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Programs and Courses > Master of Education in Leadership in Learning
Educational scholarship, research, and practice.

Master of Education in Leadership in Learning

Overview

Master of Education in Leadership in Learning

If you want to become a leader in teaching, an administrator, a researcher or an academic, or a highly qualified educator, UPEI’s Master of Education in Leadership in Learning may be the perfect fit for you! Graduates from our program are teachers; educators in the corporate, government, arts, health, and not-for-profit sectors; PhD candidates; professors and instructors in colleges and universities; administrators and policy-makers.

The Master of Education program is designed to provide experienced educators with the knowledge and skills required to become effective educational leaders. The overall aim of the program is to promote and support educational scholarship, research, and practice. Through studying relevant curriculum with researchers and expert practitioners, our students gain the capacity to make valuable contributions to the field of education—and to the lives of others.

Continue your learning journey with us today by exploring our programs, built for flexible with on-campus, blended, and online cohorts and study and meaningful educational experiences.

We have a diverse of onsite and online program offerings that reflect our research expertise in many of today's major themes in education.

Choose from graduate programs and explore their many "fields" of study that allow you to build expertise in the area of most value to you while earning a well-recognized graduate degree.

 

Current Cohorts

Please indicate on your application form and in your personal statement the the specific cohort you are applying to. Applications will be accepted for each cohort until full. Sufficient enrolment for each cohort is needed for each program to go ahead.

Additional Designation in Inclusive Education

The Faculty of Education at UPEI is pleased to announce the launch of a second cohort in the Master of Education program beginning in the fall of 2015. Within this 10-course MEd program, five of these courses will certify students towards the additional Designation in Inclusive Education required by the PEI Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. This combination of courses will prepare teachers to specialize as Resource Room or Special Education teachers. The Faculty of Education is proud to provide our teachers the opportunity to receive this designation. See brochure below for more information.

Program highlights include:

  • 10 courses (focus on inclusion and differentiated instruction)
  • Competitive tuition fees
  • Program completion within 24 months
  • Small class sizes focused on individualized learning

MEd with a focus in Inclusive Education - program brochure


Global Perspectives (Fall and Winter)

This innovative course-based graduate program is designed for international students from a variety of countries to bring a global perspective to leadership in learning in 21st century educational contexts. Participants will explore theory and practice from the fields of international and comparative education, educational leadership, curriculum and pedagogy, and global education.

Students will enhance their competencies as educators and global citizens as they engage in active experiential learning and critical reflection.

Highlights of the program include:

  • Extensive practical experiences in diverse educational settings and learning communities
  • Wide range of opportunities to interact with domestic and international students from various countries
  • 10 courses (combination of blended, online, and face-to-face experiences)
  • Competitive tuition rates
  • Program completion within 16-24 months
  • Small class sizes
  • Rich opportunities to engage with local cultures

Additional MEd program resources:

  • Global Perspectives program brochure - Fall 2015
  • Global Perspectives program brochure - Winter 2016

Special Cohort for College Educators and Leaders

UPEI, in partnership with Holland College, is offering a Master of Education (MEd) in Leadership in Learning with a focus on College Leadership - a special cohort for College educators and leaders. This is round four of this customized program.

Highlights of the program include:

  • Work with fellow college educators, leaders and aspiring leaders
  • 10 courses (combination of blended, online, and face-to-face experiences)
  • Competitive tuition rates
  • Program completion within 30 months
  • Nationally recognized instructors with extensive experience in university and college settings
  • Small class sizes

MEd with a focus on College Leadership - program brochure


Focus on 21st Century Teaching and Learning

Beginning in July 2016, a third iteration of our Master of Education with a focus on 21st Century Teaching and Learning will be offered. This cohort will be delivered online.

This degree will offer leadership courses that are focused on:

  • Student Engagement
  • Project Based Learning
  • Digital Technologies
  • Assessment
  • Teaching and Learning

 

Course-based Option

Students enrolled in the graduate program are required to choose a thesis-based or course-based option. In the course-based option, students will complete seven compulsory courses and three elective courses.

COURSE-BASED OPTION - Compulsory Courses (7 required courses)

Education 611 Introduction to Research Methods in Education

Education 612 Quantitative Research Design, or
Education 613 Qualitative Research Design, or
Education 616 Action Research in Education

Education 614 Theories of Research and Learning
Education 615 Educational Leadership
Education 617 Issues in Educational Leadership
Education 619 Critical Pedagogy
Education 625 Curriculum: Leadership in Learning

Elective Courses (3 courses required)

Education 601 Selected Topics in Education
Education 618 Learning, Leadership and Reflective Practice
Education 621 Current Research in Learning
Education 622 Research on Learning Difficulties
Education 623 Statistics for Research in Education
Education 624 Change: Leadership in Learning
Education 626 Technology: Leadership in Learning
Education 627 Global Education
Education 628 International Education and Development
Education 629 Program Evaluation
Education 630 Perspectives in Ecology and Sustainable Leadership
Education 631 Leadership in Postcolonial Education
Education 632 Leadership in Languages and Literacies
Education 691 Directed Study
Education 695 Graduate Seminar

 

Thesis-based Option

Students enrolled in the graduate program are required to choose a thesis-based or course-based option.In the thesis-based option students will complete five compulsory courses, one elective course, and a thesis (4 course equivalents).

THESIS-BASED OPTION - Compulsory Courses (5 required courses)

Education 611 Introduction to Research Methods in Education

Education 612 Quantitative Research Design, or
Education 613 Qualitative Research Design

Education 614 Theories of Research and Learning
Education 615 Educational Leadership
Education 619 Critical Pedagogy Elective Courses (1 required)
Education 601 Selected Topics in Education
Education 616 Action Research in Education
Education 617 Issues in Educational Leadership
Education 618 Learning, Leadership and Reflective Practice
Education 622 Research on Learning Difficulties
Education 624 Change: Leadership in Learning
Education 625 Curriculum: Leadership in Learning
Education 626 Technology: Leadership in Learning
Education 627 Global Education
Education 628 International Education and Development
Education 629 Program Evaluation
Education 630 Perspectives in Ecology and Sustainable Leadership
Education 631 Leadership in Postcolonial Education
Education 632 Leadership in Languages and Literacies
Education 691 Directed Study
Education 695 Graduate Seminar
Thesis Education 699 (4 course equivalents)

Thesis

Each candidate in the thesis-based option is required to submit a thesis based upon research conducted under supervision as described in this section of the calendar. The thesis must demonstrate the student’s capacity for original and independent research and should extend the knowledge base in the field under study. General specifications as to paper, format, order, and binding are available from the Office of the Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies.

The student should consult frequently with the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee when preparing the thesis. After the final draft has been read and approved by the members of the Supervisory Committee, four copies must be submitted to the Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies for dissemination to members of the Examining Committee. These copies must be submitted no later than four weeks prior to the student’s oral defense.

The Master’s Examination

The final oral examination, which is devoted chiefly to the defense of the thesis, is a Faculty examination, identified as the Master’s Examination. Normally, the Examining Committee consists of the two members of the Supervisory Committee, one other member of the Faculty of Education, and one reader, external to the University, who submits a written report attesting to the quality of the work. The Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies selects the Examining Committee at the request of the Supervisor, appoints the Chair, and is responsible for notifying the Dean of Education of its composition.

Normally, the final oral examination is open to the public; however, members of the public may question the student only upon the invitation of the Chair of the Examining Committee.

The examination is passed and the thesis approved if there is no more than one negative vote; an abstention is considered to be a negative vote. The Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies is responsible for reporting the result of the examination to the Dean of Education. The result is recorded as “Accepted as is,” “Accepted after minor revision,” “Accepted after substantial revision,” or “Unacceptable.” The result “Accepted after minor revision” normally entails editorial changes. If the result is “Accepted after substantial revision,” the student may be given the opportunity by the Examining Committee to revise the thesis with or without defending again. If the thesis revision is successful, the thesis supervisor is to sign before the thesis is presented to the Graduate Studies Committee. Six copies, including one unbound copy, should be presented to the Graduate Studies Co-ordinator. If the result is “Unacceptable,” the student may be given one opportunity by the Examining Committee to revise the thesis and to defend it again.

Submission of Thesis

When the thesis, in its final form, has been prepared after the final oral examination, the student will bring six unbound copies to the Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies at least three weeks prior to Convocation. Each copy must be submitted in a separate folder with the pages numbered and arranged in the appropriate order. The thesis must be free from typographical and other errors. All copies must include the Certificate of Approval signed by the Examination Committee and the members of the Supervisory Committee. Also included must be a brief Abstract and a copy of the circulation waiver and the copying licence.

When accepted by the Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies, one copy will be retained for microfilming and for deposit in the University Library after being bound. A second copy will be released to the Faculty of Education. A third copy will be released to the student’s supervisor and three copies will be released to the student.

Publication

The University requires publication of the thesis in the following manner:

One unbound copy of the thesis is forwarded to Library and Archives Canada, together with an agreement form signed by the candidate authorizing Library and Archives Canada to microfilm the thesis and to make microfilm copies available for sale on request. Library and Archives Canada will film the thesis exactly as it is and will list the thesis in Canadiana as a publication of Library and Archives Canada. A fee is charged by Library and Archives Canada to offset the cost of microfilming.

Library and Archives Canada’s Microfilm Agreement form will be sent to the candidate prior to the Master’s Examination, to be signed and submitted to the Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies immediately after the successful completion of the examination.

The student, in consultation with the Supervisor and the Co-ordinator of Graduate Studies, shall have the right to request that circulation and/or copying of the thesis in any form be withheld for up to one year.

Circulation and Copying of Thesis

In normal circumstances, as a condition of engaging in graduate study at the University, the author of a thesis grants certain licences and waivers in respect of the circulation and of copying of the thesis:

i. to the University Librarian, a waiver permitting the circulation of the thesis as part of the Library collection;
ii. to the University, a licence to make single copies of the thesis under carefully specified conditions; and
iii. to Library and Archives Canada, a licence to microfilm the thesis under carefully specified conditions.

Copyright Provision

Copies of the thesis shall have on the title page the words, “In partial fulfilment of requirements for the degree of Master of Education.” The international copyright notice, which consists of three elements in the same line—the letter “C” enclosed in a circle; the name of the copyright owner (the student); and the year should appear as a bottom line on the title page of the thesis.

 

Careers: 
Principal
School Counsellor
Professor
Educational Consultant
Psychologist
Course Level: 
600 Level
Courses: 

601 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION
In this course, students investigate special topics in the field of education.  Permission of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and the Dean is required.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours 

611 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION 
In this course, students are introduced to a variety of methods that are appropriate for conducting research in educational settings. Students develop an understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Students are introduced to the process of planning, conducting, and reporting research on learning and instruction, and to the critical analysis of current studies reported in educational literature. 
Hours of Credit: 3

612 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN 
In this course, students explore the characteristics of quantitative methodology and examine their usefulness in conducting educational research. The methods discussed include causal-comparative, correlational, and experimental. Students learn how to state hypotheses, define and measure variables, select samples, collect and analyze data, and prepare research reports. Students design a research study on a topic related to learning and instruction. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor.
Hours of Credit: 3

613 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN 
In this course, students study the development of qualitative research methodology and explore approaches drawn from this model that are used frequently by educational researchers. Students examine the use of observational techniques, interviews, questionnaires, and personal and official documents. Students design studies using qualitative methods. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

614 THEORIES OF RESEARCH AND LEARNING 
In this course, students address the role of theory in educational research. The aim is to familiarize graduate students with various theoretical frameworks including theories and principles of learning. 
Hours of Credit: 3

615 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 
In this course, students examine the field of educational leadership. Educational leadership extends beyond the role of the school administrator and focuses upon the development of teachers as leaders who impact on creating effective educational environments. Students research aspects of leadership which impact on schools, and explore models of effective leadership through case studies and simulation. 
Hours of Credit: 3

616 ACTION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION 
In this course, students explore ways in which teachers can systematically examine their own classroom practices using action research strategies. Emphasis is placed on issues such as topic selection, methodology, data collection and analysis, and interpretation of results. This process of inquiry is directed towards reflective practice. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

617 ISSUES IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 
In this course, students examine current issues in educational leadership. Students research the factors which influence educational leadership such as socio-economic trends, school restructuring, curriculum development, and educational technology. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 615 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

618 LEARNING, LEADERSHIP AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE 
In this course, students examine processes of reflective practice such as analytic problem-solving and self-assessment. Students research reflective practices that have made positive contributions to learning and leadership. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 615 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

619 CRITICAL PEDAGOGY 
In this course, students examine the social conditions and practices that shape education. Students explore schools in their historical, economic, political, cultural, and social contexts. 
PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

622 RESEARCH ON LEARNING DIFFICULTIES 
In this course, students examine the research on learning difficulties, and conduct research to identify effective strategies which can be applied in their teaching. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

624 CHANGE: LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING 
In this course, students examine the research on models of innovation and change which have had an impact on education over the last thirty years. Students explore the role of leadership in facilitating change in education.
PREREQUISITE: Education 615 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

625 CURRICULUM: LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING
In this course, students examine research into recent curriculum developments which are based on principles of integration, resource-based learning, and holistic learning, and which require the use of alternative assessment approaches. In addition, the impact of these developments on teachers' instructional strategies and students' learning are investigated. The focus is on the integration of knowledge about curriculum design and teaching in order to develop leadership skills for curriculum change. 
Hours of Credit: 3

626 TECHNOLOGY: LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING 
This course provides an opportunity for students to examine and critique current research trends in information and communication technology in education. Leadership models for the implementation of technology plans are studies and evaluated. A major portion of work for this course takes place in an on-line learning environment. 
Hours of Credit: 3

627 GLOBAL EDUCATION 
In this course, students examine the theory and practice of global education as it has developed in Canada and elsewhere. Other curriculum innovations that have contributed to global education (e.g., development education, environmental education, human rights education, peace education) are also examined. Interactive and participatory learning methodologies are used to encourage reflection on the teaching of contemporary social and global issues in a variety of educational contexts. 
Hours of Credit: 3

628 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT 
In this course, students examine how education is organized and practised in other countries, and its relationship to cultural, economic, and social development. Insights into education systems in Canada are afforded through comparing these with others around the world. In addition to common themes of study, students explore topics of their choice through the methodology of a comparative case study. Electronic communication with teachers in other countries provides first-hand information. 
Hours of Credit: 3

629 PROGRAM EVALUATION 
In this course, students study the various concepts and issues in program evaluation. Students research the literature on program evaluation to understand the tools and knowledge necessary for conducting an evaluation assessment. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

630 PERSPECTIVES IN ECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE LEADERSHIP 
This interdisciplinary course explores contemporary topics related to the environment, such as ecological consciousness, place attachment, principles of ecological design, sustainability and responsible stewardship, ecological citizenship, and environmental practice. Students apply a critical inquiry framework and consider philosophical ideologies related to anthropocentric and ecocentric perspectives, environmental ethics, and ecological worldviews. Participatory methodologies are encouraged to promote leadership in ecological knowledge and environmental preservation in a variety of contexts. 
Hours of Credit:  3  

631 LEADERSHIP IN POSTCOLONIAL EDUCATION
In this course, students consider postcolonial history and key texts as they critically examine a variety of theoretical frameworks within postcolonial education. The postcolonial context of education within particular Indigenous and colonized societies provides a major focus for the course. The role of educational leaders in negotiating complex change in specific contexts is considered.
Hours of Credit: 3

632 LEADERSHIP IN LANGUAGES AND LITERACIES
In this course, students address the role of educational leaders in the implementation of policies and practices sustaining languages and literacies in particular contexts. A variety of theoretical frameworks and principles of language learning and plurilingualism are considered. Successes and challenges related to leadership in language retention and the development of multi-literacies in education are carefully examined.
Hours of Credit: 3

671 FOUNDATIONS OF SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY LIBRARIANSHIP
This course provides participants working in a wide range of library contexts with the historical foundations and theoretical framework for the role, philosophy, and administration of school and community libraries and to the role of teacher-librarians in the context of 21st century schools and learning.

672 SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY LIBRARIES FOR 21st CENTURY LEARNING
This course explores the theoretical underpinnings of information and digital literacies and how they are developed within school and local library programs. Participants examine research supporting the guided inquiry process, problem-based learning, the effective use of digital and traditional learning resources, as well as how teacher-librarians, classroom teachers and community members collaborate to design and implement effective multi-literacies instruction.

673 BUILDING A CULTURE FOR READING IN A DIGITAL AGE
This course examines the emerging principles and practices influencing the development of reading habits in children and youth and the role of libraries in creating a culture for reading in the community. Participants explore gender issues related to reading, diversifying reading choices, building worldmindedness into children’s reading. Using social media to promote and encourage reading as well as critically examining online reading issues are also addressed.

674 COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT
This course examines the principles and methods of establishing, managing and sustaining school and community library collections. including the formulation of selection/circulation policies and criteria for evaluating /critiquing print, non-print and digital materials. Issues of censorship, influences of digital media and copyright are included as well as a critical examination of the relationship of the publishing industry to collection development and knowledge sharing.

675 INQUIRY PROJECTS IN SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY LIBRARIES
This is an action research, project-based course. Participants will identify an issue that pertains to learning in contemporary school and community libraries and will design a research project employing the principles of action research. Working from a solid theoretical framework, participants apply the inquiry process to explore critical questions in their practice.

691 DIRECTED STUDIES 
In this course, individual students pursue a special topic or issue in education. Before approval is granted, each student must prepare a detailed outline of the contents of the course, and obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work. 
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Dean and Coordinator of Graduate Studies, or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

ED 692 HIGHER EDUCATION TEACHING
This course introduces the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to successful teaching at the post­secondary level. It examines topics such as the teaching­learning process, instructional and curriculum design, addressing student needs, and learning characteristics.  Note:  This course is graded pass-fail.
Cross-listing:  None required, but the course could be cross-listed with various graduate programs across the UPEI campus.
PREREQUISITES and/or CO­REQUISITES: The minimum standard for admission would be the successful completion of an undergraduate degree, as per the admission requirements for graduate programs at UPEI.
Hours of Credit:  3 

695 GRADUATE SEMINAR 
In this course, students attend and present seminars on topics in their discipline, are evaluated on their seminars, and provide constructive criticism to others giving seminars in the course. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611, 612/613, 614, 615, 616, or permission of instructor.
Hours of Credit: 3

699 THESIS 
Each student in the Master of Education program is required, under the supervision of a Faculty Adviser and Thesis Committee, to write a thesis based on research into an approved topic. It must demonstrate the candidate's ability to conduct original independent work, and include a critical evaluation of the principal works published on the subject of the thesis. It should make an original contribution to the body of knowledge in that field of study. 
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the MEd program. 
Hours of Credit: 12 upon completion of Thesis.

Calendar Courses

601 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION
In this course, students investigate special topics in the field of education.  Permission of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and the Dean is required.
HOURS OF CREDIT: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours 

611 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION 
In this course, students are introduced to a variety of methods that are appropriate for conducting research in educational settings. Students develop an understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. Students are introduced to the process of planning, conducting, and reporting research on learning and instruction, and to the critical analysis of current studies reported in educational literature. 
Hours of Credit: 3

612 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN 
In this course, students explore the characteristics of quantitative methodology and examine their usefulness in conducting educational research. The methods discussed include causal-comparative, correlational, and experimental. Students learn how to state hypotheses, define and measure variables, select samples, collect and analyze data, and prepare research reports. Students design a research study on a topic related to learning and instruction. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor.
Hours of Credit: 3

613 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN 
In this course, students study the development of qualitative research methodology and explore approaches drawn from this model that are used frequently by educational researchers. Students examine the use of observational techniques, interviews, questionnaires, and personal and official documents. Students design studies using qualitative methods. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

614 THEORIES OF RESEARCH AND LEARNING 
In this course, students address the role of theory in educational research. The aim is to familiarize graduate students with various theoretical frameworks including theories and principles of learning. 
Hours of Credit: 3

615 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 
In this course, students examine the field of educational leadership. Educational leadership extends beyond the role of the school administrator and focuses upon the development of teachers as leaders who impact on creating effective educational environments. Students research aspects of leadership which impact on schools, and explore models of effective leadership through case studies and simulation. 
Hours of Credit: 3

616 ACTION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION 
In this course, students explore ways in which teachers can systematically examine their own classroom practices using action research strategies. Emphasis is placed on issues such as topic selection, methodology, data collection and analysis, and interpretation of results. This process of inquiry is directed towards reflective practice. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

617 ISSUES IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 
In this course, students examine current issues in educational leadership. Students research the factors which influence educational leadership such as socio-economic trends, school restructuring, curriculum development, and educational technology. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 615 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

618 LEARNING, LEADERSHIP AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE 
In this course, students examine processes of reflective practice such as analytic problem-solving and self-assessment. Students research reflective practices that have made positive contributions to learning and leadership. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 615 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

619 CRITICAL PEDAGOGY 
In this course, students examine the social conditions and practices that shape education. Students explore schools in their historical, economic, political, cultural, and social contexts. 
PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

622 RESEARCH ON LEARNING DIFFICULTIES 
In this course, students examine the research on learning difficulties, and conduct research to identify effective strategies which can be applied in their teaching. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

624 CHANGE: LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING 
In this course, students examine the research on models of innovation and change which have had an impact on education over the last thirty years. Students explore the role of leadership in facilitating change in education.
PREREQUISITE: Education 615 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

625 CURRICULUM: LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING
In this course, students examine research into recent curriculum developments which are based on principles of integration, resource-based learning, and holistic learning, and which require the use of alternative assessment approaches. In addition, the impact of these developments on teachers' instructional strategies and students' learning are investigated. The focus is on the integration of knowledge about curriculum design and teaching in order to develop leadership skills for curriculum change. 
Hours of Credit: 3

626 TECHNOLOGY: LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING 
This course provides an opportunity for students to examine and critique current research trends in information and communication technology in education. Leadership models for the implementation of technology plans are studies and evaluated. A major portion of work for this course takes place in an on-line learning environment. 
Hours of Credit: 3

627 GLOBAL EDUCATION 
In this course, students examine the theory and practice of global education as it has developed in Canada and elsewhere. Other curriculum innovations that have contributed to global education (e.g., development education, environmental education, human rights education, peace education) are also examined. Interactive and participatory learning methodologies are used to encourage reflection on the teaching of contemporary social and global issues in a variety of educational contexts. 
Hours of Credit: 3

628 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT 
In this course, students examine how education is organized and practised in other countries, and its relationship to cultural, economic, and social development. Insights into education systems in Canada are afforded through comparing these with others around the world. In addition to common themes of study, students explore topics of their choice through the methodology of a comparative case study. Electronic communication with teachers in other countries provides first-hand information. 
Hours of Credit: 3

629 PROGRAM EVALUATION 
In this course, students study the various concepts and issues in program evaluation. Students research the literature on program evaluation to understand the tools and knowledge necessary for conducting an evaluation assessment. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611 or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

630 PERSPECTIVES IN ECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE LEADERSHIP 
This interdisciplinary course explores contemporary topics related to the environment, such as ecological consciousness, place attachment, principles of ecological design, sustainability and responsible stewardship, ecological citizenship, and environmental practice. Students apply a critical inquiry framework and consider philosophical ideologies related to anthropocentric and ecocentric perspectives, environmental ethics, and ecological worldviews. Participatory methodologies are encouraged to promote leadership in ecological knowledge and environmental preservation in a variety of contexts. 
Hours of Credit:  3  

631 LEADERSHIP IN POSTCOLONIAL EDUCATION
In this course, students consider postcolonial history and key texts as they critically examine a variety of theoretical frameworks within postcolonial education. The postcolonial context of education within particular Indigenous and colonized societies provides a major focus for the course. The role of educational leaders in negotiating complex change in specific contexts is considered.
Hours of Credit: 3

632 LEADERSHIP IN LANGUAGES AND LITERACIES
In this course, students address the role of educational leaders in the implementation of policies and practices sustaining languages and literacies in particular contexts. A variety of theoretical frameworks and principles of language learning and plurilingualism are considered. Successes and challenges related to leadership in language retention and the development of multi-literacies in education are carefully examined.
Hours of Credit: 3

671 FOUNDATIONS OF SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY LIBRARIANSHIP
This course provides participants working in a wide range of library contexts with the historical foundations and theoretical framework for the role, philosophy, and administration of school and community libraries and to the role of teacher-librarians in the context of 21st century schools and learning.

672 SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY LIBRARIES FOR 21st CENTURY LEARNING
This course explores the theoretical underpinnings of information and digital literacies and how they are developed within school and local library programs. Participants examine research supporting the guided inquiry process, problem-based learning, the effective use of digital and traditional learning resources, as well as how teacher-librarians, classroom teachers and community members collaborate to design and implement effective multi-literacies instruction.

673 BUILDING A CULTURE FOR READING IN A DIGITAL AGE
This course examines the emerging principles and practices influencing the development of reading habits in children and youth and the role of libraries in creating a culture for reading in the community. Participants explore gender issues related to reading, diversifying reading choices, building worldmindedness into children’s reading. Using social media to promote and encourage reading as well as critically examining online reading issues are also addressed.

674 COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT
This course examines the principles and methods of establishing, managing and sustaining school and community library collections. including the formulation of selection/circulation policies and criteria for evaluating /critiquing print, non-print and digital materials. Issues of censorship, influences of digital media and copyright are included as well as a critical examination of the relationship of the publishing industry to collection development and knowledge sharing.

675 INQUIRY PROJECTS IN SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY LIBRARIES
This is an action research, project-based course. Participants will identify an issue that pertains to learning in contemporary school and community libraries and will design a research project employing the principles of action research. Working from a solid theoretical framework, participants apply the inquiry process to explore critical questions in their practice.

691 DIRECTED STUDIES 
In this course, individual students pursue a special topic or issue in education. Before approval is granted, each student must prepare a detailed outline of the contents of the course, and obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work. 
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Dean and Coordinator of Graduate Studies, or permission of instructor. 
Hours of Credit: 3

ED 692 HIGHER EDUCATION TEACHING
This course introduces the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to successful teaching at the post­secondary level. It examines topics such as the teaching­learning process, instructional and curriculum design, addressing student needs, and learning characteristics.  Note:  This course is graded pass-fail.
Cross-listing:  None required, but the course could be cross-listed with various graduate programs across the UPEI campus.
PREREQUISITES and/or CO­REQUISITES: The minimum standard for admission would be the successful completion of an undergraduate degree, as per the admission requirements for graduate programs at UPEI.
Hours of Credit:  3 

695 GRADUATE SEMINAR 
In this course, students attend and present seminars on topics in their discipline, are evaluated on their seminars, and provide constructive criticism to others giving seminars in the course. 
PREREQUISITE: Education 611, 612/613, 614, 615, 616, or permission of instructor.
Hours of Credit: 3

699 THESIS 
Each student in the Master of Education program is required, under the supervision of a Faculty Adviser and Thesis Committee, to write a thesis based on research into an approved topic. It must demonstrate the candidate's ability to conduct original independent work, and include a critical evaluation of the principal works published on the subject of the thesis. It should make an original contribution to the body of knowledge in that field of study. 
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the MEd program. 
Hours of Credit: 12 upon completion of Thesis.