Literature, art, and culture.

English

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The department of English is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

If you are a person who loves to read, you've come to the right place. We have several degree options. Each offers strong preparation for further studies in a wide variety of areas.

The Major in English provides intensive study through reading, writing, and lively conversation. Explore the world through fiction, drama, film, poetry, non-fiction, and memoir. Enhance your ability to think about, understand, and interact with our increasingly complex society. Gain a richly diverse knowledge of how language and literature have been shaping, and continue to shape, human experience and culture.

The Minor in English is designed for those of you who want to enhance another major or wish to clear a space for literature and language studies in your lives. We also welcome anyone who wants to sample a course here and there, staying in touch with familiar writers and discovering new ones.

The Honours degree is for those who want to extend a thorough grounding in English language or literature by developing an area of independent study through a scholarly or creative writing Honours project.

As well as the place for all things literary, the English Department is home to the University Writing and Theatre Studies Programs. You will also find creative writing workshops and linguistics courses here.

Our faculty is creative, dynamic, and student-centred, with a passionate dedication to innovative research and to teaching excellence. In fact, many of us have received national, regional, and local teaching awards that recognize our commitment to our students. Every English major and Honours student, and every English interested minor, is matched with a faculty mentor who will help guide you through your program. The English Department is known for its profs' open doors, and for the mentoring relationships that develop and enrich the student experience. If you'd like to know more about what we do and what we offer, drop by the Department to chat with any one of us. You also can learn more about our courses below, by reading the Department's Calendar Supplement, which is updated annually and available on the right of this page, or by clicking on the link to Department Site on the right.

Studies in English language and literature will help you thrive—in your university experience and in your personal life.

Sincerely,

Dr. Greg Doran, Chair
UPEI Department of English
Want more information about English? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneur
  • Journalist
  • Librarian
  • Educator
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
The department of English is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

The English Majors and Honours program encourages students to explore the diverse body of literature in English from a variety of perspectives. Course content and critical approaches range across the discipline and include historical, theoretical, interdisciplinary and genre studies. The program also offers courses in creative writing and linguistics. Students may expect to gain both a sound background in the history of the English language and literature, and a familiarity with the most recent developments in literary practice and scholarship. The curriculum is designed to encourage a progressive acquisition of literary skills. As students earn their degree through their four years, they will progress from introduction to, through development in, toward mastery of, the following: (a) elements of the English language; (b) the research essay; (c) critical reading and literary theory; (d) the terminology of the discipline; (e) knowledge of the periods of literary history; (f ) verbal presentations. In order for students to understand the goal of sequencing of courses and skills acquisition, the Department offers the following general descriptions for courses at four levels:

(i) 100-level courses: Introduction (ii) 200-level courses: Foundation (iii) 300-level courses: Coverage (iv) 400-level courses: Focus

COURSE LEVELS AND PREREQUISITES

(i) Courses at the 100 level are introductory courses that provide a basic framework for critical reading and writing at university. English 192 and 195 are general introductions to literature, taught from a variety of perspectives. English 121 and 122 are required courses for a major, minor, or honours in English. Detailed descriptions of each year’s courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

(ii) Courses at the 200 level are either general interest courses or foundational courses that develop the skills necessary for further study in English. The prerequisite for 200-level courses is at least one 100-level English course or permission of the instructor.

(iii) Courses at the 300 level provide detailed study of areas of language and literature. The prerequisites for these courses are (a) at least one 100-level English course, and (b) at least one 200-level English course, or permission of the instructor. Some courses require specific 200-level courses.

(iv) Courses at the 400 level are designed to give students the opportunity for advanced study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. Students must have completed English 296: Writing About Literature and at least two 300-level courses before enrolling in a 400-level course.

ADVANCED STUDIES

Advanced Studies courses are designed to give students the opportunity for in-depth study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. They may be devoted to a major author, a group of authors, thematic or stylistic developments, or critical or theoretical concerns. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Advanced Studies courses are published in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

Want more information about English? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneur
  • Journalist
  • Librarian
  • Educator
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
The department of English is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

ADMISSION

The permission of the English Department is required before a student enrols in Honours English. The admission requirement is an overall average of at least 75% in all prior English courses. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources available at the Department, not all applicants who meet the formal admission requirements will be accepted into the Honours program.

PREREQUISITES

English 121, 122, 204 and 296

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

An Honours English student must complete 126 semester hours of credit, including the prerequisite courses and the following minimal requirements in English:

  • Medieval Literature - 3 hours
  • Shakespeare and one other Renaissance course - 6 hours
  • Eighteenth-Century Literature - 3 hours
  • Nineteenth-Century British Literature - 3 hours
  • Modern and Contemporary Literature - 6 hours
  • Canadian Literature - 3 hours
  • American Literature - 3 hours
  • English Language and Linguistics - 3 hours
  • Literary Theory - 3 hours
  • Two 400 level courses - 6 hours
  • Graduating Essay -  6 hours
  • Three additional English courses, at least one of which must be in British Literature before 1900 and the other two must be at the 300-level - 9 hours

English Honours Chart and Worksheet  
English Honours Application

Want more information about English? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneur
  • Journalist
  • Librarian
  • Educator
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
The department of English is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

PREREQUISITES: English 121, 122, 204 and 296

I. Required Courses

Students must take at least 3 semester hours from each of the following areas:

  • Medieval Literature
  • Renaissance Literature other than Shakespeare
  • Shakespeare
  • Eighteenth-Century Literature
  • Nineteenth-Century Literature
  • Twentieth-Century Literature or Contemporary Literary Theory (Canadian Literature is strongly recommended)
  • English Language and Linguistics

II. English Electives  (18 semester hours)

In addition to the required courses, students choose six other English courses, at least two of which must be at the 300 level and two at the 400 level. For guidance in the choice of electives, please consult the Department’s Calendar Supplement or the Department Chair.

English Honours Chart and Worksheet

Want more information about English? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneur
  • Journalist
  • Librarian
  • Educator
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
The department of English is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ENGLISH

Students in the English Minors program complete English 121 and 122, and at least five other English courses above the 100 level as electives, two of which must be at the 300 or 400 level. Students are encouraged to choose those electives in consultation with the Department Chair or Minors Co-ordinator.

Want more information about English? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneur
  • Journalist
  • Librarian
  • Educator
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
The department of English is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353
  • Elizabeth Epperly, Professor Emeritus
  • Brendan O’Grady, Professor Emeritus
  • Terry Pratt, Professor Emeritus
  • John Smith, Professor Emeritus
  • Brent MacLaine, Professor Emeritus
  • Greg Doran, Associate Professor, Chair
  • Anne Furlong, Associate Professor
  • Catherine Innes-Parker, Professor
  • Richard M. Lemm, Professor
  • Geoffrey Lindsay, Associate Professor
  • John McIntyre, Associate Professor
  • Shannon Murray, Professor
  • Wendy Shilton, Associate Professor
  • Esther Wohlgemut, Associate Professor
Overview

If you are a person who loves to read, you've come to the right place. We have several degree options. Each offers strong preparation for further studies in a wide variety of areas.

The Major in English provides intensive study through reading, writing, and lively conversation. Explore the world through fiction, drama, film, poetry, non-fiction, and memoir. Enhance your ability to think about, understand, and interact with our increasingly complex society. Gain a richly diverse knowledge of how language and literature have been shaping, and continue to shape, human experience and culture.

The Minor in English is designed for those of you who want to enhance another major or wish to clear a space for literature and language studies in your lives. We also welcome anyone who wants to sample a course here and there, staying in touch with familiar writers and discovering new ones.

The Honours degree is for those who want to extend a thorough grounding in English language or literature by developing an area of independent study through a scholarly or creative writing Honours project.

As well as the place for all things literary, the English Department is home to the University Writing and Theatre Studies Programs. You will also find creative writing workshops and linguistics courses here.

Our faculty is creative, dynamic, and student-centred, with a passionate dedication to innovative research and to teaching excellence. In fact, many of us have received national, regional, and local teaching awards that recognize our commitment to our students. Every English major and Honours student, and every English interested minor, is matched with a faculty mentor who will help guide you through your program. The English Department is known for its profs' open doors, and for the mentoring relationships that develop and enrich the student experience. If you'd like to know more about what we do and what we offer, drop by the Department to chat with any one of us. You also can learn more about our courses below, by reading the Department's Calendar Supplement, which is updated annually and available on the right of this page, or by clicking on the link to Department Site on the right.

Studies in English language and literature will help you thrive—in your university experience and in your personal life.

Sincerely,

UPEI Department of English
Dr. Greg Doran, Chair
Preamble

The English Majors and Honours program encourages students to explore the diverse body of literature in English from a variety of perspectives. Course content and critical approaches range across the discipline and include historical, theoretical, interdisciplinary and genre studies. The program also offers courses in creative writing and linguistics. Students may expect to gain both a sound background in the history of the English language and literature, and a familiarity with the most recent developments in literary practice and scholarship. The curriculum is designed to encourage a progressive acquisition of literary skills. As students earn their degree through their four years, they will progress from introduction to, through development in, toward mastery of, the following: (a) elements of the English language; (b) the research essay; (c) critical reading and literary theory; (d) the terminology of the discipline; (e) knowledge of the periods of literary history; (f ) verbal presentations. In order for students to understand the goal of sequencing of courses and skills acquisition, the Department offers the following general descriptions for courses at four levels:

(i) 100-level courses: Introduction (ii) 200-level courses: Foundation (iii) 300-level courses: Coverage (iv) 400-level courses: Focus

COURSE LEVELS AND PREREQUISITES

(i) Courses at the 100 level are introductory courses that provide a basic framework for critical reading and writing at university. English 192 and 195 are general introductions to literature, taught from a variety of perspectives. English 121 and 122 are required courses for a major, minor, or honours in English. Detailed descriptions of each year’s courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

(ii) Courses at the 200 level are either general interest courses or foundational courses that develop the skills necessary for further study in English. The prerequisite for 200-level courses is at least one 100-level English course or permission of the instructor.

(iii) Courses at the 300 level provide detailed study of areas of language and literature. The prerequisites for these courses are (a) at least one 100-level English course, and (b) at least one 200-level English course, or permission of the instructor. Some courses require specific 200-level courses.

(iv) Courses at the 400 level are designed to give students the opportunity for advanced study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. Students must have completed English 296: Writing About Literature and at least two 300-level courses before enrolling in a 400-level course.

ADVANCED STUDIES

Advanced Studies courses are designed to give students the opportunity for in-depth study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. They may be devoted to a major author, a group of authors, thematic or stylistic developments, or critical or theoretical concerns. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Advanced Studies courses are published in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

Honours

ADMISSION

The permission of the English Department is required before a student enrols in Honours English. The admission requirement is an overall average of at least 75% in all prior English courses. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources available at the Department, not all applicants who meet the formal admission requirements will be accepted into the Honours program.

PREREQUISITES

English 121, 122, 204 and 296

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

An Honours English student must complete 126 semester hours of credit, including the prerequisite courses and the following minimal requirements in English:

  • Medieval Literature - 3 hours
  • Shakespeare and one other Renaissance course - 6 hours
  • Eighteenth-Century Literature - 3 hours
  • Nineteenth-Century British Literature - 3 hours
  • Modern and Contemporary Literature - 6 hours
  • Canadian Literature - 3 hours
  • American Literature - 3 hours
  • English Language and Linguistics - 3 hours
  • Literary Theory - 3 hours
  • Two 400 level courses - 6 hours
  • Graduating Essay -  6 hours
  • Three additional English courses, at least one of which must be in British Literature before 1900 and the other two must be at the 300-level - 9 hours

English Honours Chart and Worksheet  
English Honours Application

Major

PREREQUISITES: English 121, 122, 204 and 296

I. Required Courses

Students must take at least 3 semester hours from each of the following areas:

  • Medieval Literature
  • Renaissance Literature other than Shakespeare
  • Shakespeare
  • Eighteenth-Century Literature
  • Nineteenth-Century Literature
  • Twentieth-Century Literature or Contemporary Literary Theory (Canadian Literature is strongly recommended)
  • English Language and Linguistics

II. English Electives  (18 semester hours)

In addition to the required courses, students choose six other English courses, at least two of which must be at the 300 level and two at the 400 level. For guidance in the choice of electives, please consult the Department’s Calendar Supplement or the Department Chair.

English Honours Chart and Worksheet

Minor

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ENGLISH

Students in the English Minors program complete English 121 and 122, and at least five other English courses above the 100 level as electives, two of which must be at the 300 or 400 level. Students are encouraged to choose those electives in consultation with the Department Chair or Minors Co-ordinator.

Faculty
  • Elizabeth Epperly, Professor Emeritus
  • Brendan O’Grady, Professor Emeritus
  • Terry Pratt, Professor Emeritus
  • John Smith, Professor Emeritus
  • Brent MacLaine, Professor Emeritus
  • Greg Doran, Associate Professor, Chair
  • Anne Furlong, Associate Professor
  • Catherine Innes-Parker, Professor
  • Richard M. Lemm, Professor
  • Geoffrey Lindsay, Associate Professor
  • John McIntyre, Associate Professor
  • Shannon Murray, Professor
  • Wendy Shilton, Associate Professor
  • Esther Wohlgemut, Associate Professor

Overview

If you are a person who loves to read, you've come to the right place. We have several degree options. Each offers strong preparation for further studies in a wide variety of areas.

The Major in English provides intensive study through reading, writing, and lively conversation. Explore the world through fiction, drama, film, poetry, non-fiction, and memoir. Enhance your ability to think about, understand, and interact with our increasingly complex society. Gain a richly diverse knowledge of how language and literature have been shaping, and continue to shape, human experience and culture.

The Minor in English is designed for those of you who want to enhance another major or wish to clear a space for literature and language studies in your lives. We also welcome anyone who wants to sample a course here and there, staying in touch with familiar writers and discovering new ones.

The Honours degree is for those who want to extend a thorough grounding in English language or literature by developing an area of independent study through a scholarly or creative writing Honours project.

As well as the place for all things literary, the English Department is home to the University Writing and Theatre Studies Programs. You will also find creative writing workshops and linguistics courses here.

Our faculty is creative, dynamic, and student-centred, with a passionate dedication to innovative research and to teaching excellence. In fact, many of us have received national, regional, and local teaching awards that recognize our commitment to our students. Every English major and Honours student, and every English interested minor, is matched with a faculty mentor who will help guide you through your program. The English Department is known for its profs' open doors, and for the mentoring relationships that develop and enrich the student experience. If you'd like to know more about what we do and what we offer, drop by the Department to chat with any one of us. You also can learn more about our courses below, by reading the Department's Calendar Supplement, which is updated annually and available on the right of this page, or by clicking on the link to Department Site on the right.

Studies in English language and literature will help you thrive—in your university experience and in your personal life.

Sincerely,

Dr. Greg Doran, Chair
UPEI Department of English

Preamble

The English Majors and Honours program encourages students to explore the diverse body of literature in English from a variety of perspectives. Course content and critical approaches range across the discipline and include historical, theoretical, interdisciplinary and genre studies. The program also offers courses in creative writing and linguistics. Students may expect to gain both a sound background in the history of the English language and literature, and a familiarity with the most recent developments in literary practice and scholarship. The curriculum is designed to encourage a progressive acquisition of literary skills. As students earn their degree through their four years, they will progress from introduction to, through development in, toward mastery of, the following: (a) elements of the English language; (b) the research essay; (c) critical reading and literary theory; (d) the terminology of the discipline; (e) knowledge of the periods of literary history; (f ) verbal presentations. In order for students to understand the goal of sequencing of courses and skills acquisition, the Department offers the following general descriptions for courses at four levels:

(i) 100-level courses: Introduction (ii) 200-level courses: Foundation (iii) 300-level courses: Coverage (iv) 400-level courses: Focus

COURSE LEVELS AND PREREQUISITES

(i) Courses at the 100 level are introductory courses that provide a basic framework for critical reading and writing at university. English 192 and 195 are general introductions to literature, taught from a variety of perspectives. English 121 and 122 are required courses for a major, minor, or honours in English. Detailed descriptions of each year’s courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

(ii) Courses at the 200 level are either general interest courses or foundational courses that develop the skills necessary for further study in English. The prerequisite for 200-level courses is at least one 100-level English course or permission of the instructor.

(iii) Courses at the 300 level provide detailed study of areas of language and literature. The prerequisites for these courses are (a) at least one 100-level English course, and (b) at least one 200-level English course, or permission of the instructor. Some courses require specific 200-level courses.

(iv) Courses at the 400 level are designed to give students the opportunity for advanced study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. Students must have completed English 296: Writing About Literature and at least two 300-level courses before enrolling in a 400-level course.

ADVANCED STUDIES

Advanced Studies courses are designed to give students the opportunity for in-depth study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. They may be devoted to a major author, a group of authors, thematic or stylistic developments, or critical or theoretical concerns. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Advanced Studies courses are published in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

Honours

ADMISSION

The permission of the English Department is required before a student enrols in Honours English. The admission requirement is an overall average of at least 75% in all prior English courses. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources available at the Department, not all applicants who meet the formal admission requirements will be accepted into the Honours program.

PREREQUISITES

English 121, 122, 204 and 296

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

An Honours English student must complete 126 semester hours of credit, including the prerequisite courses and the following minimal requirements in English:

  • Medieval Literature - 3 hours
  • Shakespeare and one other Renaissance course - 6 hours
  • Eighteenth-Century Literature - 3 hours
  • Nineteenth-Century British Literature - 3 hours
  • Modern and Contemporary Literature - 6 hours
  • Canadian Literature - 3 hours
  • American Literature - 3 hours
  • English Language and Linguistics - 3 hours
  • Literary Theory - 3 hours
  • Two 400 level courses - 6 hours
  • Graduating Essay -  6 hours
  • Three additional English courses, at least one of which must be in British Literature before 1900 and the other two must be at the 300-level - 9 hours

English Honours Chart and Worksheet  
English Honours Application

Major

PREREQUISITES: English 121, 122, 204 and 296

I. Required Courses

Students must take at least 3 semester hours from each of the following areas:

  • Medieval Literature
  • Renaissance Literature other than Shakespeare
  • Shakespeare
  • Eighteenth-Century Literature
  • Nineteenth-Century Literature
  • Twentieth-Century Literature or Contemporary Literary Theory (Canadian Literature is strongly recommended)
  • English Language and Linguistics

II. English Electives  (18 semester hours)

In addition to the required courses, students choose six other English courses, at least two of which must be at the 300 level and two at the 400 level. For guidance in the choice of electives, please consult the Department’s Calendar Supplement or the Department Chair.

English Honours Chart and Worksheet

Minor

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ENGLISH

Students in the English Minors program complete English 121 and 122, and at least five other English courses above the 100 level as electives, two of which must be at the 300 or 400 level. Students are encouraged to choose those electives in consultation with the Department Chair or Minors Co-ordinator.

Faculty

  • Elizabeth Epperly, Professor Emeritus
  • Brendan O’Grady, Professor Emeritus
  • Terry Pratt, Professor Emeritus
  • John Smith, Professor Emeritus
  • Brent MacLaine, Professor Emeritus
  • Greg Doran, Associate Professor, Chair
  • Anne Furlong, Associate Professor
  • Catherine Innes-Parker, Professor
  • Richard M. Lemm, Professor
  • Geoffrey Lindsay, Associate Professor
  • John McIntyre, Associate Professor
  • Shannon Murray, Professor
  • Wendy Shilton, Associate Professor
  • Esther Wohlgemut, Associate Professor
Want more information about English? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Entrepreneur
Journalist
Librarian
Educator
Public Relations
Communications
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

101 ACADEMIC WRITING (Offered every semester)
This course offers an introduction to university writing and rhetoric, aimed at the development of clear, critical thinking and an effective prose style.
Cross-listed with University (cf. UPEI 101)
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) program for those students enrolled in the EAP program.
Three hours a week

121 HEROES, LOVERS, GODS, AND MONSTERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM ITS BEGINNINGS TO 1785
This course uses the idea of the hero to explore the literature of England from its beginning to 1789. The course will introduce such texts as Beowulf (the Anglo-Saxon epic hero), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (the romance hero), The Faerie Queene (the allegorical hero), Paradise Lost (the biblical epic hero) and Gulliver's Travels (the satiric hero). Along the way, students will meet other characters, including lovers, gods, and monsters, who challenge and support the hero. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

122 VISIONARIES, REBELS, EXILES, AND REFORMERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM 1785 TO THE PRESENT
This course introduces students to British literature from the onset of the Industrial Revolution in the 1780s to the multicultural, high-tech, globalized twenty-first century.   The course investigates how Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary writers responded to the profound social, psychological, economic, and political upheavals of their times in poems, short stories, novels, plays, and manifestos, which themselves revolutionized human experience. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

192 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (Offered every semester)
This course introduces the major literary genres and focuses upon a selection of representative works. Students explore and discuss the elements of poetry, fiction, and drama. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

195 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA
This course introduces the genre of drama, focusing on six specific periods. Students will explore the theatrical, historical and literary aspects of dramatic works from the Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Modern, and Contemporary periods. In addition, this course will also introduce the genre of film. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

204 RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH
This course deals with practical and theoretical issues in finding and using standard bibliographic and electronic sources for scholarly research in English literature and language and related disciplines. This course is compulsory for English Honours and Majors students, and strongly recommended for English Minors.
Three hours a week

206 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS I
This course approaches literary and cultural texts through a number of critical lenses including reader response, Marxism, feminism, historicism, psychoanalysis, and deconstruction. The course is designed to introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to the interpretation of literary and cultural texts.
Three hours a week

211 CONTINENTAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
This course introduces students to poems, plays, novels, and short stories taken from a variety of eras from the ancient to the contemporary in continental European literature. Authors whose translated works may be read include such figures as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Cervantes, Montaigne, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, Ibsen, Kafka, and Brecht.
Three hours a week

212 CREATIVE WRITING I
This workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce and revise new material and present these manuscripts to the work- shop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: Submission of a portfolio (e.g., 5-10 pages of poetry, 10-20 pages of fiction or scriptwriting, or 10-20 pages of creative non-fiction); and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

213 LITERATURE AND THE BIBLE
This course explores the influence of the Bible on English Literature from the Old English period to the present, through the study of texts such as The Dream of the Rood, the Medieval cycle plays, Paradise Lost, Absalom and Achitophel, Pilgrim’s Progress, Frankenstein, and Not Wanted On the Voyage.
Three hours a week

221 WRITING BY WOMEN
Students explore a wide range of writing by women—poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays—in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 221)
Three hours a week

222 READING FILM: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
This course introduces students to the basic elements used in the construction of films, such as narrative structure, editing, and mise en scène. Through the exploration of techniques specific to film, as well as other more general narrative strategies, students develop visual literacy skills. They learn how to understand and write about the medium of film and the particular films studied. The films screened cover a variety of styles and come from a variety of periods.
Three lecture hours a week and one screening every two weeks

224 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

226 CRIME AND DETECTIVE LITERATURE
This course examines themes of crime, criminality, and detection in English literature. Focussed on a range of works drawn from selected literary periods and genres, the course considers the roles and representations of the criminal, the detective, the suspect, the witness, the victim, and the terrorist, as well as the perception of crime and criminality more generally. Topics may include popular notions of law and order, the city as crime scene, evidence and interpretation, and social justice.
PREREQUISITE:  One 100-level English course or permission of instructor
Three hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

234 PUBLIC SPEAKING WORKSHOP
English 234 is an intensive practical course in public speaking that helps students from across the disciplines become confident oral communicators. By learning and applying the techniques that the very best speakers use, students will gain the knowledge and experience they need to overcome performance obstacles and ultimately to find their own voices. The overall aim of the course is to move participants towards an extemporaneous speaking style that they can carry with them through their studies and into their professional lives.
Three hours a week

244 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE STUDY - TEXT, CHARACTER, AND PERFORMANCE
(See Theatre Studies 244).

245 INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
This course traces the development of literature for children, including the folktale tradition, a survey of children’s literature before 1850, and some examples of children’s literature after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
Three hours a week

255 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE
This course introduces students to the study of Shakespeare’s plays through a focus on his comedies and tragedies. This course is a good choice for students who intend to teach high school English.
Three hours a week

256 SHAKESPEARE IN FILM AND MEDIA
This course explores a selection of Shakespeare’s plays through their performance in film, television, and multimedia adaptations. The course includes a film lab.
Three hours a week

272 CONTEMPORARY POETRY
This course is a study of poetic directions since 1960, exploring the work of British, Irish, and North American poets such as Larkin, Lowell, Hughes, Heaney, Atwood, Ginsberg, Plath, Hecht, and Rich.
Three hours a week

275 ARTHURIAN LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES
This course introduces students to the Arthurian legend as it is re-told through the ages. The course will begin with the origins of the Arthurian myth in Welsh legend, and trace it from the golden age of Medieval romance through to the twentieth century.
Three hours a week

281 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
This course introduces students to the nature of language by exploring the factors that shape Present-Day English. Students will cover the basic principles of linguistics, and a brief history of the language. Topics may include languages as structured systems; dialects of English (with an emphasis on Atlantic English); gender and language; the acquisition of language; and human and animal communication. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
Three hours a week

285 LINGUISTICS I: THE SOUND SYSTEM OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the phonetics and phonology of contemporary English for the purpose of studying the sound patterns of English, and acquaints them with the analysis of syllable structure, rhythm and intonation, and stress. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, practical exercises, transcription, and problem solving.
Three hours a week

286 LINGUISTICS II: THE GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the syntax and morphology of contemporary English. The course will investigate the principles of word formation (morphology), and of the formation of phrases and sentences (syntax). Class activities include lectures, group work, discussion, practical exercises, sentence analysis and problem solving.
Three hours a week

291 TRENDS IN LITERATURE
This variable content course is designed to accommodate trends in literature and literary studies. It is a general course suited to non-English majors, with a focus on particular themes, writers, or approaches. Course descriptions are published in the English Department’s Calendar Supplement.
Three hours a week

296 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
This course is designed for English students who are seriously interested in developing the analytical writing skills necessary for producing clear, well-organized, and persuasive arguments about literature. It will provide students with opportunities to read, discuss, and write about fiction, poetry, and plays while becoming more familiar with literary analysis, critical frameworks, and literary discourse (i.e., the rhetoric and terms specific to the discipline of literary studies). Assignments will be based on the multi-step writing process of preliminary writing, drafting, revising and peer review, and editing, with attention to effectiveness at the level of thinking, content, structure, and use of evidence. By the end of the course, students should experience greater confidence and proficiency in their ability to enter the critical conversation about literature.
PREREQUISITE:  English 121 or 122 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

301 THE NEW ENGLISH LITERATURES OF AFRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
This course considers the development of post-colonial African and Caribbean national and regional literary cultures within their historical contexts. Students explore works by established and newer authors.
Three hours a week

302 THE NEW ENGLISH LITERATURES OF AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
This course considers the development of post-colonial national and regional literary cultures of Australia, New Zealand, and the Indian subcontinent within their historical contexts. Students explore works by established and newer authors.
Three hours a week

303 CONTEMPORARY DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of contemporary dramatists. The course examines the plays in relationship to preceding dramatic periods and the variety of influences on them. The course examines the styles, such as Absurdism, employed and the themes explored. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Beckett, Albee, Ionesco, Walcott and Stoppard.
Three hours a week

304 CONTEMPORARY FICTION
This course studies trends and techniques in fiction in English since the Second World War. It includes representative novels and short stories by major writers of various nationalities.
Three hours a week

306 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS II
This course examines critical trends of the twentieth century and provides practice in the application of critical methodology to literary and cultural texts. The course is designed to build on the knowledge of critical approaches acquired in English 206: Critical Approaches to Texts I.
Three hours a week

307 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by English at the 300 level.

313 PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE
(See Philosophy 361)

314 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 311)

315 ENGLISH-CANADIAN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian dramatists from 1967 to the present. In addition to examining the historical and literary contexts of the plays, the course considers the external forces affecting dramatic production throughout the period. The dramatists studied may include George Ryga, David French, Wendy Lill, Sharon Pollock, Judith Thompson, and Tomson Highway.
Three hours a week

321 ENGLISH-CANADIAN PROSE
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian prose writers in the modern period, reviews the historical development and contexts of English-Canadian fiction, and explores the relationship between the writer’s narrative strategies and fictional concerns.
Three hours a week

322 ENGLISH-CANADIAN POETRY
This course examines English-Canadian poetry from the nineteenth century to the present, focusing on poets of the Confederation era, major figures of 1930-1970 such as Pratt, Livesay, Birney, Page, Avison, Layton, Purdy, Cohen and Atwood, and the important new voices and poetic developments of the 1970s and 1980s.
Three hours a week

323 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE I: DE LA NOUVELLE FRANCE A 1895
(See French 441)

324 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE II: XXe SIECLE
(See French 442)

331 THE LITERATURE OF ATLANTIC CANADA
This course studies works by the major writers of Atlantic Canada. It includes a consideration of the socioeconomic and geographic factors that have influenced them and an exploration of the character of the region as depicted in their works.
Three hours a week

332 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE
By considering the works of authors such as Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Yeats, and Joyce, this course examines the literature of Britain, including Anglo-Irish writing, from the close of the Victorian age to the mid-twentieth century.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

333 L.M. MONTGOMERY
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery’s contributions as a writer of women’s and children’s fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery’s most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 333)
Three hours a week

335 BRITISH ROMANTIC LITERATURE
This course traces the origins and development of the British Romantic movement from the dawn of the French Revolution to the aftermath of the Napoleonic wars. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Major emphasis will be on the works of such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

336 VICTORIAN LITERATURE
This course introduces students to the Victorian period through an examination of the ideas and concerns which characterized the period. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Writers covered include Arnold, Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, D. Rossetti, C. Rossetti, E. Barrett Browning, R. Browning, and Wilde.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

337 NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION
This course examines the development of the novel in Britain from the early to the late nineteenth century, focussing on novels by writers such as Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Thackeray, Eliot, and Hardy. Emphasis is placed on social context, nineteenth-century responses, and contemporary criticism of the novels studied.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

341 MODERN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant dramatists from the Modern Period. The course examines the plays in relationship to the preceding period and its influence on them. The course examines the stylistic movements associated with the period, such as Realism. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht, Synge, and Wilde.
Three hours a week

342 FICTION FROM IRELAND
This course surveys Irish fiction in English from the nineteenth century to the present, including the Irish Literary Revival. Students examine works by such writers as Edgeworth, Carleton, Joyce, O’Flaherty, Flann O’Brien, Stephens, Bowen, and Doyle in the context of the political, social, and cultural developments of their time.
Three hours a week

351 AMERICAN MODERNISM  1910-1945
This course traces the rise of American Modernism including the New York avant-garde, the First World War era, the Harlem Renaissance, the Lost Generation writers in Paris, and the classics of High Modernism in different regions of the United States. Students investigate a variety of experiences that shape American modernist aesthetics including war, technology, gender, sexuality, and urban life. Authors include E. E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Zora Neal Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Willa Cather, and the Left Bank women writers including Djuna Barnes.
Three hours a week

356 RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
This course offers a survey of the poetry and prose of the time of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and James I. Students read the sonnets of William Shakespeare and works by such writers as Thomas More, John Donne, Philip Sidney, and Ben Jonson.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

357 RENAISSANCE DRAMA
This course is a study of representative works of English Renaissance drama (excluding Shakespeare). Writers include Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Middleton, and Webster.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

358 MILTON
This course offers a thorough reading of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, as well as a representative sample of John Milton’s early poetry and prose.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

362 NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1830-1910
This course focuses on important writers and texts who influenced the social and cultural context of nineteenth-century America from the “renaissance” through the realist period to the beginning of early Modernism. Emphasis is placed on poetry, prose, and prose fiction and to such themes as freedom, individualism, idealism, materialism, and the environmental imagination. Among the writers studied are Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Fuller, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, and James.
Three hours a week

364 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1945 TO THE PRESENT
This course examines the major forces in American poetry, fiction, and drama from 1945 to the present. The topics include developments in the American realist tradition, postmodernism, regional and ethnic traditions, and the avant-garde. Typically, the selection of authors and texts is determined by a particular thematic, literary-historical, or theoretical focus.
Three hours a week

365 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE I
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between 1660 and the middle of the eighteenth century. The course allows students to consider a number of cultural themes and issues, for example, gender, race, travel, crime, and science. Writers may include Rochester, Behn, Dryden, Pepys, Hay wood, Swift, Pope, Montagu, Leapor.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

366 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE II
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between the middle and the end of the eighteenth century. The primary focus of this course is on the literature of sensibility and the development of the gothic. This course considers writers such as Richardson, Fielding, Montagu, Johnson, Walpole, Burney, and Radcliffe, placing their texts within a larger cultural context, and exploring their connection, for example, to medical discourses, architecture, and prison reform.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

367 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRAMA
This course explores British drama from the reopening of the theatres in 1660 through the eighteenth century. Students study a representative selection of plays, with particular attention to the ways they are embedded in contemporary culture. Students also read contemporary culture through the drama and the drama within a larger cultural context. Playwrights considered may include Wycherley, Behn, Congreve, Pix, Centlivre, Gay, and Sheridan.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

372 CHAUCER
This course provides an introduction to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer in his context as a fourteenth-century English poet. The course explores a selection of Chaucer’s writings, such as The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, The Legend of Good Women, and The Canterbury Tales.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

375 MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE
This course introduces Middle English Literature from the Norman Conquest to 1500. Students explore the major medieval genres, such as lyric, dream vision, romance, allegory, debate, and devotional literature through the study of authors such as the Gawain poet, the fourteenth-century Mystics, Langland and Malory.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

378 THE MEDIEVAL BOOK
This course focuses on the physical artefact of the Medieval manuscript book - in particular, how manuscripts were made, designed and used. Students are introduced to a variety of medieval manuscripts in facsimile form to study the different designs that were used for books intended for different genres and uses.
Cross-listed with History (cf. History 378)

379 UNDERSTANDING COMICS: READING GRAPHIC NOVELS
This course introduces students to the elements of the graphic novel. Through the exploration of techniques specific to the graphic novel, as well as other general narrative and literary strategies, students will learn to read, interpret and write about graphic novels. Additionally, students will learn about the development of this literary genre.
PREREQUISITE:  One 200-level English course or permission of the instructor
3 hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

381 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following: analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions, business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations. Assignments, designed for the student’s particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve these goals.
PREREQUISITE: English 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

385 LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE
In this course students apply the principles and practice of linguistics to the analysis and interpretation of literary texts. Particular emphasis is placed on metrical theory and its application to an understanding of verse forms. Topics may include a linguistic account of metaphor and aesthetic effects; the communicative function of literary language; the linguistic aspects of the performance of literature; and narrative. Classes com- bine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
PREREQUISITE: English 285 or English 286, English 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

392 CREATIVE WRITING II
This advanced workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop further their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce new material and revise work-in-progress, and present these manuscripts to the workshop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

393 CREATIVE WRITING III
This is a master-class workshop for students who have demonstrated discipline, ability, and professionalism in their previous writing, editing, and workshop participation. Students revise and finish projects in the genres of one or more of fiction, poetry, scriptwriting, and creative non-fiction, and prepare manuscripts for submission to literary journals and competitions. This course includes public readings and attendance at readings by visiting writers.
PREREQUISITE: English 212, English 392, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

394 WRITING LIVES: THE ART AND CRAFT OF LIFE-WRITING
This workshop-based course offers students the opportunity to study and to practice genres of writing such as memoir, autobiography, biography, and fictive memoir. Students examine texts with an emphasis on the craft, purpose, and historical context of life-writing. Students produce their own manuscripts, and present these to the workshop for discussion of strategies and structures involved in life-writing.
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and/or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

401 CAPSTONE IN ARTS
(See Arts 401)

404 SPECIAL STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION AND RHETORIC
(See Writing 404)

406 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CRITICAL THEORY
PREREQUISITES: English 306, or English 206 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

415 ADVANCED STUDIES IN TWENTIETH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in twentieth-century literature
Three hours a week

425 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CANADIAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in Canadian Literature
Three hours a week

435 ADVANCED STUDIES IN NINETEENTH- CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of English 335, 336, or 337, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

445 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 245 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

455 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 256, 356 or 358, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

463 ADVANCED STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of 351, 361, 362, or 364, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

465 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 365 or 366, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

466 ADVANCED STUDIES IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 466)
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in English literature or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

475 ADVANCED STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 372, 375, 376 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

485 ADVANCED STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS
PREREQUISITE: English 285, 286, and 385, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

486 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

491 SEMINARS
This variable content seminar course is designed to accommodate the most recent developments in the discipline. The course typically concentrates on a particular author, genre, theme, or methodology not covered by other 400-level courses. Course descriptions are published in the English Department Calendar Supplement.
PREREQUISITE: Normally, the prerequisites for this seminar are three 300-level English courses or permission of the instructor. Specific prerequisites may apply in any given year, depending on the seminar offered. Please see the Calendar Supplement for more information.
Three hours a week

492 TUTORIAL
With the approval of the Chair and Dean, a senior student of high (usually first class) standing, pursuing an English Major, Minor or Honours degree, may be allowed to explore a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. Before such approval is granted, the student must obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work and submit, at least one month before enrolling in the course, a detailed proposal of the project, including the area of interest, the method of approach, and a comprehensive bibliography. If the project receives Departmental approval and approval of the Dean, the student may proceed with the study.

496 HONOURS TUTORIAL
This is an intensive tutorial course in the area of the student’s Honours Thesis, supervised by the student’s Honours Supervisor. Each Honours Tutorial will be developed by the student and advisor and approved by the department as a whole.  As part of this course, students will be required to produce a substantive proposal for their Honours Thesis. Other requirements may include annotated bibliographies, preliminary draft work, reading journals, essays. This course is a prerequisite for English 497. 

497 HONOURS THESIS
Each student is required to complete a substantial scholarly work devised by the student and approved by the English Department. The thesis will be written under the supervision of a member of the English Department and assessed, after a discussion with the student, by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, a second reader from the English Department, and an outside examiner, usually from another academic department at the University.  Students must complete English 496 before beginning 497.
 

Calendar Courses

101 ACADEMIC WRITING (Offered every semester)
This course offers an introduction to university writing and rhetoric, aimed at the development of clear, critical thinking and an effective prose style.
Cross-listed with University (cf. UPEI 101)
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) program for those students enrolled in the EAP program.
Three hours a week

121 HEROES, LOVERS, GODS, AND MONSTERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM ITS BEGINNINGS TO 1785
This course uses the idea of the hero to explore the literature of England from its beginning to 1789. The course will introduce such texts as Beowulf (the Anglo-Saxon epic hero), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (the romance hero), The Faerie Queene (the allegorical hero), Paradise Lost (the biblical epic hero) and Gulliver's Travels (the satiric hero). Along the way, students will meet other characters, including lovers, gods, and monsters, who challenge and support the hero. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

122 VISIONARIES, REBELS, EXILES, AND REFORMERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM 1785 TO THE PRESENT
This course introduces students to British literature from the onset of the Industrial Revolution in the 1780s to the multicultural, high-tech, globalized twenty-first century.   The course investigates how Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary writers responded to the profound social, psychological, economic, and political upheavals of their times in poems, short stories, novels, plays, and manifestos, which themselves revolutionized human experience. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

192 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (Offered every semester)
This course introduces the major literary genres and focuses upon a selection of representative works. Students explore and discuss the elements of poetry, fiction, and drama. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

195 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA
This course introduces the genre of drama, focusing on six specific periods. Students will explore the theatrical, historical and literary aspects of dramatic works from the Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Modern, and Contemporary periods. In addition, this course will also introduce the genre of film. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

204 RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH
This course deals with practical and theoretical issues in finding and using standard bibliographic and electronic sources for scholarly research in English literature and language and related disciplines. This course is compulsory for English Honours and Majors students, and strongly recommended for English Minors.
Three hours a week

206 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS I
This course approaches literary and cultural texts through a number of critical lenses including reader response, Marxism, feminism, historicism, psychoanalysis, and deconstruction. The course is designed to introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to the interpretation of literary and cultural texts.
Three hours a week

211 CONTINENTAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
This course introduces students to poems, plays, novels, and short stories taken from a variety of eras from the ancient to the contemporary in continental European literature. Authors whose translated works may be read include such figures as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Cervantes, Montaigne, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, Ibsen, Kafka, and Brecht.
Three hours a week

212 CREATIVE WRITING I
This workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce and revise new material and present these manuscripts to the work- shop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: Submission of a portfolio (e.g., 5-10 pages of poetry, 10-20 pages of fiction or scriptwriting, or 10-20 pages of creative non-fiction); and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

213 LITERATURE AND THE BIBLE
This course explores the influence of the Bible on English Literature from the Old English period to the present, through the study of texts such as The Dream of the Rood, the Medieval cycle plays, Paradise Lost, Absalom and Achitophel, Pilgrim’s Progress, Frankenstein, and Not Wanted On the Voyage.
Three hours a week

221 WRITING BY WOMEN
Students explore a wide range of writing by women—poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays—in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 221)
Three hours a week

222 READING FILM: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
This course introduces students to the basic elements used in the construction of films, such as narrative structure, editing, and mise en scène. Through the exploration of techniques specific to film, as well as other more general narrative strategies, students develop visual literacy skills. They learn how to understand and write about the medium of film and the particular films studied. The films screened cover a variety of styles and come from a variety of periods.
Three lecture hours a week and one screening every two weeks

224 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

226 CRIME AND DETECTIVE LITERATURE
This course examines themes of crime, criminality, and detection in English literature. Focussed on a range of works drawn from selected literary periods and genres, the course considers the roles and representations of the criminal, the detective, the suspect, the witness, the victim, and the terrorist, as well as the perception of crime and criminality more generally. Topics may include popular notions of law and order, the city as crime scene, evidence and interpretation, and social justice.
PREREQUISITE:  One 100-level English course or permission of instructor
Three hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

234 PUBLIC SPEAKING WORKSHOP
English 234 is an intensive practical course in public speaking that helps students from across the disciplines become confident oral communicators. By learning and applying the techniques that the very best speakers use, students will gain the knowledge and experience they need to overcome performance obstacles and ultimately to find their own voices. The overall aim of the course is to move participants towards an extemporaneous speaking style that they can carry with them through their studies and into their professional lives.
Three hours a week

244 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE STUDY - TEXT, CHARACTER, AND PERFORMANCE
(See Theatre Studies 244).

245 INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
This course traces the development of literature for children, including the folktale tradition, a survey of children’s literature before 1850, and some examples of children’s literature after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
Three hours a week

255 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE
This course introduces students to the study of Shakespeare’s plays through a focus on his comedies and tragedies. This course is a good choice for students who intend to teach high school English.
Three hours a week

256 SHAKESPEARE IN FILM AND MEDIA
This course explores a selection of Shakespeare’s plays through their performance in film, television, and multimedia adaptations. The course includes a film lab.
Three hours a week

272 CONTEMPORARY POETRY
This course is a study of poetic directions since 1960, exploring the work of British, Irish, and North American poets such as Larkin, Lowell, Hughes, Heaney, Atwood, Ginsberg, Plath, Hecht, and Rich.
Three hours a week

275 ARTHURIAN LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES
This course introduces students to the Arthurian legend as it is re-told through the ages. The course will begin with the origins of the Arthurian myth in Welsh legend, and trace it from the golden age of Medieval romance through to the twentieth century.
Three hours a week

281 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
This course introduces students to the nature of language by exploring the factors that shape Present-Day English. Students will cover the basic principles of linguistics, and a brief history of the language. Topics may include languages as structured systems; dialects of English (with an emphasis on Atlantic English); gender and language; the acquisition of language; and human and animal communication. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
Three hours a week

285 LINGUISTICS I: THE SOUND SYSTEM OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the phonetics and phonology of contemporary English for the purpose of studying the sound patterns of English, and acquaints them with the analysis of syllable structure, rhythm and intonation, and stress. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, practical exercises, transcription, and problem solving.
Three hours a week

286 LINGUISTICS II: THE GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the syntax and morphology of contemporary English. The course will investigate the principles of word formation (morphology), and of the formation of phrases and sentences (syntax). Class activities include lectures, group work, discussion, practical exercises, sentence analysis and problem solving.
Three hours a week

291 TRENDS IN LITERATURE
This variable content course is designed to accommodate trends in literature and literary studies. It is a general course suited to non-English majors, with a focus on particular themes, writers, or approaches. Course descriptions are published in the English Department’s Calendar Supplement.
Three hours a week

296 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
This course is designed for English students who are seriously interested in developing the analytical writing skills necessary for producing clear, well-organized, and persuasive arguments about literature. It will provide students with opportunities to read, discuss, and write about fiction, poetry, and plays while becoming more familiar with literary analysis, critical frameworks, and literary discourse (i.e., the rhetoric and terms specific to the discipline of literary studies). Assignments will be based on the multi-step writing process of preliminary writing, drafting, revising and peer review, and editing, with attention to effectiveness at the level of thinking, content, structure, and use of evidence. By the end of the course, students should experience greater confidence and proficiency in their ability to enter the critical conversation about literature.
PREREQUISITE:  English 121 or 122 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

301 THE NEW ENGLISH LITERATURES OF AFRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
This course considers the development of post-colonial African and Caribbean national and regional literary cultures within their historical contexts. Students explore works by established and newer authors.
Three hours a week

302 THE NEW ENGLISH LITERATURES OF AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
This course considers the development of post-colonial national and regional literary cultures of Australia, New Zealand, and the Indian subcontinent within their historical contexts. Students explore works by established and newer authors.
Three hours a week

303 CONTEMPORARY DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of contemporary dramatists. The course examines the plays in relationship to preceding dramatic periods and the variety of influences on them. The course examines the styles, such as Absurdism, employed and the themes explored. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Beckett, Albee, Ionesco, Walcott and Stoppard.
Three hours a week

304 CONTEMPORARY FICTION
This course studies trends and techniques in fiction in English since the Second World War. It includes representative novels and short stories by major writers of various nationalities.
Three hours a week

306 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS II
This course examines critical trends of the twentieth century and provides practice in the application of critical methodology to literary and cultural texts. The course is designed to build on the knowledge of critical approaches acquired in English 206: Critical Approaches to Texts I.
Three hours a week

307 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by English at the 300 level.

313 PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE
(See Philosophy 361)

314 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 311)

315 ENGLISH-CANADIAN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian dramatists from 1967 to the present. In addition to examining the historical and literary contexts of the plays, the course considers the external forces affecting dramatic production throughout the period. The dramatists studied may include George Ryga, David French, Wendy Lill, Sharon Pollock, Judith Thompson, and Tomson Highway.
Three hours a week

321 ENGLISH-CANADIAN PROSE
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian prose writers in the modern period, reviews the historical development and contexts of English-Canadian fiction, and explores the relationship between the writer’s narrative strategies and fictional concerns.
Three hours a week

322 ENGLISH-CANADIAN POETRY
This course examines English-Canadian poetry from the nineteenth century to the present, focusing on poets of the Confederation era, major figures of 1930-1970 such as Pratt, Livesay, Birney, Page, Avison, Layton, Purdy, Cohen and Atwood, and the important new voices and poetic developments of the 1970s and 1980s.
Three hours a week

323 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE I: DE LA NOUVELLE FRANCE A 1895
(See French 441)

324 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE II: XXe SIECLE
(See French 442)

331 THE LITERATURE OF ATLANTIC CANADA
This course studies works by the major writers of Atlantic Canada. It includes a consideration of the socioeconomic and geographic factors that have influenced them and an exploration of the character of the region as depicted in their works.
Three hours a week

332 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE
By considering the works of authors such as Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Yeats, and Joyce, this course examines the literature of Britain, including Anglo-Irish writing, from the close of the Victorian age to the mid-twentieth century.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

333 L.M. MONTGOMERY
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery’s contributions as a writer of women’s and children’s fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery’s most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 333)
Three hours a week

335 BRITISH ROMANTIC LITERATURE
This course traces the origins and development of the British Romantic movement from the dawn of the French Revolution to the aftermath of the Napoleonic wars. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Major emphasis will be on the works of such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

336 VICTORIAN LITERATURE
This course introduces students to the Victorian period through an examination of the ideas and concerns which characterized the period. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Writers covered include Arnold, Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, D. Rossetti, C. Rossetti, E. Barrett Browning, R. Browning, and Wilde.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

337 NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION
This course examines the development of the novel in Britain from the early to the late nineteenth century, focussing on novels by writers such as Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Thackeray, Eliot, and Hardy. Emphasis is placed on social context, nineteenth-century responses, and contemporary criticism of the novels studied.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

341 MODERN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant dramatists from the Modern Period. The course examines the plays in relationship to the preceding period and its influence on them. The course examines the stylistic movements associated with the period, such as Realism. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht, Synge, and Wilde.
Three hours a week

342 FICTION FROM IRELAND
This course surveys Irish fiction in English from the nineteenth century to the present, including the Irish Literary Revival. Students examine works by such writers as Edgeworth, Carleton, Joyce, O’Flaherty, Flann O’Brien, Stephens, Bowen, and Doyle in the context of the political, social, and cultural developments of their time.
Three hours a week

351 AMERICAN MODERNISM  1910-1945
This course traces the rise of American Modernism including the New York avant-garde, the First World War era, the Harlem Renaissance, the Lost Generation writers in Paris, and the classics of High Modernism in different regions of the United States. Students investigate a variety of experiences that shape American modernist aesthetics including war, technology, gender, sexuality, and urban life. Authors include E. E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Zora Neal Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Willa Cather, and the Left Bank women writers including Djuna Barnes.
Three hours a week

356 RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
This course offers a survey of the poetry and prose of the time of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and James I. Students read the sonnets of William Shakespeare and works by such writers as Thomas More, John Donne, Philip Sidney, and Ben Jonson.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

357 RENAISSANCE DRAMA
This course is a study of representative works of English Renaissance drama (excluding Shakespeare). Writers include Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Middleton, and Webster.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

358 MILTON
This course offers a thorough reading of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, as well as a representative sample of John Milton’s early poetry and prose.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

362 NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1830-1910
This course focuses on important writers and texts who influenced the social and cultural context of nineteenth-century America from the “renaissance” through the realist period to the beginning of early Modernism. Emphasis is placed on poetry, prose, and prose fiction and to such themes as freedom, individualism, idealism, materialism, and the environmental imagination. Among the writers studied are Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Fuller, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, and James.
Three hours a week

364 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1945 TO THE PRESENT
This course examines the major forces in American poetry, fiction, and drama from 1945 to the present. The topics include developments in the American realist tradition, postmodernism, regional and ethnic traditions, and the avant-garde. Typically, the selection of authors and texts is determined by a particular thematic, literary-historical, or theoretical focus.
Three hours a week

365 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE I
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between 1660 and the middle of the eighteenth century. The course allows students to consider a number of cultural themes and issues, for example, gender, race, travel, crime, and science. Writers may include Rochester, Behn, Dryden, Pepys, Hay wood, Swift, Pope, Montagu, Leapor.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

366 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE II
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between the middle and the end of the eighteenth century. The primary focus of this course is on the literature of sensibility and the development of the gothic. This course considers writers such as Richardson, Fielding, Montagu, Johnson, Walpole, Burney, and Radcliffe, placing their texts within a larger cultural context, and exploring their connection, for example, to medical discourses, architecture, and prison reform.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

367 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRAMA
This course explores British drama from the reopening of the theatres in 1660 through the eighteenth century. Students study a representative selection of plays, with particular attention to the ways they are embedded in contemporary culture. Students also read contemporary culture through the drama and the drama within a larger cultural context. Playwrights considered may include Wycherley, Behn, Congreve, Pix, Centlivre, Gay, and Sheridan.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

372 CHAUCER
This course provides an introduction to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer in his context as a fourteenth-century English poet. The course explores a selection of Chaucer’s writings, such as The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, The Legend of Good Women, and The Canterbury Tales.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

375 MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE
This course introduces Middle English Literature from the Norman Conquest to 1500. Students explore the major medieval genres, such as lyric, dream vision, romance, allegory, debate, and devotional literature through the study of authors such as the Gawain poet, the fourteenth-century Mystics, Langland and Malory.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

378 THE MEDIEVAL BOOK
This course focuses on the physical artefact of the Medieval manuscript book - in particular, how manuscripts were made, designed and used. Students are introduced to a variety of medieval manuscripts in facsimile form to study the different designs that were used for books intended for different genres and uses.
Cross-listed with History (cf. History 378)

379 UNDERSTANDING COMICS: READING GRAPHIC NOVELS
This course introduces students to the elements of the graphic novel. Through the exploration of techniques specific to the graphic novel, as well as other general narrative and literary strategies, students will learn to read, interpret and write about graphic novels. Additionally, students will learn about the development of this literary genre.
PREREQUISITE:  One 200-level English course or permission of the instructor
3 hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

381 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following: analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions, business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations. Assignments, designed for the student’s particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve these goals.
PREREQUISITE: English 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

385 LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE
In this course students apply the principles and practice of linguistics to the analysis and interpretation of literary texts. Particular emphasis is placed on metrical theory and its application to an understanding of verse forms. Topics may include a linguistic account of metaphor and aesthetic effects; the communicative function of literary language; the linguistic aspects of the performance of literature; and narrative. Classes com- bine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
PREREQUISITE: English 285 or English 286, English 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

392 CREATIVE WRITING II
This advanced workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop further their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce new material and revise work-in-progress, and present these manuscripts to the workshop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

393 CREATIVE WRITING III
This is a master-class workshop for students who have demonstrated discipline, ability, and professionalism in their previous writing, editing, and workshop participation. Students revise and finish projects in the genres of one or more of fiction, poetry, scriptwriting, and creative non-fiction, and prepare manuscripts for submission to literary journals and competitions. This course includes public readings and attendance at readings by visiting writers.
PREREQUISITE: English 212, English 392, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

394 WRITING LIVES: THE ART AND CRAFT OF LIFE-WRITING
This workshop-based course offers students the opportunity to study and to practice genres of writing such as memoir, autobiography, biography, and fictive memoir. Students examine texts with an emphasis on the craft, purpose, and historical context of life-writing. Students produce their own manuscripts, and present these to the workshop for discussion of strategies and structures involved in life-writing.
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and/or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

401 CAPSTONE IN ARTS
(See Arts 401)

404 SPECIAL STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION AND RHETORIC
(See Writing 404)

406 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CRITICAL THEORY
PREREQUISITES: English 306, or English 206 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

415 ADVANCED STUDIES IN TWENTIETH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in twentieth-century literature
Three hours a week

425 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CANADIAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in Canadian Literature
Three hours a week

435 ADVANCED STUDIES IN NINETEENTH- CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of English 335, 336, or 337, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

445 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 245 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

455 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 256, 356 or 358, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

463 ADVANCED STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of 351, 361, 362, or 364, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

465 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 365 or 366, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

466 ADVANCED STUDIES IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 466)
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in English literature or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

475 ADVANCED STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 372, 375, 376 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

485 ADVANCED STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS
PREREQUISITE: English 285, 286, and 385, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

486 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

491 SEMINARS
This variable content seminar course is designed to accommodate the most recent developments in the discipline. The course typically concentrates on a particular author, genre, theme, or methodology not covered by other 400-level courses. Course descriptions are published in the English Department Calendar Supplement.
PREREQUISITE: Normally, the prerequisites for this seminar are three 300-level English courses or permission of the instructor. Specific prerequisites may apply in any given year, depending on the seminar offered. Please see the Calendar Supplement for more information.
Three hours a week

492 TUTORIAL
With the approval of the Chair and Dean, a senior student of high (usually first class) standing, pursuing an English Major, Minor or Honours degree, may be allowed to explore a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. Before such approval is granted, the student must obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work and submit, at least one month before enrolling in the course, a detailed proposal of the project, including the area of interest, the method of approach, and a comprehensive bibliography. If the project receives Departmental approval and approval of the Dean, the student may proceed with the study.

496 HONOURS TUTORIAL
This is an intensive tutorial course in the area of the student’s Honours Thesis, supervised by the student’s Honours Supervisor. Each Honours Tutorial will be developed by the student and advisor and approved by the department as a whole.  As part of this course, students will be required to produce a substantive proposal for their Honours Thesis. Other requirements may include annotated bibliographies, preliminary draft work, reading journals, essays. This course is a prerequisite for English 497. 

497 HONOURS THESIS
Each student is required to complete a substantial scholarly work devised by the student and approved by the English Department. The thesis will be written under the supervision of a member of the English Department and assessed, after a discussion with the student, by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, a second reader from the English Department, and an outside examiner, usually from another academic department at the University.  Students must complete English 496 before beginning 497.
 

Calendar Courses

100 Level

101 ACADEMIC WRITING (Offered every semester)
This course offers an introduction to university writing and rhetoric, aimed at the development of clear, critical thinking and an effective prose style.
Cross-listed with University (cf. UPEI 101)
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) program for those students enrolled in the EAP program.
Three hours a week

121 HEROES, LOVERS, GODS, AND MONSTERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM ITS BEGINNINGS TO 1785
This course uses the idea of the hero to explore the literature of England from its beginning to 1789. The course will introduce such texts as Beowulf (the Anglo-Saxon epic hero), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (the romance hero), The Faerie Queene (the allegorical hero), Paradise Lost (the biblical epic hero) and Gulliver's Travels (the satiric hero). Along the way, students will meet other characters, including lovers, gods, and monsters, who challenge and support the hero. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

122 VISIONARIES, REBELS, EXILES, AND REFORMERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM 1785 TO THE PRESENT
This course introduces students to British literature from the onset of the Industrial Revolution in the 1780s to the multicultural, high-tech, globalized twenty-first century.   The course investigates how Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary writers responded to the profound social, psychological, economic, and political upheavals of their times in poems, short stories, novels, plays, and manifestos, which themselves revolutionized human experience. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

192 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (Offered every semester)
This course introduces the major literary genres and focuses upon a selection of representative works. Students explore and discuss the elements of poetry, fiction, and drama. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

195 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA
This course introduces the genre of drama, focusing on six specific periods. Students will explore the theatrical, historical and literary aspects of dramatic works from the Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Modern, and Contemporary periods. In addition, this course will also introduce the genre of film. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

200 Level

204 RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH
This course deals with practical and theoretical issues in finding and using standard bibliographic and electronic sources for scholarly research in English literature and language and related disciplines. This course is compulsory for English Honours and Majors students, and strongly recommended for English Minors.
Three hours a week

206 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS I
This course approaches literary and cultural texts through a number of critical lenses including reader response, Marxism, feminism, historicism, psychoanalysis, and deconstruction. The course is designed to introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to the interpretation of literary and cultural texts.
Three hours a week

211 CONTINENTAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
This course introduces students to poems, plays, novels, and short stories taken from a variety of eras from the ancient to the contemporary in continental European literature. Authors whose translated works may be read include such figures as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Cervantes, Montaigne, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, Ibsen, Kafka, and Brecht.
Three hours a week

212 CREATIVE WRITING I
This workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce and revise new material and present these manuscripts to the work- shop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: Submission of a portfolio (e.g., 5-10 pages of poetry, 10-20 pages of fiction or scriptwriting, or 10-20 pages of creative non-fiction); and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

213 LITERATURE AND THE BIBLE
This course explores the influence of the Bible on English Literature from the Old English period to the present, through the study of texts such as The Dream of the Rood, the Medieval cycle plays, Paradise Lost, Absalom and Achitophel, Pilgrim’s Progress, Frankenstein, and Not Wanted On the Voyage.
Three hours a week

221 WRITING BY WOMEN
Students explore a wide range of writing by women—poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays—in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 221)
Three hours a week

222 READING FILM: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
This course introduces students to the basic elements used in the construction of films, such as narrative structure, editing, and mise en scène. Through the exploration of techniques specific to film, as well as other more general narrative strategies, students develop visual literacy skills. They learn how to understand and write about the medium of film and the particular films studied. The films screened cover a variety of styles and come from a variety of periods.
Three lecture hours a week and one screening every two weeks

224 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

226 CRIME AND DETECTIVE LITERATURE
This course examines themes of crime, criminality, and detection in English literature. Focussed on a range of works drawn from selected literary periods and genres, the course considers the roles and representations of the criminal, the detective, the suspect, the witness, the victim, and the terrorist, as well as the perception of crime and criminality more generally. Topics may include popular notions of law and order, the city as crime scene, evidence and interpretation, and social justice.
PREREQUISITE:  One 100-level English course or permission of instructor
Three hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

234 PUBLIC SPEAKING WORKSHOP
English 234 is an intensive practical course in public speaking that helps students from across the disciplines become confident oral communicators. By learning and applying the techniques that the very best speakers use, students will gain the knowledge and experience they need to overcome performance obstacles and ultimately to find their own voices. The overall aim of the course is to move participants towards an extemporaneous speaking style that they can carry with them through their studies and into their professional lives.
Three hours a week

244 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE STUDY - TEXT, CHARACTER, AND PERFORMANCE
(See Theatre Studies 244).

245 INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
This course traces the development of literature for children, including the folktale tradition, a survey of children’s literature before 1850, and some examples of children’s literature after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
Three hours a week

255 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE
This course introduces students to the study of Shakespeare’s plays through a focus on his comedies and tragedies. This course is a good choice for students who intend to teach high school English.
Three hours a week

256 SHAKESPEARE IN FILM AND MEDIA
This course explores a selection of Shakespeare’s plays through their performance in film, television, and multimedia adaptations. The course includes a film lab.
Three hours a week

272 CONTEMPORARY POETRY
This course is a study of poetic directions since 1960, exploring the work of British, Irish, and North American poets such as Larkin, Lowell, Hughes, Heaney, Atwood, Ginsberg, Plath, Hecht, and Rich.
Three hours a week

275 ARTHURIAN LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES
This course introduces students to the Arthurian legend as it is re-told through the ages. The course will begin with the origins of the Arthurian myth in Welsh legend, and trace it from the golden age of Medieval romance through to the twentieth century.
Three hours a week

281 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
This course introduces students to the nature of language by exploring the factors that shape Present-Day English. Students will cover the basic principles of linguistics, and a brief history of the language. Topics may include languages as structured systems; dialects of English (with an emphasis on Atlantic English); gender and language; the acquisition of language; and human and animal communication. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
Three hours a week

285 LINGUISTICS I: THE SOUND SYSTEM OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the phonetics and phonology of contemporary English for the purpose of studying the sound patterns of English, and acquaints them with the analysis of syllable structure, rhythm and intonation, and stress. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, practical exercises, transcription, and problem solving.
Three hours a week

286 LINGUISTICS II: THE GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the syntax and morphology of contemporary English. The course will investigate the principles of word formation (morphology), and of the formation of phrases and sentences (syntax). Class activities include lectures, group work, discussion, practical exercises, sentence analysis and problem solving.
Three hours a week

291 TRENDS IN LITERATURE
This variable content course is designed to accommodate trends in literature and literary studies. It is a general course suited to non-English majors, with a focus on particular themes, writers, or approaches. Course descriptions are published in the English Department’s Calendar Supplement.
Three hours a week

296 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
This course is designed for English students who are seriously interested in developing the analytical writing skills necessary for producing clear, well-organized, and persuasive arguments about literature. It will provide students with opportunities to read, discuss, and write about fiction, poetry, and plays while becoming more familiar with literary analysis, critical frameworks, and literary discourse (i.e., the rhetoric and terms specific to the discipline of literary studies). Assignments will be based on the multi-step writing process of preliminary writing, drafting, revising and peer review, and editing, with attention to effectiveness at the level of thinking, content, structure, and use of evidence. By the end of the course, students should experience greater confidence and proficiency in their ability to enter the critical conversation about literature.
PREREQUISITE:  English 121 or 122 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

300 Level

301 THE NEW ENGLISH LITERATURES OF AFRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
This course considers the development of post-colonial African and Caribbean national and regional literary cultures within their historical contexts. Students explore works by established and newer authors.
Three hours a week

302 THE NEW ENGLISH LITERATURES OF AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
This course considers the development of post-colonial national and regional literary cultures of Australia, New Zealand, and the Indian subcontinent within their historical contexts. Students explore works by established and newer authors.
Three hours a week

303 CONTEMPORARY DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of contemporary dramatists. The course examines the plays in relationship to preceding dramatic periods and the variety of influences on them. The course examines the styles, such as Absurdism, employed and the themes explored. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Beckett, Albee, Ionesco, Walcott and Stoppard.
Three hours a week

304 CONTEMPORARY FICTION
This course studies trends and techniques in fiction in English since the Second World War. It includes representative novels and short stories by major writers of various nationalities.
Three hours a week

306 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS II
This course examines critical trends of the twentieth century and provides practice in the application of critical methodology to literary and cultural texts. The course is designed to build on the knowledge of critical approaches acquired in English 206: Critical Approaches to Texts I.
Three hours a week

307 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by English at the 300 level.

313 PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE
(See Philosophy 361)

314 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 311)

315 ENGLISH-CANADIAN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian dramatists from 1967 to the present. In addition to examining the historical and literary contexts of the plays, the course considers the external forces affecting dramatic production throughout the period. The dramatists studied may include George Ryga, David French, Wendy Lill, Sharon Pollock, Judith Thompson, and Tomson Highway.
Three hours a week

321 ENGLISH-CANADIAN PROSE
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian prose writers in the modern period, reviews the historical development and contexts of English-Canadian fiction, and explores the relationship between the writer’s narrative strategies and fictional concerns.
Three hours a week

322 ENGLISH-CANADIAN POETRY
This course examines English-Canadian poetry from the nineteenth century to the present, focusing on poets of the Confederation era, major figures of 1930-1970 such as Pratt, Livesay, Birney, Page, Avison, Layton, Purdy, Cohen and Atwood, and the important new voices and poetic developments of the 1970s and 1980s.
Three hours a week

323 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE I: DE LA NOUVELLE FRANCE A 1895
(See French 441)

324 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE II: XXe SIECLE
(See French 442)

331 THE LITERATURE OF ATLANTIC CANADA
This course studies works by the major writers of Atlantic Canada. It includes a consideration of the socioeconomic and geographic factors that have influenced them and an exploration of the character of the region as depicted in their works.
Three hours a week

332 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE
By considering the works of authors such as Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Yeats, and Joyce, this course examines the literature of Britain, including Anglo-Irish writing, from the close of the Victorian age to the mid-twentieth century.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

333 L.M. MONTGOMERY
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery’s contributions as a writer of women’s and children’s fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery’s most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 333)
Three hours a week

335 BRITISH ROMANTIC LITERATURE
This course traces the origins and development of the British Romantic movement from the dawn of the French Revolution to the aftermath of the Napoleonic wars. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Major emphasis will be on the works of such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

336 VICTORIAN LITERATURE
This course introduces students to the Victorian period through an examination of the ideas and concerns which characterized the period. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Writers covered include Arnold, Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, D. Rossetti, C. Rossetti, E. Barrett Browning, R. Browning, and Wilde.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

337 NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION
This course examines the development of the novel in Britain from the early to the late nineteenth century, focussing on novels by writers such as Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Thackeray, Eliot, and Hardy. Emphasis is placed on social context, nineteenth-century responses, and contemporary criticism of the novels studied.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

341 MODERN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant dramatists from the Modern Period. The course examines the plays in relationship to the preceding period and its influence on them. The course examines the stylistic movements associated with the period, such as Realism. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht, Synge, and Wilde.
Three hours a week

342 FICTION FROM IRELAND
This course surveys Irish fiction in English from the nineteenth century to the present, including the Irish Literary Revival. Students examine works by such writers as Edgeworth, Carleton, Joyce, O’Flaherty, Flann O’Brien, Stephens, Bowen, and Doyle in the context of the political, social, and cultural developments of their time.
Three hours a week

351 AMERICAN MODERNISM  1910-1945
This course traces the rise of American Modernism including the New York avant-garde, the First World War era, the Harlem Renaissance, the Lost Generation writers in Paris, and the classics of High Modernism in different regions of the United States. Students investigate a variety of experiences that shape American modernist aesthetics including war, technology, gender, sexuality, and urban life. Authors include E. E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Zora Neal Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Willa Cather, and the Left Bank women writers including Djuna Barnes.
Three hours a week

356 RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
This course offers a survey of the poetry and prose of the time of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and James I. Students read the sonnets of William Shakespeare and works by such writers as Thomas More, John Donne, Philip Sidney, and Ben Jonson.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

357 RENAISSANCE DRAMA
This course is a study of representative works of English Renaissance drama (excluding Shakespeare). Writers include Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Middleton, and Webster.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

358 MILTON
This course offers a thorough reading of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, as well as a representative sample of John Milton’s early poetry and prose.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

362 NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1830-1910
This course focuses on important writers and texts who influenced the social and cultural context of nineteenth-century America from the “renaissance” through the realist period to the beginning of early Modernism. Emphasis is placed on poetry, prose, and prose fiction and to such themes as freedom, individualism, idealism, materialism, and the environmental imagination. Among the writers studied are Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Fuller, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, and James.
Three hours a week

364 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1945 TO THE PRESENT
This course examines the major forces in American poetry, fiction, and drama from 1945 to the present. The topics include developments in the American realist tradition, postmodernism, regional and ethnic traditions, and the avant-garde. Typically, the selection of authors and texts is determined by a particular thematic, literary-historical, or theoretical focus.
Three hours a week

365 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE I
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between 1660 and the middle of the eighteenth century. The course allows students to consider a number of cultural themes and issues, for example, gender, race, travel, crime, and science. Writers may include Rochester, Behn, Dryden, Pepys, Hay wood, Swift, Pope, Montagu, Leapor.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

366 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE II
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between the middle and the end of the eighteenth century. The primary focus of this course is on the literature of sensibility and the development of the gothic. This course considers writers such as Richardson, Fielding, Montagu, Johnson, Walpole, Burney, and Radcliffe, placing their texts within a larger cultural context, and exploring their connection, for example, to medical discourses, architecture, and prison reform.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

367 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRAMA
This course explores British drama from the reopening of the theatres in 1660 through the eighteenth century. Students study a representative selection of plays, with particular attention to the ways they are embedded in contemporary culture. Students also read contemporary culture through the drama and the drama within a larger cultural context. Playwrights considered may include Wycherley, Behn, Congreve, Pix, Centlivre, Gay, and Sheridan.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

372 CHAUCER
This course provides an introduction to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer in his context as a fourteenth-century English poet. The course explores a selection of Chaucer’s writings, such as The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, The Legend of Good Women, and The Canterbury Tales.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

375 MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE
This course introduces Middle English Literature from the Norman Conquest to 1500. Students explore the major medieval genres, such as lyric, dream vision, romance, allegory, debate, and devotional literature through the study of authors such as the Gawain poet, the fourteenth-century Mystics, Langland and Malory.
PREREQUISITE: English 121 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

378 THE MEDIEVAL BOOK
This course focuses on the physical artefact of the Medieval manuscript book - in particular, how manuscripts were made, designed and used. Students are introduced to a variety of medieval manuscripts in facsimile form to study the different designs that were used for books intended for different genres and uses.
Cross-listed with History (cf. History 378)

379 UNDERSTANDING COMICS: READING GRAPHIC NOVELS
This course introduces students to the elements of the graphic novel. Through the exploration of techniques specific to the graphic novel, as well as other general narrative and literary strategies, students will learn to read, interpret and write about graphic novels. Additionally, students will learn about the development of this literary genre.
PREREQUISITE:  One 200-level English course or permission of the instructor
3 hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

381 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following: analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions, business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations. Assignments, designed for the student’s particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve these goals.
PREREQUISITE: English 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

385 LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE
In this course students apply the principles and practice of linguistics to the analysis and interpretation of literary texts. Particular emphasis is placed on metrical theory and its application to an understanding of verse forms. Topics may include a linguistic account of metaphor and aesthetic effects; the communicative function of literary language; the linguistic aspects of the performance of literature; and narrative. Classes com- bine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
PREREQUISITE: English 285 or English 286, English 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

392 CREATIVE WRITING II
This advanced workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop further their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce new material and revise work-in-progress, and present these manuscripts to the workshop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

393 CREATIVE WRITING III
This is a master-class workshop for students who have demonstrated discipline, ability, and professionalism in their previous writing, editing, and workshop participation. Students revise and finish projects in the genres of one or more of fiction, poetry, scriptwriting, and creative non-fiction, and prepare manuscripts for submission to literary journals and competitions. This course includes public readings and attendance at readings by visiting writers.
PREREQUISITE: English 212, English 392, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

394 WRITING LIVES: THE ART AND CRAFT OF LIFE-WRITING
This workshop-based course offers students the opportunity to study and to practice genres of writing such as memoir, autobiography, biography, and fictive memoir. Students examine texts with an emphasis on the craft, purpose, and historical context of life-writing. Students produce their own manuscripts, and present these to the workshop for discussion of strategies and structures involved in life-writing.
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and/or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

400 Level

401 CAPSTONE IN ARTS
(See Arts 401)

404 SPECIAL STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION AND RHETORIC
(See Writing 404)

406 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CRITICAL THEORY
PREREQUISITES: English 306, or English 206 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

415 ADVANCED STUDIES IN TWENTIETH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in twentieth-century literature
Three hours a week

425 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CANADIAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in Canadian Literature
Three hours a week

435 ADVANCED STUDIES IN NINETEENTH- CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of English 335, 336, or 337, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

445 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 245 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

455 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 256, 356 or 358, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

463 ADVANCED STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of 351, 361, 362, or 364, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

465 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 365 or 366, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

466 ADVANCED STUDIES IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 466)
PREREQUISITE: One 300-level course in English literature or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

475 ADVANCED STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 372, 375, 376 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

485 ADVANCED STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS
PREREQUISITE: English 285, 286, and 385, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

486 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
PREREQUISITE: English 212 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

491 SEMINARS
This variable content seminar course is designed to accommodate the most recent developments in the discipline. The course typically concentrates on a particular author, genre, theme, or methodology not covered by other 400-level courses. Course descriptions are published in the English Department Calendar Supplement.
PREREQUISITE: Normally, the prerequisites for this seminar are three 300-level English courses or permission of the instructor. Specific prerequisites may apply in any given year, depending on the seminar offered. Please see the Calendar Supplement for more information.
Three hours a week

492 TUTORIAL
With the approval of the Chair and Dean, a senior student of high (usually first class) standing, pursuing an English Major, Minor or Honours degree, may be allowed to explore a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. Before such approval is granted, the student must obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work and submit, at least one month before enrolling in the course, a detailed proposal of the project, including the area of interest, the method of approach, and a comprehensive bibliography. If the project receives Departmental approval and approval of the Dean, the student may proceed with the study.

496 HONOURS TUTORIAL
This is an intensive tutorial course in the area of the student’s Honours Thesis, supervised by the student’s Honours Supervisor. Each Honours Tutorial will be developed by the student and advisor and approved by the department as a whole.  As part of this course, students will be required to produce a substantive proposal for their Honours Thesis. Other requirements may include annotated bibliographies, preliminary draft work, reading journals, essays. This course is a prerequisite for English 497. 

497 HONOURS THESIS
Each student is required to complete a substantial scholarly work devised by the student and approved by the English Department. The thesis will be written under the supervision of a member of the English Department and assessed, after a discussion with the student, by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, a second reader from the English Department, and an outside examiner, usually from another academic department at the University.  Students must complete English 496 before beginning 497.