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Master of Science - Faculty of Science

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First Name:
Last Name:
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  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research. There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

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First Name:
Last Name:
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Careers:
  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

A. General Structure of the Program

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research.

There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

In addition to the "General Regulations for Graduate Programs," described above, the following regulations apply specifically to the Master's degree:

Residency Requirements
Normally, at least two semesters of full-time study in residence at the University must be devoted to the Master's program if the student is admitted as a regular student. For a regular student admitted to a part-time study program, the residency period is based on the equivalence of three part-time semesters to one full-time semester. A student, admitted as a provisional student requiring two semesters in that category, must spend at least one additional semester as a regular full-time student to meet the residency requirement. Upon completion of the residency requirement the student is then eligible to become a candidate for the MSc degree.

Normally, the thesis must be formally submitted or the program be otherwise complete within 48 months of the completion of the residency requirement. Departure from these normal requirements requires approval from the Graduate Studies Committee.

B. Courses

Prescribed Studies
The proportion of weight attached to the research and thesis may vary, even within a department/faculty. Accordingly, the number of courses and/or general examinations may correspondingly vary. In no case, however, will the minimum requirements be less than those outlined in the following two paragraphs. For graduate credit, the courses selected must be acceptable to the department/faculty and the Graduate Studies Committee. The candidate must maintain an average grade of at least a B standing (see Grades in General Regulations section) in the substantive courses outlined below in order to maintain registration in the program.

A department/faculty may require examinations (oral and/or written), from time to time, to evaluate the student's progress in his/her overall program.

Additional Courses
In addition to these prescribed studies, the candidate may undertake to achieve satisfactory standings in courses supportive of the special discipline. These courses may be at either the undergraduate or the graduate level. The standings obtained in them will not affect the average grade of the prescribed studies.

C. The Thesis

Research
Normally, the equivalent of at least two full-time semesters must be devoted to research in fulfilment of the thesis requirement. Summers during which research work is actively conducted may be counted as research semester equivalents, even though courses would not normally be offered at that time. In order to avoid undue prolongation of the time required to complete the degree, the research topic should be identified early and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Research involving the use of animals must follow the Guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care.

Thesis
Each candidate for the degree of Master of Science is required to submit a thesis based upon the research conducted under supervision as described above. The thesis must demonstrate the candidate's capacity for original and independent work, and should include a critical evaluation of work which has previously been done in the field of his or her research. The thesis should emphasize any new conclusions which may be drawn from the candidate's own research.

General specifications as to paper, format, order, and binding are available from the Office of the Program Administrator.

Procedures
The thesis may be handed in at any time of the year, but candidates must bear in mind the desirability of having the final examination as much in advance of the deadline date for thesis submission as possible. Candidates are advised to inform themselves of the deadlines schedule, a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of the Program Administrator. It is desirable that each candidate initiate discussion about examination dates with the Supervisor early in the final semester.

The candidate should keep in close touch with the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee, throughout the preparation of the thesis. The final draft of the thesis, after it has been reviewed by all members of the Supervisory Committee, is sent when ready for examination, to the members of the Master's Examination Committee (see below).

Following the Master's Examination, the candidate, if successful, arranges for the preparation of the thesis in final form, and for its submission to the Program Administrator (see below). The thesis in final form must include any minor corrections or revisions indicated during the Examination. Approval of the thesis takes the form of a Certificate of Approval, signed by the Examination Committee.

The Master's Examination
The final oral examination, devoted chiefly to the defence of the thesis, is an examination identified as the Master's Examination and carried out by the Master's Examination Committee.

The Department Chair selects the Examination Committee at the request of the Supervisor and is responsible for notifying the Program Administrator of its composition. The Examination is normally open to the public; however, members of the audience may question the candidate only upon invitation of the Chair of the Committee.

The Examination is passed and the thesis approved if there is no more than one negative vote, an abstention being regarded as a negative vote. The report, from the Department Chair to the Program Administrator, records the result as "unsatisfactory” or “satisfactory." If the result is "unsatisfactory," the candidate may be given the opportunity by the Master's Examination Committee of a second attempt. A second "unsatisfactory" result will terminate candidacy at this university.

The Master's Examination Committee normally consists of five members as follows:

  • Three members of the Supervisory Committee, including the Supervisor of the candidate's research;
  • One member of the area of specialization but from a department other than that of the student’s supervisor. This external examiner may be from the University of Prince Edward Island, or from another University or Research Institute, as is deemed appropriate;
  • The Coordinator of Graduate Studies (or designate), who will Chair the Master's Examination Committee. 
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First Name:
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  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

Entrance requirements include a BSc degree for the MSc program or a MSc degree or equivalent for the PhD programs (see Sciences PhD programs for details). Both programs require also an acceptable level of grades during the last 20 courses completed before the application is submitted. Although UPEI requires a minimum average of 70% in order to consider an application, the Faculty of Science normally requires at least a 75% in order to accept students in the MSc or PhD programs. Regardless of the program (MSc or PhD), the applicant must have a confirmed supervisor and a source of funding must be identified at the time of the application.

For a successful application, prospective students should follow the steps listed below:

Step 1. Prospective students must meet the entrance requirements before considering an application. International students should learn in advance about visa requirements, and for those whose first language is not English, there are also language requirements that must be fulfilled  (see Application form).

Step 2. Review departmental and individual faculty webpages to find out about availability of space and resources in the research groups of interest. Students must identify, contact, and confirm a potential supervisor as this faculty will subsequently need to commit in writing to the student’s program.

Step 3. Complete and submit an Application form to the Registrar’s Office. The form must be accompanied by official transcripts and an application fee. The student should also arrange to have two letters of reference and, if applicable, proof of English proficiency sent to the Registrar’s Office.

In case there are questions or in order to facilitate a timely review process, students may contact he Graduate Studies Coordinator (ahsiao@upei.ca) once the application has been submitted.

Want more information about Master of Science - Faculty of Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

Students are required to take a minimum of three graduate level courses, all of which are to be regarded as substantive. A Seminar course (MMS 8900 or ESC 8900 or HB 8900 or SDE 8900) is required. Students may take only one Directed Studies course (MMS 8810 or ESC 8810 or HB 8810 or SDE 8810, or alternatively, VBS 8810 or 8820, VPM 8810 or 8820, VCA 8810 or 8820, VHM 8810 or 8820) for credit. Students lacking an Honours degree or background in one or more area may, at the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, be required to take the appropriate undergraduate level course(s), in addition to the required courses. All graduate students must receive non-credit WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) training in their first year.

When a student is required to register in a seminar or colloquium course in more than one semester, the record will show a grade or a designation of "In Progress" for semesters prior to completion of the course and "Pass" or "Fail" (or a numerical grade in the case of MMS 8900) for the final semester. Enrolment in the Seminar course implies the student will participate as a presenter in at least one Graduate Studies Day. With the consent of the Supervisory Committee, and of the instructor and the Department Chair concerned, a student may register for, and audit, all or part of a course. It is understood that the student will attend lectures as prescribed, but will not write any examination or receive any grade. Such a course may be recorded as an additional course, identified by AUD.

Want more information about Master of Science - Faculty of Science? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • A Master's degree can be applied to virtually any career.
The Master of Science Program includes all science departments at UPEI.
(902) 628-4373

MASTER OF SCIENCE—ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ESC) COURSES

ESC 800 THESIS

ESC 812 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
This course covers advances in practical and theoretical aspects of aquatic and terrestrial ecology, and represents one of the three general axes of research expertise within the Department. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science or permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 813 ADVANCED TOPICS IN PLANT SCIENCE
This course covers current advances in botany, including plant development and morphology, anatomy and physiology, pollination biology, and biotechnology. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 862 ADVANCED FRESHWATER ECOLOGY
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student’s individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation.
NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 462 (Limnology) and Biology 862 and ESC 862.
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 865 ADVANCES IN MARINE ECOLOGY
This course provides an update on relevant areas of ongoing marine research. The first part of the course concentrates on marine ecology topics including benthic-pelagic coupling, dispersal and adult-larval interactions, animal-sediment relationships, biodiversity ecosystem services, encrusting communities and their interactions, and aquatic invasive species. The second part includes participation in regular discussion sessions based on analysis of advanced literature relevant to the discipline and to the student’s particular research. Assignments include an essay relevant (but not restricted) to a student’s field of research, and a seminar on a topic relating general ecological hypotheses to the topic addressed in the essay.
NOTE: Credit will not be given for both Biology 465 (Marine Community Ecology) and ESC 865.
PREREQUISITE: Entry into a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab/field trip per week, plus discussion group.)
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE: Admission in the graduate program in Biology and permission of instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

ESC 890 SEMINAR
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their thesis areas and deliver seminars. Techniques in preparing scientific communications (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

MASTER OF SCIENCE—HUMAN BIOLOGY (HB) COURSES

HB 800 THESIS

HB 811 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
This course enhances student knowledge of cell and molecular biology from a research perspective. Current advances in cell and molecular biology, including biotechnology and cytogenetics, are emphasized. Topics vary yearly according to the needs of the participating students. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 825 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation
of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student’s discipline forms the basis of a course project.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program or Permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 832 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
(See Kinesiology 432)

HB 835 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
(See Kinesiology 435)

HB 843 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
(See Kinesiology 443)

HB 872 ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE BIOLOGY OF CANCER AND OTHER DISEASES
The course addresses the principles of pathobiology with an emphasis on human diseases and a focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology associated with disease paradigms. Topical diseases include cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and AIDS, among others. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the course BIOL 472, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project in a cancer biology related topic or one relevant to the student's area of study. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade.
Cross-listed with Biology (Biology 472)
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 472 and HB 872. Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE: Admission in the graduate program in Biology and permission of instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

HB 883 EPIDEMIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS IN PRIMARY HEALTHCARE RESEARCH
This course introduces essential principles of epidemiological applications that are relevant to primary healthcare research. Students will be introduced to the principles of patient oriented research, primary healthcare, and the background of epidemiological applications, as well as the specific applications and computations of sensitivity and specificity, risk estimation, rates and proportions, hypothesis generating and hypothesis evaluation, as well as arithmetic and mathematical modeling.  A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, group discussions and interpretation of outcomes from specific analyses using customized “webulators” will be used.  Students are expected to prepare written reports and/or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

HB 885 BIOINFORMATICS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
This course is an introduction to bioinformatics and a practical guide to the analysis of genes and proteins. It will familiarize students with the tools and principles of contemporary bioinformatics. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge at the graduate level of a variety of publicly available databases and computational tools important in bioinformatics, and a grasp of the underlying principles that are adequate for them to evaluate and utilize novel techniques as they arise in the future.

In addition to participating in all the lectures and activities of the undergraduate course CS 322/ BIO 322, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project and attend extra guest lectures specially prepared for graduate students (when the graduate enrolment is 3 or more). The graduate project would be related to the student's research, so the thesis supervisor will be invited to join in the process of choosing and evaluating the graduate project. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade.
Cross-listed with CS 322, BIO 322, VPM 885
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3
Note:  No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 885, VPM 885, CS 322, and BIO 322

HB 890 SEMINAR
(See ESC 890)

MASTER OF SCIENCE—MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES (MMS) COURSES

MMS 800 THESIS

MMS 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee, and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student’s research project, although they may be in the same discipline.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

MMS 882 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
This course covers current advances and advanced topics in a discipline of Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and is a thorough study of specific topics. It is offered to graduate students at the discretion of the Department, and covers areas of specialization not covered in other graduate courses. The course discusses recent advances in an area of interest to the students but which are not part of the students’ thesis research directly.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 883 ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY
This course exercises the application of computational chemistry to structural and reactivity questions in organic and inorganic chemistry. Computational methods discussed include molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical calculations, and density functional theory. The objective is to gain an understanding of the application of these methods to chemical problems. The current literature is explored to illustrate the use of computational chemistry in research.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to MSc Program
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 884 ADVANCED SPECTROSCOPIC STRUCTURE ELUCIDATION
This course covers various forms of spectrometry used in the determination of structures in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Major topics include the theory and use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in particular the use of 2D experiments; mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the students’ ability to interpret spectra and elucidate the structure of a molecule based on this evidence. Spectroscopic techniques for the study of transient species are also discussed, including: laser flash photolysis (LFP); laser-induced fluorescence (LIF); and stopped-flow and relaxation methods for fast reaction studies.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 890 SEMINAR IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
In this course students attend regular departmental seminars. Students are also required to present a seminar on a topic within their discipline, but unrelated to their research project. Students must register for this course each semester, and receive a grade of “In Progress” until completion of their MSc programs.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to MSc Program in Science
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MASTER OF SCIENCE—SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING (SDE) COURSES

SDE 800 THESIS
Registration of thesis
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
NOTE:  No credit, but registration required.

SDE 802 QUALITY CONTROL AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT
This course is an introduction to the most widely accepted project management practices in the workforce today.  The student will learn the industrially accepted techniques associated with the management of time, cost, risk, and scope in order to achieve total project stakeholder satisfaction. The goal in this course is to prepare students with the most efficient and effective project management practices by applying these techniques to their graduate research work, and in so doing greatly increase their likelihood of managing successful projects during their careers.  
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 804 DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
This course focuses on the design, implementation, and analysis of engineering, scientific, and computer-based experiments.  The course will examine the proper and scientific approach to experimentation, modeling, simulation, and analysis of data.  Various designs are discussed and their respective advantages and disadvantages are noted. Factorial designs and sensitivity analysis will be studied in detail because of its relevance to various industries.  Use of software for designing and analyzing experiments will also be used.  For experiments that involved mainly physical quantities and natural phenomena, techniques of dimensional analysis will also be introduced. 
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 806 MODELING, CONTROL, AND DESIGN  OF ENERGY SYSTEMS
This course focuses on the understanding of the physical processes underlying the energy conversion process from wind and solar energy.  Students will have an advanced knowledge of aerodynamics and structural dynamics, and they will understand the main strategies used for controlling these machines over their complete operating range. A specific goal of the course is to provide students with a multidisciplinary vision on the physics of energy systems, and an understanding of the methods used for their modeling and simulation. A particular emphasis will be placed on design, and on the effects of design choices on the cost of energy.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 808 INDUSTRIAL MACHINE VISION
This course focuses on computer vision with an emphasis on techniques for automated inspection, object recognition, mechanical metrology, and robotics.  Image processing courses typically focus for image enhancement, restoration, filtering, smoothing, etc. These topics will be covered to a certain degree but the main focus will be on image segmentation, feature extraction, morphological operators, recognition and photogrammetry. Issues related to the efficient software implementation of these techniques for real-time applications will also be addressed.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 810 BIOFUEL AND BIOMASS TECHNOLOGY
This course focuses on advanced concepts in understanding biofuels and bioenergy systems, renewable feedstocks, their production, availability and attributes for biofuel/bioenergy production, types of biomass derived fuels and energy, thermochemical conversion of biomass to heat, power and fuel, biochemical conversion of biomass to fuel environmental aspects of biofuel production, economics and life-cycle analysis of biofuel, and value adding of biofuel residues. Students will analyze, as well as prepare, case studies on biofuel production.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 823 TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company.  Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, patents, business plans, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, liability, tax implications, sales, marketing, operational and human resource management.  This course will be taught using problem-based and experiential learning strategies with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators.  Graduate-level project will be defined.
Cross-listed with Engineering 432

SDE 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering and permission of supervisor
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 890 SEMINAR
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their research area of Sustainable Design Engineering and are expected to be seminar presenters.  Techniques in preparing scientific communication (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

 

Overview

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research. There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

Program

A. General Structure of the Program

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research.

There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

In addition to the "General Regulations for Graduate Programs," described above, the following regulations apply specifically to the Master's degree:

Residency Requirements
Normally, at least two semesters of full-time study in residence at the University must be devoted to the Master's program if the student is admitted as a regular student. For a regular student admitted to a part-time study program, the residency period is based on the equivalence of three part-time semesters to one full-time semester. A student, admitted as a provisional student requiring two semesters in that category, must spend at least one additional semester as a regular full-time student to meet the residency requirement. Upon completion of the residency requirement the student is then eligible to become a candidate for the MSc degree.

Normally, the thesis must be formally submitted or the program be otherwise complete within 48 months of the completion of the residency requirement. Departure from these normal requirements requires approval from the Graduate Studies Committee.

B. Courses

Prescribed Studies
The proportion of weight attached to the research and thesis may vary, even within a department/faculty. Accordingly, the number of courses and/or general examinations may correspondingly vary. In no case, however, will the minimum requirements be less than those outlined in the following two paragraphs. For graduate credit, the courses selected must be acceptable to the department/faculty and the Graduate Studies Committee. The candidate must maintain an average grade of at least a B standing (see Grades in General Regulations section) in the substantive courses outlined below in order to maintain registration in the program.

A department/faculty may require examinations (oral and/or written), from time to time, to evaluate the student's progress in his/her overall program.

Additional Courses
In addition to these prescribed studies, the candidate may undertake to achieve satisfactory standings in courses supportive of the special discipline. These courses may be at either the undergraduate or the graduate level. The standings obtained in them will not affect the average grade of the prescribed studies.

C. The Thesis

Research
Normally, the equivalent of at least two full-time semesters must be devoted to research in fulfilment of the thesis requirement. Summers during which research work is actively conducted may be counted as research semester equivalents, even though courses would not normally be offered at that time. In order to avoid undue prolongation of the time required to complete the degree, the research topic should be identified early and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Research involving the use of animals must follow the Guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care.

Thesis
Each candidate for the degree of Master of Science is required to submit a thesis based upon the research conducted under supervision as described above. The thesis must demonstrate the candidate's capacity for original and independent work, and should include a critical evaluation of work which has previously been done in the field of his or her research. The thesis should emphasize any new conclusions which may be drawn from the candidate's own research.

General specifications as to paper, format, order, and binding are available from the Office of the Program Administrator.

Procedures
The thesis may be handed in at any time of the year, but candidates must bear in mind the desirability of having the final examination as much in advance of the deadline date for thesis submission as possible. Candidates are advised to inform themselves of the deadlines schedule, a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of the Program Administrator. It is desirable that each candidate initiate discussion about examination dates with the Supervisor early in the final semester.

The candidate should keep in close touch with the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee, throughout the preparation of the thesis. The final draft of the thesis, after it has been reviewed by all members of the Supervisory Committee, is sent when ready for examination, to the members of the Master's Examination Committee (see below).

Following the Master's Examination, the candidate, if successful, arranges for the preparation of the thesis in final form, and for its submission to the Program Administrator (see below). The thesis in final form must include any minor corrections or revisions indicated during the Examination. Approval of the thesis takes the form of a Certificate of Approval, signed by the Examination Committee.

The Master's Examination
The final oral examination, devoted chiefly to the defence of the thesis, is an examination identified as the Master's Examination and carried out by the Master's Examination Committee.

The Department Chair selects the Examination Committee at the request of the Supervisor and is responsible for notifying the Program Administrator of its composition. The Examination is normally open to the public; however, members of the audience may question the candidate only upon invitation of the Chair of the Committee.

The Examination is passed and the thesis approved if there is no more than one negative vote, an abstention being regarded as a negative vote. The report, from the Department Chair to the Program Administrator, records the result as "unsatisfactory” or “satisfactory." If the result is "unsatisfactory," the candidate may be given the opportunity by the Master's Examination Committee of a second attempt. A second "unsatisfactory" result will terminate candidacy at this university.

The Master's Examination Committee normally consists of five members as follows:

  • Three members of the Supervisory Committee, including the Supervisor of the candidate's research;
  • One member of the area of specialization but from a department other than that of the student’s supervisor. This external examiner may be from the University of Prince Edward Island, or from another University or Research Institute, as is deemed appropriate;
  • The Coordinator of Graduate Studies (or designate), who will Chair the Master's Examination Committee. 
Admission

Entrance requirements include a BSc degree for the MSc program or a MSc degree or equivalent for the PhD programs (see Sciences PhD programs for details). Both programs require also an acceptable level of grades during the last 20 courses completed before the application is submitted. Although UPEI requires a minimum average of 70% in order to consider an application, the Faculty of Science normally requires at least a 75% in order to accept students in the MSc or PhD programs. Regardless of the program (MSc or PhD), the applicant must have a confirmed supervisor and a source of funding must be identified at the time of the application.

For a successful application, prospective students should follow the steps listed below:

Step 1. Prospective students must meet the entrance requirements before considering an application. International students should learn in advance about visa requirements, and for those whose first language is not English, there are also language requirements that must be fulfilled  (see Application form).

Step 2. Review departmental and individual faculty webpages to find out about availability of space and resources in the research groups of interest. Students must identify, contact, and confirm a potential supervisor as this faculty will subsequently need to commit in writing to the student’s program.

Step 3. Complete and submit an Application form to the Registrar’s Office. The form must be accompanied by official transcripts and an application fee. The student should also arrange to have two letters of reference and, if applicable, proof of English proficiency sent to the Registrar’s Office.

In case there are questions or in order to facilitate a timely review process, students may contact he Graduate Studies Coordinator (ahsiao@upei.ca) once the application has been submitted.

Requirements

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

Students are required to take a minimum of three graduate level courses, all of which are to be regarded as substantive. A Seminar course (MMS 8900 or ESC 8900 or HB 8900 or SDE 8900) is required. Students may take only one Directed Studies course (MMS 8810 or ESC 8810 or HB 8810 or SDE 8810, or alternatively, VBS 8810 or 8820, VPM 8810 or 8820, VCA 8810 or 8820, VHM 8810 or 8820) for credit. Students lacking an Honours degree or background in one or more area may, at the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, be required to take the appropriate undergraduate level course(s), in addition to the required courses. All graduate students must receive non-credit WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) training in their first year.

When a student is required to register in a seminar or colloquium course in more than one semester, the record will show a grade or a designation of "In Progress" for semesters prior to completion of the course and "Pass" or "Fail" (or a numerical grade in the case of MMS 8900) for the final semester. Enrolment in the Seminar course implies the student will participate as a presenter in at least one Graduate Studies Day. With the consent of the Supervisory Committee, and of the instructor and the Department Chair concerned, a student may register for, and audit, all or part of a course. It is understood that the student will attend lectures as prescribed, but will not write any examination or receive any grade. Such a course may be recorded as an additional course, identified by AUD.

Courses

MASTER OF SCIENCE—ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ESC) COURSES

ESC 800 THESIS

ESC 812 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
This course covers advances in practical and theoretical aspects of aquatic and terrestrial ecology, and represents one of the three general axes of research expertise within the Department. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science or permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 813 ADVANCED TOPICS IN PLANT SCIENCE
This course covers current advances in botany, including plant development and morphology, anatomy and physiology, pollination biology, and biotechnology. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 862 ADVANCED FRESHWATER ECOLOGY
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student’s individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation.
NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 462 (Limnology) and Biology 862 and ESC 862.
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 865 ADVANCES IN MARINE ECOLOGY
This course provides an update on relevant areas of ongoing marine research. The first part of the course concentrates on marine ecology topics including benthic-pelagic coupling, dispersal and adult-larval interactions, animal-sediment relationships, biodiversity ecosystem services, encrusting communities and their interactions, and aquatic invasive species. The second part includes participation in regular discussion sessions based on analysis of advanced literature relevant to the discipline and to the student’s particular research. Assignments include an essay relevant (but not restricted) to a student’s field of research, and a seminar on a topic relating general ecological hypotheses to the topic addressed in the essay.
NOTE: Credit will not be given for both Biology 465 (Marine Community Ecology) and ESC 865.
PREREQUISITE: Entry into a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab/field trip per week, plus discussion group.)
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE: Admission in the graduate program in Biology and permission of instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

ESC 890 SEMINAR
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their thesis areas and deliver seminars. Techniques in preparing scientific communications (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

MASTER OF SCIENCE—HUMAN BIOLOGY (HB) COURSES

HB 800 THESIS

HB 811 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
This course enhances student knowledge of cell and molecular biology from a research perspective. Current advances in cell and molecular biology, including biotechnology and cytogenetics, are emphasized. Topics vary yearly according to the needs of the participating students. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 825 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation
of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student’s discipline forms the basis of a course project.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program or Permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 832 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
(See Kinesiology 432)

HB 835 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
(See Kinesiology 435)

HB 843 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
(See Kinesiology 443)

HB 872 ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE BIOLOGY OF CANCER AND OTHER DISEASES
The course addresses the principles of pathobiology with an emphasis on human diseases and a focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology associated with disease paradigms. Topical diseases include cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and AIDS, among others. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the course BIOL 472, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project in a cancer biology related topic or one relevant to the student's area of study. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade.
Cross-listed with Biology (Biology 472)
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 472 and HB 872. Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE: Admission in the graduate program in Biology and permission of instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

HB 883 EPIDEMIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS IN PRIMARY HEALTHCARE RESEARCH
This course introduces essential principles of epidemiological applications that are relevant to primary healthcare research. Students will be introduced to the principles of patient oriented research, primary healthcare, and the background of epidemiological applications, as well as the specific applications and computations of sensitivity and specificity, risk estimation, rates and proportions, hypothesis generating and hypothesis evaluation, as well as arithmetic and mathematical modeling.  A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, group discussions and interpretation of outcomes from specific analyses using customized “webulators” will be used.  Students are expected to prepare written reports and/or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

HB 885 BIOINFORMATICS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
This course is an introduction to bioinformatics and a practical guide to the analysis of genes and proteins. It will familiarize students with the tools and principles of contemporary bioinformatics. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge at the graduate level of a variety of publicly available databases and computational tools important in bioinformatics, and a grasp of the underlying principles that are adequate for them to evaluate and utilize novel techniques as they arise in the future.

In addition to participating in all the lectures and activities of the undergraduate course CS 322/ BIO 322, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project and attend extra guest lectures specially prepared for graduate students (when the graduate enrolment is 3 or more). The graduate project would be related to the student's research, so the thesis supervisor will be invited to join in the process of choosing and evaluating the graduate project. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade.
Cross-listed with CS 322, BIO 322, VPM 885
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3
Note:  No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 885, VPM 885, CS 322, and BIO 322

HB 890 SEMINAR
(See ESC 890)

MASTER OF SCIENCE—MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES (MMS) COURSES

MMS 800 THESIS

MMS 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee, and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student’s research project, although they may be in the same discipline.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

MMS 882 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
This course covers current advances and advanced topics in a discipline of Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and is a thorough study of specific topics. It is offered to graduate students at the discretion of the Department, and covers areas of specialization not covered in other graduate courses. The course discusses recent advances in an area of interest to the students but which are not part of the students’ thesis research directly.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 883 ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY
This course exercises the application of computational chemistry to structural and reactivity questions in organic and inorganic chemistry. Computational methods discussed include molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical calculations, and density functional theory. The objective is to gain an understanding of the application of these methods to chemical problems. The current literature is explored to illustrate the use of computational chemistry in research.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to MSc Program
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 884 ADVANCED SPECTROSCOPIC STRUCTURE ELUCIDATION
This course covers various forms of spectrometry used in the determination of structures in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Major topics include the theory and use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in particular the use of 2D experiments; mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the students’ ability to interpret spectra and elucidate the structure of a molecule based on this evidence. Spectroscopic techniques for the study of transient species are also discussed, including: laser flash photolysis (LFP); laser-induced fluorescence (LIF); and stopped-flow and relaxation methods for fast reaction studies.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 890 SEMINAR IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
In this course students attend regular departmental seminars. Students are also required to present a seminar on a topic within their discipline, but unrelated to their research project. Students must register for this course each semester, and receive a grade of “In Progress” until completion of their MSc programs.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to MSc Program in Science
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MASTER OF SCIENCE—SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING (SDE) COURSES

SDE 800 THESIS
Registration of thesis
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
NOTE:  No credit, but registration required.

SDE 802 QUALITY CONTROL AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT
This course is an introduction to the most widely accepted project management practices in the workforce today.  The student will learn the industrially accepted techniques associated with the management of time, cost, risk, and scope in order to achieve total project stakeholder satisfaction. The goal in this course is to prepare students with the most efficient and effective project management practices by applying these techniques to their graduate research work, and in so doing greatly increase their likelihood of managing successful projects during their careers.  
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 804 DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
This course focuses on the design, implementation, and analysis of engineering, scientific, and computer-based experiments.  The course will examine the proper and scientific approach to experimentation, modeling, simulation, and analysis of data.  Various designs are discussed and their respective advantages and disadvantages are noted. Factorial designs and sensitivity analysis will be studied in detail because of its relevance to various industries.  Use of software for designing and analyzing experiments will also be used.  For experiments that involved mainly physical quantities and natural phenomena, techniques of dimensional analysis will also be introduced. 
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 806 MODELING, CONTROL, AND DESIGN  OF ENERGY SYSTEMS
This course focuses on the understanding of the physical processes underlying the energy conversion process from wind and solar energy.  Students will have an advanced knowledge of aerodynamics and structural dynamics, and they will understand the main strategies used for controlling these machines over their complete operating range. A specific goal of the course is to provide students with a multidisciplinary vision on the physics of energy systems, and an understanding of the methods used for their modeling and simulation. A particular emphasis will be placed on design, and on the effects of design choices on the cost of energy.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 808 INDUSTRIAL MACHINE VISION
This course focuses on computer vision with an emphasis on techniques for automated inspection, object recognition, mechanical metrology, and robotics.  Image processing courses typically focus for image enhancement, restoration, filtering, smoothing, etc. These topics will be covered to a certain degree but the main focus will be on image segmentation, feature extraction, morphological operators, recognition and photogrammetry. Issues related to the efficient software implementation of these techniques for real-time applications will also be addressed.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 810 BIOFUEL AND BIOMASS TECHNOLOGY
This course focuses on advanced concepts in understanding biofuels and bioenergy systems, renewable feedstocks, their production, availability and attributes for biofuel/bioenergy production, types of biomass derived fuels and energy, thermochemical conversion of biomass to heat, power and fuel, biochemical conversion of biomass to fuel environmental aspects of biofuel production, economics and life-cycle analysis of biofuel, and value adding of biofuel residues. Students will analyze, as well as prepare, case studies on biofuel production.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 823 TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company.  Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, patents, business plans, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, liability, tax implications, sales, marketing, operational and human resource management.  This course will be taught using problem-based and experiential learning strategies with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators.  Graduate-level project will be defined.
Cross-listed with Engineering 432

SDE 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering and permission of supervisor
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 890 SEMINAR
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their research area of Sustainable Design Engineering and are expected to be seminar presenters.  Techniques in preparing scientific communication (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

 

Overview

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research. There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

Program

A. General Structure of the Program

The MSc degree of the University of Prince Edward Island requires the demonstration of a reasonable mastery of a concentrated field of study. The latter is attested by the achieving of satisfactory standings in the minimum number of graduate courses required by the respective Faculty, the completion of a research project, and the writing of a thesis based upon the research.

There will be considerable interaction and co-operation among the departments/faculties to provide courses and research facilities to meet the needs of individual students and their research projects.

In addition to the "General Regulations for Graduate Programs," described above, the following regulations apply specifically to the Master's degree:

Residency Requirements
Normally, at least two semesters of full-time study in residence at the University must be devoted to the Master's program if the student is admitted as a regular student. For a regular student admitted to a part-time study program, the residency period is based on the equivalence of three part-time semesters to one full-time semester. A student, admitted as a provisional student requiring two semesters in that category, must spend at least one additional semester as a regular full-time student to meet the residency requirement. Upon completion of the residency requirement the student is then eligible to become a candidate for the MSc degree.

Normally, the thesis must be formally submitted or the program be otherwise complete within 48 months of the completion of the residency requirement. Departure from these normal requirements requires approval from the Graduate Studies Committee.

B. Courses

Prescribed Studies
The proportion of weight attached to the research and thesis may vary, even within a department/faculty. Accordingly, the number of courses and/or general examinations may correspondingly vary. In no case, however, will the minimum requirements be less than those outlined in the following two paragraphs. For graduate credit, the courses selected must be acceptable to the department/faculty and the Graduate Studies Committee. The candidate must maintain an average grade of at least a B standing (see Grades in General Regulations section) in the substantive courses outlined below in order to maintain registration in the program.

A department/faculty may require examinations (oral and/or written), from time to time, to evaluate the student's progress in his/her overall program.

Additional Courses
In addition to these prescribed studies, the candidate may undertake to achieve satisfactory standings in courses supportive of the special discipline. These courses may be at either the undergraduate or the graduate level. The standings obtained in them will not affect the average grade of the prescribed studies.

C. The Thesis

Research
Normally, the equivalent of at least two full-time semesters must be devoted to research in fulfilment of the thesis requirement. Summers during which research work is actively conducted may be counted as research semester equivalents, even though courses would not normally be offered at that time. In order to avoid undue prolongation of the time required to complete the degree, the research topic should be identified early and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Research involving the use of animals must follow the Guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care.

Thesis
Each candidate for the degree of Master of Science is required to submit a thesis based upon the research conducted under supervision as described above. The thesis must demonstrate the candidate's capacity for original and independent work, and should include a critical evaluation of work which has previously been done in the field of his or her research. The thesis should emphasize any new conclusions which may be drawn from the candidate's own research.

General specifications as to paper, format, order, and binding are available from the Office of the Program Administrator.

Procedures
The thesis may be handed in at any time of the year, but candidates must bear in mind the desirability of having the final examination as much in advance of the deadline date for thesis submission as possible. Candidates are advised to inform themselves of the deadlines schedule, a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of the Program Administrator. It is desirable that each candidate initiate discussion about examination dates with the Supervisor early in the final semester.

The candidate should keep in close touch with the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee, throughout the preparation of the thesis. The final draft of the thesis, after it has been reviewed by all members of the Supervisory Committee, is sent when ready for examination, to the members of the Master's Examination Committee (see below).

Following the Master's Examination, the candidate, if successful, arranges for the preparation of the thesis in final form, and for its submission to the Program Administrator (see below). The thesis in final form must include any minor corrections or revisions indicated during the Examination. Approval of the thesis takes the form of a Certificate of Approval, signed by the Examination Committee.

The Master's Examination
The final oral examination, devoted chiefly to the defence of the thesis, is an examination identified as the Master's Examination and carried out by the Master's Examination Committee.

The Department Chair selects the Examination Committee at the request of the Supervisor and is responsible for notifying the Program Administrator of its composition. The Examination is normally open to the public; however, members of the audience may question the candidate only upon invitation of the Chair of the Committee.

The Examination is passed and the thesis approved if there is no more than one negative vote, an abstention being regarded as a negative vote. The report, from the Department Chair to the Program Administrator, records the result as "unsatisfactory” or “satisfactory." If the result is "unsatisfactory," the candidate may be given the opportunity by the Master's Examination Committee of a second attempt. A second "unsatisfactory" result will terminate candidacy at this university.

The Master's Examination Committee normally consists of five members as follows:

  • Three members of the Supervisory Committee, including the Supervisor of the candidate's research;
  • One member of the area of specialization but from a department other than that of the student’s supervisor. This external examiner may be from the University of Prince Edward Island, or from another University or Research Institute, as is deemed appropriate;
  • The Coordinator of Graduate Studies (or designate), who will Chair the Master's Examination Committee. 

Admission

Entrance requirements include a BSc degree for the MSc program or a MSc degree or equivalent for the PhD programs (see Sciences PhD programs for details). Both programs require also an acceptable level of grades during the last 20 courses completed before the application is submitted. Although UPEI requires a minimum average of 70% in order to consider an application, the Faculty of Science normally requires at least a 75% in order to accept students in the MSc or PhD programs. Regardless of the program (MSc or PhD), the applicant must have a confirmed supervisor and a source of funding must be identified at the time of the application.

For a successful application, prospective students should follow the steps listed below:

Step 1. Prospective students must meet the entrance requirements before considering an application. International students should learn in advance about visa requirements, and for those whose first language is not English, there are also language requirements that must be fulfilled  (see Application form).

Step 2. Review departmental and individual faculty webpages to find out about availability of space and resources in the research groups of interest. Students must identify, contact, and confirm a potential supervisor as this faculty will subsequently need to commit in writing to the student’s program.

Step 3. Complete and submit an Application form to the Registrar’s Office. The form must be accompanied by official transcripts and an application fee. The student should also arrange to have two letters of reference and, if applicable, proof of English proficiency sent to the Registrar’s Office.

In case there are questions or in order to facilitate a timely review process, students may contact he Graduate Studies Coordinator (ahsiao@upei.ca) once the application has been submitted.

Requirements

The graduate students will register in one of the designated areas of specialization listed below:

  • Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences (MMS)
  • Environmental Sciences (ESC)
  • Human Biology (HB)
  • Sustainable Design Engineering (SDE)

Students are required to take a minimum of three graduate level courses, all of which are to be regarded as substantive. A Seminar course (MMS 8900 or ESC 8900 or HB 8900 or SDE 8900) is required. Students may take only one Directed Studies course (MMS 8810 or ESC 8810 or HB 8810 or SDE 8810, or alternatively, VBS 8810 or 8820, VPM 8810 or 8820, VCA 8810 or 8820, VHM 8810 or 8820) for credit. Students lacking an Honours degree or background in one or more area may, at the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, be required to take the appropriate undergraduate level course(s), in addition to the required courses. All graduate students must receive non-credit WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) training in their first year.

When a student is required to register in a seminar or colloquium course in more than one semester, the record will show a grade or a designation of "In Progress" for semesters prior to completion of the course and "Pass" or "Fail" (or a numerical grade in the case of MMS 8900) for the final semester. Enrolment in the Seminar course implies the student will participate as a presenter in at least one Graduate Studies Day. With the consent of the Supervisory Committee, and of the instructor and the Department Chair concerned, a student may register for, and audit, all or part of a course. It is understood that the student will attend lectures as prescribed, but will not write any examination or receive any grade. Such a course may be recorded as an additional course, identified by AUD.

Courses

MASTER OF SCIENCE—ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ESC) COURSES

ESC 800 THESIS

ESC 812 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
This course covers advances in practical and theoretical aspects of aquatic and terrestrial ecology, and represents one of the three general axes of research expertise within the Department. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science or permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 813 ADVANCED TOPICS IN PLANT SCIENCE
This course covers current advances in botany, including plant development and morphology, anatomy and physiology, pollination biology, and biotechnology. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 862 ADVANCED FRESHWATER ECOLOGY
This course provides advanced study in the ecology of freshwater habitats, particularly those found on Prince Edward Island. The first part of the course concentrates on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fresh waters, classification of freshwater habitats, and applied limnology. A laboratory/field component includes an introduction to water analysis techniques and field equipment, field water analysis, the collection and analysis of biological samples, and the physical properties of water. The second part is a field/lab project on a limnological topic tailored to the student’s individual program, and consists of an experimental or observational study coupled with a comprehensive literature review, project write-up, and oral presentation.
NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 462 (Limnology) and Biology 862 and ESC 862.
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 865 ADVANCES IN MARINE ECOLOGY
This course provides an update on relevant areas of ongoing marine research. The first part of the course concentrates on marine ecology topics including benthic-pelagic coupling, dispersal and adult-larval interactions, animal-sediment relationships, biodiversity ecosystem services, encrusting communities and their interactions, and aquatic invasive species. The second part includes participation in regular discussion sessions based on analysis of advanced literature relevant to the discipline and to the student’s particular research. Assignments include an essay relevant (but not restricted) to a student’s field of research, and a seminar on a topic relating general ecological hypotheses to the topic addressed in the essay.
NOTE: Credit will not be given for both Biology 465 (Marine Community Ecology) and ESC 865.
PREREQUISITE: Entry into a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3 (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab/field trip per week, plus discussion group.)
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

ESC 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE: Admission in the graduate program in Biology and permission of instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

ESC 890 SEMINAR
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their thesis areas and deliver seminars. Techniques in preparing scientific communications (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

MASTER OF SCIENCE—HUMAN BIOLOGY (HB) COURSES

HB 800 THESIS

HB 811 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
This course enhances student knowledge of cell and molecular biology from a research perspective. Current advances in cell and molecular biology, including biotechnology and cytogenetics, are emphasized. Topics vary yearly according to the needs of the participating students. A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, and group discussion of journal articles is used. Students are expected to prepare written reports or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 825 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
This course covers the principles of scanning electron microscopy, including techniques used for the preparation
of biological or other materials for microscopy and the use of specialized software to analyze surface features of samples. Students learn to operate the instrument over the full spectrum of use, generating their own images and interpreting patterns. A microscopical investigation of material relevant to the student’s discipline forms the basis of a course project.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program or Permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 832 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
(See Kinesiology 432)

HB 835 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
(See Kinesiology 435)

HB 843 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
(See Kinesiology 443)

HB 872 ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE BIOLOGY OF CANCER AND OTHER DISEASES
The course addresses the principles of pathobiology with an emphasis on human diseases and a focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology associated with disease paradigms. Topical diseases include cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and AIDS, among others. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the course BIOL 472, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project in a cancer biology related topic or one relevant to the student's area of study. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade.
Cross-listed with Biology (Biology 472)
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 472 and HB 872. Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Biology.

HB 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE: Admission in the graduate program in Biology and permission of instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

HB 883 EPIDEMIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS IN PRIMARY HEALTHCARE RESEARCH
This course introduces essential principles of epidemiological applications that are relevant to primary healthcare research. Students will be introduced to the principles of patient oriented research, primary healthcare, and the background of epidemiological applications, as well as the specific applications and computations of sensitivity and specificity, risk estimation, rates and proportions, hypothesis generating and hypothesis evaluation, as well as arithmetic and mathematical modeling.  A combination of formal lectures, directed readings, group discussions and interpretation of outcomes from specific analyses using customized “webulators” will be used.  Students are expected to prepare written reports and/or present seminars.
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to a graduate program in Science and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

HB 885 BIOINFORMATICS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
This course is an introduction to bioinformatics and a practical guide to the analysis of genes and proteins. It will familiarize students with the tools and principles of contemporary bioinformatics. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge at the graduate level of a variety of publicly available databases and computational tools important in bioinformatics, and a grasp of the underlying principles that are adequate for them to evaluate and utilize novel techniques as they arise in the future.

In addition to participating in all the lectures and activities of the undergraduate course CS 322/ BIO 322, graduate students are expected to accomplish a graduate project and attend extra guest lectures specially prepared for graduate students (when the graduate enrolment is 3 or more). The graduate project would be related to the student's research, so the thesis supervisor will be invited to join in the process of choosing and evaluating the graduate project. The graduate project will be worth 30% of the final grade.
Cross-listed with CS 322, BIO 322, VPM 885
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3
Note:  No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 885, VPM 885, CS 322, and BIO 322

HB 890 SEMINAR
(See ESC 890)

MASTER OF SCIENCE—MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES (MMS) COURSES

MMS 800 THESIS

MMS 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
This course is a thorough study of a selected topic in Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences. Entry to the course, and the course outline, are subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee, and the Dean of Science. The course may include directed reading, directed research, and discussion with the instructor. The student may be required to prepare a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be directly related to the student’s research project, although they may be in the same discipline.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3

MMS 882 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
This course covers current advances and advanced topics in a discipline of Molecular and Macromolecular Sciences and is a thorough study of specific topics. It is offered to graduate students at the discretion of the Department, and covers areas of specialization not covered in other graduate courses. The course discusses recent advances in an area of interest to the students but which are not part of the students’ thesis research directly.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 883 ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY
This course exercises the application of computational chemistry to structural and reactivity questions in organic and inorganic chemistry. Computational methods discussed include molecular mechanics, ab initio and semi-empirical calculations, and density functional theory. The objective is to gain an understanding of the application of these methods to chemical problems. The current literature is explored to illustrate the use of computational chemistry in research.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to MSc Program
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 884 ADVANCED SPECTROSCOPIC STRUCTURE ELUCIDATION
This course covers various forms of spectrometry used in the determination of structures in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Major topics include the theory and use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in particular the use of 2D experiments; mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the students’ ability to interpret spectra and elucidate the structure of a molecule based on this evidence. Spectroscopic techniques for the study of transient species are also discussed, including: laser flash photolysis (LFP); laser-induced fluorescence (LIF); and stopped-flow and relaxation methods for fast reaction studies.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate program.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MMS 890 SEMINAR IN MOLECULAR AND MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCES
In this course students attend regular departmental seminars. Students are also required to present a seminar on a topic within their discipline, but unrelated to their research project. Students must register for this course each semester, and receive a grade of “In Progress” until completion of their MSc programs.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to MSc Program in Science
HOURS OF CREDIT: 3
NOTE:  Responsibility for this course rests with the department of Chemistry.

MASTER OF SCIENCE—SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING (SDE) COURSES

SDE 800 THESIS
Registration of thesis
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
NOTE:  No credit, but registration required.

SDE 802 QUALITY CONTROL AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT
This course is an introduction to the most widely accepted project management practices in the workforce today.  The student will learn the industrially accepted techniques associated with the management of time, cost, risk, and scope in order to achieve total project stakeholder satisfaction. The goal in this course is to prepare students with the most efficient and effective project management practices by applying these techniques to their graduate research work, and in so doing greatly increase their likelihood of managing successful projects during their careers.  
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 804 DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
This course focuses on the design, implementation, and analysis of engineering, scientific, and computer-based experiments.  The course will examine the proper and scientific approach to experimentation, modeling, simulation, and analysis of data.  Various designs are discussed and their respective advantages and disadvantages are noted. Factorial designs and sensitivity analysis will be studied in detail because of its relevance to various industries.  Use of software for designing and analyzing experiments will also be used.  For experiments that involved mainly physical quantities and natural phenomena, techniques of dimensional analysis will also be introduced. 
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 806 MODELING, CONTROL, AND DESIGN  OF ENERGY SYSTEMS
This course focuses on the understanding of the physical processes underlying the energy conversion process from wind and solar energy.  Students will have an advanced knowledge of aerodynamics and structural dynamics, and they will understand the main strategies used for controlling these machines over their complete operating range. A specific goal of the course is to provide students with a multidisciplinary vision on the physics of energy systems, and an understanding of the methods used for their modeling and simulation. A particular emphasis will be placed on design, and on the effects of design choices on the cost of energy.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 808 INDUSTRIAL MACHINE VISION
This course focuses on computer vision with an emphasis on techniques for automated inspection, object recognition, mechanical metrology, and robotics.  Image processing courses typically focus for image enhancement, restoration, filtering, smoothing, etc. These topics will be covered to a certain degree but the main focus will be on image segmentation, feature extraction, morphological operators, recognition and photogrammetry. Issues related to the efficient software implementation of these techniques for real-time applications will also be addressed.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 810 BIOFUEL AND BIOMASS TECHNOLOGY
This course focuses on advanced concepts in understanding biofuels and bioenergy systems, renewable feedstocks, their production, availability and attributes for biofuel/bioenergy production, types of biomass derived fuels and energy, thermochemical conversion of biomass to heat, power and fuel, biochemical conversion of biomass to fuel environmental aspects of biofuel production, economics and life-cycle analysis of biofuel, and value adding of biofuel residues. Students will analyze, as well as prepare, case studies on biofuel production.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 823 TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company.  Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, patents, business plans, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, liability, tax implications, sales, marketing, operational and human resource management.  This course will be taught using problem-based and experiential learning strategies with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators.  Graduate-level project will be defined.
Cross-listed with Engineering 432

SDE 881 DIRECTED STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ENGINEERING
Under the supervision of a faculty member, a graduate student independently pursues an area of interest in depth. The course includes an extensive literature review of the specific discipline, directed research on the topic, or collection and analysis of data. The student may be required to present a written report and/or present a seminar in the area. Topics must not be a part of the student’s thesis research although they may be in a complementary area. Course outlines must be approved by the supervisory committee, the department Chair, and the Dean of Science.
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering and permission of supervisor
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

SDE 890 SEMINAR
In this course students attend seminars on current topics in their research area of Sustainable Design Engineering and are expected to be seminar presenters.  Techniques in preparing scientific communication (oral presentations and poster displays) are also covered.
PREREQUISTE:   Admission to the graduate program in School of Sustainable Design Engineering
HOURS OF CREDIT:  3

 

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