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Master of Science - Faculty of Science

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First Name:
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  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research. There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

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First Name:
Last Name:
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  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

A. General Structure of the Program

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research.

There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

In addition to the "General Regulations for Graduate Programs," described above, the following regulations apply specifically to the Master's degree:

Residency Requirements
Normally, at least two semesters of full-time study in residence at the University must be devoted to the Master's program if the student is admitted as a regular student. For a regular student admitted to a part-time study program, the residency period is based on the equivalence of three part-time semesters to one full-time semester. A student, admitted as a provisional student requiring two semesters in that category, must spend at least one additional semester as a regular full-time student to meet the residency requirement. Upon completion of the residency requirement the student is then eligible to become a candidate for the MSc degree.

Normally, the thesis must be formally submitted or the program be otherwise complete within 48 months of the completion of the residency requirement. Departure from these normal requirements requires approval from the Graduate Studies Committee.

B. Courses

Prescribed Studies
The proportion of weight attached to the research and thesis may vary, even within a department/faculty. Accordingly, the number of courses and/or general examinations may correspondingly vary. In no case, however, will the minimum requirements be less than those outlined in the following two paragraphs. For graduate credit, the courses selected must be acceptable to the department/faculty and the Graduate Studies Committee. The candidate must maintain an average grade of at least a B standing (see Grades in General Regulations section) in the substantive courses outlined below in order to maintain registration in the program.

A department/faculty may require examinations (oral and/or written), from time to time, to evaluate the student's progress in his/her overall program.

Additional Courses
In addition to these prescribed studies, the candidate may undertake to achieve satisfactory standings in courses supportive of the special discipline. These courses may be at either the undergraduate or the graduate level. The standings obtained in them will not affect the average grade of the prescribed studies.

C. The Thesis

Research
Normally, the equivalent of at least two full-time semesters must be devoted to research in fulfilment of the thesis requirement. Summers during which research work is actively conducted may be counted as research semester equivalents, even though courses would not normally be offered at that time. In order to avoid undue prolongation of the time required to complete the degree, the research topic should be identified early and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Research involving the use of animals must follow the Guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care.

Thesis
Each candidate for the degree of Master of Science is required to submit a thesis based upon the research conducted under supervision as described above. The thesis must demonstrate the candidate's capacity for original and independent work, and should include a critical evaluation of work which has previously been done in the field of his or her research. The thesis should emphasize any new conclusions which may be drawn from the candidate's own research.

General specifications as to paper, format, order, and binding are available from the Office of the Program Administrator.

Procedures
The thesis may be handed in at any time of the year, but candidates must bear in mind the desirability of having the final examination as much in advance of the deadline date for thesis submission as possible. Candidates are advised to inform themselves of the deadlines schedule, a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of the Program Administrator. It is desirable that each candidate initiate discussion about examination dates with the Supervisor early in the final semester.

The candidate should keep in close touch with the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee, throughout the preparation of the thesis. The final draft of the thesis, after it has been reviewed by all members of the Supervisory Committee, is sent when ready for examination, to the members of the Master's Examination Committee (see below).

Following the Master's Examination, the candidate, if successful, arranges for the preparation of the thesis in final form, and for its submission to the Program Administrator (see below). The thesis in final form must include any minor corrections or revisions indicated during the Examination. Approval of the thesis takes the form of a Certificate of Approval, signed by the Examination Committee.

The Master's Examination
The final oral examination, devoted chiefly to the defence of the thesis, is an examination identified as the Master's Examination and carried out by the Master's Examination Committee.

The Department Chair selects the Examination Committee at the request of the Supervisor and is responsible for notifying the Program Administrator of its composition. The Examination is normally open to the public; however, members of the audience may question the candidate only upon invitation of the Chair of the Committee.

The Examination is passed and the thesis approved if there is no more than one negative vote, an abstention being regarded as a negative vote. The report, from the Department Chair to the Program Administrator, records the result as "unsatisfactory” or “satisfactory." If the result is "unsatisfactory," the candidate may be given the opportunity by the Master's Examination Committee of a second attempt. A second "unsatisfactory" result will terminate candidacy at this university.

The Master's Examination Committee normally consists of five members as follows:

  • Three members of the Supervisory Committee, including the Supervisor of the candidate's research;
  • One member of the area of specialization but from a department other than that of the student’s supervisor. This external examiner may be from the University of Prince Edward Island, or from another University or Research Institute, as is deemed appropriate;
  • The Coordinator of Graduate Studies (or designate), who will Chair the Master's Examination Committee. 
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First Name:
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  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

Entrance requirements include a BSc degree for the MSc program or a MSc degree or equivalent for the PhD programs (see Sciences PhD programs for details). Both programs require also an acceptable level of grades during the last 20 courses completed before the application is submitted. Although UPEI requires a minimum average of 70% in order to consider an application, the Faculty of Science normally requires at least a 75% in order to accept students in the MSc or PhD programs. Regardless of the program (MSc or PhD), the applicant must have a confirmed supervisor and a source of funding must be identified at the time of the application.

For a successful application, prospective students should follow the steps listed below:

Step 1. Prospective students must meet the entrance requirements before considering an application. International students should learn in advance about visa requirements, and for those whose first language is not English, there are also language requirements that must be fulfilled  (see Application form).

Step 2. Review departmental and individual faculty webpages to find out about availability of space and resources in the research groups of interest. Students must identify, contact, and confirm a potential supervisor as this faculty will subsequently need to commit in writing to the student’s program.

Step 3. Complete and submit an Application form to the Registrar’s Office. The form must be accompanied by official transcripts and an application fee. The student should also arrange to have two letters of reference and, if applicable, proof of English proficiency sent to the Registrar’s Office.

In case there are questions or in order to facilitate a timely review process, students may contact the Graduate Studies Coordinator (pquijon@upei.ca) once the application has been submitted.

Want more information about Master of Science - Faculty of Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

Students are required to take a minimum of three graduate level courses, all of which are to be regarded as substantive. A Seminar course (MMS 8900 or ESC 8900 or HB 8900 or SDE 8900) is required. Students may take only one Directed Studies course (MMS 8810 or ESC 8810 or HB 8810 or SDE 8810, or alternatively, VBS 8810 or 8820, VPM 8810 or 8820, VCA 8810 or 8820, VHM 8810 or 8820) for credit. Students lacking an Honours degree or background in one or more area may, at the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, be required to take the appropriate undergraduate level course(s), in addition to the required courses. All graduate students must receive non-credit WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) training in their first year.

When a student is required to register in a seminar or colloquium course in more than one semester, the record will show a grade or a designation of "In Progress" for semesters prior to completion of the course and "Pass" or "Fail" (or a numerical grade in the case of MMS 8900) for the final semester. Enrolment in the Seminar course implies the student will participate as a presenter in at least one Graduate Studies Day. With the consent of the Supervisory Committee, and of the instructor and the Department Chair concerned, a student may register for, and audit, all or part of a course. It is understood that the student will attend lectures as prescribed, but will not write any examination or receive any grade. Such a course may be recorded as an additional course, identified by AUD.

Want more information about Master of Science - Faculty of Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

MASTER OF SCIENCE—ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ESC) COURSES

ESC-8000 Thesis
ESC-8010 PhD Thesis
This is the main science-oriented component of the PhD, and as such, it is a course in which students will conduct an original research project, report orally on this work throughout the course of the degree, culminating in the submission and defence of a dissertation. A formal approval to initiate the research project will be granted after the supervisory committee has been established and a research proposal, including a thorough review of pertinent literature available, is provided by the candidate. Students must register in this course each semester to maintain enrolment in the program. It embodies the research component of this program. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8020 Communication Strategies
This course promotes the development of communication skills in the context of environmental issues and exposes students to direct interaction with representatives from industry, government, community, and the social sciences. The course will also provide broad theoretical and practical knowledge needed to resolve disputes as well as skills training in techniques of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation. Beyond the activities of ENV-4330, the graduate-level assessment of this course involves weekly assigned readings, an essay on a selected topic that includes an extensive literature review, and a seminar on the researched topic. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science. Cross-listed with ENV 4330; Credit cannot be received for both ENV 4330 and ESC 8020.
3 hours credit
ESC-8030 Current Issues in Environmental Impact Assessment
This course is intended to review the theory behind Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) through the use of case studies that best exemplify project development that prevent or minimize environmental degradation. This course will examine the needs, methods, regulatory frameworks and social implications of EIA with emphasis on recent Canadian case studies. On completion of this course, students will be familiarized with the concept of EIA (its history, principles, key constructs and main steps), the legislative and institutional context of EIA, and will be able to critically examine EIA cases and identify their implications. (Cross-listed with Enviromental Studies 4310). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8040 Practical Issues Surrounding Environmental Management
This course intends to provide hands-on experience to our students by deploying them in NGOs, government agencies, or environmental consulting companies for approximately 75 flexible hours (the equivalent to the number of contact hours typically considered for a course's lectures and laboratory). The primary goal of this course is to expose students of a given environmental discipline into the multiple aspects involved in the actual issues and decision-making process that take place in agencies outside the academic setting. This unique training period (spread from two weeks to an entire semester) will provide human resources to often resource-limited groups/ entities that will be chosen by each supervisory committee according to their relevance for the student research focus. Students are expected to gain unprecedented experience and, to some extent, provide actual input into environmental management. The student will prepare a written report and share their experience by giving a public seminar. The supervisory committee in collaboration with the Faculty of Science Graduate Studies Committee will be responsible for identifying an appropriate placement based on the student's discipline and interests. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8120 Advanced Topics in Ecology and Environmental Sciences
This course covers advances in practical and theoretical aspects of aquatic and terrestrial ecology, and represents one of the three general axes of research expertise within the Department. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science or have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit
ESC-8130 Advanced Topics in Plant Science
This course covers current advances in botany, including plant development and morphology, anatomy and physiology, pollination biology, and biotechnology. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit
ESC-8620 Advanced Freshwater Ecology
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student's individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation. NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4620(Limnology) and Biology 8620 and ESC 8620
3 hours credit
ESC-8650 Advances in Marine Ecology
This course provides an update on relevant areas of ongoing marine research. The first part of the course concentrates on marine ecology topics including benthic-pelagic coupling, dispersal and adult-larval interactions, animal-sediment relationships, biodiversity ecosystem services, encrusting communities and their interactions, and aquatic invasive species. The second part includes participation in regular discussion sessions based on analysis of advanced literature relevant to the discipline and to the student's particular research. Assignments include an essay relevant (but not restricted) to a student's field of research, and a seminar on a topic relating general ecological hypotheses to the topic addressed in the essay. NOTE: Credit will not be given for both Biology 4650 (Marine Community Ecology) and ESC 8650. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab/field trip per week, plus discussion group.
3 hours credit
ESC-8710 Advanced Studies in Environmental Toxicology
This course provides an in depth analysis of environmental impacts of the major classes of contaminants including methodologies for environmental impact assessment and monitoring. Effects of environmental contaminants are examined at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, biochemical and molecular levels. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the fate of contaminants of concern in aquatic and terrestrial environments including their environmental chemistry, biogeochemical cycles, and exposure and uptake pathways by organisms. The course consists of lectures, discussions of peer-reviewed literature, case studies, presentations by students and laboratories. (Cross-listed with MMS 8240) Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8720 Advanced Studies of Macroecology and Biogeography
This course examines our current understanding of the patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms from the integrative perspective of macroecology and biogeography. The first discipline is concerned with understanding patterns at large spatial and temporal scales via the use of large quantitative databases and statistical techniques. The second one is concerned with the study of the patterns of distribution of animal species by integrating information on historical events (e.g., plate tectonics), evolutionary processes, as well as ecological and physiological trends. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8730 Conservation Genetics
Conservation genetics is an emerging and topical field of biology that combines molecular genetic approaches with environmental, evolutionary and ecological research under the umbrella of conservation biology. This course will cover a range of research topics pertaining to the conservation of biodiversity including ecological and landscape genetics, contemporary evolution and human-mediated change, invasion biology, genomics for endangered species, and genetics of captive or isolated populations. The course will introduce students to theoretical and experimental approaches to measuring and managing genetic diversity, as well as cultural and ethical issues in conservation biology through lectures, tutorial and case study discussion. Students will have hands-on experience with DNA and molecular marker analysis techniques, lead in-class discussions, write critical reviews of current research, and develop research proposals for selected questions in conservation genetics. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8750 Quantitative Methods for the Analysis of Animal Movement
A better comprehension of animal movement is vital to interpreting key ecological and evolutionary processes, such as the spatial-temporal patterns of resource selection, foraging behaviour, and predator-prey interactions. As human activities continually alter landscapes and influence the behaviour and movement patterns of organisms, a variety of pressing ecological and health issues are emerging, such as the spread of invasive species and infectious diseases. Hence, advances in our understanding of animal movement will have direct implications in several disciplines including landscape ecology, conservation biology, and wildlife management, as well as those dealing with public health. In this course, the student will investigate the various methods currently employed to study animal movement in complex landscapes. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8770 Veterinary Biostatistics
This course provides the student with a working knowledge of the basic statistical techniques used in veterinary science. Topics include descriptive statistics, inferential statistics non-parametric statistics, analysis of variance, regression and correlation and experimental design. (Cross-listed with graduate level course VHM 8010). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8780 Island Biogeography and Conservation of Insular Systems
This course examines the several fundamental patterns and processes that characterize biotas and environments on islands and other broadly defined insular systems. Topics covered include earth history and historical biogeography, speciation, dispersal, extinction, island biogeography, assembly and evolution of insular communities, island effect, adaptive radiation, environmental determinism, conservation biology, marine and terrestrial protected areas, and vulnerability of island biotas to terrestrial and aquatic invasive species. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8790 Advanced Techniques in Scanning Electronic Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students will learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use and will generate their own images and learn to interpret patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline will form the basis of a course project. (Cross-listed with MMS 8130 and HB 8250). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8800 Molecular Biotechnology
This course examines principles of gene manipulation, and the application of molecular biology in all the fields of biotechnology. Recent developments in medicine, agriculture, industry and basic research are considered. Emphasis is placed on reviewing current literature in the field, particularly on areas more closely related to the natural sciences/ environment. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8810 Directed Studies
Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program in Biology and be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
ESC-8900 Seminar
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—HUMAN BIOLOGY (HB) COURSES

HB-8000 Thesis
HB-8110 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology
This course enhances student knowledge of cell and molecular biology from a research perspective. Current advances in cell and molecular biology, including biotechnology and cytogenetics, are emphasized. Topics vary yearly according to the needs of the participating students. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8250 Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline forms the basis of a course project. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program or be granted permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
HB-8320 Movement Disorders
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder. (Cross-listed with Kinesiology 4320) PREREQUISITE: Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor. NOTE: Credit not given for both KINE 4320 and HB 8320; responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences
3 hours credit
HB-8350 Principles of Positive Youth Development through Sport
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development. (Cross-listed with Kinesiology 4350). Restriction: Student must have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8430 Advanced Physiology of Exercise Adaption and Performance
This course focuses on factors governing chronic exercise adaptations, acute exercise performance and health. Course content explores concepts such as skeletal muscle repair, genetics of sport performance and the effects of various training modalities (HIIT, resistance etc.). Students will combine theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, and prepare a review paper related to a topic of interest within the area of exercise physiology. (Cross-listed with KINE 4430) Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor. NOTE: Credit not given for both KINE 4430 and HB 8430; Responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences.
3 hours credit
HB-8620 Advanced Freshwater Ecology
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student's individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation. NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4620(Limnology) and Biology 8620 and ESC 8620.
3 hours credit
HB-8720 Advanced Studies in the Biology of Cancer and Other Diseases
The course addresses the principles of pathobiology with an emphasis on human diseases and a focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology associated with disease paradigms. Topical diseases include cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and AIDS, among others. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the course BIO 4720, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project in a cancer biology related topic or one relevant to the student's area of study. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade. (Cross-listed with Biology 4720) NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4720 and HB 8720. Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program at UPEI and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8810 Directed Studies in Human Development and Health
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student's thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science. Restriction: Student must be admitted in the graduate program in Biology and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8830 Epidemiological Applications in Primary Healthcare Research
This course introduces essential principles of epidemiological applications that are relevant to primary healthcare research. Students will be introduced to the principles of patient oriented research, primary healthcare, and the background of epidemiological applications, as well as the specific applications and computations of sensitivity and specificity, risk estimation, rates and proportions, hypothesis generating and hypothesis evaluation, as well as arithmetic and mathematical modeling. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, group discussions and interpretation of outcomes from specific analyses using customized "webulators" will be used. Students are expected to prepare written reports and/or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8850 Bioinformatics for Graduate Students
This course is an introduction to bioinformatics and a practical guide to the analysis of genes and proteins. It will familiarize students with the tools and principles of contemporary bioinformatics. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge at the graduate level of a variety of publicly available databases and computational tools important in bioinformatics, and a grasp of the underlying principles that are adequate for them to evaluate and utilize novel techniques as they arise in the future. In addition to participating in all the lectures and activities of the undergraduate course CS 3220/BIO 3220, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project and attend extra guest lectures specially prepared for graduate students (when the graduate enrolment is 3 or more). The graduate project would be related to the student's research, so the thesis supervisor will be invited to join in the process of choosing and evaluating the graduate project. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade. (Cross-listed with CS 3220, BIO 3220, VPM 8850) Note: No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 8850, VPM 8850, CS 3220, and BIO 3220. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8900 Seminar
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their thesis areas and deliver seminars. Techniques in preparing scientific communications (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES (MMS) COURSES

MMS-8000 Thesis
MMS-8010 PhD Thesis
This is a research-oriented course in which students will conduct an extensive original research project,culminating in the submission and defence of a thesis. Students must register in this course each semester to maintain enrolment in the program. It embodies the research component of the PhD program.
MMS-8020 Molecules, MacRomolecules and the Business of Science
This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters.
6 hours credit
MMS-8021 Molecules, MacRomolecules and the Business of Science - Part I
This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters. HOURS OF CREDIT: 6 Restriction: Student must be admitted into the PhD program
MMS-8022 Molecules/Business of Science - Part II
MOLECULES, MACROMOLECULES AND THE BUSINESS OF SCIENCE This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters. HOURS OF CREDIT: 6 Restriction: Student must be admitted into the PhD program
PREREQUISITE: MMS 8021
6 hours credit
MMS-8030 Directed Studies in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in the Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences constellation. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student's research project, although they may be in the same discipline. Coverage of the topic by the student must include the relevant commercial and business aspects of the field. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8040 Field Course in Marine Drug Discovery
This course offering will familiarize students in the areas of marine natural products, marine taxonomy, field based biological assays of relevance to drug discovery, marine microbiology, and biotechnology. Lectures will introduce students to the concepts of field research and their applications to drug discovery. Students will participate in field collections of marine invertebrates. The collected organisms will then be subjected to several biological and chemical assays. Students will present field reports identifying the collected species and any chemical or biological activities observed. The second half of the course will focus on supervised research projects. The project topics will be chosen by the students and instructors. In lieu of a textbook, students will be provided with a collection of several publications from the marine natural products literature. These articles will include reviews of marine natural products, reports of recent advances, and founding texts of the field. Course experience in invertebrate zoology at the undergraduate level is strongly recommended. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8050 Advanced Studies in NMR Spectroscopy
This course covers the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry used in the determination of structures in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Major topics include the theory and use of NMR spectroscopy, in particular the use of 2D experiments and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the students' ability to interpret spectra and elucidate the structure of a molecule based on this evidence beyond the undergraduate level, as well as the role NMR has played as a structural tool in the pharmaceutical industry and academia. Students will have a practical/hands-on component in this course. Cross-listed with CHEM 4050. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8050 and CHEM 4050. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8060 Advanced Topics Computational Chemistry
This course exercises the application of computational chemistry to structural and reactivity questions in organic and inorganic chemistry. Computational methods discussed include molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical calculations, and density functional theory. The objective is to gain an understanding of the application of these methods to chemical problems. The current literature is explored to illustrate the use of computational chemistry in research. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the MSc Program HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.
3 hours credit
MMS-8070 Advanced Study in Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms
This course develops inorganic reaction mechanisms, with an emphasis on catalytic cycles, catalyst development, and the context of these reactions within the polymer, pharmaceutical and consumer product industries. Students will learn how to support reaction mechanisms through appropriate experimentation and spectroscopic characterization of catalysts, reactions and products. Students will examine how new catalysts are developed, patented and brought into commercial use. Major projects include a patent application on an imaginary catalytic system, and a report assessing the commercial relevance of a recent literature discovery. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8080 Green Chemistry
This course will develop the fundamentals of greener chemical processes and syntheses. The course will present the principles of green chemistry in the context of case studies within Canadian academia and industry. Coursework and projects will aim to develop synthetic skills, providing students with the tools to propose green synthetic plans for small molecules and polymers while introducing students to wider political and environmental issues which impact on chemical industry. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8090 Biomaterials
This course covers the fundamentals of the synthesis, properties, and biocompatibility of metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and biological materials that come in contact with tissue and biological fluids. Emphasis is placed on using biomaterials for both hard and soft tissue replacement, organ replacement, coatings and adhesives, dental implants, and drug delivery systems. New trends in biomaterials and the recent merging of cell biology and biochemistry with materials is examined. Cross-listed with CHEM 4090. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8090 and CHEM 4090. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8100 Soft Condensed Matter Physics
This course utilizes a variety of tools developed within the general framework of statistical and solid-state physics to study the structural and dynamic properties of a number of important soft-condensed matter systems, including: polymers, liquid crystals, and membranes. Some key topics include: (1) Liquid crystals: elasticity, deformations, surface effects, fluctuations and scattering; (2) Polymers: chain conformations, mixtures and phase behaviour, motion in melts and glasses (viscoelasticity, relaxation, reptation); (3) Membranes: two and three-dimensional networks, self-assembly of amphiphiles, thermal fluctuations in membrane shape, bilayer bending and surface curvature. One of the goals of the course is to introduce students to a variety of important analytical methods, including: mean-field theory, density functional theory, Landau-Ginzberg theory, and renormalization-group theory. In addition, a number of key computational methods are employed to explore the properties of some simple polymeric systems, including: Monte Carlo, Molecular Dynamics and Discontinuous Molecular Dynamics. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8110 Advanced Topics in Materials Characterization
This course introduces students to instrumentation that is routinely used in materials chemistry. The techniques to be covered include powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, AC impedance and Raman spectroscopy. The theory behind these techniques will be thoroughly discussed in class, with an emphasis of data interpretation. Students will also gain hands-on experience with these instrumental techniques through laboratory work. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8130 Advanced Techniques in Scanning Electron Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline forms the basis of a course project. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8140 Marine Natural Products Chemistry
The overall goal of the course is to provide a description of the structures and biosynthetic origins of natural products of marine origin. The main classes of natural products will be reviewed with an emphasis on their biological origin as a tool to understanding structures. The biomedical relevance of marine natural products will be discussed along with special topics lectures on such themes as "From lead compound to FDA approval" and "Development of a natural product drug lead". Additional lectures on biological screening and metabolomics as modern tools in drug discovery, and chromatographic purification of natural products will round out the discussions. Students will be expected to develop a thorough understanding of the biosynthetic origin of all major categories of natural products through case studies. Cross-listed with Chemistry 4140. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8140 and CHEM 4140. Admission to graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8240 Advanced Studies in Environmental Toxicology
This course provides an in-depth analysis of environmental impacts of the major classes of contaminants including methodologies for environmental impact assessment and monitoring. Effects of environmental contaminants are examined at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, biochemical and molecular levels. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the fate of contaminants of concern in aquatic and terrestrial environments including their environmental chemistry, biogeochemical cycles, and exposure and uptake pathways by organisms. The course consists of lectures, discussions of peer-reviewed literature, case studies, presentations by students and laboratories. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8690 Materials Chemistry
This course discusses current topics in materials chemistry. Topics include the synthesis and characterization of intercalation compounds, conductive polymers and their applications, semiconductors and their applications, defects in inorganic solids, and transport measurements. Students will perform a thorough literature search on a topic in materials science; write a review and a research proposal on the selected topic, followed by in-class presentations. Cross-listed with CHEM 4690. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8690 and CHEM 4690. Admission to a graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8810 Directed Studies in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee, and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student's research project, although they may be in the same discipline.
3 hours credit
MMS-8820 Advanced Topics in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course covers current advances and advanced topics in a discipline of Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and is a thorough study of specific topics. It is offered to graduate students at the discretion of the Department, and covers areas of specialization not covered in other graduate courses. The course discusses recent advances in an area of interest to the students but which are not part of the students' thesis research directly.
3 hours credit
MMS-8900 Seminar in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
In this course students attend regular departmental seminars. Students are also required to present a seminar on a topic within their discipline, but unrelated to their research project. Students must register for this course each semester, and receive a grade of "In Progress" until completion of their MSc programs. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING (SDE) COURSES

SDE-8000 Thesis
Registration of thesis. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
SDE-8020 Quality Control and Project Management
This course is an introduction to the most widely accepted project management practices in the workforce today. The student will learn the industrially accepted techniques associated with the management of time, cost, risk, and scope in order to achieve total project stakeholder satisfaction. The goal in this course is to prepare students with the most efficient and effective project management practices by applying these techniques to their graduate research work, and in so doing greatly increase their likelihood of managing successful projects during their careers. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8040 Design of Experiments
This course focuses on the design, implementation, and analysis of engineering, scientific, and computer-based experiments. The course will examine the proper and scientific approach to experimentation, modeling, simulation, and analysis of data. Various designs are discussed and their respective advantages and disadvantages are noted. Factorial designs and sensitivity analysis will be studied in detail because of its relevance to various industries. Use of software for designing and analyzing experiments will also be used. For experiments that involved mainly physical quantities and natural phenomena, techniques of dimensional analysis will also be introduced. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
3 hours credit
SDE-8060 Modeling, Control, and Design of Energy Systems
This course focuses on the understanding of the physical processes underlying the energy conversion process from wind and solar energy. Students will have an advanced knowledge of aerodynamics and structural dynamics, and they will understand the main strategies used for controlling these machines over their complete operating range. A specific goal of the course is to provide students with a multidisciplinary vision on the physics of energy systems, and an understanding of the methods used for their modeling and simulation. A particular emphasis will be placed on design, and on the effects of design choices on the cost of energy. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8080 Industrial Machine Vision
This course focuses on computer vision with an emphasis on techniques for automated inspection, object recognition, mechanical metrology, and robotics. Image processing courses typically focus for image enhancement, restoration, filtering, smoothing, etc. These topics will be covered to a certain degree but the main focus will be on image segmentation, feature extraction, morphological operators, recognition and photogrammetry. Issues related to the efficient software implementation of these techniques for real-time applications will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8100 Biofuel and Biomass Technology
This course focuses on advanced concepts in understanding biofuels and bioenergy systems, renewable feedstocks, their production, availability and attributes for biofuel/bioenergy production, types of biomass derived fuels and energy, thermochemical conversion of biomass to heat, power and fuel, biochemical conversion of biomass to fuel environmental aspects of biofuel production, economics and life-cycle analysis of biofuel, and value adding of biofuel residues. Students will analyze, as well as prepare, case studies on biofuel production. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8230 Technology Management & Entrepreneurship
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company. Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, patents, business plans, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, liability, tax implications, sales, marketing, operational and human resource management. This course will be taught using problem-based and experiential learning strategies with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators. Graduate-level project will be defined. Cross-listed with Engineering 3430 (previously 4230).
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3720
3 hours credit
SDE-8310 Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
This course concentrates on manufacturing knowledge with a focus on advanced fabrication techniques (AFT) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). Students will expand their knowledge of traditional processes including CAD/CAM, forming, welding, milling, etc. leading into innovative advanced fabrication techniques in additive and precision manufacturing, next generation electronics, robotics and smart automation (CIM), and sustainable and green manufacturing modeling and simulation in the manufacturing process developed through lectures and labs. Integration of CIM into supply chain design and management is emphasized based on synergistic application of mechatronics approach and philosophy. Cross-listed with ENGN 4310; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8320 Control System Design
This course will provide students with an overview of system modelling and control methodologies of single/multiple input/output systems, e.g., energy transport control, reactor control, heat exchanger control, power production, and mechatronic systems. Students will learn classical control methods e.g.,feedforward, feedbacks, cascade, decoupling to modern control methods, LQR, predictive control,optimal and robust control. Students will be equipped with knowledge and skills for analyzing stability, controllability and observability of state-space representation modelled systems. Cross-listed with ENGN 4320; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8330 Innovations in Biomedical Engineering
This course introduces the study of medicine by focusing on innovations in medical devices, and future trends in materials, especially the increasing use of bio-resources, informatics, and mechatronics engineering applications in orthopedic, rehabilitation, simulation and education technologies. In its broader context, this course focuses on four areas of biotechnology, biomechanics, biomaterials and biosignals. Through a hands-on approach, the course focuses on innovative product development related to bio-signal, instrumentation, sensing, and image processing. Students will also gain an appreciation for the collaborative, interdisciplinary nature of engineering in medicine and its potential impact on society. Graduate project will be defined. Cross-listed with ENGN-4330
3 hours credit
SDE-8350 Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control
This course advances the fundamentals of robotics through exposure to in-depth knowledge and understanding of kinematics, dynamics, control and trajectory with applications to autonomous vehicles, automated manufacturing and processing and mobile robotics. Areas of interest include: position transformation and control, rigid body motion, kinematic control, compliance and force control. Cross-listed with ENGN 4350; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8370 Fluid Power Control
This course covers the analysis and design of basic hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems. Topics include a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics including flow through valves, fittings, and pipe; classification of hydrostatic pumps and motors; control valves; hydraulic accumulators; sizing of practical hydraulic circuits; thermal and energy considerations; electrohydraulic control and modeling of hydraulic control systems. The latter part of the course focuses on pneumatic systems including pneumatic cylinders and motors, control valves, and compressor technology. The application of Programmable Logic Controls (PLCs) to industrial automation and the sequential control of pneumatic actuators is also addressed. Cross-listed with ENGN 4370; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8410 Macro Energy Systems
This course covers methods for analyzing energy supply, conversion processes, and end-use at the system level. Aspects considered include the dynamics of energy supply and demand, efficiencies of energy conversion, characteristics of energy currencies, and energy needs across different sectors. Students will characterize methods of delivering energy services such as heat, light, industrial power and transportation. Exergy analysis will be introduced and used to build a quantitative framework for integrating techno-economic analysis of energy system components, with emphasis on elements such as fossil fuels and nuclear power. Students will gain an enhanced, quantitative appreciation for the sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity aspects of energy services delivery. Cross-listed with ENGN 4410; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8440 Advanced Energy Storage
This course considers advanced technical analysis of energy storage systems. A comprehensive overview of all industrially relevant energy storage systems is reviewed and emphasis is placed on promising energy storage technologies of the future. Chemical, thermal and kinetic storage technologies will be discussed in detail. Cross-listed with ENGN 4440; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8450 Fluid Loads on Energy Structures
This course is an introduction to the loads applied on structures from wind, waves, and currents, and their heightened relevance to structures designed for energy conversion. Phenomena to be discussed include lift and drag, boundary layers, vortex-induced vibrations, wakes, hydrostatic loading, and water waves. A selection of engineering methods will be introduced and brought to bear on these topics, such as potential flow theory, blade-element theory, Airy wave theory and Morison's equation. Dimensional analysis will be introduced to characterize flow problems. Design implications will be discussed for a selection of relevant energy conversion structures such as aircraft wings, wind turbines, breakwaters, marine vessels, and offshore energy platforms. Cross-listed with ENGN 4450; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8470 Micro Grids
SDE 8470 MICRO GRIDS This course focuses on the concept, operation and optimization of renewable-energy-based micro-grids. Concepts introduced and considered include renewable energy resources, integration technologies, grid-connected operation, islanded grid operation, energy storage integration and the optimal dimensioning and mixing of multiple energy sources where some are stochastic in nature and some are dispatchable. Existing and future energy storage technologies will be also be discussed. This course is based on energy flow analysis and makes extensive use of software simulation tools. Students will develop a framework for performing techno-economic assessments of micro-grid architectures and designs. A strong background in electrical power systems is not necessarily required. Cross-listed with ENGN 4470; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8510 Geoinformatics in Bioresource
This course covers the theory and practice of geoinformatics and their applications to problems in bioresources using digital mapping and spatial analysis. Hands on laboratories will provide students with an experience to collect georeferenced data using differential global positioning system, followed by mapping and analysis in geographical information system. Topics include datums, map projections and transformations, vector and raster data, geo-spatial analysis, geo-statistics and interpolation techniques. This course will also cover the fundamentals of remote sensing, data collection with sensors, and spatial and temporal aspects of the bio-resources attributes. Cross-listed with ENGN 4510; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8530 Fundamentals of Agriculture Machinery
This course highlights the fundamentals of mechanized agriculture machinery from soil preparation, planting, and crop management to mechanical harvesting. The machines and their unit operation are analyzed with respect functions, work rates, material flow and power usage. The machine performance relating to work quality and environmental effects will also be evaluated. The labs will emphasize on safety, basic maintenance, adjustment, calibrations of equipment and performance testing. This course also covers the variable rate applicators for site-specific application of inputs, auto guidance system, data acquisition and management for intelligent decision making for machines, and precision agriculture technologies. Cross-listed with ENGN 4530; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8550 Chemical and Biological Processes
Processes used in the chemical and biological industries, which emphasize underlying physical, chemical, and biological principles, will be introduced. By carrying out the mass and energy balances, students will conduct design and economic assessment of major chemical and biological engineering processes. Introduction to modelling of chemical processes will be covered in this course. (Formerly ENGN-3590) Cross-listed with ENGN 4550; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8810 Directed Studies in SDE
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student's thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering and permission of supervisor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8830 Biomedical Signal Processing
This course is an introduction to the basics of viewing, processing, and analyzing of biosignals, or signals originating from living beings. Biosignals may be characterized as bioelectrical signals which can be composed of both electrical and non-electrical parts. Topics include both linear and nonlinear systems, signal conditioning or filtering, improving signal quality (signal-to-noise ratio) through averaging techniques, and signal representations in both the time and frequency domains. Cross-listed with ENGN 4830; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8900 Seminar
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their research area of Sustainable Design Engineering and are expected to be seminar presenters. Techniques in preparing scientific communication (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
3 hours credit
Overview

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research. There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

Program

A. General Structure of the Program

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research.

There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

In addition to the "General Regulations for Graduate Programs," described above, the following regulations apply specifically to the Master's degree:

Residency Requirements
Normally, at least two semesters of full-time study in residence at the University must be devoted to the Master's program if the student is admitted as a regular student. For a regular student admitted to a part-time study program, the residency period is based on the equivalence of three part-time semesters to one full-time semester. A student, admitted as a provisional student requiring two semesters in that category, must spend at least one additional semester as a regular full-time student to meet the residency requirement. Upon completion of the residency requirement the student is then eligible to become a candidate for the MSc degree.

Normally, the thesis must be formally submitted or the program be otherwise complete within 48 months of the completion of the residency requirement. Departure from these normal requirements requires approval from the Graduate Studies Committee.

B. Courses

Prescribed Studies
The proportion of weight attached to the research and thesis may vary, even within a department/faculty. Accordingly, the number of courses and/or general examinations may correspondingly vary. In no case, however, will the minimum requirements be less than those outlined in the following two paragraphs. For graduate credit, the courses selected must be acceptable to the department/faculty and the Graduate Studies Committee. The candidate must maintain an average grade of at least a B standing (see Grades in General Regulations section) in the substantive courses outlined below in order to maintain registration in the program.

A department/faculty may require examinations (oral and/or written), from time to time, to evaluate the student's progress in his/her overall program.

Additional Courses
In addition to these prescribed studies, the candidate may undertake to achieve satisfactory standings in courses supportive of the special discipline. These courses may be at either the undergraduate or the graduate level. The standings obtained in them will not affect the average grade of the prescribed studies.

C. The Thesis

Research
Normally, the equivalent of at least two full-time semesters must be devoted to research in fulfilment of the thesis requirement. Summers during which research work is actively conducted may be counted as research semester equivalents, even though courses would not normally be offered at that time. In order to avoid undue prolongation of the time required to complete the degree, the research topic should be identified early and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Research involving the use of animals must follow the Guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care.

Thesis
Each candidate for the degree of Master of Science is required to submit a thesis based upon the research conducted under supervision as described above. The thesis must demonstrate the candidate's capacity for original and independent work, and should include a critical evaluation of work which has previously been done in the field of his or her research. The thesis should emphasize any new conclusions which may be drawn from the candidate's own research.

General specifications as to paper, format, order, and binding are available from the Office of the Program Administrator.

Procedures
The thesis may be handed in at any time of the year, but candidates must bear in mind the desirability of having the final examination as much in advance of the deadline date for thesis submission as possible. Candidates are advised to inform themselves of the deadlines schedule, a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of the Program Administrator. It is desirable that each candidate initiate discussion about examination dates with the Supervisor early in the final semester.

The candidate should keep in close touch with the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee, throughout the preparation of the thesis. The final draft of the thesis, after it has been reviewed by all members of the Supervisory Committee, is sent when ready for examination, to the members of the Master's Examination Committee (see below).

Following the Master's Examination, the candidate, if successful, arranges for the preparation of the thesis in final form, and for its submission to the Program Administrator (see below). The thesis in final form must include any minor corrections or revisions indicated during the Examination. Approval of the thesis takes the form of a Certificate of Approval, signed by the Examination Committee.

The Master's Examination
The final oral examination, devoted chiefly to the defence of the thesis, is an examination identified as the Master's Examination and carried out by the Master's Examination Committee.

The Department Chair selects the Examination Committee at the request of the Supervisor and is responsible for notifying the Program Administrator of its composition. The Examination is normally open to the public; however, members of the audience may question the candidate only upon invitation of the Chair of the Committee.

The Examination is passed and the thesis approved if there is no more than one negative vote, an abstention being regarded as a negative vote. The report, from the Department Chair to the Program Administrator, records the result as "unsatisfactory” or “satisfactory." If the result is "unsatisfactory," the candidate may be given the opportunity by the Master's Examination Committee of a second attempt. A second "unsatisfactory" result will terminate candidacy at this university.

The Master's Examination Committee normally consists of five members as follows:

  • Three members of the Supervisory Committee, including the Supervisor of the candidate's research;
  • One member of the area of specialization but from a department other than that of the student’s supervisor. This external examiner may be from the University of Prince Edward Island, or from another University or Research Institute, as is deemed appropriate;
  • The Coordinator of Graduate Studies (or designate), who will Chair the Master's Examination Committee. 
Admission

Entrance requirements include a BSc degree for the MSc program or a MSc degree or equivalent for the PhD programs (see Sciences PhD programs for details). Both programs require also an acceptable level of grades during the last 20 courses completed before the application is submitted. Although UPEI requires a minimum average of 70% in order to consider an application, the Faculty of Science normally requires at least a 75% in order to accept students in the MSc or PhD programs. Regardless of the program (MSc or PhD), the applicant must have a confirmed supervisor and a source of funding must be identified at the time of the application.

For a successful application, prospective students should follow the steps listed below:

Step 1. Prospective students must meet the entrance requirements before considering an application. International students should learn in advance about visa requirements, and for those whose first language is not English, there are also language requirements that must be fulfilled  (see Application form).

Step 2. Review departmental and individual faculty webpages to find out about availability of space and resources in the research groups of interest. Students must identify, contact, and confirm a potential supervisor as this faculty will subsequently need to commit in writing to the student’s program.

Step 3. Complete and submit an Application form to the Registrar’s Office. The form must be accompanied by official transcripts and an application fee. The student should also arrange to have two letters of reference and, if applicable, proof of English proficiency sent to the Registrar’s Office.

In case there are questions or in order to facilitate a timely review process, students may contact the Graduate Studies Coordinator (pquijon@upei.ca) once the application has been submitted.

Requirements

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

Students are required to take a minimum of three graduate level courses, all of which are to be regarded as substantive. A Seminar course (MMS 8900 or ESC 8900 or HB 8900 or SDE 8900) is required. Students may take only one Directed Studies course (MMS 8810 or ESC 8810 or HB 8810 or SDE 8810, or alternatively, VBS 8810 or 8820, VPM 8810 or 8820, VCA 8810 or 8820, VHM 8810 or 8820) for credit. Students lacking an Honours degree or background in one or more area may, at the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, be required to take the appropriate undergraduate level course(s), in addition to the required courses. All graduate students must receive non-credit WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) training in their first year.

When a student is required to register in a seminar or colloquium course in more than one semester, the record will show a grade or a designation of "In Progress" for semesters prior to completion of the course and "Pass" or "Fail" (or a numerical grade in the case of MMS 8900) for the final semester. Enrolment in the Seminar course implies the student will participate as a presenter in at least one Graduate Studies Day. With the consent of the Supervisory Committee, and of the instructor and the Department Chair concerned, a student may register for, and audit, all or part of a course. It is understood that the student will attend lectures as prescribed, but will not write any examination or receive any grade. Such a course may be recorded as an additional course, identified by AUD.

Courses

MASTER OF SCIENCE—ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ESC) COURSES

ESC-8000 Thesis
ESC-8010 PhD Thesis
This is the main science-oriented component of the PhD, and as such, it is a course in which students will conduct an original research project, report orally on this work throughout the course of the degree, culminating in the submission and defence of a dissertation. A formal approval to initiate the research project will be granted after the supervisory committee has been established and a research proposal, including a thorough review of pertinent literature available, is provided by the candidate. Students must register in this course each semester to maintain enrolment in the program. It embodies the research component of this program. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8020 Communication Strategies
This course promotes the development of communication skills in the context of environmental issues and exposes students to direct interaction with representatives from industry, government, community, and the social sciences. The course will also provide broad theoretical and practical knowledge needed to resolve disputes as well as skills training in techniques of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation. Beyond the activities of ENV-4330, the graduate-level assessment of this course involves weekly assigned readings, an essay on a selected topic that includes an extensive literature review, and a seminar on the researched topic. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science. Cross-listed with ENV 4330; Credit cannot be received for both ENV 4330 and ESC 8020.
3 hours credit
ESC-8030 Current Issues in Environmental Impact Assessment
This course is intended to review the theory behind Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) through the use of case studies that best exemplify project development that prevent or minimize environmental degradation. This course will examine the needs, methods, regulatory frameworks and social implications of EIA with emphasis on recent Canadian case studies. On completion of this course, students will be familiarized with the concept of EIA (its history, principles, key constructs and main steps), the legislative and institutional context of EIA, and will be able to critically examine EIA cases and identify their implications. (Cross-listed with Enviromental Studies 4310). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8040 Practical Issues Surrounding Environmental Management
This course intends to provide hands-on experience to our students by deploying them in NGOs, government agencies, or environmental consulting companies for approximately 75 flexible hours (the equivalent to the number of contact hours typically considered for a course's lectures and laboratory). The primary goal of this course is to expose students of a given environmental discipline into the multiple aspects involved in the actual issues and decision-making process that take place in agencies outside the academic setting. This unique training period (spread from two weeks to an entire semester) will provide human resources to often resource-limited groups/ entities that will be chosen by each supervisory committee according to their relevance for the student research focus. Students are expected to gain unprecedented experience and, to some extent, provide actual input into environmental management. The student will prepare a written report and share their experience by giving a public seminar. The supervisory committee in collaboration with the Faculty of Science Graduate Studies Committee will be responsible for identifying an appropriate placement based on the student's discipline and interests. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8120 Advanced Topics in Ecology and Environmental Sciences
This course covers advances in practical and theoretical aspects of aquatic and terrestrial ecology, and represents one of the three general axes of research expertise within the Department. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science or have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit
ESC-8130 Advanced Topics in Plant Science
This course covers current advances in botany, including plant development and morphology, anatomy and physiology, pollination biology, and biotechnology. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit
ESC-8620 Advanced Freshwater Ecology
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student's individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation. NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4620(Limnology) and Biology 8620 and ESC 8620
3 hours credit
ESC-8650 Advances in Marine Ecology
This course provides an update on relevant areas of ongoing marine research. The first part of the course concentrates on marine ecology topics including benthic-pelagic coupling, dispersal and adult-larval interactions, animal-sediment relationships, biodiversity ecosystem services, encrusting communities and their interactions, and aquatic invasive species. The second part includes participation in regular discussion sessions based on analysis of advanced literature relevant to the discipline and to the student's particular research. Assignments include an essay relevant (but not restricted) to a student's field of research, and a seminar on a topic relating general ecological hypotheses to the topic addressed in the essay. NOTE: Credit will not be given for both Biology 4650 (Marine Community Ecology) and ESC 8650. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab/field trip per week, plus discussion group.
3 hours credit
ESC-8710 Advanced Studies in Environmental Toxicology
This course provides an in depth analysis of environmental impacts of the major classes of contaminants including methodologies for environmental impact assessment and monitoring. Effects of environmental contaminants are examined at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, biochemical and molecular levels. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the fate of contaminants of concern in aquatic and terrestrial environments including their environmental chemistry, biogeochemical cycles, and exposure and uptake pathways by organisms. The course consists of lectures, discussions of peer-reviewed literature, case studies, presentations by students and laboratories. (Cross-listed with MMS 8240) Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8720 Advanced Studies of Macroecology and Biogeography
This course examines our current understanding of the patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms from the integrative perspective of macroecology and biogeography. The first discipline is concerned with understanding patterns at large spatial and temporal scales via the use of large quantitative databases and statistical techniques. The second one is concerned with the study of the patterns of distribution of animal species by integrating information on historical events (e.g., plate tectonics), evolutionary processes, as well as ecological and physiological trends. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8730 Conservation Genetics
Conservation genetics is an emerging and topical field of biology that combines molecular genetic approaches with environmental, evolutionary and ecological research under the umbrella of conservation biology. This course will cover a range of research topics pertaining to the conservation of biodiversity including ecological and landscape genetics, contemporary evolution and human-mediated change, invasion biology, genomics for endangered species, and genetics of captive or isolated populations. The course will introduce students to theoretical and experimental approaches to measuring and managing genetic diversity, as well as cultural and ethical issues in conservation biology through lectures, tutorial and case study discussion. Students will have hands-on experience with DNA and molecular marker analysis techniques, lead in-class discussions, write critical reviews of current research, and develop research proposals for selected questions in conservation genetics. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8750 Quantitative Methods for the Analysis of Animal Movement
A better comprehension of animal movement is vital to interpreting key ecological and evolutionary processes, such as the spatial-temporal patterns of resource selection, foraging behaviour, and predator-prey interactions. As human activities continually alter landscapes and influence the behaviour and movement patterns of organisms, a variety of pressing ecological and health issues are emerging, such as the spread of invasive species and infectious diseases. Hence, advances in our understanding of animal movement will have direct implications in several disciplines including landscape ecology, conservation biology, and wildlife management, as well as those dealing with public health. In this course, the student will investigate the various methods currently employed to study animal movement in complex landscapes. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8770 Veterinary Biostatistics
This course provides the student with a working knowledge of the basic statistical techniques used in veterinary science. Topics include descriptive statistics, inferential statistics non-parametric statistics, analysis of variance, regression and correlation and experimental design. (Cross-listed with graduate level course VHM 8010). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8780 Island Biogeography and Conservation of Insular Systems
This course examines the several fundamental patterns and processes that characterize biotas and environments on islands and other broadly defined insular systems. Topics covered include earth history and historical biogeography, speciation, dispersal, extinction, island biogeography, assembly and evolution of insular communities, island effect, adaptive radiation, environmental determinism, conservation biology, marine and terrestrial protected areas, and vulnerability of island biotas to terrestrial and aquatic invasive species. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8790 Advanced Techniques in Scanning Electronic Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students will learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use and will generate their own images and learn to interpret patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline will form the basis of a course project. (Cross-listed with MMS 8130 and HB 8250). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8800 Molecular Biotechnology
This course examines principles of gene manipulation, and the application of molecular biology in all the fields of biotechnology. Recent developments in medicine, agriculture, industry and basic research are considered. Emphasis is placed on reviewing current literature in the field, particularly on areas more closely related to the natural sciences/ environment. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8810 Directed Studies
Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program in Biology and be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
ESC-8900 Seminar
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—HUMAN BIOLOGY (HB) COURSES

HB-8000 Thesis
HB-8110 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology
This course enhances student knowledge of cell and molecular biology from a research perspective. Current advances in cell and molecular biology, including biotechnology and cytogenetics, are emphasized. Topics vary yearly according to the needs of the participating students. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8250 Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline forms the basis of a course project. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program or be granted permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
HB-8320 Movement Disorders
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder. (Cross-listed with Kinesiology 4320) PREREQUISITE: Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor. NOTE: Credit not given for both KINE 4320 and HB 8320; responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences
3 hours credit
HB-8350 Principles of Positive Youth Development through Sport
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development. (Cross-listed with Kinesiology 4350). Restriction: Student must have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8430 Advanced Physiology of Exercise Adaption and Performance
This course focuses on factors governing chronic exercise adaptations, acute exercise performance and health. Course content explores concepts such as skeletal muscle repair, genetics of sport performance and the effects of various training modalities (HIIT, resistance etc.). Students will combine theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, and prepare a review paper related to a topic of interest within the area of exercise physiology. (Cross-listed with KINE 4430) Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor. NOTE: Credit not given for both KINE 4430 and HB 8430; Responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences.
3 hours credit
HB-8620 Advanced Freshwater Ecology
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student's individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation. NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4620(Limnology) and Biology 8620 and ESC 8620.
3 hours credit
HB-8720 Advanced Studies in the Biology of Cancer and Other Diseases
The course addresses the principles of pathobiology with an emphasis on human diseases and a focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology associated with disease paradigms. Topical diseases include cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and AIDS, among others. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the course BIO 4720, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project in a cancer biology related topic or one relevant to the student's area of study. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade. (Cross-listed with Biology 4720) NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4720 and HB 8720. Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program at UPEI and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8810 Directed Studies in Human Development and Health
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student's thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science. Restriction: Student must be admitted in the graduate program in Biology and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8830 Epidemiological Applications in Primary Healthcare Research
This course introduces essential principles of epidemiological applications that are relevant to primary healthcare research. Students will be introduced to the principles of patient oriented research, primary healthcare, and the background of epidemiological applications, as well as the specific applications and computations of sensitivity and specificity, risk estimation, rates and proportions, hypothesis generating and hypothesis evaluation, as well as arithmetic and mathematical modeling. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, group discussions and interpretation of outcomes from specific analyses using customized "webulators" will be used. Students are expected to prepare written reports and/or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8850 Bioinformatics for Graduate Students
This course is an introduction to bioinformatics and a practical guide to the analysis of genes and proteins. It will familiarize students with the tools and principles of contemporary bioinformatics. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge at the graduate level of a variety of publicly available databases and computational tools important in bioinformatics, and a grasp of the underlying principles that are adequate for them to evaluate and utilize novel techniques as they arise in the future. In addition to participating in all the lectures and activities of the undergraduate course CS 3220/BIO 3220, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project and attend extra guest lectures specially prepared for graduate students (when the graduate enrolment is 3 or more). The graduate project would be related to the student's research, so the thesis supervisor will be invited to join in the process of choosing and evaluating the graduate project. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade. (Cross-listed with CS 3220, BIO 3220, VPM 8850) Note: No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 8850, VPM 8850, CS 3220, and BIO 3220. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8900 Seminar
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their thesis areas and deliver seminars. Techniques in preparing scientific communications (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES (MMS) COURSES

MMS-8000 Thesis
MMS-8010 PhD Thesis
This is a research-oriented course in which students will conduct an extensive original research project,culminating in the submission and defence of a thesis. Students must register in this course each semester to maintain enrolment in the program. It embodies the research component of the PhD program.
MMS-8020 Molecules, MacRomolecules and the Business of Science
This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters.
6 hours credit
MMS-8021 Molecules, MacRomolecules and the Business of Science - Part I
This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters. HOURS OF CREDIT: 6 Restriction: Student must be admitted into the PhD program
MMS-8022 Molecules/Business of Science - Part II
MOLECULES, MACROMOLECULES AND THE BUSINESS OF SCIENCE This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters. HOURS OF CREDIT: 6 Restriction: Student must be admitted into the PhD program
PREREQUISITE: MMS 8021
6 hours credit
MMS-8030 Directed Studies in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in the Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences constellation. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student's research project, although they may be in the same discipline. Coverage of the topic by the student must include the relevant commercial and business aspects of the field. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8040 Field Course in Marine Drug Discovery
This course offering will familiarize students in the areas of marine natural products, marine taxonomy, field based biological assays of relevance to drug discovery, marine microbiology, and biotechnology. Lectures will introduce students to the concepts of field research and their applications to drug discovery. Students will participate in field collections of marine invertebrates. The collected organisms will then be subjected to several biological and chemical assays. Students will present field reports identifying the collected species and any chemical or biological activities observed. The second half of the course will focus on supervised research projects. The project topics will be chosen by the students and instructors. In lieu of a textbook, students will be provided with a collection of several publications from the marine natural products literature. These articles will include reviews of marine natural products, reports of recent advances, and founding texts of the field. Course experience in invertebrate zoology at the undergraduate level is strongly recommended. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8050 Advanced Studies in NMR Spectroscopy
This course covers the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry used in the determination of structures in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Major topics include the theory and use of NMR spectroscopy, in particular the use of 2D experiments and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the students' ability to interpret spectra and elucidate the structure of a molecule based on this evidence beyond the undergraduate level, as well as the role NMR has played as a structural tool in the pharmaceutical industry and academia. Students will have a practical/hands-on component in this course. Cross-listed with CHEM 4050. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8050 and CHEM 4050. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8060 Advanced Topics Computational Chemistry
This course exercises the application of computational chemistry to structural and reactivity questions in organic and inorganic chemistry. Computational methods discussed include molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical calculations, and density functional theory. The objective is to gain an understanding of the application of these methods to chemical problems. The current literature is explored to illustrate the use of computational chemistry in research. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the MSc Program HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.
3 hours credit
MMS-8070 Advanced Study in Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms
This course develops inorganic reaction mechanisms, with an emphasis on catalytic cycles, catalyst development, and the context of these reactions within the polymer, pharmaceutical and consumer product industries. Students will learn how to support reaction mechanisms through appropriate experimentation and spectroscopic characterization of catalysts, reactions and products. Students will examine how new catalysts are developed, patented and brought into commercial use. Major projects include a patent application on an imaginary catalytic system, and a report assessing the commercial relevance of a recent literature discovery. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8080 Green Chemistry
This course will develop the fundamentals of greener chemical processes and syntheses. The course will present the principles of green chemistry in the context of case studies within Canadian academia and industry. Coursework and projects will aim to develop synthetic skills, providing students with the tools to propose green synthetic plans for small molecules and polymers while introducing students to wider political and environmental issues which impact on chemical industry. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8090 Biomaterials
This course covers the fundamentals of the synthesis, properties, and biocompatibility of metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and biological materials that come in contact with tissue and biological fluids. Emphasis is placed on using biomaterials for both hard and soft tissue replacement, organ replacement, coatings and adhesives, dental implants, and drug delivery systems. New trends in biomaterials and the recent merging of cell biology and biochemistry with materials is examined. Cross-listed with CHEM 4090. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8090 and CHEM 4090. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8100 Soft Condensed Matter Physics
This course utilizes a variety of tools developed within the general framework of statistical and solid-state physics to study the structural and dynamic properties of a number of important soft-condensed matter systems, including: polymers, liquid crystals, and membranes. Some key topics include: (1) Liquid crystals: elasticity, deformations, surface effects, fluctuations and scattering; (2) Polymers: chain conformations, mixtures and phase behaviour, motion in melts and glasses (viscoelasticity, relaxation, reptation); (3) Membranes: two and three-dimensional networks, self-assembly of amphiphiles, thermal fluctuations in membrane shape, bilayer bending and surface curvature. One of the goals of the course is to introduce students to a variety of important analytical methods, including: mean-field theory, density functional theory, Landau-Ginzberg theory, and renormalization-group theory. In addition, a number of key computational methods are employed to explore the properties of some simple polymeric systems, including: Monte Carlo, Molecular Dynamics and Discontinuous Molecular Dynamics. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8110 Advanced Topics in Materials Characterization
This course introduces students to instrumentation that is routinely used in materials chemistry. The techniques to be covered include powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, AC impedance and Raman spectroscopy. The theory behind these techniques will be thoroughly discussed in class, with an emphasis of data interpretation. Students will also gain hands-on experience with these instrumental techniques through laboratory work. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8130 Advanced Techniques in Scanning Electron Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline forms the basis of a course project. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8140 Marine Natural Products Chemistry
The overall goal of the course is to provide a description of the structures and biosynthetic origins of natural products of marine origin. The main classes of natural products will be reviewed with an emphasis on their biological origin as a tool to understanding structures. The biomedical relevance of marine natural products will be discussed along with special topics lectures on such themes as "From lead compound to FDA approval" and "Development of a natural product drug lead". Additional lectures on biological screening and metabolomics as modern tools in drug discovery, and chromatographic purification of natural products will round out the discussions. Students will be expected to develop a thorough understanding of the biosynthetic origin of all major categories of natural products through case studies. Cross-listed with Chemistry 4140. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8140 and CHEM 4140. Admission to graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8240 Advanced Studies in Environmental Toxicology
This course provides an in-depth analysis of environmental impacts of the major classes of contaminants including methodologies for environmental impact assessment and monitoring. Effects of environmental contaminants are examined at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, biochemical and molecular levels. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the fate of contaminants of concern in aquatic and terrestrial environments including their environmental chemistry, biogeochemical cycles, and exposure and uptake pathways by organisms. The course consists of lectures, discussions of peer-reviewed literature, case studies, presentations by students and laboratories. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8690 Materials Chemistry
This course discusses current topics in materials chemistry. Topics include the synthesis and characterization of intercalation compounds, conductive polymers and their applications, semiconductors and their applications, defects in inorganic solids, and transport measurements. Students will perform a thorough literature search on a topic in materials science; write a review and a research proposal on the selected topic, followed by in-class presentations. Cross-listed with CHEM 4690. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8690 and CHEM 4690. Admission to a graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8810 Directed Studies in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee, and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student's research project, although they may be in the same discipline.
3 hours credit
MMS-8820 Advanced Topics in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course covers current advances and advanced topics in a discipline of Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and is a thorough study of specific topics. It is offered to graduate students at the discretion of the Department, and covers areas of specialization not covered in other graduate courses. The course discusses recent advances in an area of interest to the students but which are not part of the students' thesis research directly.
3 hours credit
MMS-8900 Seminar in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
In this course students attend regular departmental seminars. Students are also required to present a seminar on a topic within their discipline, but unrelated to their research project. Students must register for this course each semester, and receive a grade of "In Progress" until completion of their MSc programs. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING (SDE) COURSES

SDE-8000 Thesis
Registration of thesis. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
SDE-8020 Quality Control and Project Management
This course is an introduction to the most widely accepted project management practices in the workforce today. The student will learn the industrially accepted techniques associated with the management of time, cost, risk, and scope in order to achieve total project stakeholder satisfaction. The goal in this course is to prepare students with the most efficient and effective project management practices by applying these techniques to their graduate research work, and in so doing greatly increase their likelihood of managing successful projects during their careers. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8040 Design of Experiments
This course focuses on the design, implementation, and analysis of engineering, scientific, and computer-based experiments. The course will examine the proper and scientific approach to experimentation, modeling, simulation, and analysis of data. Various designs are discussed and their respective advantages and disadvantages are noted. Factorial designs and sensitivity analysis will be studied in detail because of its relevance to various industries. Use of software for designing and analyzing experiments will also be used. For experiments that involved mainly physical quantities and natural phenomena, techniques of dimensional analysis will also be introduced. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
3 hours credit
SDE-8060 Modeling, Control, and Design of Energy Systems
This course focuses on the understanding of the physical processes underlying the energy conversion process from wind and solar energy. Students will have an advanced knowledge of aerodynamics and structural dynamics, and they will understand the main strategies used for controlling these machines over their complete operating range. A specific goal of the course is to provide students with a multidisciplinary vision on the physics of energy systems, and an understanding of the methods used for their modeling and simulation. A particular emphasis will be placed on design, and on the effects of design choices on the cost of energy. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8080 Industrial Machine Vision
This course focuses on computer vision with an emphasis on techniques for automated inspection, object recognition, mechanical metrology, and robotics. Image processing courses typically focus for image enhancement, restoration, filtering, smoothing, etc. These topics will be covered to a certain degree but the main focus will be on image segmentation, feature extraction, morphological operators, recognition and photogrammetry. Issues related to the efficient software implementation of these techniques for real-time applications will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8100 Biofuel and Biomass Technology
This course focuses on advanced concepts in understanding biofuels and bioenergy systems, renewable feedstocks, their production, availability and attributes for biofuel/bioenergy production, types of biomass derived fuels and energy, thermochemical conversion of biomass to heat, power and fuel, biochemical conversion of biomass to fuel environmental aspects of biofuel production, economics and life-cycle analysis of biofuel, and value adding of biofuel residues. Students will analyze, as well as prepare, case studies on biofuel production. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8230 Technology Management & Entrepreneurship
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company. Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, patents, business plans, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, liability, tax implications, sales, marketing, operational and human resource management. This course will be taught using problem-based and experiential learning strategies with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators. Graduate-level project will be defined. Cross-listed with Engineering 3430 (previously 4230).
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3720
3 hours credit
SDE-8310 Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
This course concentrates on manufacturing knowledge with a focus on advanced fabrication techniques (AFT) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). Students will expand their knowledge of traditional processes including CAD/CAM, forming, welding, milling, etc. leading into innovative advanced fabrication techniques in additive and precision manufacturing, next generation electronics, robotics and smart automation (CIM), and sustainable and green manufacturing modeling and simulation in the manufacturing process developed through lectures and labs. Integration of CIM into supply chain design and management is emphasized based on synergistic application of mechatronics approach and philosophy. Cross-listed with ENGN 4310; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8320 Control System Design
This course will provide students with an overview of system modelling and control methodologies of single/multiple input/output systems, e.g., energy transport control, reactor control, heat exchanger control, power production, and mechatronic systems. Students will learn classical control methods e.g.,feedforward, feedbacks, cascade, decoupling to modern control methods, LQR, predictive control,optimal and robust control. Students will be equipped with knowledge and skills for analyzing stability, controllability and observability of state-space representation modelled systems. Cross-listed with ENGN 4320; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8330 Innovations in Biomedical Engineering
This course introduces the study of medicine by focusing on innovations in medical devices, and future trends in materials, especially the increasing use of bio-resources, informatics, and mechatronics engineering applications in orthopedic, rehabilitation, simulation and education technologies. In its broader context, this course focuses on four areas of biotechnology, biomechanics, biomaterials and biosignals. Through a hands-on approach, the course focuses on innovative product development related to bio-signal, instrumentation, sensing, and image processing. Students will also gain an appreciation for the collaborative, interdisciplinary nature of engineering in medicine and its potential impact on society. Graduate project will be defined. Cross-listed with ENGN-4330
3 hours credit
SDE-8350 Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control
This course advances the fundamentals of robotics through exposure to in-depth knowledge and understanding of kinematics, dynamics, control and trajectory with applications to autonomous vehicles, automated manufacturing and processing and mobile robotics. Areas of interest include: position transformation and control, rigid body motion, kinematic control, compliance and force control. Cross-listed with ENGN 4350; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8370 Fluid Power Control
This course covers the analysis and design of basic hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems. Topics include a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics including flow through valves, fittings, and pipe; classification of hydrostatic pumps and motors; control valves; hydraulic accumulators; sizing of practical hydraulic circuits; thermal and energy considerations; electrohydraulic control and modeling of hydraulic control systems. The latter part of the course focuses on pneumatic systems including pneumatic cylinders and motors, control valves, and compressor technology. The application of Programmable Logic Controls (PLCs) to industrial automation and the sequential control of pneumatic actuators is also addressed. Cross-listed with ENGN 4370; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8410 Macro Energy Systems
This course covers methods for analyzing energy supply, conversion processes, and end-use at the system level. Aspects considered include the dynamics of energy supply and demand, efficiencies of energy conversion, characteristics of energy currencies, and energy needs across different sectors. Students will characterize methods of delivering energy services such as heat, light, industrial power and transportation. Exergy analysis will be introduced and used to build a quantitative framework for integrating techno-economic analysis of energy system components, with emphasis on elements such as fossil fuels and nuclear power. Students will gain an enhanced, quantitative appreciation for the sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity aspects of energy services delivery. Cross-listed with ENGN 4410; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8440 Advanced Energy Storage
This course considers advanced technical analysis of energy storage systems. A comprehensive overview of all industrially relevant energy storage systems is reviewed and emphasis is placed on promising energy storage technologies of the future. Chemical, thermal and kinetic storage technologies will be discussed in detail. Cross-listed with ENGN 4440; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8450 Fluid Loads on Energy Structures
This course is an introduction to the loads applied on structures from wind, waves, and currents, and their heightened relevance to structures designed for energy conversion. Phenomena to be discussed include lift and drag, boundary layers, vortex-induced vibrations, wakes, hydrostatic loading, and water waves. A selection of engineering methods will be introduced and brought to bear on these topics, such as potential flow theory, blade-element theory, Airy wave theory and Morison's equation. Dimensional analysis will be introduced to characterize flow problems. Design implications will be discussed for a selection of relevant energy conversion structures such as aircraft wings, wind turbines, breakwaters, marine vessels, and offshore energy platforms. Cross-listed with ENGN 4450; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8470 Micro Grids
SDE 8470 MICRO GRIDS This course focuses on the concept, operation and optimization of renewable-energy-based micro-grids. Concepts introduced and considered include renewable energy resources, integration technologies, grid-connected operation, islanded grid operation, energy storage integration and the optimal dimensioning and mixing of multiple energy sources where some are stochastic in nature and some are dispatchable. Existing and future energy storage technologies will be also be discussed. This course is based on energy flow analysis and makes extensive use of software simulation tools. Students will develop a framework for performing techno-economic assessments of micro-grid architectures and designs. A strong background in electrical power systems is not necessarily required. Cross-listed with ENGN 4470; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8510 Geoinformatics in Bioresource
This course covers the theory and practice of geoinformatics and their applications to problems in bioresources using digital mapping and spatial analysis. Hands on laboratories will provide students with an experience to collect georeferenced data using differential global positioning system, followed by mapping and analysis in geographical information system. Topics include datums, map projections and transformations, vector and raster data, geo-spatial analysis, geo-statistics and interpolation techniques. This course will also cover the fundamentals of remote sensing, data collection with sensors, and spatial and temporal aspects of the bio-resources attributes. Cross-listed with ENGN 4510; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8530 Fundamentals of Agriculture Machinery
This course highlights the fundamentals of mechanized agriculture machinery from soil preparation, planting, and crop management to mechanical harvesting. The machines and their unit operation are analyzed with respect functions, work rates, material flow and power usage. The machine performance relating to work quality and environmental effects will also be evaluated. The labs will emphasize on safety, basic maintenance, adjustment, calibrations of equipment and performance testing. This course also covers the variable rate applicators for site-specific application of inputs, auto guidance system, data acquisition and management for intelligent decision making for machines, and precision agriculture technologies. Cross-listed with ENGN 4530; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8550 Chemical and Biological Processes
Processes used in the chemical and biological industries, which emphasize underlying physical, chemical, and biological principles, will be introduced. By carrying out the mass and energy balances, students will conduct design and economic assessment of major chemical and biological engineering processes. Introduction to modelling of chemical processes will be covered in this course. (Formerly ENGN-3590) Cross-listed with ENGN 4550; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8810 Directed Studies in SDE
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student's thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering and permission of supervisor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8830 Biomedical Signal Processing
This course is an introduction to the basics of viewing, processing, and analyzing of biosignals, or signals originating from living beings. Biosignals may be characterized as bioelectrical signals which can be composed of both electrical and non-electrical parts. Topics include both linear and nonlinear systems, signal conditioning or filtering, improving signal quality (signal-to-noise ratio) through averaging techniques, and signal representations in both the time and frequency domains. Cross-listed with ENGN 4830; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8900 Seminar
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their research area of Sustainable Design Engineering and are expected to be seminar presenters. Techniques in preparing scientific communication (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
3 hours credit

Overview

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research. There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

Program

A. General Structure of the Program

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research.

There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

In addition to the "General Regulations for Graduate Programs," described above, the following regulations apply specifically to the Master's degree:

Residency Requirements
Normally, at least two semesters of full-time study in residence at the University must be devoted to the Master's program if the student is admitted as a regular student. For a regular student admitted to a part-time study program, the residency period is based on the equivalence of three part-time semesters to one full-time semester. A student, admitted as a provisional student requiring two semesters in that category, must spend at least one additional semester as a regular full-time student to meet the residency requirement. Upon completion of the residency requirement the student is then eligible to become a candidate for the MSc degree.

Normally, the thesis must be formally submitted or the program be otherwise complete within 48 months of the completion of the residency requirement. Departure from these normal requirements requires approval from the Graduate Studies Committee.

B. Courses

Prescribed Studies
The proportion of weight attached to the research and thesis may vary, even within a department/faculty. Accordingly, the number of courses and/or general examinations may correspondingly vary. In no case, however, will the minimum requirements be less than those outlined in the following two paragraphs. For graduate credit, the courses selected must be acceptable to the department/faculty and the Graduate Studies Committee. The candidate must maintain an average grade of at least a B standing (see Grades in General Regulations section) in the substantive courses outlined below in order to maintain registration in the program.

A department/faculty may require examinations (oral and/or written), from time to time, to evaluate the student's progress in his/her overall program.

Additional Courses
In addition to these prescribed studies, the candidate may undertake to achieve satisfactory standings in courses supportive of the special discipline. These courses may be at either the undergraduate or the graduate level. The standings obtained in them will not affect the average grade of the prescribed studies.

C. The Thesis

Research
Normally, the equivalent of at least two full-time semesters must be devoted to research in fulfilment of the thesis requirement. Summers during which research work is actively conducted may be counted as research semester equivalents, even though courses would not normally be offered at that time. In order to avoid undue prolongation of the time required to complete the degree, the research topic should be identified early and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Research involving the use of animals must follow the Guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care.

Thesis
Each candidate for the degree of Master of Science is required to submit a thesis based upon the research conducted under supervision as described above. The thesis must demonstrate the candidate's capacity for original and independent work, and should include a critical evaluation of work which has previously been done in the field of his or her research. The thesis should emphasize any new conclusions which may be drawn from the candidate's own research.

General specifications as to paper, format, order, and binding are available from the Office of the Program Administrator.

Procedures
The thesis may be handed in at any time of the year, but candidates must bear in mind the desirability of having the final examination as much in advance of the deadline date for thesis submission as possible. Candidates are advised to inform themselves of the deadlines schedule, a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of the Program Administrator. It is desirable that each candidate initiate discussion about examination dates with the Supervisor early in the final semester.

The candidate should keep in close touch with the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee, throughout the preparation of the thesis. The final draft of the thesis, after it has been reviewed by all members of the Supervisory Committee, is sent when ready for examination, to the members of the Master's Examination Committee (see below).

Following the Master's Examination, the candidate, if successful, arranges for the preparation of the thesis in final form, and for its submission to the Program Administrator (see below). The thesis in final form must include any minor corrections or revisions indicated during the Examination. Approval of the thesis takes the form of a Certificate of Approval, signed by the Examination Committee.

The Master's Examination
The final oral examination, devoted chiefly to the defence of the thesis, is an examination identified as the Master's Examination and carried out by the Master's Examination Committee.

The Department Chair selects the Examination Committee at the request of the Supervisor and is responsible for notifying the Program Administrator of its composition. The Examination is normally open to the public; however, members of the audience may question the candidate only upon invitation of the Chair of the Committee.

The Examination is passed and the thesis approved if there is no more than one negative vote, an abstention being regarded as a negative vote. The report, from the Department Chair to the Program Administrator, records the result as "unsatisfactory” or “satisfactory." If the result is "unsatisfactory," the candidate may be given the opportunity by the Master's Examination Committee of a second attempt. A second "unsatisfactory" result will terminate candidacy at this university.

The Master's Examination Committee normally consists of five members as follows:

  • Three members of the Supervisory Committee, including the Supervisor of the candidate's research;
  • One member of the area of specialization but from a department other than that of the student’s supervisor. This external examiner may be from the University of Prince Edward Island, or from another University or Research Institute, as is deemed appropriate;
  • The Coordinator of Graduate Studies (or designate), who will Chair the Master's Examination Committee. 

Admission

Entrance requirements include a BSc degree for the MSc program or a MSc degree or equivalent for the PhD programs (see Sciences PhD programs for details). Both programs require also an acceptable level of grades during the last 20 courses completed before the application is submitted. Although UPEI requires a minimum average of 70% in order to consider an application, the Faculty of Science normally requires at least a 75% in order to accept students in the MSc or PhD programs. Regardless of the program (MSc or PhD), the applicant must have a confirmed supervisor and a source of funding must be identified at the time of the application.

For a successful application, prospective students should follow the steps listed below:

Step 1. Prospective students must meet the entrance requirements before considering an application. International students should learn in advance about visa requirements, and for those whose first language is not English, there are also language requirements that must be fulfilled  (see Application form).

Step 2. Review departmental and individual faculty webpages to find out about availability of space and resources in the research groups of interest. Students must identify, contact, and confirm a potential supervisor as this faculty will subsequently need to commit in writing to the student’s program.

Step 3. Complete and submit an Application form to the Registrar’s Office. The form must be accompanied by official transcripts and an application fee. The student should also arrange to have two letters of reference and, if applicable, proof of English proficiency sent to the Registrar’s Office.

In case there are questions or in order to facilitate a timely review process, students may contact the Graduate Studies Coordinator (pquijon@upei.ca) once the application has been submitted.

Requirements

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

Students are required to take a minimum of three graduate level courses, all of which are to be regarded as substantive. A Seminar course (MMS 8900 or ESC 8900 or HB 8900 or SDE 8900) is required. Students may take only one Directed Studies course (MMS 8810 or ESC 8810 or HB 8810 or SDE 8810, or alternatively, VBS 8810 or 8820, VPM 8810 or 8820, VCA 8810 or 8820, VHM 8810 or 8820) for credit. Students lacking an Honours degree or background in one or more area may, at the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, be required to take the appropriate undergraduate level course(s), in addition to the required courses. All graduate students must receive non-credit WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) training in their first year.

When a student is required to register in a seminar or colloquium course in more than one semester, the record will show a grade or a designation of "In Progress" for semesters prior to completion of the course and "Pass" or "Fail" (or a numerical grade in the case of MMS 8900) for the final semester. Enrolment in the Seminar course implies the student will participate as a presenter in at least one Graduate Studies Day. With the consent of the Supervisory Committee, and of the instructor and the Department Chair concerned, a student may register for, and audit, all or part of a course. It is understood that the student will attend lectures as prescribed, but will not write any examination or receive any grade. Such a course may be recorded as an additional course, identified by AUD.

Courses

MASTER OF SCIENCE—ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ESC) COURSES

ESC-8000 Thesis
ESC-8010 PhD Thesis
This is the main science-oriented component of the PhD, and as such, it is a course in which students will conduct an original research project, report orally on this work throughout the course of the degree, culminating in the submission and defence of a dissertation. A formal approval to initiate the research project will be granted after the supervisory committee has been established and a research proposal, including a thorough review of pertinent literature available, is provided by the candidate. Students must register in this course each semester to maintain enrolment in the program. It embodies the research component of this program. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8020 Communication Strategies
This course promotes the development of communication skills in the context of environmental issues and exposes students to direct interaction with representatives from industry, government, community, and the social sciences. The course will also provide broad theoretical and practical knowledge needed to resolve disputes as well as skills training in techniques of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation. Beyond the activities of ENV-4330, the graduate-level assessment of this course involves weekly assigned readings, an essay on a selected topic that includes an extensive literature review, and a seminar on the researched topic. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science. Cross-listed with ENV 4330; Credit cannot be received for both ENV 4330 and ESC 8020.
3 hours credit
ESC-8030 Current Issues in Environmental Impact Assessment
This course is intended to review the theory behind Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) through the use of case studies that best exemplify project development that prevent or minimize environmental degradation. This course will examine the needs, methods, regulatory frameworks and social implications of EIA with emphasis on recent Canadian case studies. On completion of this course, students will be familiarized with the concept of EIA (its history, principles, key constructs and main steps), the legislative and institutional context of EIA, and will be able to critically examine EIA cases and identify their implications. (Cross-listed with Enviromental Studies 4310). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8040 Practical Issues Surrounding Environmental Management
This course intends to provide hands-on experience to our students by deploying them in NGOs, government agencies, or environmental consulting companies for approximately 75 flexible hours (the equivalent to the number of contact hours typically considered for a course's lectures and laboratory). The primary goal of this course is to expose students of a given environmental discipline into the multiple aspects involved in the actual issues and decision-making process that take place in agencies outside the academic setting. This unique training period (spread from two weeks to an entire semester) will provide human resources to often resource-limited groups/ entities that will be chosen by each supervisory committee according to their relevance for the student research focus. Students are expected to gain unprecedented experience and, to some extent, provide actual input into environmental management. The student will prepare a written report and share their experience by giving a public seminar. The supervisory committee in collaboration with the Faculty of Science Graduate Studies Committee will be responsible for identifying an appropriate placement based on the student's discipline and interests. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8120 Advanced Topics in Ecology and Environmental Sciences
This course covers advances in practical and theoretical aspects of aquatic and terrestrial ecology, and represents one of the three general axes of research expertise within the Department. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science or have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit
ESC-8130 Advanced Topics in Plant Science
This course covers current advances in botany, including plant development and morphology, anatomy and physiology, pollination biology, and biotechnology. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit
ESC-8620 Advanced Freshwater Ecology
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student's individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation. NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4620(Limnology) and Biology 8620 and ESC 8620
3 hours credit
ESC-8650 Advances in Marine Ecology
This course provides an update on relevant areas of ongoing marine research. The first part of the course concentrates on marine ecology topics including benthic-pelagic coupling, dispersal and adult-larval interactions, animal-sediment relationships, biodiversity ecosystem services, encrusting communities and their interactions, and aquatic invasive species. The second part includes participation in regular discussion sessions based on analysis of advanced literature relevant to the discipline and to the student's particular research. Assignments include an essay relevant (but not restricted) to a student's field of research, and a seminar on a topic relating general ecological hypotheses to the topic addressed in the essay. NOTE: Credit will not be given for both Biology 4650 (Marine Community Ecology) and ESC 8650. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab/field trip per week, plus discussion group.
3 hours credit
ESC-8710 Advanced Studies in Environmental Toxicology
This course provides an in depth analysis of environmental impacts of the major classes of contaminants including methodologies for environmental impact assessment and monitoring. Effects of environmental contaminants are examined at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, biochemical and molecular levels. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the fate of contaminants of concern in aquatic and terrestrial environments including their environmental chemistry, biogeochemical cycles, and exposure and uptake pathways by organisms. The course consists of lectures, discussions of peer-reviewed literature, case studies, presentations by students and laboratories. (Cross-listed with MMS 8240) Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8720 Advanced Studies of Macroecology and Biogeography
This course examines our current understanding of the patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms from the integrative perspective of macroecology and biogeography. The first discipline is concerned with understanding patterns at large spatial and temporal scales via the use of large quantitative databases and statistical techniques. The second one is concerned with the study of the patterns of distribution of animal species by integrating information on historical events (e.g., plate tectonics), evolutionary processes, as well as ecological and physiological trends. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8730 Conservation Genetics
Conservation genetics is an emerging and topical field of biology that combines molecular genetic approaches with environmental, evolutionary and ecological research under the umbrella of conservation biology. This course will cover a range of research topics pertaining to the conservation of biodiversity including ecological and landscape genetics, contemporary evolution and human-mediated change, invasion biology, genomics for endangered species, and genetics of captive or isolated populations. The course will introduce students to theoretical and experimental approaches to measuring and managing genetic diversity, as well as cultural and ethical issues in conservation biology through lectures, tutorial and case study discussion. Students will have hands-on experience with DNA and molecular marker analysis techniques, lead in-class discussions, write critical reviews of current research, and develop research proposals for selected questions in conservation genetics. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8750 Quantitative Methods for the Analysis of Animal Movement
A better comprehension of animal movement is vital to interpreting key ecological and evolutionary processes, such as the spatial-temporal patterns of resource selection, foraging behaviour, and predator-prey interactions. As human activities continually alter landscapes and influence the behaviour and movement patterns of organisms, a variety of pressing ecological and health issues are emerging, such as the spread of invasive species and infectious diseases. Hence, advances in our understanding of animal movement will have direct implications in several disciplines including landscape ecology, conservation biology, and wildlife management, as well as those dealing with public health. In this course, the student will investigate the various methods currently employed to study animal movement in complex landscapes. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8770 Veterinary Biostatistics
This course provides the student with a working knowledge of the basic statistical techniques used in veterinary science. Topics include descriptive statistics, inferential statistics non-parametric statistics, analysis of variance, regression and correlation and experimental design. (Cross-listed with graduate level course VHM 8010). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8780 Island Biogeography and Conservation of Insular Systems
This course examines the several fundamental patterns and processes that characterize biotas and environments on islands and other broadly defined insular systems. Topics covered include earth history and historical biogeography, speciation, dispersal, extinction, island biogeography, assembly and evolution of insular communities, island effect, adaptive radiation, environmental determinism, conservation biology, marine and terrestrial protected areas, and vulnerability of island biotas to terrestrial and aquatic invasive species. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8790 Advanced Techniques in Scanning Electronic Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students will learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use and will generate their own images and learn to interpret patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline will form the basis of a course project. (Cross-listed with MMS 8130 and HB 8250). Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8800 Molecular Biotechnology
This course examines principles of gene manipulation, and the application of molecular biology in all the fields of biotechnology. Recent developments in medicine, agriculture, industry and basic research are considered. Emphasis is placed on reviewing current literature in the field, particularly on areas more closely related to the natural sciences/ environment. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
ESC-8810 Directed Studies
Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program in Biology and be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
ESC-8900 Seminar
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—HUMAN BIOLOGY (HB) COURSES

HB-8000 Thesis
HB-8110 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology
This course enhances student knowledge of cell and molecular biology from a research perspective. Current advances in cell and molecular biology, including biotechnology and cytogenetics, are emphasized. Topics vary yearly according to the needs of the participating students. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8250 Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline forms the basis of a course project. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program or be granted permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
HB-8320 Movement Disorders
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder. (Cross-listed with Kinesiology 4320) PREREQUISITE: Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor. NOTE: Credit not given for both KINE 4320 and HB 8320; responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences
3 hours credit
HB-8350 Principles of Positive Youth Development through Sport
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development. (Cross-listed with Kinesiology 4350). Restriction: Student must have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8430 Advanced Physiology of Exercise Adaption and Performance
This course focuses on factors governing chronic exercise adaptations, acute exercise performance and health. Course content explores concepts such as skeletal muscle repair, genetics of sport performance and the effects of various training modalities (HIIT, resistance etc.). Students will combine theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, and prepare a review paper related to a topic of interest within the area of exercise physiology. (Cross-listed with KINE 4430) Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor. NOTE: Credit not given for both KINE 4430 and HB 8430; Responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences.
3 hours credit
HB-8620 Advanced Freshwater Ecology
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student's individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation. NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4620(Limnology) and Biology 8620 and ESC 8620.
3 hours credit
HB-8720 Advanced Studies in the Biology of Cancer and Other Diseases
The course addresses the principles of pathobiology with an emphasis on human diseases and a focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology associated with disease paradigms. Topical diseases include cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and AIDS, among others. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the course BIO 4720, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project in a cancer biology related topic or one relevant to the student's area of study. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade. (Cross-listed with Biology 4720) NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4720 and HB 8720. Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program at UPEI and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8810 Directed Studies in Human Development and Health
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student's thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science. Restriction: Student must be admitted in the graduate program in Biology and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8830 Epidemiological Applications in Primary Healthcare Research
This course introduces essential principles of epidemiological applications that are relevant to primary healthcare research. Students will be introduced to the principles of patient oriented research, primary healthcare, and the background of epidemiological applications, as well as the specific applications and computations of sensitivity and specificity, risk estimation, rates and proportions, hypothesis generating and hypothesis evaluation, as well as arithmetic and mathematical modeling. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, group discussions and interpretation of outcomes from specific analyses using customized "webulators" will be used. Students are expected to prepare written reports and/or present seminars. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8850 Bioinformatics for Graduate Students
This course is an introduction to bioinformatics and a practical guide to the analysis of genes and proteins. It will familiarize students with the tools and principles of contemporary bioinformatics. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge at the graduate level of a variety of publicly available databases and computational tools important in bioinformatics, and a grasp of the underlying principles that are adequate for them to evaluate and utilize novel techniques as they arise in the future. In addition to participating in all the lectures and activities of the undergraduate course CS 3220/BIO 3220, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project and attend extra guest lectures specially prepared for graduate students (when the graduate enrolment is 3 or more). The graduate project would be related to the student's research, so the thesis supervisor will be invited to join in the process of choosing and evaluating the graduate project. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade. (Cross-listed with CS 3220, BIO 3220, VPM 8850) Note: No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 8850, VPM 8850, CS 3220, and BIO 3220. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the graduate program and have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HB-8900 Seminar
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their thesis areas and deliver seminars. Techniques in preparing scientific communications (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered. Restriction: Student must be admitted to a graduate program in Science. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES (MMS) COURSES

MMS-8000 Thesis
MMS-8010 PhD Thesis
This is a research-oriented course in which students will conduct an extensive original research project,culminating in the submission and defence of a thesis. Students must register in this course each semester to maintain enrolment in the program. It embodies the research component of the PhD program.
MMS-8020 Molecules, MacRomolecules and the Business of Science
This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters.
6 hours credit
MMS-8021 Molecules, MacRomolecules and the Business of Science - Part I
This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters. HOURS OF CREDIT: 6 Restriction: Student must be admitted into the PhD program
MMS-8022 Molecules/Business of Science - Part II
MOLECULES, MACROMOLECULES AND THE BUSINESS OF SCIENCE This capstone course highlights the integration between Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and Business. In conjunction with the Program Coordinators and the PEI BioAlliance, the student will be paired with a receptive industry or government partner to develop a new research idea, direction, or application of potential interest to industry. The student will consult on scientific business ideas within the context of recent literature, scientific expertise, and the current industrial environment, with a focus on entrepreneurship and the development of new scientific products, processes, or markets. The partner in this course will be chosen so that the project will build toward the student's doctoral thesis with integration across all three components (doctoral-level study, MMS, and the business of science) of the program. This cross- sector collaboration will culminate in the student presenting and defending his/her work on the developed concept to industry and academic experts. This six-credit course will take place over a period of two-three semesters. HOURS OF CREDIT: 6 Restriction: Student must be admitted into the PhD program
PREREQUISITE: MMS 8021
6 hours credit
MMS-8030 Directed Studies in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in the Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences constellation. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student's research project, although they may be in the same discipline. Coverage of the topic by the student must include the relevant commercial and business aspects of the field. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8040 Field Course in Marine Drug Discovery
This course offering will familiarize students in the areas of marine natural products, marine taxonomy, field based biological assays of relevance to drug discovery, marine microbiology, and biotechnology. Lectures will introduce students to the concepts of field research and their applications to drug discovery. Students will participate in field collections of marine invertebrates. The collected organisms will then be subjected to several biological and chemical assays. Students will present field reports identifying the collected species and any chemical or biological activities observed. The second half of the course will focus on supervised research projects. The project topics will be chosen by the students and instructors. In lieu of a textbook, students will be provided with a collection of several publications from the marine natural products literature. These articles will include reviews of marine natural products, reports of recent advances, and founding texts of the field. Course experience in invertebrate zoology at the undergraduate level is strongly recommended. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8050 Advanced Studies in NMR Spectroscopy
This course covers the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry used in the determination of structures in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Major topics include the theory and use of NMR spectroscopy, in particular the use of 2D experiments and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the students' ability to interpret spectra and elucidate the structure of a molecule based on this evidence beyond the undergraduate level, as well as the role NMR has played as a structural tool in the pharmaceutical industry and academia. Students will have a practical/hands-on component in this course. Cross-listed with CHEM 4050. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8050 and CHEM 4050. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8060 Advanced Topics Computational Chemistry
This course exercises the application of computational chemistry to structural and reactivity questions in organic and inorganic chemistry. Computational methods discussed include molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical calculations, and density functional theory. The objective is to gain an understanding of the application of these methods to chemical problems. The current literature is explored to illustrate the use of computational chemistry in research. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the MSc Program HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.
3 hours credit
MMS-8070 Advanced Study in Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms
This course develops inorganic reaction mechanisms, with an emphasis on catalytic cycles, catalyst development, and the context of these reactions within the polymer, pharmaceutical and consumer product industries. Students will learn how to support reaction mechanisms through appropriate experimentation and spectroscopic characterization of catalysts, reactions and products. Students will examine how new catalysts are developed, patented and brought into commercial use. Major projects include a patent application on an imaginary catalytic system, and a report assessing the commercial relevance of a recent literature discovery. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8080 Green Chemistry
This course will develop the fundamentals of greener chemical processes and syntheses. The course will present the principles of green chemistry in the context of case studies within Canadian academia and industry. Coursework and projects will aim to develop synthetic skills, providing students with the tools to propose green synthetic plans for small molecules and polymers while introducing students to wider political and environmental issues which impact on chemical industry. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8090 Biomaterials
This course covers the fundamentals of the synthesis, properties, and biocompatibility of metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and biological materials that come in contact with tissue and biological fluids. Emphasis is placed on using biomaterials for both hard and soft tissue replacement, organ replacement, coatings and adhesives, dental implants, and drug delivery systems. New trends in biomaterials and the recent merging of cell biology and biochemistry with materials is examined. Cross-listed with CHEM 4090. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8090 and CHEM 4090. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8100 Soft Condensed Matter Physics
This course utilizes a variety of tools developed within the general framework of statistical and solid-state physics to study the structural and dynamic properties of a number of important soft-condensed matter systems, including: polymers, liquid crystals, and membranes. Some key topics include: (1) Liquid crystals: elasticity, deformations, surface effects, fluctuations and scattering; (2) Polymers: chain conformations, mixtures and phase behaviour, motion in melts and glasses (viscoelasticity, relaxation, reptation); (3) Membranes: two and three-dimensional networks, self-assembly of amphiphiles, thermal fluctuations in membrane shape, bilayer bending and surface curvature. One of the goals of the course is to introduce students to a variety of important analytical methods, including: mean-field theory, density functional theory, Landau-Ginzberg theory, and renormalization-group theory. In addition, a number of key computational methods are employed to explore the properties of some simple polymeric systems, including: Monte Carlo, Molecular Dynamics and Discontinuous Molecular Dynamics. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8110 Advanced Topics in Materials Characterization
This course introduces students to instrumentation that is routinely used in materials chemistry. The techniques to be covered include powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, AC impedance and Raman spectroscopy. The theory behind these techniques will be thoroughly discussed in class, with an emphasis of data interpretation. Students will also gain hands-on experience with these instrumental techniques through laboratory work. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8130 Advanced Techniques in Scanning Electron Microscopy
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student's discipline forms the basis of a course project. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology. Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8140 Marine Natural Products Chemistry
The overall goal of the course is to provide a description of the structures and biosynthetic origins of natural products of marine origin. The main classes of natural products will be reviewed with an emphasis on their biological origin as a tool to understanding structures. The biomedical relevance of marine natural products will be discussed along with special topics lectures on such themes as "From lead compound to FDA approval" and "Development of a natural product drug lead". Additional lectures on biological screening and metabolomics as modern tools in drug discovery, and chromatographic purification of natural products will round out the discussions. Students will be expected to develop a thorough understanding of the biosynthetic origin of all major categories of natural products through case studies. Cross-listed with Chemistry 4140. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8140 and CHEM 4140. Admission to graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8240 Advanced Studies in Environmental Toxicology
This course provides an in-depth analysis of environmental impacts of the major classes of contaminants including methodologies for environmental impact assessment and monitoring. Effects of environmental contaminants are examined at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, biochemical and molecular levels. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the fate of contaminants of concern in aquatic and terrestrial environments including their environmental chemistry, biogeochemical cycles, and exposure and uptake pathways by organisms. The course consists of lectures, discussions of peer-reviewed literature, case studies, presentations by students and laboratories. HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 Restriction: Student must be admitted into a graduate program in Science
3 hours credit
MMS-8690 Materials Chemistry
This course discusses current topics in materials chemistry. Topics include the synthesis and characterization of intercalation compounds, conductive polymers and their applications, semiconductors and their applications, defects in inorganic solids, and transport measurements. Students will perform a thorough literature search on a topic in materials science; write a review and a research proposal on the selected topic, followed by in-class presentations. Cross-listed with CHEM 4690. Credit cannot be received for both MMS 8690 and CHEM 4690. Admission to a graduate program in Science.
3 hours credit
MMS-8810 Directed Studies in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee, and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student's research project, although they may be in the same discipline.
3 hours credit
MMS-8820 Advanced Topics in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
This course covers current advances and advanced topics in a discipline of Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and is a thorough study of specific topics. It is offered to graduate students at the discretion of the Department, and covers areas of specialization not covered in other graduate courses. The course discusses recent advances in an area of interest to the students but which are not part of the students' thesis research directly.
3 hours credit
MMS-8900 Seminar in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences
In this course students attend regular departmental seminars. Students are also required to present a seminar on a topic within their discipline, but unrelated to their research project. Students must register for this course each semester, and receive a grade of "In Progress" until completion of their MSc programs. NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.
3 hours credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE—SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING (SDE) COURSES

SDE-8000 Thesis
Registration of thesis. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
SDE-8020 Quality Control and Project Management
This course is an introduction to the most widely accepted project management practices in the workforce today. The student will learn the industrially accepted techniques associated with the management of time, cost, risk, and scope in order to achieve total project stakeholder satisfaction. The goal in this course is to prepare students with the most efficient and effective project management practices by applying these techniques to their graduate research work, and in so doing greatly increase their likelihood of managing successful projects during their careers. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8040 Design of Experiments
This course focuses on the design, implementation, and analysis of engineering, scientific, and computer-based experiments. The course will examine the proper and scientific approach to experimentation, modeling, simulation, and analysis of data. Various designs are discussed and their respective advantages and disadvantages are noted. Factorial designs and sensitivity analysis will be studied in detail because of its relevance to various industries. Use of software for designing and analyzing experiments will also be used. For experiments that involved mainly physical quantities and natural phenomena, techniques of dimensional analysis will also be introduced. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
3 hours credit
SDE-8060 Modeling, Control, and Design of Energy Systems
This course focuses on the understanding of the physical processes underlying the energy conversion process from wind and solar energy. Students will have an advanced knowledge of aerodynamics and structural dynamics, and they will understand the main strategies used for controlling these machines over their complete operating range. A specific goal of the course is to provide students with a multidisciplinary vision on the physics of energy systems, and an understanding of the methods used for their modeling and simulation. A particular emphasis will be placed on design, and on the effects of design choices on the cost of energy. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8080 Industrial Machine Vision
This course focuses on computer vision with an emphasis on techniques for automated inspection, object recognition, mechanical metrology, and robotics. Image processing courses typically focus for image enhancement, restoration, filtering, smoothing, etc. These topics will be covered to a certain degree but the main focus will be on image segmentation, feature extraction, morphological operators, recognition and photogrammetry. Issues related to the efficient software implementation of these techniques for real-time applications will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8100 Biofuel and Biomass Technology
This course focuses on advanced concepts in understanding biofuels and bioenergy systems, renewable feedstocks, their production, availability and attributes for biofuel/bioenergy production, types of biomass derived fuels and energy, thermochemical conversion of biomass to heat, power and fuel, biochemical conversion of biomass to fuel environmental aspects of biofuel production, economics and life-cycle analysis of biofuel, and value adding of biofuel residues. Students will analyze, as well as prepare, case studies on biofuel production. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
3 hours credit
SDE-8230 Technology Management & Entrepreneurship
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company. Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, patents, business plans, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, liability, tax implications, sales, marketing, operational and human resource management. This course will be taught using problem-based and experiential learning strategies with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators. Graduate-level project will be defined. Cross-listed with Engineering 3430 (previously 4230).
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3720
3 hours credit
SDE-8310 Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
This course concentrates on manufacturing knowledge with a focus on advanced fabrication techniques (AFT) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). Students will expand their knowledge of traditional processes including CAD/CAM, forming, welding, milling, etc. leading into innovative advanced fabrication techniques in additive and precision manufacturing, next generation electronics, robotics and smart automation (CIM), and sustainable and green manufacturing modeling and simulation in the manufacturing process developed through lectures and labs. Integration of CIM into supply chain design and management is emphasized based on synergistic application of mechatronics approach and philosophy. Cross-listed with ENGN 4310; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8320 Control System Design
This course will provide students with an overview of system modelling and control methodologies of single/multiple input/output systems, e.g., energy transport control, reactor control, heat exchanger control, power production, and mechatronic systems. Students will learn classical control methods e.g.,feedforward, feedbacks, cascade, decoupling to modern control methods, LQR, predictive control,optimal and robust control. Students will be equipped with knowledge and skills for analyzing stability, controllability and observability of state-space representation modelled systems. Cross-listed with ENGN 4320; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8330 Innovations in Biomedical Engineering
This course introduces the study of medicine by focusing on innovations in medical devices, and future trends in materials, especially the increasing use of bio-resources, informatics, and mechatronics engineering applications in orthopedic, rehabilitation, simulation and education technologies. In its broader context, this course focuses on four areas of biotechnology, biomechanics, biomaterials and biosignals. Through a hands-on approach, the course focuses on innovative product development related to bio-signal, instrumentation, sensing, and image processing. Students will also gain an appreciation for the collaborative, interdisciplinary nature of engineering in medicine and its potential impact on society. Graduate project will be defined. Cross-listed with ENGN-4330
3 hours credit
SDE-8350 Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control
This course advances the fundamentals of robotics through exposure to in-depth knowledge and understanding of kinematics, dynamics, control and trajectory with applications to autonomous vehicles, automated manufacturing and processing and mobile robotics. Areas of interest include: position transformation and control, rigid body motion, kinematic control, compliance and force control. Cross-listed with ENGN 4350; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8370 Fluid Power Control
This course covers the analysis and design of basic hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems. Topics include a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics including flow through valves, fittings, and pipe; classification of hydrostatic pumps and motors; control valves; hydraulic accumulators; sizing of practical hydraulic circuits; thermal and energy considerations; electrohydraulic control and modeling of hydraulic control systems. The latter part of the course focuses on pneumatic systems including pneumatic cylinders and motors, control valves, and compressor technology. The application of Programmable Logic Controls (PLCs) to industrial automation and the sequential control of pneumatic actuators is also addressed. Cross-listed with ENGN 4370; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8410 Macro Energy Systems
This course covers methods for analyzing energy supply, conversion processes, and end-use at the system level. Aspects considered include the dynamics of energy supply and demand, efficiencies of energy conversion, characteristics of energy currencies, and energy needs across different sectors. Students will characterize methods of delivering energy services such as heat, light, industrial power and transportation. Exergy analysis will be introduced and used to build a quantitative framework for integrating techno-economic analysis of energy system components, with emphasis on elements such as fossil fuels and nuclear power. Students will gain an enhanced, quantitative appreciation for the sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity aspects of energy services delivery. Cross-listed with ENGN 4410; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8440 Advanced Energy Storage
This course considers advanced technical analysis of energy storage systems. A comprehensive overview of all industrially relevant energy storage systems is reviewed and emphasis is placed on promising energy storage technologies of the future. Chemical, thermal and kinetic storage technologies will be discussed in detail. Cross-listed with ENGN 4440; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8450 Fluid Loads on Energy Structures
This course is an introduction to the loads applied on structures from wind, waves, and currents, and their heightened relevance to structures designed for energy conversion. Phenomena to be discussed include lift and drag, boundary layers, vortex-induced vibrations, wakes, hydrostatic loading, and water waves. A selection of engineering methods will be introduced and brought to bear on these topics, such as potential flow theory, blade-element theory, Airy wave theory and Morison's equation. Dimensional analysis will be introduced to characterize flow problems. Design implications will be discussed for a selection of relevant energy conversion structures such as aircraft wings, wind turbines, breakwaters, marine vessels, and offshore energy platforms. Cross-listed with ENGN 4450; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8470 Micro Grids
SDE 8470 MICRO GRIDS This course focuses on the concept, operation and optimization of renewable-energy-based micro-grids. Concepts introduced and considered include renewable energy resources, integration technologies, grid-connected operation, islanded grid operation, energy storage integration and the optimal dimensioning and mixing of multiple energy sources where some are stochastic in nature and some are dispatchable. Existing and future energy storage technologies will be also be discussed. This course is based on energy flow analysis and makes extensive use of software simulation tools. Students will develop a framework for performing techno-economic assessments of micro-grid architectures and designs. A strong background in electrical power systems is not necessarily required. Cross-listed with ENGN 4470; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8510 Geoinformatics in Bioresource
This course covers the theory and practice of geoinformatics and their applications to problems in bioresources using digital mapping and spatial analysis. Hands on laboratories will provide students with an experience to collect georeferenced data using differential global positioning system, followed by mapping and analysis in geographical information system. Topics include datums, map projections and transformations, vector and raster data, geo-spatial analysis, geo-statistics and interpolation techniques. This course will also cover the fundamentals of remote sensing, data collection with sensors, and spatial and temporal aspects of the bio-resources attributes. Cross-listed with ENGN 4510; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8530 Fundamentals of Agriculture Machinery
This course highlights the fundamentals of mechanized agriculture machinery from soil preparation, planting, and crop management to mechanical harvesting. The machines and their unit operation are analyzed with respect functions, work rates, material flow and power usage. The machine performance relating to work quality and environmental effects will also be evaluated. The labs will emphasize on safety, basic maintenance, adjustment, calibrations of equipment and performance testing. This course also covers the variable rate applicators for site-specific application of inputs, auto guidance system, data acquisition and management for intelligent decision making for machines, and precision agriculture technologies. Cross-listed with ENGN 4530; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8550 Chemical and Biological Processes
Processes used in the chemical and biological industries, which emphasize underlying physical, chemical, and biological principles, will be introduced. By carrying out the mass and energy balances, students will conduct design and economic assessment of major chemical and biological engineering processes. Introduction to modelling of chemical processes will be covered in this course. (Formerly ENGN-3590) Cross-listed with ENGN 4550; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8810 Directed Studies in SDE
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student's thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering and permission of supervisor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8830 Biomedical Signal Processing
This course is an introduction to the basics of viewing, processing, and analyzing of biosignals, or signals originating from living beings. Biosignals may be characterized as bioelectrical signals which can be composed of both electrical and non-electrical parts. Topics include both linear and nonlinear systems, signal conditioning or filtering, improving signal quality (signal-to-noise ratio) through averaging techniques, and signal representations in both the time and frequency domains. Cross-listed with ENGN 4830; credit cannot be received for both courses. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week Graduate-level project will be required as defined in consultation with the instructor.
3 hours credit
SDE-8900 Seminar
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their research area of Sustainable Design Engineering and are expected to be seminar presenters. Techniques in preparing scientific communication (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered. Restriction: Student must be admitted to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering.
3 hours credit
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