Discover the science of human movement.

Kinesiology

Want more information about Kinesiology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Physical Educator
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Ergonomics Specialist
  • Health Promoter
  • Medicine
  • Exercise Scientist
The Kinesiology program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

"My experience in the Kinesiology program here at UPEI has been amazing up to this point. Over the past three years, I have had the privilege of meeting a number of wonderful people and learning from some of the most knowledgeable professors I have ever met. I find that they do a fantastic job of connecting with us students and being on our level, which leads to strong student-teacher relationships.

The field in which we study is one with many applications. I love that what I learn in the classroom does not simply just stay in the classroom, but can be applied to situations that I encounter in everyday life. I find this really opens students eyes to the number of opportunities we have upon graduating from the program, whether it be in health, sport, management, research, the list goes on.

Being a Kinesiology student gives me a sense of self-worth, knowing that what I am learning now is going to help people in the future. Being able to be a positive impact on a person’s life is something that I look forward to being able to do on a daily basis some day, and I owe this program for giving me the tools and knowledge to help me achieve this."

Ryan Kelly, Third-year Kinesiology
Want more information about Kinesiology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Physical Educator
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Ergonomics Specialist
  • Health Promoter
  • Medicine
  • Exercise Scientist
The Kinesiology program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Kinesiology and 6 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition. Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE KINESIOLOGY MAJOR

Kinesiology courses

101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
241 - Human Development
312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
331 - Introduction to Research Methods
343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
481 - Advanced Biomechanics
Four Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level

Foods and Nutrition

211 - Introductory Nutrition I
212 - Introductory Nutrition II

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics

112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences

Statistics

221 - Introductory Statistics I (formerly Math 221)

Chemistry

111 - General Chemistry I
112 - General Chemistry II

Physics

121 Physics for Life Sciences I

Biology

121 - Human Anatomy
122 - Human Physiology
131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course

One of:

UPEI 101 - Writing Studies - Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication;
UPEI 102 - Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts; OR
UPEI 103 - University Studies - Engaging University Contexts and Experience; AND
One writing intensive course

Psychology

101-102 - Introductory Psychology I and II
 

FOLLOWING IS THE USUAL SEQUENCE FOR COMPLETION OF COURSES:

Year One

  • Kinesiology 101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Biology 121 - Human Anatomy
  • Biology 122  - Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 111 - General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  - General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
  • Psychology 101 - Introductory Psychology I
  • Psychology 102 - Introductory Psychology II
  • One free elective

Year Two

  • Kinesiology 202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Kinesiology 221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Kinesiology 232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
  • Kinesiology 241 - Human Development
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 - Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 - Introductory Nutrition II
  • Biology 131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Statistics 221 (formerly Math 221) - Introductory Statistics I
  • Physics 121 Physics for Life Sciences I
  • One free elective

Year Three

  • Kinesiology 312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 331 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • Kinesiology 343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
  • Kinesiology 382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
  • One Kinesiology elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Five free electives

Year Four

  • Kinesiology 481 - Advanced Biomechanics
  • Three Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Six free electives

 

Want more information about Kinesiology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Physical Educator
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Ergonomics Specialist
  • Health Promoter
  • Medicine
  • Exercise Scientist
The Kinesiology program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS PROGRAM IN KINESIOLOGY

The Honours program in Kinesiology is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Kinesiology or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program through completion of Kinesiology 490: Advanced Research and Thesis.

The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Kinesiology.

Year One

  • Kinesiology 101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Biology 121 - Human Anatomy
  • Biology 122  - Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 111 - General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  - General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
  • Psychology 101 - Introductory Psychology I
  • Psychology 102 - Introductory Psychology II
  • One free elective

Year Two

  • Kinesiology 202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Kinesiology 221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Kinesiology 232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
  • Kinesiology 241 - Human Development
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 - Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 - Introductory Nutrition II
  • Biology 131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Physics 121 Physics for Life Sciences I
  • Statistics 221 (formerly 221) - Introductory Statistics I
  • One free elective

Year Three

  • Kinesiology 312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 331 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • Kinesiology 343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
  • Kinesiology 382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
  • One Kinesiology elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Five free electives

Year Four

  • Kinesiology 481 - Advanced Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 490 - Advanced Research and Thesis
  • Three Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Four free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research project.

Entrance Requirements

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall average of 70% in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing the honours program should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible, no later than March 31st of the student’s third year. 

To graduate with Honours in Kinesiology, students must maintain a minimum average of 75% in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall average of 70%.

Want more information about Kinesiology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Physical Educator
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Ergonomics Specialist
  • Health Promoter
  • Medicine
  • Exercise Scientist
The Kinesiology program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

QUALIFICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION 

Graduates of our Kinesiology program are eligible to apply for many certifications after graduation. Depending on the desired certifications, students may need to take certain elective courses beyond the core curriculum of the program.  Additionally, most certifications require an entrance exam and volunteer hours prior to becoming certified. Students are encouraged to review certification requirements early in their degree so they are able to plan their education and volunteer hours accordingly. Below is a list of popular certifications, although this list is not exhaustive.
 
Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP):
Certified Personal Trainer (CSEP-CPT) and Certified
Exercise Physiologist (CSEP-CEP)
 
College of Kinesiologists of Ontario
 
Health and Fitness Federation of Canada:
Certified Personal Trainer (HFFC-CPT) and Certified
Exercise Physiologist (HFFC-CEP)
 
National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA):
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)
Want more information about Kinesiology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Physical Educator
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Ergonomics Specialist
  • Health Promoter
  • Medicine
  • Exercise Scientist
The Kinesiology program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Adam Johnston, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer
Kinesiology

"My experience in the Kinesiology program here at UPEI has been amazing up to this point. Over the past three years, I have had the privilege of meeting a number of wonderful people and learning from some of the most knowledgeable professors I have ever met. I find that they do a fantastic job of connecting with us students and being on our level, which leads to strong student-teacher relationships.

The field in which we study is one with many applications. I love that what I learn in the classroom does not simply just stay in the classroom, but can be applied to situations that I encounter in everyday life. I find this really opens students eyes to the number of opportunities we have upon graduating from the program, whether it be in health, sport, management, research, the list goes on.

Being a Kinesiology student gives me a sense of self-worth, knowing that what I am learning now is going to help people in the future. Being able to be a positive impact on a person’s life is something that I look forward to being able to do on a daily basis some day, and I owe this program for giving me the tools and knowledge to help me achieve this."

Ryan Kelly, Third-year Kinesiology
Major / Course Sequence

MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Kinesiology and 6 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition. Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE KINESIOLOGY MAJOR

Kinesiology courses

101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
241 - Human Development
312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
331 - Introduction to Research Methods
343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
481 - Advanced Biomechanics
Four Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level

Foods and Nutrition

211 - Introductory Nutrition I
212 - Introductory Nutrition II

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics

112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences

Statistics

221 - Introductory Statistics I (formerly Math 221)

Chemistry

111 - General Chemistry I
112 - General Chemistry II

Physics

121 Physics for Life Sciences I

Biology

121 - Human Anatomy
122 - Human Physiology
131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course

One of:

UPEI 101 - Writing Studies - Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication;
UPEI 102 - Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts; OR
UPEI 103 - University Studies - Engaging University Contexts and Experience; AND
One writing intensive course

Psychology

101-102 - Introductory Psychology I and II
 

FOLLOWING IS THE USUAL SEQUENCE FOR COMPLETION OF COURSES:

Year One

  • Kinesiology 101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Biology 121 - Human Anatomy
  • Biology 122  - Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 111 - General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  - General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
  • Psychology 101 - Introductory Psychology I
  • Psychology 102 - Introductory Psychology II
  • One free elective

Year Two

  • Kinesiology 202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Kinesiology 221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Kinesiology 232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
  • Kinesiology 241 - Human Development
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 - Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 - Introductory Nutrition II
  • Biology 131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Statistics 221 (formerly Math 221) - Introductory Statistics I
  • Physics 121 Physics for Life Sciences I
  • One free elective

Year Three

  • Kinesiology 312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 331 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • Kinesiology 343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
  • Kinesiology 382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
  • One Kinesiology elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Five free electives

Year Four

  • Kinesiology 481 - Advanced Biomechanics
  • Three Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Six free electives

 

Honours

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS PROGRAM IN KINESIOLOGY

The Honours program in Kinesiology is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Kinesiology or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program through completion of Kinesiology 490: Advanced Research and Thesis.

The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Kinesiology.

Year One

  • Kinesiology 101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Biology 121 - Human Anatomy
  • Biology 122  - Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 111 - General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  - General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
  • Psychology 101 - Introductory Psychology I
  • Psychology 102 - Introductory Psychology II
  • One free elective

Year Two

  • Kinesiology 202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Kinesiology 221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Kinesiology 232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
  • Kinesiology 241 - Human Development
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 - Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 - Introductory Nutrition II
  • Biology 131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Physics 121 Physics for Life Sciences I
  • Statistics 221 (formerly 221) - Introductory Statistics I
  • One free elective

Year Three

  • Kinesiology 312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 331 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • Kinesiology 343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
  • Kinesiology 382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
  • One Kinesiology elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Five free electives

Year Four

  • Kinesiology 481 - Advanced Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 490 - Advanced Research and Thesis
  • Three Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Four free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research project.

Entrance Requirements

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall average of 70% in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing the honours program should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible, no later than March 31st of the student’s third year. 

To graduate with Honours in Kinesiology, students must maintain a minimum average of 75% in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall average of 70%.

Certification

QUALIFICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION 

Graduates of our Kinesiology program are eligible to apply for many certifications after graduation. Depending on the desired certifications, students may need to take certain elective courses beyond the core curriculum of the program.  Additionally, most certifications require an entrance exam and volunteer hours prior to becoming certified. Students are encouraged to review certification requirements early in their degree so they are able to plan their education and volunteer hours accordingly. Below is a list of popular certifications, although this list is not exhaustive.
 
Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP):
Certified Personal Trainer (CSEP-CPT) and Certified
Exercise Physiologist (CSEP-CEP)
 
College of Kinesiologists of Ontario
 
Health and Fitness Federation of Canada:
Certified Personal Trainer (HFFC-CPT) and Certified
Exercise Physiologist (HFFC-CEP)
 
National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA):
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)
Faculty
  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Adam Johnston, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer

Kinesiology

"My experience in the Kinesiology program here at UPEI has been amazing up to this point. Over the past three years, I have had the privilege of meeting a number of wonderful people and learning from some of the most knowledgeable professors I have ever met. I find that they do a fantastic job of connecting with us students and being on our level, which leads to strong student-teacher relationships.

The field in which we study is one with many applications. I love that what I learn in the classroom does not simply just stay in the classroom, but can be applied to situations that I encounter in everyday life. I find this really opens students eyes to the number of opportunities we have upon graduating from the program, whether it be in health, sport, management, research, the list goes on.

Being a Kinesiology student gives me a sense of self-worth, knowing that what I am learning now is going to help people in the future. Being able to be a positive impact on a person’s life is something that I look forward to being able to do on a daily basis some day, and I owe this program for giving me the tools and knowledge to help me achieve this."

Ryan Kelly, Third-year Kinesiology

Major / Course Sequence

MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Kinesiology and 6 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition. Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE KINESIOLOGY MAJOR

Kinesiology courses

101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
241 - Human Development
312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
331 - Introduction to Research Methods
343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
481 - Advanced Biomechanics
Four Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level

Foods and Nutrition

211 - Introductory Nutrition I
212 - Introductory Nutrition II

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics

112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences

Statistics

221 - Introductory Statistics I (formerly Math 221)

Chemistry

111 - General Chemistry I
112 - General Chemistry II

Physics

121 Physics for Life Sciences I

Biology

121 - Human Anatomy
122 - Human Physiology
131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course

One of:

UPEI 101 - Writing Studies - Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication;
UPEI 102 - Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts; OR
UPEI 103 - University Studies - Engaging University Contexts and Experience; AND
One writing intensive course

Psychology

101-102 - Introductory Psychology I and II
 

FOLLOWING IS THE USUAL SEQUENCE FOR COMPLETION OF COURSES:

Year One

  • Kinesiology 101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Biology 121 - Human Anatomy
  • Biology 122  - Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 111 - General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  - General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
  • Psychology 101 - Introductory Psychology I
  • Psychology 102 - Introductory Psychology II
  • One free elective

Year Two

  • Kinesiology 202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Kinesiology 221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Kinesiology 232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
  • Kinesiology 241 - Human Development
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 - Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 - Introductory Nutrition II
  • Biology 131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Statistics 221 (formerly Math 221) - Introductory Statistics I
  • Physics 121 Physics for Life Sciences I
  • One free elective

Year Three

  • Kinesiology 312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 331 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • Kinesiology 343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
  • Kinesiology 382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
  • One Kinesiology elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Five free electives

Year Four

  • Kinesiology 481 - Advanced Biomechanics
  • Three Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Six free electives

 

Honours

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS PROGRAM IN KINESIOLOGY

The Honours program in Kinesiology is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Kinesiology or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program through completion of Kinesiology 490: Advanced Research and Thesis.

The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Kinesiology.

Year One

  • Kinesiology 101 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Biology 121 - Human Anatomy
  • Biology 122  - Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 111 - General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  - General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 112 - Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
  • Psychology 101 - Introductory Psychology I
  • Psychology 102 - Introductory Psychology II
  • One free elective

Year Two

  • Kinesiology 202 - Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Kinesiology 221 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Kinesiology 232 - Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
  • Kinesiology 241 - Human Development
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 - Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 - Introductory Nutrition II
  • Biology 131 - Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Physics 121 Physics for Life Sciences I
  • Statistics 221 (formerly 221) - Introductory Statistics I
  • One free elective

Year Three

  • Kinesiology 312 - Introduction to Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 331 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • Kinesiology 343 - Physiological Assessment and Training
  • Kinesiology 382 - Program Planning and Evaluation
  • One Kinesiology elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Five free electives

Year Four

  • Kinesiology 481 - Advanced Biomechanics
  • Kinesiology 490 - Advanced Research and Thesis
  • Three Kinesiology electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Four free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research project.

Entrance Requirements

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall average of 70% in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing the honours program should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible, no later than March 31st of the student’s third year. 

To graduate with Honours in Kinesiology, students must maintain a minimum average of 75% in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall average of 70%.

Certification

QUALIFICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION 

Graduates of our Kinesiology program are eligible to apply for many certifications after graduation. Depending on the desired certifications, students may need to take certain elective courses beyond the core curriculum of the program.  Additionally, most certifications require an entrance exam and volunteer hours prior to becoming certified. Students are encouraged to review certification requirements early in their degree so they are able to plan their education and volunteer hours accordingly. Below is a list of popular certifications, although this list is not exhaustive.
 
Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP):
Certified Personal Trainer (CSEP-CPT) and Certified
Exercise Physiologist (CSEP-CEP)
 
College of Kinesiologists of Ontario
 
Health and Fitness Federation of Canada:
Certified Personal Trainer (HFFC-CPT) and Certified
Exercise Physiologist (HFFC-CEP)
 
National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA):
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)

Faculty

  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Adam Johnston, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer
Want more information about Kinesiology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Physical Educator
Occupational Therapist
Physiotherapist
Ergonomics Specialist
Health Promoter
Medicine
Exercise Scientist
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

101 INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY
This course will provide students with an introduction to the study of human movement, and explore the physical, social, and psychological aspects of development as they relate to physical activity. Topics include: exercise physiology, biomechanics, sport psychology, sport sociology and exercise psychology.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

202 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and empirical research concerning the psychological processes that influence performance in sports, exercise, and other physical activities.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Psychology 102, and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

221 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
This course discusses the physiological response to exercise, examining both acute and chronic adaptations to an exercise stress. Discussed from a physiological systems perspective, this course will examine the functional capacity of individual physiological systems, including the muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems, and discuss the system’s response to submaximal and maximal exercise and its impact on human performance. The environmental impact on physical performance will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Biology 122 and admission to the BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory

232 INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR LEARNING AND CONTROL
This course will introduce students to the basic principles of motor behaviour and motor control. Included will be considerations of the physical changes during growth and motor developmental while considering the role of feedback and practice on skilled behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Biology 122 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

241 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
(See Family Science 241).
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 241 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 201.

262 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
This course will explore the significance of sport across society and culture. Students will gain an understanding of the role of sport in culture  and how sport is structured within society.  Different sociological theories will be presented and discussed throughout the class to explain the intersection of sport and society.
Cross-listed with Sociology (cf. Sociology 221)
PREREQUISITES:  Kinesiology 101 and admission to the Kinesiology program, or Sociology 101
Three lecture hours
 

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

312 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS
This course introduces kinesiology students to the biomechanical basis of fundamental human movement. Topics include: skeletal, muscular and neural considerations for movement; functional anatomy; and essential mechanics and mathematics for the analysis of human motion. 
Cross-listed with Physics (cf. Physics 242)
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 221, Math 112, Physics 121, and admission to BSc Kinesiology program.
NOTE: Prerequisites for Physics 242 - Kinesiology 101 or Physics 111 or Physics 121; and Math 112 or Math 191/192
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

331 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 331).

342 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND CHRONIC DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY
This course will explore the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and chronic disease. Students will be introduced to epidemiological concepts as they relate to physical activity and chronic disease, and will discuss other important modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that influence the prevention of common chronic diseases.
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 221, Kinesiology 331
Three lecture hours

343 PHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING
This course will equip students with theoretical concepts and applied experience regarding fitness assessment, physical activity prescription and client management. Content is tailored to focus on training with low-risk healthy adult populations with an emphasis on the relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, and various health-related outcomes.
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 221 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program 
Three lecture hours, three hours laboratory a week

351 (formerly 401) ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
This course explores philosophical issues related to fitness and health. Students will discuss and evaluate arguments focused on important ethical issues arising in practice.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 401)
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing in Kinesiology or Foods & Nutrition, Kinesiology 202 or FN 212
Three hours lecture a week

352 CARE & PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
This course is an introduction to the prevention and recognition of injuries from accidents in athletic activities. Analysis of the incidence of these athletic injuries, assessment techniques and therapeutic aids, support methods, conditioning and reconditioning exercises are discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 221
Three hours lecture a week

375 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
This course will focus on the role of nutrition in athletic performance and fitness. Topics include energy expenditure, macro- and micro-nutrients, hydration and dietary supplementation. Eating strategies for optimal performance and other current topics in sports nutrition will also be discussed.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 375)
PREREQUISITE: Foods & Nutrition 212
Three hours lecture a week

382 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Foods & Nutrition (cf. Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 382)
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 232 and 241 or permission of the instructor

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

411/412 FIELD PLACEMENT I/II
These courses provide students with the opportunity to integrate theory into practice in a variety of multidisciplinary environments. Students complete a combination of supervised and independent work experience, and share their experiences in the classroom.
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 312, 343, 382 and permission of the Department Chair
Two lecture hours per week and 60 hours of field placement
 
421 ERGONOMICS
This course will take an occupational biomechanics approach to ergonomics. This course will emphasize the knowledge and skills required to perform biomechanical analyses of workplace tasks, identify occupational ergonomic issues and use ergonomic assessment tools to modify physical demands to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Interdisciplinary approaches to human factors, the study of human-machine interfaces, will also be discussed. Skill development will be achieved through practical experiences
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 312
Three lecture hours

431 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
(See Foods & Nutrition 431)

432 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living.  The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder.
Cross-listed with HB 832
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 312.  Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit not given for both KINE 432 and HB 832; responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences

433 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPORT PERFORMANCE
This course integrates theory, research, and applied perspectives to the area of sport psychology. Discussions will focus on theoretical constructs related to sport performance and provide students with a broad understanding of how athletes mentally train to reach high levels of proficiency in sport. Mental skills such as imagery, positive self-talk, goal setting, and other psychological skills will be introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 202
Three semester hours of credit

435 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment.
The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development.
Cross-listed with Human Biology 835
PREREQUISITES AND/OR CO-REQUISITES:  Kinesiology 202; Graduate students need permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit 

440 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Kinesiology to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth-year standing in the Kinesiology program
Six semester hours of credit

442 DIRECTED STUDIES IN KINESIOLOGY
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for rules governing Directed Studies.)

443 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
This course combines theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques. Attention will be given to the biochemical, molecular, and metabolic perturbations associated with acute exercise and how these effects translate into chronic exercise adaptations, athletic performance, and health.  Students may take part in maximal fitness testing procedures within the laboratory setting.  The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, and prepare a review paper related to a topic of interest within the area of exercise physiology.
Cross-listed with HB 843
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 343.  Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit not given for both Kinesiology 443 and HB 8430; responsibility for this course rests with the Department of Applied Human Sciences

452 AGING: BIOLOGICAL & LIFESTYLE PERSPECTIVES
This course is an examination of the physiological changes that occur within the major organ systems (skeletal, muscular, neural, and cardiovascular) with normal human aging. The role of physical activity and nutrition to promote physiological function and quality of life as we age is emphasized. This course includes an examination of current biological theories of aging.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 452
PREREQUISITE: Biology 122 and, Kinesiology 221 or Foods & Nutrition 212
Three semester hours of credit

481 ADVANCED BIOMECHANICS
This course is a continuation of KIN 312 and provides students with in-depth case studies of how physics concepts explain the optimal biomechanics for fundamental human movements and sports activities. Topics include: the physics of balance, falling, jumping, landing, running, throwing, striking, and catching.  
Cross-listed with Physics (cf. Physics 351)
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 312
Note: Prerequisite for Physics 351 - Physics 242
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

490 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in kinesiology would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. 
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

Calendar Courses

101 INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY
This course will provide students with an introduction to the study of human movement, and explore the physical, social, and psychological aspects of development as they relate to physical activity. Topics include: exercise physiology, biomechanics, sport psychology, sport sociology and exercise psychology.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

202 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and empirical research concerning the psychological processes that influence performance in sports, exercise, and other physical activities.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Psychology 102, and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

221 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
This course discusses the physiological response to exercise, examining both acute and chronic adaptations to an exercise stress. Discussed from a physiological systems perspective, this course will examine the functional capacity of individual physiological systems, including the muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems, and discuss the system’s response to submaximal and maximal exercise and its impact on human performance. The environmental impact on physical performance will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Biology 122 and admission to the BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory

232 INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR LEARNING AND CONTROL
This course will introduce students to the basic principles of motor behaviour and motor control. Included will be considerations of the physical changes during growth and motor developmental while considering the role of feedback and practice on skilled behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Biology 122 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

241 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
(See Family Science 241).
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 241 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 201.

262 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
This course will explore the significance of sport across society and culture. Students will gain an understanding of the role of sport in culture  and how sport is structured within society.  Different sociological theories will be presented and discussed throughout the class to explain the intersection of sport and society.
Cross-listed with Sociology (cf. Sociology 221)
PREREQUISITES:  Kinesiology 101 and admission to the Kinesiology program, or Sociology 101
Three lecture hours
 

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

312 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS
This course introduces kinesiology students to the biomechanical basis of fundamental human movement. Topics include: skeletal, muscular and neural considerations for movement; functional anatomy; and essential mechanics and mathematics for the analysis of human motion. 
Cross-listed with Physics (cf. Physics 242)
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 221, Math 112, Physics 121, and admission to BSc Kinesiology program.
NOTE: Prerequisites for Physics 242 - Kinesiology 101 or Physics 111 or Physics 121; and Math 112 or Math 191/192
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

331 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 331).

342 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND CHRONIC DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY
This course will explore the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and chronic disease. Students will be introduced to epidemiological concepts as they relate to physical activity and chronic disease, and will discuss other important modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that influence the prevention of common chronic diseases.
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 221, Kinesiology 331
Three lecture hours

343 PHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING
This course will equip students with theoretical concepts and applied experience regarding fitness assessment, physical activity prescription and client management. Content is tailored to focus on training with low-risk healthy adult populations with an emphasis on the relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, and various health-related outcomes.
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 221 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program 
Three lecture hours, three hours laboratory a week

351 (formerly 401) ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
This course explores philosophical issues related to fitness and health. Students will discuss and evaluate arguments focused on important ethical issues arising in practice.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 401)
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing in Kinesiology or Foods & Nutrition, Kinesiology 202 or FN 212
Three hours lecture a week

352 CARE & PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
This course is an introduction to the prevention and recognition of injuries from accidents in athletic activities. Analysis of the incidence of these athletic injuries, assessment techniques and therapeutic aids, support methods, conditioning and reconditioning exercises are discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 221
Three hours lecture a week

375 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
This course will focus on the role of nutrition in athletic performance and fitness. Topics include energy expenditure, macro- and micro-nutrients, hydration and dietary supplementation. Eating strategies for optimal performance and other current topics in sports nutrition will also be discussed.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 375)
PREREQUISITE: Foods & Nutrition 212
Three hours lecture a week

382 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Foods & Nutrition (cf. Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 382)
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 232 and 241 or permission of the instructor

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

411/412 FIELD PLACEMENT I/II
These courses provide students with the opportunity to integrate theory into practice in a variety of multidisciplinary environments. Students complete a combination of supervised and independent work experience, and share their experiences in the classroom.
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 312, 343, 382 and permission of the Department Chair
Two lecture hours per week and 60 hours of field placement
 
421 ERGONOMICS
This course will take an occupational biomechanics approach to ergonomics. This course will emphasize the knowledge and skills required to perform biomechanical analyses of workplace tasks, identify occupational ergonomic issues and use ergonomic assessment tools to modify physical demands to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Interdisciplinary approaches to human factors, the study of human-machine interfaces, will also be discussed. Skill development will be achieved through practical experiences
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 312
Three lecture hours

431 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
(See Foods & Nutrition 431)

432 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living.  The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder.
Cross-listed with HB 832
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 312.  Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit not given for both KINE 432 and HB 832; responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences

433 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPORT PERFORMANCE
This course integrates theory, research, and applied perspectives to the area of sport psychology. Discussions will focus on theoretical constructs related to sport performance and provide students with a broad understanding of how athletes mentally train to reach high levels of proficiency in sport. Mental skills such as imagery, positive self-talk, goal setting, and other psychological skills will be introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 202
Three semester hours of credit

435 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment.
The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development.
Cross-listed with Human Biology 835
PREREQUISITES AND/OR CO-REQUISITES:  Kinesiology 202; Graduate students need permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit 

440 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Kinesiology to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth-year standing in the Kinesiology program
Six semester hours of credit

442 DIRECTED STUDIES IN KINESIOLOGY
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for rules governing Directed Studies.)

443 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
This course combines theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques. Attention will be given to the biochemical, molecular, and metabolic perturbations associated with acute exercise and how these effects translate into chronic exercise adaptations, athletic performance, and health.  Students may take part in maximal fitness testing procedures within the laboratory setting.  The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, and prepare a review paper related to a topic of interest within the area of exercise physiology.
Cross-listed with HB 843
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 343.  Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit not given for both Kinesiology 443 and HB 8430; responsibility for this course rests with the Department of Applied Human Sciences

452 AGING: BIOLOGICAL & LIFESTYLE PERSPECTIVES
This course is an examination of the physiological changes that occur within the major organ systems (skeletal, muscular, neural, and cardiovascular) with normal human aging. The role of physical activity and nutrition to promote physiological function and quality of life as we age is emphasized. This course includes an examination of current biological theories of aging.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 452
PREREQUISITE: Biology 122 and, Kinesiology 221 or Foods & Nutrition 212
Three semester hours of credit

481 ADVANCED BIOMECHANICS
This course is a continuation of KIN 312 and provides students with in-depth case studies of how physics concepts explain the optimal biomechanics for fundamental human movements and sports activities. Topics include: the physics of balance, falling, jumping, landing, running, throwing, striking, and catching.  
Cross-listed with Physics (cf. Physics 351)
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 312
Note: Prerequisite for Physics 351 - Physics 242
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

490 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in kinesiology would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. 
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

Calendar Courses

100 Level

101 INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY
This course will provide students with an introduction to the study of human movement, and explore the physical, social, and psychological aspects of development as they relate to physical activity. Topics include: exercise physiology, biomechanics, sport psychology, sport sociology and exercise psychology.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

200 Level

202 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and empirical research concerning the psychological processes that influence performance in sports, exercise, and other physical activities.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Psychology 102, and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

221 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
This course discusses the physiological response to exercise, examining both acute and chronic adaptations to an exercise stress. Discussed from a physiological systems perspective, this course will examine the functional capacity of individual physiological systems, including the muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems, and discuss the system’s response to submaximal and maximal exercise and its impact on human performance. The environmental impact on physical performance will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Biology 122 and admission to the BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory

232 INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR LEARNING AND CONTROL
This course will introduce students to the basic principles of motor behaviour and motor control. Included will be considerations of the physical changes during growth and motor developmental while considering the role of feedback and practice on skilled behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 101, Biology 122 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

241 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
(See Family Science 241).
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 241 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 201.

262 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
This course will explore the significance of sport across society and culture. Students will gain an understanding of the role of sport in culture  and how sport is structured within society.  Different sociological theories will be presented and discussed throughout the class to explain the intersection of sport and society.
Cross-listed with Sociology (cf. Sociology 221)
PREREQUISITES:  Kinesiology 101 and admission to the Kinesiology program, or Sociology 101
Three lecture hours
 

300 Level

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

312 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS
This course introduces kinesiology students to the biomechanical basis of fundamental human movement. Topics include: skeletal, muscular and neural considerations for movement; functional anatomy; and essential mechanics and mathematics for the analysis of human motion. 
Cross-listed with Physics (cf. Physics 242)
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 221, Math 112, Physics 121, and admission to BSc Kinesiology program.
NOTE: Prerequisites for Physics 242 - Kinesiology 101 or Physics 111 or Physics 121; and Math 112 or Math 191/192
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

331 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 331).

342 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND CHRONIC DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY
This course will explore the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and chronic disease. Students will be introduced to epidemiological concepts as they relate to physical activity and chronic disease, and will discuss other important modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that influence the prevention of common chronic diseases.
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 221, Kinesiology 331
Three lecture hours

343 PHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING
This course will equip students with theoretical concepts and applied experience regarding fitness assessment, physical activity prescription and client management. Content is tailored to focus on training with low-risk healthy adult populations with an emphasis on the relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, and various health-related outcomes.
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 221 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program 
Three lecture hours, three hours laboratory a week

351 (formerly 401) ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
This course explores philosophical issues related to fitness and health. Students will discuss and evaluate arguments focused on important ethical issues arising in practice.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 401)
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing in Kinesiology or Foods & Nutrition, Kinesiology 202 or FN 212
Three hours lecture a week

352 CARE & PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
This course is an introduction to the prevention and recognition of injuries from accidents in athletic activities. Analysis of the incidence of these athletic injuries, assessment techniques and therapeutic aids, support methods, conditioning and reconditioning exercises are discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 221
Three hours lecture a week

375 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
This course will focus on the role of nutrition in athletic performance and fitness. Topics include energy expenditure, macro- and micro-nutrients, hydration and dietary supplementation. Eating strategies for optimal performance and other current topics in sports nutrition will also be discussed.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 375)
PREREQUISITE: Foods & Nutrition 212
Three hours lecture a week

382 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Foods & Nutrition (cf. Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 382)
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 232 and 241 or permission of the instructor

400 Level

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

411/412 FIELD PLACEMENT I/II
These courses provide students with the opportunity to integrate theory into practice in a variety of multidisciplinary environments. Students complete a combination of supervised and independent work experience, and share their experiences in the classroom.
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 312, 343, 382 and permission of the Department Chair
Two lecture hours per week and 60 hours of field placement
 
421 ERGONOMICS
This course will take an occupational biomechanics approach to ergonomics. This course will emphasize the knowledge and skills required to perform biomechanical analyses of workplace tasks, identify occupational ergonomic issues and use ergonomic assessment tools to modify physical demands to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Interdisciplinary approaches to human factors, the study of human-machine interfaces, will also be discussed. Skill development will be achieved through practical experiences
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 312
Three lecture hours

431 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
(See Foods & Nutrition 431)

432 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living.  The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder.
Cross-listed with HB 832
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 312.  Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit not given for both KINE 432 and HB 832; responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences

433 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPORT PERFORMANCE
This course integrates theory, research, and applied perspectives to the area of sport psychology. Discussions will focus on theoretical constructs related to sport performance and provide students with a broad understanding of how athletes mentally train to reach high levels of proficiency in sport. Mental skills such as imagery, positive self-talk, goal setting, and other psychological skills will be introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 202
Three semester hours of credit

435 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment.
The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development.
Cross-listed with Human Biology 835
PREREQUISITES AND/OR CO-REQUISITES:  Kinesiology 202; Graduate students need permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit 

440 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Kinesiology to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth-year standing in the Kinesiology program
Six semester hours of credit

442 DIRECTED STUDIES IN KINESIOLOGY
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for rules governing Directed Studies.)

443 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
This course combines theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques. Attention will be given to the biochemical, molecular, and metabolic perturbations associated with acute exercise and how these effects translate into chronic exercise adaptations, athletic performance, and health.  Students may take part in maximal fitness testing procedures within the laboratory setting.  The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, and prepare a review paper related to a topic of interest within the area of exercise physiology.
Cross-listed with HB 843
PREREQUISITE:  Kinesiology 343.  Graduate students need prior admission to a graduate program at UPEI and permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit not given for both Kinesiology 443 and HB 8430; responsibility for this course rests with the Department of Applied Human Sciences

452 AGING: BIOLOGICAL & LIFESTYLE PERSPECTIVES
This course is an examination of the physiological changes that occur within the major organ systems (skeletal, muscular, neural, and cardiovascular) with normal human aging. The role of physical activity and nutrition to promote physiological function and quality of life as we age is emphasized. This course includes an examination of current biological theories of aging.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 452
PREREQUISITE: Biology 122 and, Kinesiology 221 or Foods & Nutrition 212
Three semester hours of credit

481 ADVANCED BIOMECHANICS
This course is a continuation of KIN 312 and provides students with in-depth case studies of how physics concepts explain the optimal biomechanics for fundamental human movements and sports activities. Topics include: the physics of balance, falling, jumping, landing, running, throwing, striking, and catching.  
Cross-listed with Physics (cf. Physics 351)
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 312
Note: Prerequisite for Physics 351 - Physics 242
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

490 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in kinesiology would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. 
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

Contact UPEI