitions, origins, and treatments of disorders. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2010, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and Psychology 3520
3 hours credit
PSY-3620 - ERGONOMICS This course in applied psychology explains how to take into account human abilities and requirements in regard to tasks, equipment, facilities, and environment with an emphasis on improving satisfaction, performance, efficiency, and safety. Included for study are examples of jobs, tools, information, and buildings. An individually-designed project provides an opportunity for students to apply ergonomic principles. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, or Engineering 1210 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3710 - ADVANCED STATISTICS A more advanced course in applied statistics as used by behavioural scientists in designing and analyzing experiments and field studies. The major concentration of the course is analysis of variance and linear regression. In addition students are introduced to a variety of topics in multivariate statistics, including multiple regression and correlation, discriminant analysis, Hotelling's T2 and multivariate analysis of variance. NOTE: Psychology 3710 and Mathematics 3120 may not be double credited without the permission of theDean and the Chair of the Department in which the second credit is being sought.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790. Students majoring in areas other than psychology may enrol with permission of the instructor, provided they have completed an introductory statistics course; Psychology 3710L
3 hours credit
PSY-3740 - ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH The purpose of this course is to help students gain a theoretical, practical and critical understanding of qualitative research methodology, and to teach skills for the execution of research projects based upon qualitative data. Qualitative research is research that focuses upon understanding, rather than predicting or controlling phenomena. Nine different paradigms of qualitative research methodology, their implications, and applications, are examined in this course. These paradigms are: data display, grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, psychobiography and historiography, psychoanalytic approaches, narrative psychology, hermeneutics and textual deconstruction, and social constructivism. Political and ethical issues are also highlighted in order to problematize and promote more critically informed inquiry. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3740) Lecture/Tutorial: Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790
3 hours credit
PSY-3810 - HUMAN LEARNING AND MEMORY This course provides a survey of contemporary approaches to the problem of human learning and memory. It involves an examination of theories and research relating to the structure and content of human memory, information encoding, and retrieval processes. A variety of related topics including mental imagery, mnemonics, the structure of intelligence tests, and the effects of drugs on memory may also be included. Laboratory exercises will involve work with human subjects. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.; Psychology 3810L
3 hours credit
PSY-3820 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY This course examines recent developments in cognitive psychology with special emphasis on the study of thinking, problem solving and decision making. Its topics include theories and research in inductive and deductive reasoning, information processing approaches to thinking and problem solving, and the implications of the cognitive perspective for our understanding of intelligence, creativity and mental development. A lab will provide students with the opportunity to perform problem solving demonstrations, test representative phenomena, analyze their own data, and examine the results in terms of current theories. Three hours a week class, two hours a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3830 - PSYCHOLINGUISTICS This course reviews the psychology of language from the perspectives of sensation, perception, cognition, and interpersonal processes. Topics include the nature of speech production and perception, the nature of grammatical and lexical knowledge, semantics and pragmatics, language acquisition, the social bases of human communication, and computer systems for language understanding. Three hours a week class, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3850 - CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY This course investigates how culture shapes human thought, behaviour, and the field of psychology broadly. The course begins with discussion of theoretical foundations and research methods in cultural psychology, followed by the application of a cultural perspective to psychological concepts including: self and identity, relationships, development, morality and justice, emotions, cognition, and physical and psychological health. Lectures, discussion, and in-class assignments challenge students to consider the sizeable impact of culture on human life. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3840).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3910 - PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN This course will focus on women's development throughout the life span. Topics will include: views of the nature of women, biological influences, the socialization process and its consequences at the individual, interpersonal relationship, and societal levels, as well as recent alternative views of the psychology of women. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 3910) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-3930 - HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY This course examines how psychological, social, and biological factors interact to influence health and illness. Students explore the systematic application of psychology to health promotion and maintenance, illness prevention and treatment, the determinants of health and illness, health care systems, and health policy. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit
PSY-3950 - GENDER AND VIOLENCE This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies and Family Science (cf. DSJS 3950 and Family Science 3950).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510
3 hours credit

4000 Level

PSY-4030 - ISSUES IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY (offered in alternating years) This is an advanced course in drugs and behaviour focusing primarily on issues of developmental differences in drug action and drug effects. Because many drug effects are determined by the maturity of the brain, some time is spent on developmental aspects of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. A large part of the course focuses on factors which determine, or contribute to, developmental deficits/effects consequent to early (pre-and perinatal) drug exposure. Within this developmental framework, current pharmacological models, and debates surrounding pharmacological-based causes and treatments of disorders, such as hyperactivity and Alzheimer's disease, are discussed. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2120 and Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of the instructor. Students who do not have Psychology 2780-2790, but do have equivalent statistics research methods courses may enrol with permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4110 - CONSCIOUSNESS This course focuses on what is arguably the most profound issue to humankind: Consciousness. It is more than our experience of the world around us as compiled by the brain from various sense organs. Also compiled are nerve impulses from within that tell us about our body and our past. We use it to plan what we do both in the next few seconds and for as far ahead as we can envision a future. Consciousness is what and who we are. Until the 1990s the word was almost taboo in psychology - not used by respectable scientists. Yet as cognitive psychology burst forth in the 1970s, the study of consciousness soon followed it into respectability, aided by ever more sophisticated methods of studying the brain. This course reviews the philosophical ideas that preceded and then accompanied the science. It examines the current state of what we know about the operations of the brain that produce consciousness.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4120 - MUSIC COGNITION This course focuses on the mental processes underlying music perception, performance and composition. Following a discussion of basic hearing mechanisms, students examine research on perception of musical elements (e.g., tone, interval, triad, harmony and rhythm) and then proceed to broader issues (e.g., musical memory, meaning, aesthetics and intelligence). Music cognition is also compared to other kinds of cognition. Students conduct experimental research. NOTE: While students with musical background would be especially interested in this course, there is no need for prior formal training or knowledge of music. Cross-listed with Music (cf. Music 4120) Three hours a week class, one hour a week laboratory
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4310 - DIRECTED STUDIES These courses may take at least two different forms: (1) Directed Readings in Psychology, (2) Directed Research in Psychology. Three hours a week Directed Readings is a course of supervised readings for individual students on advanced or specialized topics. Selected topics in the student's area of interest are submitted to and discussed with a faculty member. Reading will involve critical evaluation of the literature. Students will be evaluated on the basis of either oral or written performance. Directed Research provides an opportunity for students, with the help of a faculty supervisor, to design and carry out research in Psychology. Students will be expected to write up their study according to the accepted format for publication. This course is recommended for students who intend to do post-graduate work in Psychology. NOTE: Students should meet with a professor in the Psychology Department well in advance of registration to discuss the nature, design and content of the course. No one will be allowed to register for the course unless he/she has made arrangements with a professor in the Department. In accordance with present Senate regulations, no student shall take a total of more than 12 semester hours of Directed Studies courses in any one Department. (See Academic Regulation #9 for regulations governing Directed Studies).
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4320 - SPECIAL TOPICS Special Topics are courses offered by individual members of the Psychology faculty, or visiting instructors, which provide advanced instruction in specialized areas of study, and supplement the general program of courses in Psychology. NOTE: Students may receive repeated credit for 4320 so long as the course topic varies. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 and permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4350 - GENDER AND SEXUALITY This course provides a critical examination of gender and sexuality. It explores the individual, interpersonal, and societal constructions of gender and sexuality within varying biological, cultural, and historical contexts; and uses psychological theory and research to analyze experiences and representations of gender and sexuality. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 4350) Three hours a week seminar
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2420, Psychology 2780-2790, and one of Psychology 3010, Psychology 3020 or Psychology 3910
3 hours credit
PSY-4410 - EXISTENTIAL - PHENOMENOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY This is an inquiry into a psychology of the experience of the person. This part of the course is an attempt to understand the personal world through a critical examination of the problems of becoming a person in our time. The approach to be taken is problem-centred with the person as a focal point. Each student is encouraged to formulate questions by which his/her inquiry will be guided. Extensive reading lists on existential themes will be provided. Possible topics include alienation, values, meanings, and identity.
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2220 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 or permission of instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4530 - HUMAN SERVICES: INTEGRATING THEORY AND PRACTICE This course focuses on the connections between theories about human behaviour, cognition, and emotion, and the experience of clients and workers in human service settings. Students participate in service provision at an assigned agency and independently study and write about theoretical perspectives in psychology relevant to their field placement. Discussions include ethical issues in human services. One hour a week class, three to four hours field placement
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4610 - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychological assessment with an emphasis on psychometric issues. The major approaches within the process are examined within multiple contexts such as clinical, school, and forensic settings. Students also gain experience in the application of fundamental assessment-related skills such as active listening, interviewing, and test administration. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3520 and permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4620 - PSYCHOTHERAPY This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychological treatment of mental health problems. In addition to learning about the dominant contemporary approaches to psychotherapy, students are expected to continue to build on the fundamental skills introduced in Psychology 4610 as they relate to psychotherapy. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790, Psychology 3520, Psychology 4610 and permission of instructor
3 hours credit
PSY-4630 - CRITICAL ISSUES FOR CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY This course focuses on some of the fundamental assumptions and questions in contemporary psychology. It begins with a discussion of psychological methods as forms of social practice, and the resulting product/knowledge of these practices as situated within a socio-historical context. We then discuss the importance of metaphor, and language in general, for psychological description and explanation, and the historicity this language displays. These issues lead to a review of the most foundational challenge to contemporary psychology: its reception of and reaction to postmodernism. This includes readings and discussion on social constructionist thought, feminist epistemologies, critical psychology, hermeneutics, and qualitative (vs. quantitative) research. The last portion of the course is devoted to student seminars, where students select a topic from class discussion and develop a presentation. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020 and Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510.; Psychology 2020 or Psychology 3020
3 hours credit
PSY-4720 - SOCIAL JUSTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY This course examines the praxis (practice and theory) of social justice through psychologies of liberation and decolonization. The focus is on a critical understanding of radical moments of theorizing and action and will examine psychologies created to resist broad social systems of colonization and control. Students interrogate contemporary issues of inequity embedded within systems of privilege and how these systems create as much as reflect psychological phenomena. Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 4720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 1010-1020, Psychology 2780-2790 or Psychology 2510, and either Psychology 3330 or Psychology 3910, or permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
PSY-4800 - HONOURS LITERATURE REVIEW Under the supervisor's direction, the student seeks out and studies reports of previous research and theoretical essays that relate to the conducting of a research project for an Honours degree in Psychology. Evaluation is based on the student's written review of the literature. Six semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted into the Psychology Honours Program.
6 hours credit
PSY-4900 - HONOURS THESIS This is a course that offers selected students the opportunity to conduct a research project and to write a thesis on that subject under the direction of a faculty supervisor. The topic of this project is established through consultation with one or more faculty members who have agreed to supervise the student in pursuing an Honours degree. The thesis is to be written in the professional format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association. The thesis is evaluated by a committee of at least three faculty members including the student's supervisor. Six semester hours of credit
PREREQUISITE: Psychology 4800
6 hours credit
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