Discover the diverse role of foods and nutrients in human health.

Foods and Nutrition

Want more information about Foods and Nutrition ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Dietitian
  • Food Service Manager
  • Nutrition Researcher
  • Nutritionist
  • Food Scientist
The Foods and Nutrition program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
(902) 628-4353

Intimate class sizes, experienced professors, and real world application meet in the Bachelor of Science in Foods and Nutrition at the University of Prince Edward Island.

This accredited program prepares students for their future, opening doors to careers as sports nutritionists, registered dietitians, food scientists, product developers, policy makers, and countless other paths.

Get hands-on experience in your field to set you apart from the pack through honours options, case studies, internships, and research opportunities.

Sixty to eighty percent of third-year applicants are accepted into our accredited internship program, which sees students placed in a variety of positions in industry, public health, and health care institutions.

Many of our students are awarded summer placements with department professors, engaging in cutting-edge research in areas such as chronic disease prevention, food product development, childhood nutrition, and food security.

Cross-disciplinary opportunities are also offered through collaboration with Kinesiology and Family Science faculty.

Want more information about Foods and Nutrition ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Dietitian
  • Food Service Manager
  • Nutrition Researcher
  • Nutritionist
  • Food Scientist
The Foods and Nutrition program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
(902) 628-4353

The Honours program in Foods and Nutrition is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Foods and Nutrition or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report and one additional advanced Foods and Nutrition course for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program and would normally require one summer (four months) preceding the graduating year. Evaluation of the research data and writing of the thesis would normally be done during the fall and/or spring session in Foods and Nutrition 490: Advanced Research and Thesis. The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Foods and Nutrition.

First Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Family Science 114 Families in Contemporary Society
  • Chemistry 111-112 General Chemistry I and II
  • Math 111 or 112 Finite Mathematics or Calculus
  • Biology 131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Three free electives

Second Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 211-212 Introductory Nutrition I and II
  • Foods and Nutrition 223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
  • Foods and Nutrition 261 Communications
  • Biology 122 Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 243  Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Statistics 221 (formerly Math 221) Introductory Statistics I
  • One Family Science elective
  • Two free electives

Third Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 302 Advanced Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 331 Introduction in Research Methods
  • Foods and Nutrition 351 Nutritional Assessment
  • Foods and Nutrition 352 Clinical Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 382 Program Planning and Evaluation
  • Chemistry 353  Biochemistry
  • Biology 206 Microbial Diversity
  • One Family Science elective
  • Two free electives

Fourth Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 412 Human Metabolism
  • Foods and Nutrition 434 Community Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 461 Clinical Nutrition II
  • Foods and Nutrition 490 Advanced Research and Thesis
  • Two Foods and Nutrition electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Three free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to take an advanced statistics course and consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research projects.

Entrance Requirements

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and an overall average of 70% in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing an honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31st of the student’s third year.

To graduate with Honours in Foods and Nutrition, students must maintain a minimum average of 75% in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and an overall average of 70%.

Want more information about Foods and Nutrition ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Dietitian
  • Food Service Manager
  • Nutrition Researcher
  • Nutritionist
  • Food Scientist
The Foods and Nutrition program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
(902) 628-4353

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FOODS & NUTRITION

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition and 9 semester hours in Family Science.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR FOODS AND NUTRITION MAJOR

Foods and Nutrition
111 Introductory Foods
211 Introductory Nutrition I
212 Introductory Nutrition II
223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
261 Communications
302 Advanced Foods
331 Introduction to Research Methods
351 Nutritional Assessment
352 Clinical Nutrition I
382 Program Planning & Evaluation
412 Human Metabolism
434 Community Nutrition
461 Clinical Nutrition II
One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 300 or 400 level

Family Science
114 Families in Contemporary Society
Two Family Science electives excluding 381, 411, and 412

In addition to the courses required for the Foods and Nutrition major, students interested in applying for either the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program or a graduate dietetic internship must take Foods and Nutrition 321 (Foodservice Systems Management), Foods and Nutrition 422 (Quantity Food Production), Foods and Nutrition 431 (Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences), and Foods and Nutrition 483 (Professional Practice in Dietetics).

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
111 Finite Mathematics or 112 Calculus

Statistics
221 Introductory Statistics I (formerly Math 221)

Chemistry
111 General Chemistry I
112 General Chemistry II
243 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
353 Biochemistry

Biology
122 Human Physiology
131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
206 Microbial Diversity

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 101 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 102 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 103 – University Studies - Engaging University Contexts and Experience
AND One writing intensive course

COURSE SEQUENCE
Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:
 

First Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Family Science 114 Families in Contemporary Society
  • Biology 131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Chemistry 111  General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 111 Finite Mathematics OR
  • Math 112 Calculus
  • Three free electives

Second Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 211 Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 Introductory Nutrition II
  • Foods and Nutrition 223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
  • Foods and Nutrition 261 Communications
  • Biology 122 Human Physiology
  • Biology 206 Microbial Diversity
  • Chemistry 243 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Statistics 221 Introductory Statistics I
  • One Family Science elective
  • One free elective

Third Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 302 Advanced Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 331 Introduction to Research Methods
  • Foods and Nutrition 351 Nutritional Assessment
  • Foods and Nutrition 352 Clinical Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 382 Program Planning & Evaluation
  • Chemistry 353  Biochemistry
  • One Family Science elective
  • Three free electives

Fourth Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 412 Human Metabolism
  • Foods and Nutrition 434 Community Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 461 Clinical Nutrition II
  • One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Six free electives
Want more information about Foods and Nutrition ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Dietitian
  • Food Service Manager
  • Nutrition Researcher
  • Nutritionist
  • Food Scientist
The Foods and Nutrition program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
(902) 628-4353

Students in the Minors Program in Foods and Nutrition must complete a total of 21 semester hours of credit in Foods and Nutrition.

These consist of 9 semester hours of required core courses as follows:

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 Introductory Nutrition II

Twelve additional hours of electives must be chosen at the 200, 300, or 400 level.

Students intending to do a Minor in Foods and Nutrition are advised to consult with the Chair of the Department of Applied Human Sciences to ensure that they have the required course prerequisites. A student majoring in Family Science is eligible to pursue the Foods and Nutrition Minor.

Want more information about Foods and Nutrition ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Dietitian
  • Food Service Manager
  • Nutrition Researcher
  • Nutritionist
  • Food Scientist
The Foods and Nutrition program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
(902) 628-4353

Students in Foods and Nutrition may apply for admission to the optional Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. For more information about the program, see the Dietetic Internship program page.

Want more information about Foods and Nutrition ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Dietitian
  • Food Service Manager
  • Nutrition Researcher
  • Nutritionist
  • Food Scientist
The Foods and Nutrition program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
(902) 628-4353
  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Lucy Njoki Kathuri-Ogola, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Irene Awuor Ogada, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer
Overview

Intimate class sizes, experienced professors, and real world application meet in the Bachelor of Science in Foods and Nutrition at the University of Prince Edward Island.

This accredited program prepares students for their future, opening doors to careers as sports nutritionists, registered dietitians, food scientists, product developers, policy makers, and countless other paths.

Get hands-on experience in your field to set you apart from the pack through honours options, case studies, internships, and research opportunities.

Sixty to eighty percent of third-year applicants are accepted into our accredited internship program, which sees students placed in a variety of positions in industry, public health, and health care institutions.

Many of our students are awarded summer placements with department professors, engaging in cutting-edge research in areas such as chronic disease prevention, food product development, childhood nutrition, and food security.

Cross-disciplinary opportunities are also offered through collaboration with Kinesiology and Family Science faculty.

Honours

The Honours program in Foods and Nutrition is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Foods and Nutrition or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report and one additional advanced Foods and Nutrition course for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program and would normally require one summer (four months) preceding the graduating year. Evaluation of the research data and writing of the thesis would normally be done during the fall and/or spring session in Foods and Nutrition 490: Advanced Research and Thesis. The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Foods and Nutrition.

First Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Family Science 114 Families in Contemporary Society
  • Chemistry 111-112 General Chemistry I and II
  • Math 111 or 112 Finite Mathematics or Calculus
  • Biology 131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Three free electives

Second Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 211-212 Introductory Nutrition I and II
  • Foods and Nutrition 223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
  • Foods and Nutrition 261 Communications
  • Biology 122 Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 243  Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Statistics 221 (formerly Math 221) Introductory Statistics I
  • One Family Science elective
  • Two free electives

Third Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 302 Advanced Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 331 Introduction in Research Methods
  • Foods and Nutrition 351 Nutritional Assessment
  • Foods and Nutrition 352 Clinical Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 382 Program Planning and Evaluation
  • Chemistry 353  Biochemistry
  • Biology 206 Microbial Diversity
  • One Family Science elective
  • Two free electives

Fourth Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 412 Human Metabolism
  • Foods and Nutrition 434 Community Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 461 Clinical Nutrition II
  • Foods and Nutrition 490 Advanced Research and Thesis
  • Two Foods and Nutrition electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Three free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to take an advanced statistics course and consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research projects.

Entrance Requirements

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and an overall average of 70% in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing an honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31st of the student’s third year.

To graduate with Honours in Foods and Nutrition, students must maintain a minimum average of 75% in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and an overall average of 70%.

Major

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FOODS & NUTRITION

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition and 9 semester hours in Family Science.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR FOODS AND NUTRITION MAJOR

Foods and Nutrition
111 Introductory Foods
211 Introductory Nutrition I
212 Introductory Nutrition II
223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
261 Communications
302 Advanced Foods
331 Introduction to Research Methods
351 Nutritional Assessment
352 Clinical Nutrition I
382 Program Planning & Evaluation
412 Human Metabolism
434 Community Nutrition
461 Clinical Nutrition II
One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 300 or 400 level

Family Science
114 Families in Contemporary Society
Two Family Science electives excluding 381, 411, and 412

In addition to the courses required for the Foods and Nutrition major, students interested in applying for either the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program or a graduate dietetic internship must take Foods and Nutrition 321 (Foodservice Systems Management), Foods and Nutrition 422 (Quantity Food Production), Foods and Nutrition 431 (Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences), and Foods and Nutrition 483 (Professional Practice in Dietetics).

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
111 Finite Mathematics or 112 Calculus

Statistics
221 Introductory Statistics I (formerly Math 221)

Chemistry
111 General Chemistry I
112 General Chemistry II
243 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
353 Biochemistry

Biology
122 Human Physiology
131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
206 Microbial Diversity

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 101 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 102 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 103 – University Studies - Engaging University Contexts and Experience
AND One writing intensive course

COURSE SEQUENCE
Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:
 

First Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Family Science 114 Families in Contemporary Society
  • Biology 131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Chemistry 111  General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 111 Finite Mathematics OR
  • Math 112 Calculus
  • Three free electives

Second Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 211 Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 Introductory Nutrition II
  • Foods and Nutrition 223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
  • Foods and Nutrition 261 Communications
  • Biology 122 Human Physiology
  • Biology 206 Microbial Diversity
  • Chemistry 243 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Statistics 221 Introductory Statistics I
  • One Family Science elective
  • One free elective

Third Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 302 Advanced Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 331 Introduction to Research Methods
  • Foods and Nutrition 351 Nutritional Assessment
  • Foods and Nutrition 352 Clinical Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 382 Program Planning & Evaluation
  • Chemistry 353  Biochemistry
  • One Family Science elective
  • Three free electives

Fourth Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 412 Human Metabolism
  • Foods and Nutrition 434 Community Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 461 Clinical Nutrition II
  • One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Six free electives
Minor

Students in the Minors Program in Foods and Nutrition must complete a total of 21 semester hours of credit in Foods and Nutrition.

These consist of 9 semester hours of required core courses as follows:

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 Introductory Nutrition II

Twelve additional hours of electives must be chosen at the 200, 300, or 400 level.

Students intending to do a Minor in Foods and Nutrition are advised to consult with the Chair of the Department of Applied Human Sciences to ensure that they have the required course prerequisites. A student majoring in Family Science is eligible to pursue the Foods and Nutrition Minor.

Internship Program

Students in Foods and Nutrition may apply for admission to the optional Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. For more information about the program, see the Dietetic Internship program page.

Faculty
  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Lucy Njoki Kathuri-Ogola, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Irene Awuor Ogada, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer

Overview

Intimate class sizes, experienced professors, and real world application meet in the Bachelor of Science in Foods and Nutrition at the University of Prince Edward Island.

This accredited program prepares students for their future, opening doors to careers as sports nutritionists, registered dietitians, food scientists, product developers, policy makers, and countless other paths.

Get hands-on experience in your field to set you apart from the pack through honours options, case studies, internships, and research opportunities.

Sixty to eighty percent of third-year applicants are accepted into our accredited internship program, which sees students placed in a variety of positions in industry, public health, and health care institutions.

Many of our students are awarded summer placements with department professors, engaging in cutting-edge research in areas such as chronic disease prevention, food product development, childhood nutrition, and food security.

Cross-disciplinary opportunities are also offered through collaboration with Kinesiology and Family Science faculty.

Honours

The Honours program in Foods and Nutrition is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Foods and Nutrition or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report and one additional advanced Foods and Nutrition course for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program and would normally require one summer (four months) preceding the graduating year. Evaluation of the research data and writing of the thesis would normally be done during the fall and/or spring session in Foods and Nutrition 490: Advanced Research and Thesis. The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Foods and Nutrition.

First Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Family Science 114 Families in Contemporary Society
  • Chemistry 111-112 General Chemistry I and II
  • Math 111 or 112 Finite Mathematics or Calculus
  • Biology 131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Three free electives

Second Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 211-212 Introductory Nutrition I and II
  • Foods and Nutrition 223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
  • Foods and Nutrition 261 Communications
  • Biology 122 Human Physiology
  • Chemistry 243  Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Statistics 221 (formerly Math 221) Introductory Statistics I
  • One Family Science elective
  • Two free electives

Third Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 302 Advanced Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 331 Introduction in Research Methods
  • Foods and Nutrition 351 Nutritional Assessment
  • Foods and Nutrition 352 Clinical Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 382 Program Planning and Evaluation
  • Chemistry 353  Biochemistry
  • Biology 206 Microbial Diversity
  • One Family Science elective
  • Two free electives

Fourth Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 412 Human Metabolism
  • Foods and Nutrition 434 Community Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 461 Clinical Nutrition II
  • Foods and Nutrition 490 Advanced Research and Thesis
  • Two Foods and Nutrition electives at the 300 or 400 level
  • Three free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to take an advanced statistics course and consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research projects.

Entrance Requirements

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and an overall average of 70% in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing an honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31st of the student’s third year.

To graduate with Honours in Foods and Nutrition, students must maintain a minimum average of 75% in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and an overall average of 70%.

Major

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FOODS & NUTRITION

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition and 9 semester hours in Family Science.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR FOODS AND NUTRITION MAJOR

Foods and Nutrition
111 Introductory Foods
211 Introductory Nutrition I
212 Introductory Nutrition II
223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
261 Communications
302 Advanced Foods
331 Introduction to Research Methods
351 Nutritional Assessment
352 Clinical Nutrition I
382 Program Planning & Evaluation
412 Human Metabolism
434 Community Nutrition
461 Clinical Nutrition II
One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 300 or 400 level

Family Science
114 Families in Contemporary Society
Two Family Science electives excluding 381, 411, and 412

In addition to the courses required for the Foods and Nutrition major, students interested in applying for either the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program or a graduate dietetic internship must take Foods and Nutrition 321 (Foodservice Systems Management), Foods and Nutrition 422 (Quantity Food Production), Foods and Nutrition 431 (Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences), and Foods and Nutrition 483 (Professional Practice in Dietetics).

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
111 Finite Mathematics or 112 Calculus

Statistics
221 Introductory Statistics I (formerly Math 221)

Chemistry
111 General Chemistry I
112 General Chemistry II
243 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
353 Biochemistry

Biology
122 Human Physiology
131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
206 Microbial Diversity

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 101 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 102 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 103 – University Studies - Engaging University Contexts and Experience
AND One writing intensive course

COURSE SEQUENCE
Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:
 

First Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Family Science 114 Families in Contemporary Society
  • Biology 131 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Chemistry 111  General Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 112  General Chemistry II
  • One of UPEI 101, 102 or 103
  • Math 111 Finite Mathematics OR
  • Math 112 Calculus
  • Three free electives

Second Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 211 Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 Introductory Nutrition II
  • Foods and Nutrition 223 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
  • Foods and Nutrition 261 Communications
  • Biology 122 Human Physiology
  • Biology 206 Microbial Diversity
  • Chemistry 243 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Statistics 221 Introductory Statistics I
  • One Family Science elective
  • One free elective

Third Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 302 Advanced Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 331 Introduction to Research Methods
  • Foods and Nutrition 351 Nutritional Assessment
  • Foods and Nutrition 352 Clinical Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 382 Program Planning & Evaluation
  • Chemistry 353  Biochemistry
  • One Family Science elective
  • Three free electives

Fourth Year

  • Foods and Nutrition 412 Human Metabolism
  • Foods and Nutrition 434 Community Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 461 Clinical Nutrition II
  • One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 300 or 400 level
  • Six free electives

Minor

Students in the Minors Program in Foods and Nutrition must complete a total of 21 semester hours of credit in Foods and Nutrition.

These consist of 9 semester hours of required core courses as follows:

  • Foods and Nutrition 111 Introductory Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 211 Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 212 Introductory Nutrition II

Twelve additional hours of electives must be chosen at the 200, 300, or 400 level.

Students intending to do a Minor in Foods and Nutrition are advised to consult with the Chair of the Department of Applied Human Sciences to ensure that they have the required course prerequisites. A student majoring in Family Science is eligible to pursue the Foods and Nutrition Minor.

Internship Program

Students in Foods and Nutrition may apply for admission to the optional Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. For more information about the program, see the Dietetic Internship program page.

Faculty

  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Lucy Njoki Kathuri-Ogola, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Irene Awuor Ogada, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer
Want more information about Foods and Nutrition ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Dietitian
Food Service Manager
Nutrition Researcher
Nutritionist
Food Scientist
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

101 NUTRITION FOR LIVING
This course is an introduction to the study of nutrition as it relates to health and health promotion. Topics include factors influencing food use; personal dietary assessment and selection of a healthy diet; nutrition labels; nutrition and physical activity; nutrition throughout the life cycle; and prevention of chronic disease.
Three lecture hours
NOTE: This course is designed primarily for non-Foods and Nutrition or Family Science majors who will not be taking advanced courses in Nutrition. Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 101 if completed after F-N 211 and credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 101 if a student has already received credit for F-N 102.

102 NUTRITION FOR NURSING PRACTICE 
This course is an introduction to the science of nutrition specifically designed for nursing students. Topics discussed include: the nutrients, role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention, diet therapy for specific disease conditions, nutritional needs across the lifespan and the selection of a healthy diet.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 121
COREQUISITE: Biology 122
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 102 if a student has already received credit for F-N 101.

111 INTRODUCTORY FOODS
This course is a study of the physical, chemical, and nutritive properties of food; the changes that occur during food preparation, storage, and handling; the factors affecting food acceptability and quality.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII Chemistry or the permission of the Chair in special cases
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

211 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION I
This course is a study of applied human nutrition with a focus on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and select micronutrients; requirements and food sources of these nutrients and their role in chronic disease prevention; digestion, absorption and metabolism; and assessment of nutritional status.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 112, or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

212 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of FN 211 with a focus on water, major minerals and trace minerals; requirements and food sources of these nutrients; role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention; nutritional needs across the lifespan, and the selection of an adequate diet.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 211 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

223 DETERMINANTS OF DIETARY BEHAVIOUR
This course studies the factors influencing human dietary behaviour and ultimately nutritional health. Topics include the food system, development of food preferences, food and culture, school food issues, food insecurity, food and the media, and sensory influences on dietary behaviour.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 211 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

231 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 212)

261 COMMUNICATIONS
(See Family Science 261)

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

302 ADVANCED FOODS
This course is an advanced study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of foods through food experimentation; objective and subjective testing of food attributes with emphasis on sensory analysis; and principles of research methodology as applied to foods. Current trends are discussed. A product development project is required.
PREREQUISITES: Chemistry 112, Foods and Nutrition 111, and Foods and Nutrition/Family Science 331 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 300 level.

321 FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
This course is a study of food service management with emphasis on concepts and theories of organizational behaviour; safety, sanitation and hygienic practices in food service; quality and cost control; personnel management, staffing, physical design and delivery systems and the process of management in an institutional setting and in other food service operations. Other topics include menu planning, marketing, management information systems, budgeting, and the role of computers in food service management.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 111 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

331 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Kinesiology 331)

351 NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition assessment. Topics include dietary, anthropometric, laboratory and clinical methods currently in use to assess nutritional status at the population and individual level; challenges in interpreting nutritional assessment data; and nutrition counselling.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 212 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

352 CLINICAL NUTRITION I
This course introduces the fundamentals of the pathophysiology and nutritional management of disease and monitoring of nutritional status and the development, implementation, and evaluation of nutritional care plans. Specialized nutrition support techniques and drug-nutrient interactions are also studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 351 and Biology 122
Three lecture hours

371 LIFESPAN NUTRITION
This course builds on Introductory Nutrition by exploring in depth the nutritional foundations necessary for growth, development, normal functioning, and disease prevention at various stages of the life cycle. The impact of nutritional deficiencies and excesses on the body at various life stages will also be studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 102 or 211, or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours

373 NUTRITION AND AGING
This course is a comprehensive overview of the unique nutrition issues associated with aging. Topics include nutrient requirements of the older adult; the physiological basis of aging; nutrition interventions for chronic diseases, diet and cultural diversity; nutrition and disease prevention in the older adult.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 102 or 211, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

375 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
(See Kinesiology 375).

382 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology (cf. Family Science/Kinesiology 382)
PREREQUISITES: Completion of required second year Foods and Nutrition courses or permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.

383 (formerly 483) PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN DIETETICS
This course is designed to prepare students for a career in dietetic practice. Students will be introduced to the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice (ICDEP) and develop a professional portfolio which will demonstrate achievement of professional competencies. Topics include: career planning, federal/provincial/territorial requirements for dietetic practice, reflective practice, professional ethics, standards of practice, and professional boundaries.
PREREQUISITE:  Students must be a third year Foods and Nutrition major intending to enter the field of dietetics
Three lecture hours

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

401 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
(See Kinesiology 351).

409 SPECIAL TOPIC
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 400 level.

412 HUMAN METABOLISM
This course is an advanced study of the role of macronutrients in physiological and biochemical processes, their regulation in the human body, and their involvement in human health and disease. Application of current nutrition research findings and the rationale for current recommendations will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 122, Math 221, Chemistry 353, and Foods and Nutrition 212 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

422 QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION
This course is a study of food service production and management. Topics include quantity food purchasing and preparation, food safety and HACCP, sanitation, human resource planning and supervision. Practical experience in quantity food production and food service administration is gained by running a food catering operation using a team approach to management.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 321
Two lecture hours, six hours laboratory

431 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology (cf. Family Science/Kinesiology 431)
PREREQUISITE: Family Science/Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 331 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

434 COMMUNITY NUTRITION
This course is an introduction to the field of community nutrition, which is the study of the prevention of nutritional problems and the promotion of health through organized com- munity efforts. Students develop an increased awareness of the theory and practice of community nutrition, including how it fits within the population health framework. Topics include nutrition programs and policies at the provincial, national, and international levels; food insecurity; and working with diversity.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition/Family Science/Kinesiology 382 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

440 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Foods and Nutrition to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry into this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth year standing in the Foods and Nutrition program
Six semester hours of credit

441/442 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FOODS AND NUTRITION
(See Academic Regulation 9 for regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

461 CLINICAL NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of Foods and Nutrition 352 with emphasis on the pathophysiology and nutritional management of gastrointestinal disorders, food sensitivities, liver diseases, hypermetabolic states, renal disease, and AIDS.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 352
Three lecture hours

472 CURRENT ISSUES IN NUTRITION
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition research. Students use independent research and problem- solving skills to critique literature, present seminars, and write a scientific paper.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 212, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

490 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in foods and nutrition would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. Some of this work may be carried out in the summer months.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

Calendar Courses

101 NUTRITION FOR LIVING
This course is an introduction to the study of nutrition as it relates to health and health promotion. Topics include factors influencing food use; personal dietary assessment and selection of a healthy diet; nutrition labels; nutrition and physical activity; nutrition throughout the life cycle; and prevention of chronic disease.
Three lecture hours
NOTE: This course is designed primarily for non-Foods and Nutrition or Family Science majors who will not be taking advanced courses in Nutrition. Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 101 if completed after F-N 211 and credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 101 if a student has already received credit for F-N 102.

102 NUTRITION FOR NURSING PRACTICE 
This course is an introduction to the science of nutrition specifically designed for nursing students. Topics discussed include: the nutrients, role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention, diet therapy for specific disease conditions, nutritional needs across the lifespan and the selection of a healthy diet.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 121
COREQUISITE: Biology 122
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 102 if a student has already received credit for F-N 101.

111 INTRODUCTORY FOODS
This course is a study of the physical, chemical, and nutritive properties of food; the changes that occur during food preparation, storage, and handling; the factors affecting food acceptability and quality.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII Chemistry or the permission of the Chair in special cases
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

211 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION I
This course is a study of applied human nutrition with a focus on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and select micronutrients; requirements and food sources of these nutrients and their role in chronic disease prevention; digestion, absorption and metabolism; and assessment of nutritional status.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 112, or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

212 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of FN 211 with a focus on water, major minerals and trace minerals; requirements and food sources of these nutrients; role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention; nutritional needs across the lifespan, and the selection of an adequate diet.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 211 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

223 DETERMINANTS OF DIETARY BEHAVIOUR
This course studies the factors influencing human dietary behaviour and ultimately nutritional health. Topics include the food system, development of food preferences, food and culture, school food issues, food insecurity, food and the media, and sensory influences on dietary behaviour.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 211 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

231 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 212)

261 COMMUNICATIONS
(See Family Science 261)

302 ADVANCED FOODS
This course is an advanced study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of foods through food experimentation; objective and subjective testing of food attributes with emphasis on sensory analysis; and principles of research methodology as applied to foods. Current trends are discussed. A product development project is required.
PREREQUISITES: Chemistry 112, Foods and Nutrition 111, and Foods and Nutrition/Family Science 331 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 300 level.

321 FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
This course is a study of food service management with emphasis on concepts and theories of organizational behaviour; safety, sanitation and hygienic practices in food service; quality and cost control; personnel management, staffing, physical design and delivery systems and the process of management in an institutional setting and in other food service operations. Other topics include menu planning, marketing, management information systems, budgeting, and the role of computers in food service management.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 111 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

331 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Kinesiology 331)

351 NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition assessment. Topics include dietary, anthropometric, laboratory and clinical methods currently in use to assess nutritional status at the population and individual level; challenges in interpreting nutritional assessment data; and nutrition counselling.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 212 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

352 CLINICAL NUTRITION I
This course introduces the fundamentals of the pathophysiology and nutritional management of disease and monitoring of nutritional status and the development, implementation, and evaluation of nutritional care plans. Specialized nutrition support techniques and drug-nutrient interactions are also studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 351 and Biology 122
Three lecture hours

371 LIFESPAN NUTRITION
This course builds on Introductory Nutrition by exploring in depth the nutritional foundations necessary for growth, development, normal functioning, and disease prevention at various stages of the life cycle. The impact of nutritional deficiencies and excesses on the body at various life stages will also be studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 102 or 211, or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours

373 NUTRITION AND AGING
This course is a comprehensive overview of the unique nutrition issues associated with aging. Topics include nutrient requirements of the older adult; the physiological basis of aging; nutrition interventions for chronic diseases, diet and cultural diversity; nutrition and disease prevention in the older adult.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 102 or 211, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

375 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
(See Kinesiology 375).

382 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology (cf. Family Science/Kinesiology 382)
PREREQUISITES: Completion of required second year Foods and Nutrition courses or permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.

383 (formerly 483) PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN DIETETICS
This course is designed to prepare students for a career in dietetic practice. Students will be introduced to the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice (ICDEP) and develop a professional portfolio which will demonstrate achievement of professional competencies. Topics include: career planning, federal/provincial/territorial requirements for dietetic practice, reflective practice, professional ethics, standards of practice, and professional boundaries.
PREREQUISITE:  Students must be a third year Foods and Nutrition major intending to enter the field of dietetics
Three lecture hours

401 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
(See Kinesiology 351).

409 SPECIAL TOPIC
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 400 level.

412 HUMAN METABOLISM
This course is an advanced study of the role of macronutrients in physiological and biochemical processes, their regulation in the human body, and their involvement in human health and disease. Application of current nutrition research findings and the rationale for current recommendations will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 122, Math 221, Chemistry 353, and Foods and Nutrition 212 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

422 QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION
This course is a study of food service production and management. Topics include quantity food purchasing and preparation, food safety and HACCP, sanitation, human resource planning and supervision. Practical experience in quantity food production and food service administration is gained by running a food catering operation using a team approach to management.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 321
Two lecture hours, six hours laboratory

431 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology (cf. Family Science/Kinesiology 431)
PREREQUISITE: Family Science/Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 331 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

434 COMMUNITY NUTRITION
This course is an introduction to the field of community nutrition, which is the study of the prevention of nutritional problems and the promotion of health through organized com- munity efforts. Students develop an increased awareness of the theory and practice of community nutrition, including how it fits within the population health framework. Topics include nutrition programs and policies at the provincial, national, and international levels; food insecurity; and working with diversity.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition/Family Science/Kinesiology 382 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

440 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Foods and Nutrition to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry into this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth year standing in the Foods and Nutrition program
Six semester hours of credit

441/442 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FOODS AND NUTRITION
(See Academic Regulation 9 for regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

461 CLINICAL NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of Foods and Nutrition 352 with emphasis on the pathophysiology and nutritional management of gastrointestinal disorders, food sensitivities, liver diseases, hypermetabolic states, renal disease, and AIDS.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 352
Three lecture hours

472 CURRENT ISSUES IN NUTRITION
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition research. Students use independent research and problem- solving skills to critique literature, present seminars, and write a scientific paper.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 212, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

490 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in foods and nutrition would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. Some of this work may be carried out in the summer months.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

Calendar Courses

100 Level

101 NUTRITION FOR LIVING
This course is an introduction to the study of nutrition as it relates to health and health promotion. Topics include factors influencing food use; personal dietary assessment and selection of a healthy diet; nutrition labels; nutrition and physical activity; nutrition throughout the life cycle; and prevention of chronic disease.
Three lecture hours
NOTE: This course is designed primarily for non-Foods and Nutrition or Family Science majors who will not be taking advanced courses in Nutrition. Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 101 if completed after F-N 211 and credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 101 if a student has already received credit for F-N 102.

102 NUTRITION FOR NURSING PRACTICE 
This course is an introduction to the science of nutrition specifically designed for nursing students. Topics discussed include: the nutrients, role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention, diet therapy for specific disease conditions, nutritional needs across the lifespan and the selection of a healthy diet.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 121
COREQUISITE: Biology 122
Three lecture hours
NOTE:  Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 102 if a student has already received credit for F-N 101.

111 INTRODUCTORY FOODS
This course is a study of the physical, chemical, and nutritive properties of food; the changes that occur during food preparation, storage, and handling; the factors affecting food acceptability and quality.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII Chemistry or the permission of the Chair in special cases
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

200 Level

211 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION I
This course is a study of applied human nutrition with a focus on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and select micronutrients; requirements and food sources of these nutrients and their role in chronic disease prevention; digestion, absorption and metabolism; and assessment of nutritional status.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 112, or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

212 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of FN 211 with a focus on water, major minerals and trace minerals; requirements and food sources of these nutrients; role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention; nutritional needs across the lifespan, and the selection of an adequate diet.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 211 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

223 DETERMINANTS OF DIETARY BEHAVIOUR
This course studies the factors influencing human dietary behaviour and ultimately nutritional health. Topics include the food system, development of food preferences, food and culture, school food issues, food insecurity, food and the media, and sensory influences on dietary behaviour.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 211 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

231 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 212)

261 COMMUNICATIONS
(See Family Science 261)

300 Level

302 ADVANCED FOODS
This course is an advanced study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of foods through food experimentation; objective and subjective testing of food attributes with emphasis on sensory analysis; and principles of research methodology as applied to foods. Current trends are discussed. A product development project is required.
PREREQUISITES: Chemistry 112, Foods and Nutrition 111, and Foods and Nutrition/Family Science 331 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 300 level.

321 FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
This course is a study of food service management with emphasis on concepts and theories of organizational behaviour; safety, sanitation and hygienic practices in food service; quality and cost control; personnel management, staffing, physical design and delivery systems and the process of management in an institutional setting and in other food service operations. Other topics include menu planning, marketing, management information systems, budgeting, and the role of computers in food service management.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 111 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

331 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Kinesiology 331)

351 NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition assessment. Topics include dietary, anthropometric, laboratory and clinical methods currently in use to assess nutritional status at the population and individual level; challenges in interpreting nutritional assessment data; and nutrition counselling.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 212 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

352 CLINICAL NUTRITION I
This course introduces the fundamentals of the pathophysiology and nutritional management of disease and monitoring of nutritional status and the development, implementation, and evaluation of nutritional care plans. Specialized nutrition support techniques and drug-nutrient interactions are also studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 351 and Biology 122
Three lecture hours

371 LIFESPAN NUTRITION
This course builds on Introductory Nutrition by exploring in depth the nutritional foundations necessary for growth, development, normal functioning, and disease prevention at various stages of the life cycle. The impact of nutritional deficiencies and excesses on the body at various life stages will also be studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 102 or 211, or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours

373 NUTRITION AND AGING
This course is a comprehensive overview of the unique nutrition issues associated with aging. Topics include nutrient requirements of the older adult; the physiological basis of aging; nutrition interventions for chronic diseases, diet and cultural diversity; nutrition and disease prevention in the older adult.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 101 or 102 or 211, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

375 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
(See Kinesiology 375).

382 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology (cf. Family Science/Kinesiology 382)
PREREQUISITES: Completion of required second year Foods and Nutrition courses or permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.

383 (formerly 483) PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN DIETETICS
This course is designed to prepare students for a career in dietetic practice. Students will be introduced to the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice (ICDEP) and develop a professional portfolio which will demonstrate achievement of professional competencies. Topics include: career planning, federal/provincial/territorial requirements for dietetic practice, reflective practice, professional ethics, standards of practice, and professional boundaries.
PREREQUISITE:  Students must be a third year Foods and Nutrition major intending to enter the field of dietetics
Three lecture hours

400 Level

401 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
(See Kinesiology 351).

409 SPECIAL TOPIC
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 400 level.

412 HUMAN METABOLISM
This course is an advanced study of the role of macronutrients in physiological and biochemical processes, their regulation in the human body, and their involvement in human health and disease. Application of current nutrition research findings and the rationale for current recommendations will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 122, Math 221, Chemistry 353, and Foods and Nutrition 212 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

422 QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION
This course is a study of food service production and management. Topics include quantity food purchasing and preparation, food safety and HACCP, sanitation, human resource planning and supervision. Practical experience in quantity food production and food service administration is gained by running a food catering operation using a team approach to management.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 321
Two lecture hours, six hours laboratory

431 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology (cf. Family Science/Kinesiology 431)
PREREQUISITE: Family Science/Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 331 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

434 COMMUNITY NUTRITION
This course is an introduction to the field of community nutrition, which is the study of the prevention of nutritional problems and the promotion of health through organized com- munity efforts. Students develop an increased awareness of the theory and practice of community nutrition, including how it fits within the population health framework. Topics include nutrition programs and policies at the provincial, national, and international levels; food insecurity; and working with diversity.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition/Family Science/Kinesiology 382 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

440 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Foods and Nutrition to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry into this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth year standing in the Foods and Nutrition program
Six semester hours of credit

441/442 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FOODS AND NUTRITION
(See Academic Regulation 9 for regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

461 CLINICAL NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of Foods and Nutrition 352 with emphasis on the pathophysiology and nutritional management of gastrointestinal disorders, food sensitivities, liver diseases, hypermetabolic states, renal disease, and AIDS.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 352
Three lecture hours

472 CURRENT ISSUES IN NUTRITION
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition research. Students use independent research and problem- solving skills to critique literature, present seminars, and write a scientific paper.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 212, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

490 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in foods and nutrition would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. Some of this work may be carried out in the summer months.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit