Critical thinking, communication, and research.

Political Science

Want more information about Political Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Analyst
  • Lawyer
  • Politician
  • Foreign Diplomat
  • Immigration Officer
The department of Political Studies is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

There are a number of reasons why you should choose to major or minor in political science at UPEI. The department is characterized by diverse course offerings by expert and engaging faculty with active research interests. The small and collegial atmosphere in the department provides a unique opportunity to build mentor relationships with faculty and upper year students. The small class sizes and upper year seminar classes provide an excellent opportunity to hone research, writing, and presentation skills.

Peter McKenna, Chair
UPEI Department of Political Science
Want more information about Political Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Analyst
  • Lawyer
  • Politician
  • Foreign Diplomat
  • Immigration Officer
The department of Political Studies is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

To obtain a major in Political Science, students must complete a minimum of 42 semester hours (14 courses) in Political Science, and must include the following four core courses:

253 Introduction to Political Theory, 262 Canadian Politics, 282 International Politics , and 451 Comparative Politics; one further course from each of the following fields: Canadian Politics, Comparative Politics, and International Politics; and an additional seven electives in the discipline.

Majors will normally complete Political Science 253 (Introduction to Political Theory) by the end of their second year of study; they must do so no later than the end of their third year of studies. A major program must contain a minimum of six courses at the 300 or 400 level. The four required core courses cover four areas in the discipline: Introduction to Political Theory (253), Canadian Politics (262), International Politics (282), and Comparative Politics (451).

The purpose of the core-course requirement is to ensure that every graduate of the Department has a solid grounding in fields integral to the discipline. In addition, the core courses promote the development of analytical skills and lay the foundations for more effective work in advanced-level courses.

All majors and prospective majors are advised to consult with the Department Chair at the beginning of each term. This consultation is intended to ensure that each student’s program satisfies the Department’s requirements and satisfies the student’s needs.

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

The Department offers two introductory courses as normal entries to the discipline. While not required, either of these courses will be counted toward a major in Political Science.    

Introductory Politics  
101 Introductory Politics I Government and Politics in Liberal Democracies
102 Introductory Politics II Political Ideologies in Liberal Democracies          

Canadian Politics
201 Canadian Politics I: Government
202 Politics and Government of Prince Edward Island
211 Law, Politics and the Judicial Process I
212 Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II
262 Canadian Politics II: Environment and Processes
301 Federalism and Federation
302 Canadian Federalism
311 Canadian Public Administration
314 Canadian Public Policy
315 Canadian Foreign Policy
353 The Politics of Canadian-American Relations
401 Law, the Courts and the Constitution I
402 Law, the Courts and the Constitution II
411 Political Parties and Elections in Canada
485 Internship: Legislatures, Politics and Practice

Political Theory
222 Political Ideologies
253 Introduction to Political Theory
331 Twentieth-Century Political Thought
332 Postmodernism and Contemporary Political Thought
335 Utopia
431 Political Thinkers
432 Politics and the Mass Media
434 Leo Strauss, Neo-conservatism, and American Foreign Policy
435 The Globalization Debate

Comparative Politics
221 Political Economy and Social Change in the Developing World
233 Political Geography
343 Comparative Politics of South Asia
351 The Political Culture of the United States
352 The Political System of the United States
354 Contemporary British Politics
361 Comparative Politics of Africa
362 Comparative Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean
363 The Comparative Politics of the Middle East
371 Political Transition in Central and Eastern Europe
372 The Politics of Russia and Its Borderlands
414 Public Policy in Small Island Jurisdictions
422 Ethnic Nationalism in Comparative Perspective
441 Comparative European Politics I
442 Comparative European Politics II
445 Political Economy of East and Southeast Africa
451 Contending Approaches in Comparative Politics
461 Seminar in the History of Canadian External Relations

International Politics
231 War and Peace
282 Introduction to International Politics
390 US Foreign Policy
391 Comparative Foreign Policy
392 International Political Economy
393 International Theory
436 European Intellectual History Since 1789
471 International Organizations
472 International Law
475 International Human Rights
481 Small States and Micro-States in the International
482 The Politics of European Integration
483 American-European Relations in the Post-Cold War

Want more information about Political Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Analyst
  • Lawyer
  • Politician
  • Foreign Diplomat
  • Immigration Officer
The department of Political Studies is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

To obtain a minor in Political Science, students must complete the following requirements: 21 semester hours in the discipline at the 200 level and above, distributed over at least three of the four fields (Canadian Politics, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Politics).

At least three courses (nine semester hours) must be from the 300 level or above. Those taking a minors program in Political Science should also meet with the Department Chair at the beginning of each term to review their program.

 

Want more information about Political Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Analyst
  • Lawyer
  • Politician
  • Foreign Diplomat
  • Immigration Officer
The department of Political Studies is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353
  • David Milne, Professor Emeritus
  • Peter McKenna, Professor, Chair
  • Donald Desserud, Professor
  • Henry Srebrnik, Professor
  • Gil Germain, Associate Professor
  • David Bulger, Adjunct Professor
  • David L. Cook, Adjunct Professor
Overview

There are a number of reasons why you should choose to major or minor in political science at UPEI. The department is characterized by diverse course offerings by expert and engaging faculty with active research interests. The small and collegial atmosphere in the department provides a unique opportunity to build mentor relationships with faculty and upper year students. The small class sizes and upper year seminar classes provide an excellent opportunity to hone research, writing, and presentation skills.

UPEI Department of Political Science
Peter McKenna, Chair
Major

To obtain a major in Political Science, students must complete a minimum of 42 semester hours (14 courses) in Political Science, and must include the following four core courses:

253 Introduction to Political Theory, 262 Canadian Politics, 282 International Politics , and 451 Comparative Politics; one further course from each of the following fields: Canadian Politics, Comparative Politics, and International Politics; and an additional seven electives in the discipline.

Majors will normally complete Political Science 253 (Introduction to Political Theory) by the end of their second year of study; they must do so no later than the end of their third year of studies. A major program must contain a minimum of six courses at the 300 or 400 level. The four required core courses cover four areas in the discipline: Introduction to Political Theory (253), Canadian Politics (262), International Politics (282), and Comparative Politics (451).

The purpose of the core-course requirement is to ensure that every graduate of the Department has a solid grounding in fields integral to the discipline. In addition, the core courses promote the development of analytical skills and lay the foundations for more effective work in advanced-level courses.

All majors and prospective majors are advised to consult with the Department Chair at the beginning of each term. This consultation is intended to ensure that each student’s program satisfies the Department’s requirements and satisfies the student’s needs.

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

The Department offers two introductory courses as normal entries to the discipline. While not required, either of these courses will be counted toward a major in Political Science.    

Introductory Politics  
101 Introductory Politics I Government and Politics in Liberal Democracies
102 Introductory Politics II Political Ideologies in Liberal Democracies          

Canadian Politics
201 Canadian Politics I: Government
202 Politics and Government of Prince Edward Island
211 Law, Politics and the Judicial Process I
212 Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II
262 Canadian Politics II: Environment and Processes
301 Federalism and Federation
302 Canadian Federalism
311 Canadian Public Administration
314 Canadian Public Policy
315 Canadian Foreign Policy
353 The Politics of Canadian-American Relations
401 Law, the Courts and the Constitution I
402 Law, the Courts and the Constitution II
411 Political Parties and Elections in Canada
485 Internship: Legislatures, Politics and Practice

Political Theory
222 Political Ideologies
253 Introduction to Political Theory
331 Twentieth-Century Political Thought
332 Postmodernism and Contemporary Political Thought
335 Utopia
431 Political Thinkers
432 Politics and the Mass Media
434 Leo Strauss, Neo-conservatism, and American Foreign Policy
435 The Globalization Debate

Comparative Politics
221 Political Economy and Social Change in the Developing World
233 Political Geography
343 Comparative Politics of South Asia
351 The Political Culture of the United States
352 The Political System of the United States
354 Contemporary British Politics
361 Comparative Politics of Africa
362 Comparative Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean
363 The Comparative Politics of the Middle East
371 Political Transition in Central and Eastern Europe
372 The Politics of Russia and Its Borderlands
414 Public Policy in Small Island Jurisdictions
422 Ethnic Nationalism in Comparative Perspective
441 Comparative European Politics I
442 Comparative European Politics II
445 Political Economy of East and Southeast Africa
451 Contending Approaches in Comparative Politics
461 Seminar in the History of Canadian External Relations

International Politics
231 War and Peace
282 Introduction to International Politics
390 US Foreign Policy
391 Comparative Foreign Policy
392 International Political Economy
393 International Theory
436 European Intellectual History Since 1789
471 International Organizations
472 International Law
475 International Human Rights
481 Small States and Micro-States in the International
482 The Politics of European Integration
483 American-European Relations in the Post-Cold War

Minor

To obtain a minor in Political Science, students must complete the following requirements: 21 semester hours in the discipline at the 200 level and above, distributed over at least three of the four fields (Canadian Politics, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Politics).

At least three courses (nine semester hours) must be from the 300 level or above. Those taking a minors program in Political Science should also meet with the Department Chair at the beginning of each term to review their program.

 

Faculty
  • David Milne, Professor Emeritus
  • Peter McKenna, Professor, Chair
  • Donald Desserud, Professor
  • Henry Srebrnik, Professor
  • Gil Germain, Associate Professor
  • David Bulger, Adjunct Professor
  • David L. Cook, Adjunct Professor

Overview

There are a number of reasons why you should choose to major or minor in political science at UPEI. The department is characterized by diverse course offerings by expert and engaging faculty with active research interests. The small and collegial atmosphere in the department provides a unique opportunity to build mentor relationships with faculty and upper year students. The small class sizes and upper year seminar classes provide an excellent opportunity to hone research, writing, and presentation skills.

Peter McKenna, Chair
UPEI Department of Political Science

Major

To obtain a major in Political Science, students must complete a minimum of 42 semester hours (14 courses) in Political Science, and must include the following four core courses:

253 Introduction to Political Theory, 262 Canadian Politics, 282 International Politics , and 451 Comparative Politics; one further course from each of the following fields: Canadian Politics, Comparative Politics, and International Politics; and an additional seven electives in the discipline.

Majors will normally complete Political Science 253 (Introduction to Political Theory) by the end of their second year of study; they must do so no later than the end of their third year of studies. A major program must contain a minimum of six courses at the 300 or 400 level. The four required core courses cover four areas in the discipline: Introduction to Political Theory (253), Canadian Politics (262), International Politics (282), and Comparative Politics (451).

The purpose of the core-course requirement is to ensure that every graduate of the Department has a solid grounding in fields integral to the discipline. In addition, the core courses promote the development of analytical skills and lay the foundations for more effective work in advanced-level courses.

All majors and prospective majors are advised to consult with the Department Chair at the beginning of each term. This consultation is intended to ensure that each student’s program satisfies the Department’s requirements and satisfies the student’s needs.

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

The Department offers two introductory courses as normal entries to the discipline. While not required, either of these courses will be counted toward a major in Political Science.    

Introductory Politics  
101 Introductory Politics I Government and Politics in Liberal Democracies
102 Introductory Politics II Political Ideologies in Liberal Democracies          

Canadian Politics
201 Canadian Politics I: Government
202 Politics and Government of Prince Edward Island
211 Law, Politics and the Judicial Process I
212 Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II
262 Canadian Politics II: Environment and Processes
301 Federalism and Federation
302 Canadian Federalism
311 Canadian Public Administration
314 Canadian Public Policy
315 Canadian Foreign Policy
353 The Politics of Canadian-American Relations
401 Law, the Courts and the Constitution I
402 Law, the Courts and the Constitution II
411 Political Parties and Elections in Canada
485 Internship: Legislatures, Politics and Practice

Political Theory
222 Political Ideologies
253 Introduction to Political Theory
331 Twentieth-Century Political Thought
332 Postmodernism and Contemporary Political Thought
335 Utopia
431 Political Thinkers
432 Politics and the Mass Media
434 Leo Strauss, Neo-conservatism, and American Foreign Policy
435 The Globalization Debate

Comparative Politics
221 Political Economy and Social Change in the Developing World
233 Political Geography
343 Comparative Politics of South Asia
351 The Political Culture of the United States
352 The Political System of the United States
354 Contemporary British Politics
361 Comparative Politics of Africa
362 Comparative Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean
363 The Comparative Politics of the Middle East
371 Political Transition in Central and Eastern Europe
372 The Politics of Russia and Its Borderlands
414 Public Policy in Small Island Jurisdictions
422 Ethnic Nationalism in Comparative Perspective
441 Comparative European Politics I
442 Comparative European Politics II
445 Political Economy of East and Southeast Africa
451 Contending Approaches in Comparative Politics
461 Seminar in the History of Canadian External Relations

International Politics
231 War and Peace
282 Introduction to International Politics
390 US Foreign Policy
391 Comparative Foreign Policy
392 International Political Economy
393 International Theory
436 European Intellectual History Since 1789
471 International Organizations
472 International Law
475 International Human Rights
481 Small States and Micro-States in the International
482 The Politics of European Integration
483 American-European Relations in the Post-Cold War

Minor

To obtain a minor in Political Science, students must complete the following requirements: 21 semester hours in the discipline at the 200 level and above, distributed over at least three of the four fields (Canadian Politics, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Politics).

At least three courses (nine semester hours) must be from the 300 level or above. Those taking a minors program in Political Science should also meet with the Department Chair at the beginning of each term to review their program.

 

Faculty

  • David Milne, Professor Emeritus
  • Peter McKenna, Professor, Chair
  • Donald Desserud, Professor
  • Henry Srebrnik, Professor
  • Gil Germain, Associate Professor
  • David Bulger, Adjunct Professor
  • David L. Cook, Adjunct Professor
Want more information about Political Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Analyst
Lawyer
Politician
Foreign Diplomat
Immigration Officer
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

101 INTRODUCTORY POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN LIBERAL  DEMOCRACIES
This course is a comprehensive introduction to politics. Initially students explore the nature of political activity and basic concepts such as political culture, the nation-state, the various roles of government, and the international system. The course examines differences among democratic, authoritarian, and totalitarian political systems just as it introduces students to such contemporary ideologies as liberalism, conservatism, socialism and nationalism.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTORY POLITICS II: POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES IN LIBERAL DEMOCRACIES
This course introduces students to a comparative analysis of the political systems of major nations, among them Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Russia, China, Brazil, India, Japan, and South Africa. Among the topics covered are political parties and electoral systems; interest groups and public opinion; and decision-making and public policy formulation in the areas of commerce, education, health and welfare.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

201 CANADIAN POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT
This course introduces and surveys the basic constitutional components of Canadian politics: Parliament (including the Crown, the House of Commons, the Senate, Cabinet, courts, and the bureaucracy), federalism (including the distribution of legislative authority, inter-governmental decision making, and fiscal federalism), and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Constitutional principles and actual practices of government are discussed.
Lecture: Three hours a week

202 POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
This course examines the evolution of Prince Edward Island’s political parties, electoral system, pressure groups, and political culture. The politics of Prince Edward Island are compared to those of other Canadian provinces. The provincial government’s development programs are examined in the broader framework of federal-provincial relations.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an introductory/general manner.

211 LAW, POLITICS AND THE JUDICIAL PROCESS I
This course is designed to acquaint interested students with the nature of law. It has a Canadian focus with special reference to Prince Edward Island. The areas covered in this semester include sources of law, interests protected by the law, and fundamental legal and political concepts. Major areas of concentration are constitutional and civil law.
Lecture: Three hours a week

212 LAW, POLITICS AND THE JUDICIAL PROCESS II
In this course, students examine various areas of civil law. The politics of Prince Edward Island are used to illustrate the relationships between legal and political systems.
Lecture: Three hours a week

221 POLITICAL ECONOMY AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD
This course provides an overview of the legacy of colonization and the consequences of imperial domination in the developing world. It examines crises of state legitimacy resulting from cultural and ethnic tensions within fragmented political systems. The course analyzes authoritarianism, militarism, clientism, and patrimonialism as recurrent problems blocking transitions to democracy.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

222 POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES
This course introduces students to the concept of ideology, or the “science of ideas.” It examines the modern origin of ideologies, their various forms and evolution, and how ideological thought affects political change. Surveyed are Ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, fascism, feminism, and environmentalism.
Lecture: Three hours a week

231 WAR AND PEACE
What are the roots of war and what are the prospects for its end? Arms races, the balance of power, liberation wars, and nuclear proliferation are among the topics considered. Case studies include the World Wars, the Arab-Israeli wars, the Falklands war, and the two Persian Gulf wars. Finally, students explore prospects for world peace in the light of the end of the Cold War. In addition to lectures, there will be open class discussions and video presentations.
Lecture: Three hours a week

233 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY
The intellectual development and the foundational literature of political geography is an essential tool for students of both Political Science and island studies. This course seeks to provide an introduction to this long-standing body of literature with reference to the most pressing issues and cases in the contemporary international system. It is structured as a foundational course which is open to all interested students in the two cross-listed fields and to students in cognate disciplines. Classes will explore general themes such as boundaries, size and shape, and ethnicity. The classes will consist of lectures and seminars which will address the central themes outlined in the class schedule.

253 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY
This course offers students a thematic overview of the history of Western political thought. The meaning and relevance for politics of issues such as justice, leadership, law, democracy, freedom, and the common good are reviewed through a careful reading of major ancient and modern thinkers, including Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Nietzsche.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

262 CANADIAN POLITICS II: ENVIRONMENT AND PROCESSES
This course introduces non-constitutional aspects of Canadian politics: political culture, nationalism, regionalism, and bi-culturalism. It also treats electoral politics, interest group activities and the role of the mass media.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 201 or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

282 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
This course examines the evolution and structure of the contemporary global system and considers the perennial questions of peace and stability in a world of independent polities. It treats the diverse capabilities, roles and relationships of state and non-state actors, and considers major patterns of change in the post-war world. Principal attention is directed to recurring theoretical concerns in the study of international politics. Both lectures and readings make generous use of case studies and contemporary issues.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

302 CANADIAN FEDERALISM
This is a seminar course on the theory and practice of divided political authority. The aim is to understand the logic and attraction of federalism as a political theory and the problems of working out that idea in Canadian government, politics, and society. This course examines the constitution as a fundamental contract for shared rule between Ottawa and the provinces and traces federalism in intergovernmental relations and public policy. The course concludes with an overview of the important approaches and schools of thought in this field. PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an intermediate manner.

311 CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
This course introduces the study of public administration. It examines the theories, practices, and politics that shape decision-making and management in the Canadian public sector. Among the topics explored are theories of decision- making, organization, motivation, and democracy influencing public administration; the policy-making and political role of public servants; the growth and expansion of the Canadian state; and the evolution of financial and personnel management systems.
PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 202, 262 or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

314 CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY
This course examines the evolution, nature, instruments, and consequences of Canadian public policy, particularly that of the Federal Government. In the first half of the course, students discuss the tools and frameworks used in public policy research and analysis and review the broad structure of Canadian public policy. In the second half of the course, students research areas or issues in Canadian public policy and present their findings in seminars and essays.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

315 CANADIAN FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines Canada’s growing involvement in the post-1945 international environment. It focuses on the determinants of Canadian foreign policy, the major actors involved, and the various constraints on decision-makers. Particular attention is paid to key issues, themes, and foreign policy initiatives over the last forty years.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 201 or 262
Three hours a week

331 20th CENTURY POLITICAL THOUGHT
This seminar provides an overview of the major trends in 20th century political thought. Special focus is placed on the political implications of various critiques of modern rationality. The writings of conservatives such as Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin are contrasted against the more radical critiques of modernity offered by prominent Continental Thinkers such as Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

332 POSTMODERNISM AND CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT
This seminar asks the question: What does it mean to act and think “after modernity?” The question is addressed through readings of those contemporary social and political theorists who were among the first to announce the death of the modern order and to articulate the contours of a new “postmodern” order. Issues to be investigated include the disintegration of the human subject, the retribalizing of the human community, and the impact of the communications revolution on political processes.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

335 UTOPIA
This course explores utopian thought and its relation to Western society. The history of utopian literature and imagery is examined through a reading of the genre’s leading proponents, including Plato, More, Bacon, Swift, Butler, Orwell, and Huxley.  Questions pertaining to the political context of utopian literature, evolving historical trends in utopian thought, and the relationship between the utopian impulse and the human condition are entertained as well.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

343 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA
This describes political developments since independence in the arc of South Asian countries from Afghanistan to Myanmar.  It focuses on state-building in post-colonial societies, regional alliances and rivalries, and the salience of culture, ethnicity, and religion.  The course concentrates on the politics of Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, the Maldives, and the Himalayan States.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

351 THE POLITICAL CULTURE OF THE UNITED STATES
This course examines the evolution of the American Republic. Topics include the nature of American pluralism and civil society; the allocation of power and resources among a diversity of ethnic, religious and gender groups; civil liberties and civil rights; the changing demography and political economy of the urban landscape; the political cultures of different regions and states; and environmental issues affecting Americans.
Seminar: Three hours a week

352 THE POLITICAL SYSTEM OF THE UNITED STATES
This course focuses on the fundamentals of American government and politics. It examines institutional structures such as Congress, the Presidency and the Supreme Court, and the separation of powers among these branches of government as reflections of liberal democratic theory and constitutional practice. The course studies such topics as American federalism and states’ rights; elections and voting behaviour; and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media.
Seminar: Three hours a week
NOTE: Political Science 351 and 352 may be taken in any sequence.

353 THE POLITICS OF CANADIAN-AMERICAN RELATIONS
This course examines the important areas of cooperation and contention between Canada and the United States. Discussions focus on such issues as attempts to protect Canadian culture from American influences, the politics surrounding trade between the two countries, and the creation and operation of joint agencies.
PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

354 CONTEMPORARY BRITISH POLITICS
This course introduces students to both the foundations of the British political system and to the issues which have dominated public debate in Britain for the last generation. Early seminars explore the constitutional evolution of the British legal and political cultures and the most critical developments in the evolution of British political parties. Later seminars critically examine such contentious issues as devolution, the Northern Ireland question, the ideological and electoral shifts in the British party system, changing strategies in economic management, Britain’s relations with Europe and such constitutional issues as electoral reform, the future of the House of Lords, and the campaign for a Bill of Rights.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

361 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF AFRICA
This course offers a comparative view of the political systems of sub-Saharan African states. It examines discontinuities between indigenous and externally-imposed political structures; mass-elite cleavages and ethnic rivalries in deeply divided societies; and the economic peripheralization and debt crisis facing many of these nations today.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

362 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
This course examines the political systems of Caribbean, Central and South American states. It explores the emergence of new social and economic hierarchies and the development of highly complex plural societies. It also analyzes ideological conflicts, civil strife, and non-democratic paradigms of governance, and concludes with case studies of countries such as Jamaica, Mexico and/or other selected states.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

363 THE COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST
This course offers a comparative study of the political cultures, political economy, governments, and political parties in selected Middle Eastern states. Particular attention is given to the historical and political origins of the contemporary state system, patterns of modernization, revolutionary change, the impact of Islamic and nationalist movements and the Palestine question.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

371 POLITICAL TRANSITION IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE
This course deals primarily with political transitions in the former Communist countries of central and Eastern Europe. It begins with an historical overview of the region, which has in this century witnessed authoritarian, fascist, Marxist-Leninist and democratic regimes, both indigenous and imposed. The course examines the efforts made since 1989 to transform these polities from command economies into market societies, and from single-party regimes into liberal-democratic states. It considers impediments to democracy, including the lack of minority rights, secessionist movements, religious traditionalism, and economic fragility.
Seminar: Three hours a week

372 THE POLITICS OF RUSSIA AND ITS BORDERLANDS
This course examines regime changes and ideological shifts in Russia and other states that have emerged following the breakup of the Soviet Union. It focuses on theoretical questions regarding the nature of the post-Communist state and its relationship to the economy and civil society. It studies the political cultures and institutions within the multi-ethnic Russian Federation as well as successor states in the Caucasus and central Asia, including Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Kazakhstan. It also examines secessionist movements in Chechnya, Dagestan, and elsewhere in the post-Soviet states.
Seminar: Three hours a week

390 US FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines the conduct of US foreign policy in the post-1945 period. It focuses on the key determinants and overarching objectives of US foreign policy, the major actors, and the various constraints acting upon these decision- makers—all within a theoretical context. Particular attention is paid to key developments and themes, case studies, various US administrations, and the ramifications of US foreign policy behaviour.

391 COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY
This course emphasizes comparative analysis of foreign-policy formulation in both developed and developing countries. Seminars focus on major powers, selected middle powers and small states. The use of case studies illuminates major theoretical concerns in foreign-policy analysis.
Seminar: Three hours a week

392 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
The objective of the course is to provide students with an understanding of international political economy as a critical and analytical approach to the problems of world politics. Seminars focus on the politics of money, the debt crisis, international trade, energy and resource management, technology transfers and international investment. Although many of these issues are particularly significant in the content of North-South relations, the course also examines economic relations among advanced industrialized states including the emerging market economies in the former Communist world. The course explores the evolution of the contemporary international economy, and probes the impact of global economic institutions and regulations on the foreign policies of states.
Seminar: Three hours a week

393 INTERNATIONAL THEORY
This course examines the principal theoretical debates in the literature of international relations theory in the post-war period. Students first concentrate on the impact of realism in international theory and move on to explore those currents of theory which have challenged realist analysis. Particular attention is given to systems theories, economic explanations of international relations, decision-making theory, game theory, and theories of regional integration.
Seminar: Three hours a week
 

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

401 LAW, THE COURTS AND THE CONSTITUTION I
In this course, students read and analyze some important constitutional decisions in Canada. This intensive examination of legal cases shows the complexities of federal-provincial jurisdiction in Canada and the ways in which courts have tried to deal with them. Students become familiar with the necessary “policy-making” role of the courts and see the practical effects that constitutional judgments have had on the powers of provincial and federal governments in this country. Enrolment is limited to a maximum of twenty-one qualified students. Although background in Canadian government and politics is desirable, students with preparation in cognate disciplines and with a strong interest in law are encouraged to enrol.
Seminar: Three hours a week

402 LAW, THE COURTS AND THE CONSTITUTION II
In this course, students apply the knowledge acquired in Political Science 401 to a series of constitutional conflicts. In courtroom simulations students gain insight into the methods, rationality and conflicts of constitutional review. Particular attention is paid to human rights issues, especially those raised by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The course concludes with critical analyzes of the role of the courts in distributing power in our federal system, the kind of knowledge required for such adjudication and the strengths and weaknesses of existing practice.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 401 or permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an advanced manner.

411 POLITICAL PARTIES AND ELECTIONS  IN CANADA
This course analyzes the development of political parties, party systems, elections, and voting behaviour in Canada. It examines both national and provincial parties and elections. It studies and evaluates Canadian practices in the context of democratic theories of representation and participation.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

414 PUBLIC POLICY IN SMALL ISLAND JURISDICTIONS
This course examines the determinants or causes of public policy in small island jurisdictions, with particular emphasis on the impact of “islandness” and size on the patterns, goals, instruments, and consequences of public policy. Students familiarize themselves with various models for understanding the causes of public policy and with selected frameworks for comparing policy across jurisdictions. These models and frameworks are applied to selected island jurisdictions in seminar discussions and research papers.
Seminar: Three hours a week

422 ETHNIC NATIONALISM IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
This course examines the global dimensions of ethnic nationalism and the “clash of civilizations” both in the developing and advanced industrial states. Following an examination of the theoretical literature on ethnicity and politics, specific case studies focus on multi-ethnic countries such as Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cyprus, Ireland, Fiji, Mauritius and Trinidad/Tobago. Particular attention is paid to historical developments in these countries and to the institutional mechanisms and governmental strategies that have evolved to cope, often unsuccessfully, with ethnic divisions.
PREREQUISITE:  Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

431 POLITICAL THINKERS
This seminar explores in depth the work of one or more political thinkers including theorists whose contribution to the discipline requires extensive treatment, as well as those significant thinkers often neglected in standard survey courses in political theory: Plato, Hegel, Rousseau, Kant, Nietzsche, Arendt, Voegelin, Strauss, Habermas, and Foucault are among those who may be considered.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

432 POLITICS AND THE MASS MEDIA
Students review the theory and practice of modern communication primarily as it affects Canadian politics. Principal themes examined include theories of mass communication, ideology and the media, media ownership, the political economy of the media, public regulation, and the political impact of the media. The writings of major communications thinkers such as Innis, McLuhan, and Chomsky are considered.
PREREQUISITE:  None
Seminar: Three hours a week

434 LEO STRAUSS, NEO-CONSERVATISM, AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines the political thought of one of North America’s most influential political theorists and its impact on the foreign policy decisions of recent American administrations. It focuses on Strauss’s teaching, the school of thought that bears his name, the formative influence of Straussian thought on neo-conservatism, the entry of Straussians into positions of political power, and the impact of this development on American foreign policy, especially as it relates to Iraq and the War on Terror. This extended investigation will speak to the central and abiding tension between politics and truth.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

435 THE GLOBALIZATION DEBATE
This course examines various arguments clustered around the theme of globalization. It investigates theoretical issues pertaining to globalism as an idea, outlines the forces that contribute to ‘real world’ globalization, reviews the responses and reactions to globalization, and assesses likely future scenarios for an increasingly globalized world.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

436 THE IDEAS THAT CHANGED MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
(See History 485)

441 COMPARATIVE EUROPEAN POLITICS I
This course is a comparative study of the political cultures, governmental institutions and electoral politics of European democracies. Although principal attention is given to Britain, France, Germany and Italy, the course also examines such topics as the politics of the welfare state in the Nordic countries, linguistic and confessional cleavages in Belgium and the Netherlands, the restoration of democratic governments in the Mediterranean states and the transition from Communism to liberal democracy in Central and Eastern Europe.
Seminar: Three hours a week

442 COMPARATIVE EUROPEAN POLITICS II
In contrast to the case study approach this advanced course focuses on the thematic comparative analysis of European democracies. Among the themes considered are the role of the state, executive-legislative relations, ideologies, political parties and pressure groups and problems of ethnic minorities.
Seminar: Three hours a week

445 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF EAST AND SOUTHEAST ASIA
Students are introduced to selected theoretical perspectives on international political economy and apply them to region building in East and Southeast Asia using relevant case studies. The emergence of the region as a force in international economic and political arenas is examined by focusing on the development of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Asian Development Bank, and the Asia Pacific Roundtable. The region’s relationship with other groupings such as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum and the European Union also is considered.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

451 CONTENDING APPROACHES IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS
This course gives students a theoretical overview of the field of comparative politics, the different treatments of recurring questions in the discipline, and the historical and geographic frameworks within which contemporary polities have developed.  The course is retrospective in its critical examination of various models and classification schemes.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 461) 
PREREQUISITE:  At least one course from the Comparative stream or permission of the instructor
Note: Some background in the empirical literature of comparative politics is essential.
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN EXTERNAL RELATIONS
(See History 431)
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 282. Majors wishing to credit this course toward the international politics field requirement must secure the permission of the Political Science department.

471 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
This seminar analyzes the role of both inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations in the international system. Students examine theoretical approaches to international organization as well as the structures and functions of particular global and regional bodies. The focus of the course is the United Nations system and particularly the challenges facing the U.N. in a post-Cold War world.
Seminar: Three hours a week

472 INTERNATIONAL LAW
This course examines the sources of international law, the changing nature of international legal principles, and the development of the institutional apparatus for the application of international law. Throughout the course, students weigh the effectiveness of international law as a reflection of the values of a developing international community and as a contribution to world order.
Seminar: Three hours a week

475 INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS
This course examines the language and legal instruments of human rights, the international human rights agenda since 1945, and the arguments for and against states incorporating a human rights component into their external relations. Particular attention is paid to key issues, such as genocide, women, and transnational corporations, along with how states seek to punish governments that violate the rights of their citizenry.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 282
Seminar: Three hours a week

481 SMALL STATES AND MICRO-STATES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM
This course examines the ongoing proliferation of small states and micro-states in the international system. It gives particular attention to problems of legitimacy and status, and to the constraints of small size in undertaking effective diplomacy, ensuring security and achieving some measure of economic autonomy.
Seminar: Three hours a week

482 THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION
Seminars focus on the principal theoretical schools of integration literature and their relevance to various strategies for advanced co-operation in Europe. Among the topics considered are problems of policy making and institutional development in the European Union, the terms of the Single Europe Act, and the debate over enlargement, the scale and depth of integration in an expanding continental community.
Seminar: Three hours a week

483 AMERICAN-EUROPEAN RELATIONS IN THE POST-COLD WAR
In spite of enduring for nearly 60 years, the Atlantic Alliance continues to reflect sharply different perspectives facing the Western world in the 21’st century. In his landmark essay on the subject Robert Kagan argued that Americans are from Mars and Europeans are from Venus. This course will examine the roots of European-American tensions since 1945 but the essential focus of the seminars will be the contemporary global system and issues confronting both sides that have arisen with the end of Communism, the tragedy of 9/11, international terrorism, nuclear proliferation and challenges in the Middle East since the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

485 INTERNSHIP: LEGISLATURES, POLITICS AND PRACTICE
This course is available to one student per year and are selected by a Departmental vetting process.  The over-arching purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the inner/administrative workings of the PEI Legislature. It is designed to encourage the student to incorporate knowledge learned in the classroom with practical skills acquired during the work term. 
Three semester hours of credit

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
This is a research or reading program available principally to Political Science majors.  The student undertakes advanced work in an area such as Canadian Politics, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Politics and is supervised by a member of the Department in either semester. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).
 

Calendar Courses

101 INTRODUCTORY POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN LIBERAL  DEMOCRACIES
This course is a comprehensive introduction to politics. Initially students explore the nature of political activity and basic concepts such as political culture, the nation-state, the various roles of government, and the international system. The course examines differences among democratic, authoritarian, and totalitarian political systems just as it introduces students to such contemporary ideologies as liberalism, conservatism, socialism and nationalism.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTORY POLITICS II: POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES IN LIBERAL DEMOCRACIES
This course introduces students to a comparative analysis of the political systems of major nations, among them Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Russia, China, Brazil, India, Japan, and South Africa. Among the topics covered are political parties and electoral systems; interest groups and public opinion; and decision-making and public policy formulation in the areas of commerce, education, health and welfare.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

201 CANADIAN POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT
This course introduces and surveys the basic constitutional components of Canadian politics: Parliament (including the Crown, the House of Commons, the Senate, Cabinet, courts, and the bureaucracy), federalism (including the distribution of legislative authority, inter-governmental decision making, and fiscal federalism), and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Constitutional principles and actual practices of government are discussed.
Lecture: Three hours a week

202 POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
This course examines the evolution of Prince Edward Island’s political parties, electoral system, pressure groups, and political culture. The politics of Prince Edward Island are compared to those of other Canadian provinces. The provincial government’s development programs are examined in the broader framework of federal-provincial relations.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an introductory/general manner.

211 LAW, POLITICS AND THE JUDICIAL PROCESS I
This course is designed to acquaint interested students with the nature of law. It has a Canadian focus with special reference to Prince Edward Island. The areas covered in this semester include sources of law, interests protected by the law, and fundamental legal and political concepts. Major areas of concentration are constitutional and civil law.
Lecture: Three hours a week

212 LAW, POLITICS AND THE JUDICIAL PROCESS II
In this course, students examine various areas of civil law. The politics of Prince Edward Island are used to illustrate the relationships between legal and political systems.
Lecture: Three hours a week

221 POLITICAL ECONOMY AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD
This course provides an overview of the legacy of colonization and the consequences of imperial domination in the developing world. It examines crises of state legitimacy resulting from cultural and ethnic tensions within fragmented political systems. The course analyzes authoritarianism, militarism, clientism, and patrimonialism as recurrent problems blocking transitions to democracy.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

222 POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES
This course introduces students to the concept of ideology, or the “science of ideas.” It examines the modern origin of ideologies, their various forms and evolution, and how ideological thought affects political change. Surveyed are Ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, fascism, feminism, and environmentalism.
Lecture: Three hours a week

231 WAR AND PEACE
What are the roots of war and what are the prospects for its end? Arms races, the balance of power, liberation wars, and nuclear proliferation are among the topics considered. Case studies include the World Wars, the Arab-Israeli wars, the Falklands war, and the two Persian Gulf wars. Finally, students explore prospects for world peace in the light of the end of the Cold War. In addition to lectures, there will be open class discussions and video presentations.
Lecture: Three hours a week

233 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY
The intellectual development and the foundational literature of political geography is an essential tool for students of both Political Science and island studies. This course seeks to provide an introduction to this long-standing body of literature with reference to the most pressing issues and cases in the contemporary international system. It is structured as a foundational course which is open to all interested students in the two cross-listed fields and to students in cognate disciplines. Classes will explore general themes such as boundaries, size and shape, and ethnicity. The classes will consist of lectures and seminars which will address the central themes outlined in the class schedule.

253 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY
This course offers students a thematic overview of the history of Western political thought. The meaning and relevance for politics of issues such as justice, leadership, law, democracy, freedom, and the common good are reviewed through a careful reading of major ancient and modern thinkers, including Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Nietzsche.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

262 CANADIAN POLITICS II: ENVIRONMENT AND PROCESSES
This course introduces non-constitutional aspects of Canadian politics: political culture, nationalism, regionalism, and bi-culturalism. It also treats electoral politics, interest group activities and the role of the mass media.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 201 or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

282 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
This course examines the evolution and structure of the contemporary global system and considers the perennial questions of peace and stability in a world of independent polities. It treats the diverse capabilities, roles and relationships of state and non-state actors, and considers major patterns of change in the post-war world. Principal attention is directed to recurring theoretical concerns in the study of international politics. Both lectures and readings make generous use of case studies and contemporary issues.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

302 CANADIAN FEDERALISM
This is a seminar course on the theory and practice of divided political authority. The aim is to understand the logic and attraction of federalism as a political theory and the problems of working out that idea in Canadian government, politics, and society. This course examines the constitution as a fundamental contract for shared rule between Ottawa and the provinces and traces federalism in intergovernmental relations and public policy. The course concludes with an overview of the important approaches and schools of thought in this field. PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an intermediate manner.

311 CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
This course introduces the study of public administration. It examines the theories, practices, and politics that shape decision-making and management in the Canadian public sector. Among the topics explored are theories of decision- making, organization, motivation, and democracy influencing public administration; the policy-making and political role of public servants; the growth and expansion of the Canadian state; and the evolution of financial and personnel management systems.
PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 202, 262 or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

314 CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY
This course examines the evolution, nature, instruments, and consequences of Canadian public policy, particularly that of the Federal Government. In the first half of the course, students discuss the tools and frameworks used in public policy research and analysis and review the broad structure of Canadian public policy. In the second half of the course, students research areas or issues in Canadian public policy and present their findings in seminars and essays.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

315 CANADIAN FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines Canada’s growing involvement in the post-1945 international environment. It focuses on the determinants of Canadian foreign policy, the major actors involved, and the various constraints on decision-makers. Particular attention is paid to key issues, themes, and foreign policy initiatives over the last forty years.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 201 or 262
Three hours a week

331 20th CENTURY POLITICAL THOUGHT
This seminar provides an overview of the major trends in 20th century political thought. Special focus is placed on the political implications of various critiques of modern rationality. The writings of conservatives such as Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin are contrasted against the more radical critiques of modernity offered by prominent Continental Thinkers such as Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

332 POSTMODERNISM AND CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT
This seminar asks the question: What does it mean to act and think “after modernity?” The question is addressed through readings of those contemporary social and political theorists who were among the first to announce the death of the modern order and to articulate the contours of a new “postmodern” order. Issues to be investigated include the disintegration of the human subject, the retribalizing of the human community, and the impact of the communications revolution on political processes.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

335 UTOPIA
This course explores utopian thought and its relation to Western society. The history of utopian literature and imagery is examined through a reading of the genre’s leading proponents, including Plato, More, Bacon, Swift, Butler, Orwell, and Huxley.  Questions pertaining to the political context of utopian literature, evolving historical trends in utopian thought, and the relationship between the utopian impulse and the human condition are entertained as well.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

343 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA
This describes political developments since independence in the arc of South Asian countries from Afghanistan to Myanmar.  It focuses on state-building in post-colonial societies, regional alliances and rivalries, and the salience of culture, ethnicity, and religion.  The course concentrates on the politics of Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, the Maldives, and the Himalayan States.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

351 THE POLITICAL CULTURE OF THE UNITED STATES
This course examines the evolution of the American Republic. Topics include the nature of American pluralism and civil society; the allocation of power and resources among a diversity of ethnic, religious and gender groups; civil liberties and civil rights; the changing demography and political economy of the urban landscape; the political cultures of different regions and states; and environmental issues affecting Americans.
Seminar: Three hours a week

352 THE POLITICAL SYSTEM OF THE UNITED STATES
This course focuses on the fundamentals of American government and politics. It examines institutional structures such as Congress, the Presidency and the Supreme Court, and the separation of powers among these branches of government as reflections of liberal democratic theory and constitutional practice. The course studies such topics as American federalism and states’ rights; elections and voting behaviour; and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media.
Seminar: Three hours a week
NOTE: Political Science 351 and 352 may be taken in any sequence.

353 THE POLITICS OF CANADIAN-AMERICAN RELATIONS
This course examines the important areas of cooperation and contention between Canada and the United States. Discussions focus on such issues as attempts to protect Canadian culture from American influences, the politics surrounding trade between the two countries, and the creation and operation of joint agencies.
PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

354 CONTEMPORARY BRITISH POLITICS
This course introduces students to both the foundations of the British political system and to the issues which have dominated public debate in Britain for the last generation. Early seminars explore the constitutional evolution of the British legal and political cultures and the most critical developments in the evolution of British political parties. Later seminars critically examine such contentious issues as devolution, the Northern Ireland question, the ideological and electoral shifts in the British party system, changing strategies in economic management, Britain’s relations with Europe and such constitutional issues as electoral reform, the future of the House of Lords, and the campaign for a Bill of Rights.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

361 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF AFRICA
This course offers a comparative view of the political systems of sub-Saharan African states. It examines discontinuities between indigenous and externally-imposed political structures; mass-elite cleavages and ethnic rivalries in deeply divided societies; and the economic peripheralization and debt crisis facing many of these nations today.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

362 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
This course examines the political systems of Caribbean, Central and South American states. It explores the emergence of new social and economic hierarchies and the development of highly complex plural societies. It also analyzes ideological conflicts, civil strife, and non-democratic paradigms of governance, and concludes with case studies of countries such as Jamaica, Mexico and/or other selected states.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

363 THE COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST
This course offers a comparative study of the political cultures, political economy, governments, and political parties in selected Middle Eastern states. Particular attention is given to the historical and political origins of the contemporary state system, patterns of modernization, revolutionary change, the impact of Islamic and nationalist movements and the Palestine question.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

371 POLITICAL TRANSITION IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE
This course deals primarily with political transitions in the former Communist countries of central and Eastern Europe. It begins with an historical overview of the region, which has in this century witnessed authoritarian, fascist, Marxist-Leninist and democratic regimes, both indigenous and imposed. The course examines the efforts made since 1989 to transform these polities from command economies into market societies, and from single-party regimes into liberal-democratic states. It considers impediments to democracy, including the lack of minority rights, secessionist movements, religious traditionalism, and economic fragility.
Seminar: Three hours a week

372 THE POLITICS OF RUSSIA AND ITS BORDERLANDS
This course examines regime changes and ideological shifts in Russia and other states that have emerged following the breakup of the Soviet Union. It focuses on theoretical questions regarding the nature of the post-Communist state and its relationship to the economy and civil society. It studies the political cultures and institutions within the multi-ethnic Russian Federation as well as successor states in the Caucasus and central Asia, including Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Kazakhstan. It also examines secessionist movements in Chechnya, Dagestan, and elsewhere in the post-Soviet states.
Seminar: Three hours a week

390 US FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines the conduct of US foreign policy in the post-1945 period. It focuses on the key determinants and overarching objectives of US foreign policy, the major actors, and the various constraints acting upon these decision- makers—all within a theoretical context. Particular attention is paid to key developments and themes, case studies, various US administrations, and the ramifications of US foreign policy behaviour.

391 COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY
This course emphasizes comparative analysis of foreign-policy formulation in both developed and developing countries. Seminars focus on major powers, selected middle powers and small states. The use of case studies illuminates major theoretical concerns in foreign-policy analysis.
Seminar: Three hours a week

392 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
The objective of the course is to provide students with an understanding of international political economy as a critical and analytical approach to the problems of world politics. Seminars focus on the politics of money, the debt crisis, international trade, energy and resource management, technology transfers and international investment. Although many of these issues are particularly significant in the content of North-South relations, the course also examines economic relations among advanced industrialized states including the emerging market economies in the former Communist world. The course explores the evolution of the contemporary international economy, and probes the impact of global economic institutions and regulations on the foreign policies of states.
Seminar: Three hours a week

393 INTERNATIONAL THEORY
This course examines the principal theoretical debates in the literature of international relations theory in the post-war period. Students first concentrate on the impact of realism in international theory and move on to explore those currents of theory which have challenged realist analysis. Particular attention is given to systems theories, economic explanations of international relations, decision-making theory, game theory, and theories of regional integration.
Seminar: Three hours a week
 

401 LAW, THE COURTS AND THE CONSTITUTION I
In this course, students read and analyze some important constitutional decisions in Canada. This intensive examination of legal cases shows the complexities of federal-provincial jurisdiction in Canada and the ways in which courts have tried to deal with them. Students become familiar with the necessary “policy-making” role of the courts and see the practical effects that constitutional judgments have had on the powers of provincial and federal governments in this country. Enrolment is limited to a maximum of twenty-one qualified students. Although background in Canadian government and politics is desirable, students with preparation in cognate disciplines and with a strong interest in law are encouraged to enrol.
Seminar: Three hours a week

402 LAW, THE COURTS AND THE CONSTITUTION II
In this course, students apply the knowledge acquired in Political Science 401 to a series of constitutional conflicts. In courtroom simulations students gain insight into the methods, rationality and conflicts of constitutional review. Particular attention is paid to human rights issues, especially those raised by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The course concludes with critical analyzes of the role of the courts in distributing power in our federal system, the kind of knowledge required for such adjudication and the strengths and weaknesses of existing practice.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 401 or permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an advanced manner.

411 POLITICAL PARTIES AND ELECTIONS  IN CANADA
This course analyzes the development of political parties, party systems, elections, and voting behaviour in Canada. It examines both national and provincial parties and elections. It studies and evaluates Canadian practices in the context of democratic theories of representation and participation.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

414 PUBLIC POLICY IN SMALL ISLAND JURISDICTIONS
This course examines the determinants or causes of public policy in small island jurisdictions, with particular emphasis on the impact of “islandness” and size on the patterns, goals, instruments, and consequences of public policy. Students familiarize themselves with various models for understanding the causes of public policy and with selected frameworks for comparing policy across jurisdictions. These models and frameworks are applied to selected island jurisdictions in seminar discussions and research papers.
Seminar: Three hours a week

422 ETHNIC NATIONALISM IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
This course examines the global dimensions of ethnic nationalism and the “clash of civilizations” both in the developing and advanced industrial states. Following an examination of the theoretical literature on ethnicity and politics, specific case studies focus on multi-ethnic countries such as Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cyprus, Ireland, Fiji, Mauritius and Trinidad/Tobago. Particular attention is paid to historical developments in these countries and to the institutional mechanisms and governmental strategies that have evolved to cope, often unsuccessfully, with ethnic divisions.
PREREQUISITE:  Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

431 POLITICAL THINKERS
This seminar explores in depth the work of one or more political thinkers including theorists whose contribution to the discipline requires extensive treatment, as well as those significant thinkers often neglected in standard survey courses in political theory: Plato, Hegel, Rousseau, Kant, Nietzsche, Arendt, Voegelin, Strauss, Habermas, and Foucault are among those who may be considered.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

432 POLITICS AND THE MASS MEDIA
Students review the theory and practice of modern communication primarily as it affects Canadian politics. Principal themes examined include theories of mass communication, ideology and the media, media ownership, the political economy of the media, public regulation, and the political impact of the media. The writings of major communications thinkers such as Innis, McLuhan, and Chomsky are considered.
PREREQUISITE:  None
Seminar: Three hours a week

434 LEO STRAUSS, NEO-CONSERVATISM, AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines the political thought of one of North America’s most influential political theorists and its impact on the foreign policy decisions of recent American administrations. It focuses on Strauss’s teaching, the school of thought that bears his name, the formative influence of Straussian thought on neo-conservatism, the entry of Straussians into positions of political power, and the impact of this development on American foreign policy, especially as it relates to Iraq and the War on Terror. This extended investigation will speak to the central and abiding tension between politics and truth.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

435 THE GLOBALIZATION DEBATE
This course examines various arguments clustered around the theme of globalization. It investigates theoretical issues pertaining to globalism as an idea, outlines the forces that contribute to ‘real world’ globalization, reviews the responses and reactions to globalization, and assesses likely future scenarios for an increasingly globalized world.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

436 THE IDEAS THAT CHANGED MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
(See History 485)

441 COMPARATIVE EUROPEAN POLITICS I
This course is a comparative study of the political cultures, governmental institutions and electoral politics of European democracies. Although principal attention is given to Britain, France, Germany and Italy, the course also examines such topics as the politics of the welfare state in the Nordic countries, linguistic and confessional cleavages in Belgium and the Netherlands, the restoration of democratic governments in the Mediterranean states and the transition from Communism to liberal democracy in Central and Eastern Europe.
Seminar: Three hours a week

442 COMPARATIVE EUROPEAN POLITICS II
In contrast to the case study approach this advanced course focuses on the thematic comparative analysis of European democracies. Among the themes considered are the role of the state, executive-legislative relations, ideologies, political parties and pressure groups and problems of ethnic minorities.
Seminar: Three hours a week

445 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF EAST AND SOUTHEAST ASIA
Students are introduced to selected theoretical perspectives on international political economy and apply them to region building in East and Southeast Asia using relevant case studies. The emergence of the region as a force in international economic and political arenas is examined by focusing on the development of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Asian Development Bank, and the Asia Pacific Roundtable. The region’s relationship with other groupings such as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum and the European Union also is considered.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

451 CONTENDING APPROACHES IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS
This course gives students a theoretical overview of the field of comparative politics, the different treatments of recurring questions in the discipline, and the historical and geographic frameworks within which contemporary polities have developed.  The course is retrospective in its critical examination of various models and classification schemes.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 461) 
PREREQUISITE:  At least one course from the Comparative stream or permission of the instructor
Note: Some background in the empirical literature of comparative politics is essential.
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN EXTERNAL RELATIONS
(See History 431)
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 282. Majors wishing to credit this course toward the international politics field requirement must secure the permission of the Political Science department.

471 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
This seminar analyzes the role of both inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations in the international system. Students examine theoretical approaches to international organization as well as the structures and functions of particular global and regional bodies. The focus of the course is the United Nations system and particularly the challenges facing the U.N. in a post-Cold War world.
Seminar: Three hours a week

472 INTERNATIONAL LAW
This course examines the sources of international law, the changing nature of international legal principles, and the development of the institutional apparatus for the application of international law. Throughout the course, students weigh the effectiveness of international law as a reflection of the values of a developing international community and as a contribution to world order.
Seminar: Three hours a week

475 INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS
This course examines the language and legal instruments of human rights, the international human rights agenda since 1945, and the arguments for and against states incorporating a human rights component into their external relations. Particular attention is paid to key issues, such as genocide, women, and transnational corporations, along with how states seek to punish governments that violate the rights of their citizenry.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 282
Seminar: Three hours a week

481 SMALL STATES AND MICRO-STATES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM
This course examines the ongoing proliferation of small states and micro-states in the international system. It gives particular attention to problems of legitimacy and status, and to the constraints of small size in undertaking effective diplomacy, ensuring security and achieving some measure of economic autonomy.
Seminar: Three hours a week

482 THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION
Seminars focus on the principal theoretical schools of integration literature and their relevance to various strategies for advanced co-operation in Europe. Among the topics considered are problems of policy making and institutional development in the European Union, the terms of the Single Europe Act, and the debate over enlargement, the scale and depth of integration in an expanding continental community.
Seminar: Three hours a week

483 AMERICAN-EUROPEAN RELATIONS IN THE POST-COLD WAR
In spite of enduring for nearly 60 years, the Atlantic Alliance continues to reflect sharply different perspectives facing the Western world in the 21’st century. In his landmark essay on the subject Robert Kagan argued that Americans are from Mars and Europeans are from Venus. This course will examine the roots of European-American tensions since 1945 but the essential focus of the seminars will be the contemporary global system and issues confronting both sides that have arisen with the end of Communism, the tragedy of 9/11, international terrorism, nuclear proliferation and challenges in the Middle East since the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

485 INTERNSHIP: LEGISLATURES, POLITICS AND PRACTICE
This course is available to one student per year and are selected by a Departmental vetting process.  The over-arching purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the inner/administrative workings of the PEI Legislature. It is designed to encourage the student to incorporate knowledge learned in the classroom with practical skills acquired during the work term. 
Three semester hours of credit

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
This is a research or reading program available principally to Political Science majors.  The student undertakes advanced work in an area such as Canadian Politics, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Politics and is supervised by a member of the Department in either semester. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).
 

Calendar Courses

100 Level

101 INTRODUCTORY POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN LIBERAL  DEMOCRACIES
This course is a comprehensive introduction to politics. Initially students explore the nature of political activity and basic concepts such as political culture, the nation-state, the various roles of government, and the international system. The course examines differences among democratic, authoritarian, and totalitarian political systems just as it introduces students to such contemporary ideologies as liberalism, conservatism, socialism and nationalism.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTORY POLITICS II: POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES IN LIBERAL DEMOCRACIES
This course introduces students to a comparative analysis of the political systems of major nations, among them Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Russia, China, Brazil, India, Japan, and South Africa. Among the topics covered are political parties and electoral systems; interest groups and public opinion; and decision-making and public policy formulation in the areas of commerce, education, health and welfare.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

200 Level

201 CANADIAN POLITICS I: GOVERNMENT
This course introduces and surveys the basic constitutional components of Canadian politics: Parliament (including the Crown, the House of Commons, the Senate, Cabinet, courts, and the bureaucracy), federalism (including the distribution of legislative authority, inter-governmental decision making, and fiscal federalism), and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Constitutional principles and actual practices of government are discussed.
Lecture: Three hours a week

202 POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
This course examines the evolution of Prince Edward Island’s political parties, electoral system, pressure groups, and political culture. The politics of Prince Edward Island are compared to those of other Canadian provinces. The provincial government’s development programs are examined in the broader framework of federal-provincial relations.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an introductory/general manner.

211 LAW, POLITICS AND THE JUDICIAL PROCESS I
This course is designed to acquaint interested students with the nature of law. It has a Canadian focus with special reference to Prince Edward Island. The areas covered in this semester include sources of law, interests protected by the law, and fundamental legal and political concepts. Major areas of concentration are constitutional and civil law.
Lecture: Three hours a week

212 LAW, POLITICS AND THE JUDICIAL PROCESS II
In this course, students examine various areas of civil law. The politics of Prince Edward Island are used to illustrate the relationships between legal and political systems.
Lecture: Three hours a week

221 POLITICAL ECONOMY AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD
This course provides an overview of the legacy of colonization and the consequences of imperial domination in the developing world. It examines crises of state legitimacy resulting from cultural and ethnic tensions within fragmented political systems. The course analyzes authoritarianism, militarism, clientism, and patrimonialism as recurrent problems blocking transitions to democracy.
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

222 POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES
This course introduces students to the concept of ideology, or the “science of ideas.” It examines the modern origin of ideologies, their various forms and evolution, and how ideological thought affects political change. Surveyed are Ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, fascism, feminism, and environmentalism.
Lecture: Three hours a week

231 WAR AND PEACE
What are the roots of war and what are the prospects for its end? Arms races, the balance of power, liberation wars, and nuclear proliferation are among the topics considered. Case studies include the World Wars, the Arab-Israeli wars, the Falklands war, and the two Persian Gulf wars. Finally, students explore prospects for world peace in the light of the end of the Cold War. In addition to lectures, there will be open class discussions and video presentations.
Lecture: Three hours a week

233 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY
The intellectual development and the foundational literature of political geography is an essential tool for students of both Political Science and island studies. This course seeks to provide an introduction to this long-standing body of literature with reference to the most pressing issues and cases in the contemporary international system. It is structured as a foundational course which is open to all interested students in the two cross-listed fields and to students in cognate disciplines. Classes will explore general themes such as boundaries, size and shape, and ethnicity. The classes will consist of lectures and seminars which will address the central themes outlined in the class schedule.

253 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY
This course offers students a thematic overview of the history of Western political thought. The meaning and relevance for politics of issues such as justice, leadership, law, democracy, freedom, and the common good are reviewed through a careful reading of major ancient and modern thinkers, including Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Nietzsche.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

262 CANADIAN POLITICS II: ENVIRONMENT AND PROCESSES
This course introduces non-constitutional aspects of Canadian politics: political culture, nationalism, regionalism, and bi-culturalism. It also treats electoral politics, interest group activities and the role of the mass media.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 201 or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

282 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
This course examines the evolution and structure of the contemporary global system and considers the perennial questions of peace and stability in a world of independent polities. It treats the diverse capabilities, roles and relationships of state and non-state actors, and considers major patterns of change in the post-war world. Principal attention is directed to recurring theoretical concerns in the study of international politics. Both lectures and readings make generous use of case studies and contemporary issues.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

300 Level

302 CANADIAN FEDERALISM
This is a seminar course on the theory and practice of divided political authority. The aim is to understand the logic and attraction of federalism as a political theory and the problems of working out that idea in Canadian government, politics, and society. This course examines the constitution as a fundamental contract for shared rule between Ottawa and the provinces and traces federalism in intergovernmental relations and public policy. The course concludes with an overview of the important approaches and schools of thought in this field. PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an intermediate manner.

311 CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
This course introduces the study of public administration. It examines the theories, practices, and politics that shape decision-making and management in the Canadian public sector. Among the topics explored are theories of decision- making, organization, motivation, and democracy influencing public administration; the policy-making and political role of public servants; the growth and expansion of the Canadian state; and the evolution of financial and personnel management systems.
PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 202, 262 or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

314 CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY
This course examines the evolution, nature, instruments, and consequences of Canadian public policy, particularly that of the Federal Government. In the first half of the course, students discuss the tools and frameworks used in public policy research and analysis and review the broad structure of Canadian public policy. In the second half of the course, students research areas or issues in Canadian public policy and present their findings in seminars and essays.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

315 CANADIAN FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines Canada’s growing involvement in the post-1945 international environment. It focuses on the determinants of Canadian foreign policy, the major actors involved, and the various constraints on decision-makers. Particular attention is paid to key issues, themes, and foreign policy initiatives over the last forty years.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 201 or 262
Three hours a week

331 20th CENTURY POLITICAL THOUGHT
This seminar provides an overview of the major trends in 20th century political thought. Special focus is placed on the political implications of various critiques of modern rationality. The writings of conservatives such as Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin are contrasted against the more radical critiques of modernity offered by prominent Continental Thinkers such as Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

332 POSTMODERNISM AND CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT
This seminar asks the question: What does it mean to act and think “after modernity?” The question is addressed through readings of those contemporary social and political theorists who were among the first to announce the death of the modern order and to articulate the contours of a new “postmodern” order. Issues to be investigated include the disintegration of the human subject, the retribalizing of the human community, and the impact of the communications revolution on political processes.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

335 UTOPIA
This course explores utopian thought and its relation to Western society. The history of utopian literature and imagery is examined through a reading of the genre’s leading proponents, including Plato, More, Bacon, Swift, Butler, Orwell, and Huxley.  Questions pertaining to the political context of utopian literature, evolving historical trends in utopian thought, and the relationship between the utopian impulse and the human condition are entertained as well.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

343 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA
This describes political developments since independence in the arc of South Asian countries from Afghanistan to Myanmar.  It focuses on state-building in post-colonial societies, regional alliances and rivalries, and the salience of culture, ethnicity, and religion.  The course concentrates on the politics of Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, the Maldives, and the Himalayan States.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

351 THE POLITICAL CULTURE OF THE UNITED STATES
This course examines the evolution of the American Republic. Topics include the nature of American pluralism and civil society; the allocation of power and resources among a diversity of ethnic, religious and gender groups; civil liberties and civil rights; the changing demography and political economy of the urban landscape; the political cultures of different regions and states; and environmental issues affecting Americans.
Seminar: Three hours a week

352 THE POLITICAL SYSTEM OF THE UNITED STATES
This course focuses on the fundamentals of American government and politics. It examines institutional structures such as Congress, the Presidency and the Supreme Court, and the separation of powers among these branches of government as reflections of liberal democratic theory and constitutional practice. The course studies such topics as American federalism and states’ rights; elections and voting behaviour; and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media.
Seminar: Three hours a week
NOTE: Political Science 351 and 352 may be taken in any sequence.

353 THE POLITICS OF CANADIAN-AMERICAN RELATIONS
This course examines the important areas of cooperation and contention between Canada and the United States. Discussions focus on such issues as attempts to protect Canadian culture from American influences, the politics surrounding trade between the two countries, and the creation and operation of joint agencies.
PREREQUISITE: One of Political Science 201, 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

354 CONTEMPORARY BRITISH POLITICS
This course introduces students to both the foundations of the British political system and to the issues which have dominated public debate in Britain for the last generation. Early seminars explore the constitutional evolution of the British legal and political cultures and the most critical developments in the evolution of British political parties. Later seminars critically examine such contentious issues as devolution, the Northern Ireland question, the ideological and electoral shifts in the British party system, changing strategies in economic management, Britain’s relations with Europe and such constitutional issues as electoral reform, the future of the House of Lords, and the campaign for a Bill of Rights.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

361 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF AFRICA
This course offers a comparative view of the political systems of sub-Saharan African states. It examines discontinuities between indigenous and externally-imposed political structures; mass-elite cleavages and ethnic rivalries in deeply divided societies; and the economic peripheralization and debt crisis facing many of these nations today.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

362 COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
This course examines the political systems of Caribbean, Central and South American states. It explores the emergence of new social and economic hierarchies and the development of highly complex plural societies. It also analyzes ideological conflicts, civil strife, and non-democratic paradigms of governance, and concludes with case studies of countries such as Jamaica, Mexico and/or other selected states.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

363 THE COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST
This course offers a comparative study of the political cultures, political economy, governments, and political parties in selected Middle Eastern states. Particular attention is given to the historical and political origins of the contemporary state system, patterns of modernization, revolutionary change, the impact of Islamic and nationalist movements and the Palestine question.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

371 POLITICAL TRANSITION IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE
This course deals primarily with political transitions in the former Communist countries of central and Eastern Europe. It begins with an historical overview of the region, which has in this century witnessed authoritarian, fascist, Marxist-Leninist and democratic regimes, both indigenous and imposed. The course examines the efforts made since 1989 to transform these polities from command economies into market societies, and from single-party regimes into liberal-democratic states. It considers impediments to democracy, including the lack of minority rights, secessionist movements, religious traditionalism, and economic fragility.
Seminar: Three hours a week

372 THE POLITICS OF RUSSIA AND ITS BORDERLANDS
This course examines regime changes and ideological shifts in Russia and other states that have emerged following the breakup of the Soviet Union. It focuses on theoretical questions regarding the nature of the post-Communist state and its relationship to the economy and civil society. It studies the political cultures and institutions within the multi-ethnic Russian Federation as well as successor states in the Caucasus and central Asia, including Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Kazakhstan. It also examines secessionist movements in Chechnya, Dagestan, and elsewhere in the post-Soviet states.
Seminar: Three hours a week

390 US FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines the conduct of US foreign policy in the post-1945 period. It focuses on the key determinants and overarching objectives of US foreign policy, the major actors, and the various constraints acting upon these decision- makers—all within a theoretical context. Particular attention is paid to key developments and themes, case studies, various US administrations, and the ramifications of US foreign policy behaviour.

391 COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY
This course emphasizes comparative analysis of foreign-policy formulation in both developed and developing countries. Seminars focus on major powers, selected middle powers and small states. The use of case studies illuminates major theoretical concerns in foreign-policy analysis.
Seminar: Three hours a week

392 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
The objective of the course is to provide students with an understanding of international political economy as a critical and analytical approach to the problems of world politics. Seminars focus on the politics of money, the debt crisis, international trade, energy and resource management, technology transfers and international investment. Although many of these issues are particularly significant in the content of North-South relations, the course also examines economic relations among advanced industrialized states including the emerging market economies in the former Communist world. The course explores the evolution of the contemporary international economy, and probes the impact of global economic institutions and regulations on the foreign policies of states.
Seminar: Three hours a week

393 INTERNATIONAL THEORY
This course examines the principal theoretical debates in the literature of international relations theory in the post-war period. Students first concentrate on the impact of realism in international theory and move on to explore those currents of theory which have challenged realist analysis. Particular attention is given to systems theories, economic explanations of international relations, decision-making theory, game theory, and theories of regional integration.
Seminar: Three hours a week
 

400 Level

401 LAW, THE COURTS AND THE CONSTITUTION I
In this course, students read and analyze some important constitutional decisions in Canada. This intensive examination of legal cases shows the complexities of federal-provincial jurisdiction in Canada and the ways in which courts have tried to deal with them. Students become familiar with the necessary “policy-making” role of the courts and see the practical effects that constitutional judgments have had on the powers of provincial and federal governments in this country. Enrolment is limited to a maximum of twenty-one qualified students. Although background in Canadian government and politics is desirable, students with preparation in cognate disciplines and with a strong interest in law are encouraged to enrol.
Seminar: Three hours a week

402 LAW, THE COURTS AND THE CONSTITUTION II
In this course, students apply the knowledge acquired in Political Science 401 to a series of constitutional conflicts. In courtroom simulations students gain insight into the methods, rationality and conflicts of constitutional review. Particular attention is paid to human rights issues, especially those raised by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The course concludes with critical analyzes of the role of the courts in distributing power in our federal system, the kind of knowledge required for such adjudication and the strengths and weaknesses of existing practice.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 401 or permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or issues are explored in an advanced manner.

411 POLITICAL PARTIES AND ELECTIONS  IN CANADA
This course analyzes the development of political parties, party systems, elections, and voting behaviour in Canada. It examines both national and provincial parties and elections. It studies and evaluates Canadian practices in the context of democratic theories of representation and participation.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 262 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

414 PUBLIC POLICY IN SMALL ISLAND JURISDICTIONS
This course examines the determinants or causes of public policy in small island jurisdictions, with particular emphasis on the impact of “islandness” and size on the patterns, goals, instruments, and consequences of public policy. Students familiarize themselves with various models for understanding the causes of public policy and with selected frameworks for comparing policy across jurisdictions. These models and frameworks are applied to selected island jurisdictions in seminar discussions and research papers.
Seminar: Three hours a week

422 ETHNIC NATIONALISM IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
This course examines the global dimensions of ethnic nationalism and the “clash of civilizations” both in the developing and advanced industrial states. Following an examination of the theoretical literature on ethnicity and politics, specific case studies focus on multi-ethnic countries such as Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cyprus, Ireland, Fiji, Mauritius and Trinidad/Tobago. Particular attention is paid to historical developments in these countries and to the institutional mechanisms and governmental strategies that have evolved to cope, often unsuccessfully, with ethnic divisions.
PREREQUISITE:  Political Science 221 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

431 POLITICAL THINKERS
This seminar explores in depth the work of one or more political thinkers including theorists whose contribution to the discipline requires extensive treatment, as well as those significant thinkers often neglected in standard survey courses in political theory: Plato, Hegel, Rousseau, Kant, Nietzsche, Arendt, Voegelin, Strauss, Habermas, and Foucault are among those who may be considered.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

432 POLITICS AND THE MASS MEDIA
Students review the theory and practice of modern communication primarily as it affects Canadian politics. Principal themes examined include theories of mass communication, ideology and the media, media ownership, the political economy of the media, public regulation, and the political impact of the media. The writings of major communications thinkers such as Innis, McLuhan, and Chomsky are considered.
PREREQUISITE:  None
Seminar: Three hours a week

434 LEO STRAUSS, NEO-CONSERVATISM, AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines the political thought of one of North America’s most influential political theorists and its impact on the foreign policy decisions of recent American administrations. It focuses on Strauss’s teaching, the school of thought that bears his name, the formative influence of Straussian thought on neo-conservatism, the entry of Straussians into positions of political power, and the impact of this development on American foreign policy, especially as it relates to Iraq and the War on Terror. This extended investigation will speak to the central and abiding tension between politics and truth.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

435 THE GLOBALIZATION DEBATE
This course examines various arguments clustered around the theme of globalization. It investigates theoretical issues pertaining to globalism as an idea, outlines the forces that contribute to ‘real world’ globalization, reviews the responses and reactions to globalization, and assesses likely future scenarios for an increasingly globalized world.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 253 or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

436 THE IDEAS THAT CHANGED MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
(See History 485)

441 COMPARATIVE EUROPEAN POLITICS I
This course is a comparative study of the political cultures, governmental institutions and electoral politics of European democracies. Although principal attention is given to Britain, France, Germany and Italy, the course also examines such topics as the politics of the welfare state in the Nordic countries, linguistic and confessional cleavages in Belgium and the Netherlands, the restoration of democratic governments in the Mediterranean states and the transition from Communism to liberal democracy in Central and Eastern Europe.
Seminar: Three hours a week

442 COMPARATIVE EUROPEAN POLITICS II
In contrast to the case study approach this advanced course focuses on the thematic comparative analysis of European democracies. Among the themes considered are the role of the state, executive-legislative relations, ideologies, political parties and pressure groups and problems of ethnic minorities.
Seminar: Three hours a week

445 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF EAST AND SOUTHEAST ASIA
Students are introduced to selected theoretical perspectives on international political economy and apply them to region building in East and Southeast Asia using relevant case studies. The emergence of the region as a force in international economic and political arenas is examined by focusing on the development of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Asian Development Bank, and the Asia Pacific Roundtable. The region’s relationship with other groupings such as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum and the European Union also is considered.
PREREQUISITE: None
Seminar: Three hours a week

451 CONTENDING APPROACHES IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS
This course gives students a theoretical overview of the field of comparative politics, the different treatments of recurring questions in the discipline, and the historical and geographic frameworks within which contemporary polities have developed.  The course is retrospective in its critical examination of various models and classification schemes.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 461) 
PREREQUISITE:  At least one course from the Comparative stream or permission of the instructor
Note: Some background in the empirical literature of comparative politics is essential.
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN EXTERNAL RELATIONS
(See History 431)
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 282. Majors wishing to credit this course toward the international politics field requirement must secure the permission of the Political Science department.

471 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
This seminar analyzes the role of both inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations in the international system. Students examine theoretical approaches to international organization as well as the structures and functions of particular global and regional bodies. The focus of the course is the United Nations system and particularly the challenges facing the U.N. in a post-Cold War world.
Seminar: Three hours a week

472 INTERNATIONAL LAW
This course examines the sources of international law, the changing nature of international legal principles, and the development of the institutional apparatus for the application of international law. Throughout the course, students weigh the effectiveness of international law as a reflection of the values of a developing international community and as a contribution to world order.
Seminar: Three hours a week

475 INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS
This course examines the language and legal instruments of human rights, the international human rights agenda since 1945, and the arguments for and against states incorporating a human rights component into their external relations. Particular attention is paid to key issues, such as genocide, women, and transnational corporations, along with how states seek to punish governments that violate the rights of their citizenry.
PREREQUISITE: Political Science 282
Seminar: Three hours a week

481 SMALL STATES AND MICRO-STATES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM
This course examines the ongoing proliferation of small states and micro-states in the international system. It gives particular attention to problems of legitimacy and status, and to the constraints of small size in undertaking effective diplomacy, ensuring security and achieving some measure of economic autonomy.
Seminar: Three hours a week

482 THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION
Seminars focus on the principal theoretical schools of integration literature and their relevance to various strategies for advanced co-operation in Europe. Among the topics considered are problems of policy making and institutional development in the European Union, the terms of the Single Europe Act, and the debate over enlargement, the scale and depth of integration in an expanding continental community.
Seminar: Three hours a week

483 AMERICAN-EUROPEAN RELATIONS IN THE POST-COLD WAR
In spite of enduring for nearly 60 years, the Atlantic Alliance continues to reflect sharply different perspectives facing the Western world in the 21’st century. In his landmark essay on the subject Robert Kagan argued that Americans are from Mars and Europeans are from Venus. This course will examine the roots of European-American tensions since 1945 but the essential focus of the seminars will be the contemporary global system and issues confronting both sides that have arisen with the end of Communism, the tragedy of 9/11, international terrorism, nuclear proliferation and challenges in the Middle East since the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

485 INTERNSHIP: LEGISLATURES, POLITICS AND PRACTICE
This course is available to one student per year and are selected by a Departmental vetting process.  The over-arching purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the inner/administrative workings of the PEI Legislature. It is designed to encourage the student to incorporate knowledge learned in the classroom with practical skills acquired during the work term. 
Three semester hours of credit

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
This is a research or reading program available principally to Political Science majors.  The student undertakes advanced work in an area such as Canadian Politics, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Politics and is supervised by a member of the Department in either semester. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).