Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

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First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Clinical psychologist

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) is a doctoral program in clinical psychology which is comprised of 26 required courses, a minimum of 750 hours of practica experience, and a fulltime, 12-month predoctoral internship. The program is designed to prepare students to practice as clinical psychologists.

Overview

Infused with a critical lens, and focused throughout on integration of theory, research, and practice across individual and cultural diversities, the Doctor of Psychology Program prepares graduates to practice as clinical psychologists who will meet the needs of individuals, couples, and families, and also of broader communities and populations through the conscientious practice of the human art and science of clinical psychology.

Students will learn to develop, deliver and supervise high quality mental health services including assessment, diagnosis as appropriate, psychotherapeutic intervention and consultation, supervision, and research as well as learn to practice clinical psychology with an emphasis on responding to the broader needs for health and wellness promotion, community strengthening and prevention of psychological distress.

Of particular priority in the program is the development in students of the capacity to respectfully and effectively engage with the diversity of past and current experiences of individuals and communities, including with respect to culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, language, religion, sexuality, physical and psychological characteristics, and identity. Students will develop an understanding of prominent systems and learn to work within them to effectively advocate for those requiring psychological services and to inform and shape organizational and public policy. Ethical decision making will be paramount throughout the program.

Students in the program are engaged full-time with the program throughout almost the entirety of the four years of study. The first semesters include five courses per semester; the workload for five graduate- level courses in a professional training program is much greater than that for five senior undergraduate courses.  As is the case in other professional training programs such as medicine or veterinary medicine, students in the PsyD will not have time for significant employment outside the program. 

Students' initial practicum placements will take place in the UPEI Psychology Clinic.  The program will place students for subsequent practica in sites across Prince Edward Island, unless students initiate an approved placement site outside of the province.  For the pre-doctoral internship, students take part with students across North America in the competitive APPIC internship matching program (www.appic.org). Internship placements cannot be guaranteed. A limited number of 12-month internship placements will be available in Prince Edward Island, considerably fewer than there will be students in the program.  Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply to internship sites outside the province.

Continuation in the program requires successful completion of, and ethical and professional conduct in, courses, practicum placements, and internship. 

Clinical Psychology

Clinical Psychology is a subfield within psychology that applies psychological theories, research and knowledge to various aspects of human functioning. Clinical psychologists are professionals who have doctoral level training in clinical psychology. They work in a wide range of contexts, with many working as professional clinicians, academics, or both. Clinical psychologists work across the spectrum of health and mental health promotion, prevention, assessment, diagnosis as appropriate, intervention, consultation, and supportive care. They are engaged with program design, implementation, and evaluation and with policy and systems change.

Clinical psychologists are trained to address many human problems including depression, anxiety, stress, major mental disorders, learning problems, relational problems, challenges in parenting, addictions, behaviours contributing to chronic disease, developmental challenges, problems related to aging, problems which may arise from abuse or other traumatic experiences, and issues within the forensic field.

Clinical psychologists often work closely with psychiatrists, social workers and other health professionals, often within leadership roles on interdisciplinary teams. They may work with individuals, couples, or groups in public mental health clinics, in private practice, in public education systems, in other community settings, and at universities.

Want more information about Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Clinical psychologist

Applicants to the UPEI Doctor of Psychology program are required to have an Honours Bachelor's degree in Psychology including an honours thesis, or an equivalent. Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (general only) prior to application is required. Applicants are encouraged to present a record of undergraduate course selection reflecting breadth of study across the core areas of psychology. Given the preponderance of quantitative methods in the current clinical psychology research literature, completion of an advanced statistics course prior to admission is required. In addition, given the methodological pluralism and critical historical and social perspective adopted by the program, previous course work in qualitative research methods and situating psychology in a critical historical perspective is highly recommended. PsyD students at UPEI will be engaged in a critical and reflective dialogue about research methods and the modern positions adopted by clinical psychology.  

A minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4-point scale is normally required, with more recent performance given greater weight. 

Applicants whose undergraduate degree is in a language other than English must complete an English as an Additional Language assessment. Applicants with a Master's Degree in clinical psychology are also welcomed to apply; advanced standing in the program will be considered but is not guaranteed.

The program seeks well-rounded applicants who recognize the importance of understanding the mental health needs of individuals from cultural, social and community contexts. Review of applications is based on various elements including specific academic requirements, such as academic transcript and GRE scores, but cultural and individual dimensions of applicants reflected in the personal statement of interest, letters of reference, volunteer and work experience in a human services related field will be highly valued. As a candidate's application will be considered in its totality, we encourage high-quality applicants to apply even though they may show relatively weaker performance on one component.

Short-listed candidates will be invited for an interview. In an effort to support a diverse program international applicants and applicants from a diversity of cultural and individual backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Indigenous applicants are especially encouraged to apply.

Application process

Applicants must submit the following to the University via the UPEI application portal.

  • a Graduate Application Form;
  • Supplemental (or Departmental) Application Form; a personal statement outlining background preparation and reason for interest in the program, specifying why this particular program is a match for the applicant;
  • a curriculum vitae which outlines all relevant academic, occupational and volunteer experience;
  • the UPEI Application Fee.
  • Applicants must ensure that the following items are forwarded directly to the university:
    • three letters of reference, at least two academic; the third may be academic or may reflect volunteer or professional experience;
    • official Transcripts (undergraduate and graduate) from all post-secondary institutions at which courses have been taken; and
    • GRE scores (general only).

All application materials must be received by January 15 of the calendar year the student wishes to enter the program.

Want more information about Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Clinical psychologist

Students following this degree program must complete 78 semester hours of required courses, 750 hours of clinical practica, and a full-time 12-month clinical internship.

YEAR 1

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 6201 Critical Historical Perspectives on Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6202 Ethics and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6101 Foundations I: Human Development and Personality
  • PSY 6203 Psychopathology and Diagnosis Across the Lifespan
  • PSY 6204 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Adults

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 6102 Foundations II: Social Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 6103 Foundations III: Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 6206 Quantitative Approaches to Research in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6207 Qualitative Research in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6205 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Children and Adolescents

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 6501 Assessment Practicum 
  • PSY 6208 Introduction to Psychotherapy: Common Factors

YEAR 2

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 7101 Foundations IV: Biological Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 7202 Intervention with Children and Adolescents
  • PSY 7201 Intervention with Adults
  • PSY 7801 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal I
  • PSY 6501 Assessment Practicum (con’t)

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 7203 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Behavioural, Cognitive & Related Approaches
  • PSY 7204 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Psychodynamic and Related Approaches
  • PSY 7205 Advanced Intervention with Children and Adolescents
  • PSY 7802 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal II
  • PSY 7501 Intervention Practicum

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 7501 Intervention Practicum (con’t)
  • PSY 7206 Biological Interventions

YEAR 3

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 8801 Clinical Dissertation: Project I
  • PSY 8201 Clinical Psychology in the Community
  • PSY 8202 Clinical Psychology for Organizational and Systems Change
  • PSY 8501 Advanced Practicum I

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 8502 Community Intervention Practicum
  • PSY 8802 Clinical Dissertation: Project II
  • PSY 8203 Clinical Supervision and Teaching
  • PSY 8204 Psychology Practice
  • PSY 8501 Advanced Practicum I

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 8503 Advanced Practicum II (optional)

YEAR 4

3 Semesters/
12 month, full-time

  • PSY 9000 Predoctoral Internship

 

Want more information about Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Clinical psychologist

For queries about UPEI's PsyD program, please contact:

Professor Stephen Butler, Director
UPEI Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) program
stbutler@upei.ca

or

Cathy Hennessey, Administrative Assistant
UPEI Department of Psychology
psychadmin@upei.ca

Overview

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) is a doctoral program in clinical psychology which is comprised of 26 required courses, a minimum of 750 hours of practica experience, and a fulltime, 12-month predoctoral internship. The program is designed to prepare students to practice as clinical psychologists.

Overview

Infused with a critical lens, and focused throughout on integration of theory, research, and practice across individual and cultural diversities, the Doctor of Psychology Program prepares graduates to practice as clinical psychologists who will meet the needs of individuals, couples, and families, and also of broader communities and populations through the conscientious practice of the human art and science of clinical psychology.

Students will learn to develop, deliver and supervise high quality mental health services including assessment, diagnosis as appropriate, psychotherapeutic intervention and consultation, supervision, and research as well as learn to practice clinical psychology with an emphasis on responding to the broader needs for health and wellness promotion, community strengthening and prevention of psychological distress.

Of particular priority in the program is the development in students of the capacity to respectfully and effectively engage with the diversity of past and current experiences of individuals and communities, including with respect to culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, language, religion, sexuality, physical and psychological characteristics, and identity. Students will develop an understanding of prominent systems and learn to work within them to effectively advocate for those requiring psychological services and to inform and shape organizational and public policy. Ethical decision making will be paramount throughout the program.

Students in the program are engaged full-time with the program throughout almost the entirety of the four years of study. The first semesters include five courses per semester; the workload for five graduate- level courses in a professional training program is much greater than that for five senior undergraduate courses.  As is the case in other professional training programs such as medicine or veterinary medicine, students in the PsyD will not have time for significant employment outside the program. 

Students' initial practicum placements will take place in the UPEI Psychology Clinic.  The program will place students for subsequent practica in sites across Prince Edward Island, unless students initiate an approved placement site outside of the province.  For the pre-doctoral internship, students take part with students across North America in the competitive APPIC internship matching program (www.appic.org). Internship placements cannot be guaranteed. A limited number of 12-month internship placements will be available in Prince Edward Island, considerably fewer than there will be students in the program.  Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply to internship sites outside the province.

Continuation in the program requires successful completion of, and ethical and professional conduct in, courses, practicum placements, and internship. 

Clinical Psychology

Clinical Psychology is a subfield within psychology that applies psychological theories, research and knowledge to various aspects of human functioning. Clinical psychologists are professionals who have doctoral level training in clinical psychology. They work in a wide range of contexts, with many working as professional clinicians, academics, or both. Clinical psychologists work across the spectrum of health and mental health promotion, prevention, assessment, diagnosis as appropriate, intervention, consultation, and supportive care. They are engaged with program design, implementation, and evaluation and with policy and systems change.

Clinical psychologists are trained to address many human problems including depression, anxiety, stress, major mental disorders, learning problems, relational problems, challenges in parenting, addictions, behaviours contributing to chronic disease, developmental challenges, problems related to aging, problems which may arise from abuse or other traumatic experiences, and issues within the forensic field.

Clinical psychologists often work closely with psychiatrists, social workers and other health professionals, often within leadership roles on interdisciplinary teams. They may work with individuals, couples, or groups in public mental health clinics, in private practice, in public education systems, in other community settings, and at universities.

Admission

Applicants to the UPEI Doctor of Psychology program are required to have an Honours Bachelor's degree in Psychology including an honours thesis, or an equivalent. Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (general only) prior to application is required. Applicants are encouraged to present a record of undergraduate course selection reflecting breadth of study across the core areas of psychology. Given the preponderance of quantitative methods in the current clinical psychology research literature, completion of an advanced statistics course prior to admission is required. In addition, given the methodological pluralism and critical historical and social perspective adopted by the program, previous course work in qualitative research methods and situating psychology in a critical historical perspective is highly recommended. PsyD students at UPEI will be engaged in a critical and reflective dialogue about research methods and the modern positions adopted by clinical psychology.  

A minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4-point scale is normally required, with more recent performance given greater weight. 

Applicants whose undergraduate degree is in a language other than English must complete an English as an Additional Language assessment. Applicants with a Master's Degree in clinical psychology are also welcomed to apply; advanced standing in the program will be considered but is not guaranteed.

The program seeks well-rounded applicants who recognize the importance of understanding the mental health needs of individuals from cultural, social and community contexts. Review of applications is based on various elements including specific academic requirements, such as academic transcript and GRE scores, but cultural and individual dimensions of applicants reflected in the personal statement of interest, letters of reference, volunteer and work experience in a human services related field will be highly valued. As a candidate's application will be considered in its totality, we encourage high-quality applicants to apply even though they may show relatively weaker performance on one component.

Short-listed candidates will be invited for an interview. In an effort to support a diverse program international applicants and applicants from a diversity of cultural and individual backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Indigenous applicants are especially encouraged to apply.

Application process

Applicants must submit the following to the University via the UPEI application portal.

  • a Graduate Application Form;
  • Supplemental (or Departmental) Application Form; a personal statement outlining background preparation and reason for interest in the program, specifying why this particular program is a match for the applicant;
  • a curriculum vitae which outlines all relevant academic, occupational and volunteer experience;
  • the UPEI Application Fee.
  • Applicants must ensure that the following items are forwarded directly to the university:
    • three letters of reference, at least two academic; the third may be academic or may reflect volunteer or professional experience;
    • official Transcripts (undergraduate and graduate) from all post-secondary institutions at which courses have been taken; and
    • GRE scores (general only).

All application materials must be received by January 15 of the calendar year the student wishes to enter the program.

Course Structure

Students following this degree program must complete 78 semester hours of required courses, 750 hours of clinical practica, and a full-time 12-month clinical internship.

YEAR 1

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 6201 Critical Historical Perspectives on Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6202 Ethics and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6101 Foundations I: Human Development and Personality
  • PSY 6203 Psychopathology and Diagnosis Across the Lifespan
  • PSY 6204 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Adults

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 6102 Foundations II: Social Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 6103 Foundations III: Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 6206 Quantitative Approaches to Research in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6207 Qualitative Research in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6205 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Children and Adolescents

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 6501 Assessment Practicum 
  • PSY 6208 Introduction to Psychotherapy: Common Factors

YEAR 2

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 7101 Foundations IV: Biological Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 7202 Intervention with Children and Adolescents
  • PSY 7201 Intervention with Adults
  • PSY 7801 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal I
  • PSY 6501 Assessment Practicum (con’t)

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 7203 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Behavioural, Cognitive & Related Approaches
  • PSY 7204 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Psychodynamic and Related Approaches
  • PSY 7205 Advanced Intervention with Children and Adolescents
  • PSY 7802 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal II
  • PSY 7501 Intervention Practicum

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 7501 Intervention Practicum (con’t)
  • PSY 7206 Biological Interventions

YEAR 3

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 8801 Clinical Dissertation: Project I
  • PSY 8201 Clinical Psychology in the Community
  • PSY 8202 Clinical Psychology for Organizational and Systems Change
  • PSY 8501 Advanced Practicum I

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 8502 Community Intervention Practicum
  • PSY 8802 Clinical Dissertation: Project II
  • PSY 8203 Clinical Supervision and Teaching
  • PSY 8204 Psychology Practice
  • PSY 8501 Advanced Practicum I

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 8503 Advanced Practicum II (optional)

YEAR 4

3 Semesters/
12 month, full-time

  • PSY 9000 Predoctoral Internship

 

Contact

For queries about UPEI's PsyD program, please contact:

Professor Stephen Butler, Director
UPEI Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) program
stbutler@upei.ca

or

Cathy Hennessey, Administrative Assistant
UPEI Department of Psychology
psychadmin@upei.ca

Overview

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) is a doctoral program in clinical psychology which is comprised of 26 required courses, a minimum of 750 hours of practica experience, and a fulltime, 12-month predoctoral internship. The program is designed to prepare students to practice as clinical psychologists.

Overview

Infused with a critical lens, and focused throughout on integration of theory, research, and practice across individual and cultural diversities, the Doctor of Psychology Program prepares graduates to practice as clinical psychologists who will meet the needs of individuals, couples, and families, and also of broader communities and populations through the conscientious practice of the human art and science of clinical psychology.

Students will learn to develop, deliver and supervise high quality mental health services including assessment, diagnosis as appropriate, psychotherapeutic intervention and consultation, supervision, and research as well as learn to practice clinical psychology with an emphasis on responding to the broader needs for health and wellness promotion, community strengthening and prevention of psychological distress.

Of particular priority in the program is the development in students of the capacity to respectfully and effectively engage with the diversity of past and current experiences of individuals and communities, including with respect to culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, language, religion, sexuality, physical and psychological characteristics, and identity. Students will develop an understanding of prominent systems and learn to work within them to effectively advocate for those requiring psychological services and to inform and shape organizational and public policy. Ethical decision making will be paramount throughout the program.

Students in the program are engaged full-time with the program throughout almost the entirety of the four years of study. The first semesters include five courses per semester; the workload for five graduate- level courses in a professional training program is much greater than that for five senior undergraduate courses.  As is the case in other professional training programs such as medicine or veterinary medicine, students in the PsyD will not have time for significant employment outside the program. 

Students' initial practicum placements will take place in the UPEI Psychology Clinic.  The program will place students for subsequent practica in sites across Prince Edward Island, unless students initiate an approved placement site outside of the province.  For the pre-doctoral internship, students take part with students across North America in the competitive APPIC internship matching program (www.appic.org). Internship placements cannot be guaranteed. A limited number of 12-month internship placements will be available in Prince Edward Island, considerably fewer than there will be students in the program.  Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply to internship sites outside the province.

Continuation in the program requires successful completion of, and ethical and professional conduct in, courses, practicum placements, and internship. 

Clinical Psychology

Clinical Psychology is a subfield within psychology that applies psychological theories, research and knowledge to various aspects of human functioning. Clinical psychologists are professionals who have doctoral level training in clinical psychology. They work in a wide range of contexts, with many working as professional clinicians, academics, or both. Clinical psychologists work across the spectrum of health and mental health promotion, prevention, assessment, diagnosis as appropriate, intervention, consultation, and supportive care. They are engaged with program design, implementation, and evaluation and with policy and systems change.

Clinical psychologists are trained to address many human problems including depression, anxiety, stress, major mental disorders, learning problems, relational problems, challenges in parenting, addictions, behaviours contributing to chronic disease, developmental challenges, problems related to aging, problems which may arise from abuse or other traumatic experiences, and issues within the forensic field.

Clinical psychologists often work closely with psychiatrists, social workers and other health professionals, often within leadership roles on interdisciplinary teams. They may work with individuals, couples, or groups in public mental health clinics, in private practice, in public education systems, in other community settings, and at universities.

Admission

Applicants to the UPEI Doctor of Psychology program are required to have an Honours Bachelor's degree in Psychology including an honours thesis, or an equivalent. Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (general only) prior to application is required. Applicants are encouraged to present a record of undergraduate course selection reflecting breadth of study across the core areas of psychology. Given the preponderance of quantitative methods in the current clinical psychology research literature, completion of an advanced statistics course prior to admission is required. In addition, given the methodological pluralism and critical historical and social perspective adopted by the program, previous course work in qualitative research methods and situating psychology in a critical historical perspective is highly recommended. PsyD students at UPEI will be engaged in a critical and reflective dialogue about research methods and the modern positions adopted by clinical psychology.  

A minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4-point scale is normally required, with more recent performance given greater weight. 

Applicants whose undergraduate degree is in a language other than English must complete an English as an Additional Language assessment. Applicants with a Master's Degree in clinical psychology are also welcomed to apply; advanced standing in the program will be considered but is not guaranteed.

The program seeks well-rounded applicants who recognize the importance of understanding the mental health needs of individuals from cultural, social and community contexts. Review of applications is based on various elements including specific academic requirements, such as academic transcript and GRE scores, but cultural and individual dimensions of applicants reflected in the personal statement of interest, letters of reference, volunteer and work experience in a human services related field will be highly valued. As a candidate's application will be considered in its totality, we encourage high-quality applicants to apply even though they may show relatively weaker performance on one component.

Short-listed candidates will be invited for an interview. In an effort to support a diverse program international applicants and applicants from a diversity of cultural and individual backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Indigenous applicants are especially encouraged to apply.

Application process

Applicants must submit the following to the University via the UPEI application portal.

  • a Graduate Application Form;
  • Supplemental (or Departmental) Application Form; a personal statement outlining background preparation and reason for interest in the program, specifying why this particular program is a match for the applicant;
  • a curriculum vitae which outlines all relevant academic, occupational and volunteer experience;
  • the UPEI Application Fee.
  • Applicants must ensure that the following items are forwarded directly to the university:
    • three letters of reference, at least two academic; the third may be academic or may reflect volunteer or professional experience;
    • official Transcripts (undergraduate and graduate) from all post-secondary institutions at which courses have been taken; and
    • GRE scores (general only).

All application materials must be received by January 15 of the calendar year the student wishes to enter the program.

Course Structure

Students following this degree program must complete 78 semester hours of required courses, 750 hours of clinical practica, and a full-time 12-month clinical internship.

YEAR 1

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 6201 Critical Historical Perspectives on Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6202 Ethics and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6101 Foundations I: Human Development and Personality
  • PSY 6203 Psychopathology and Diagnosis Across the Lifespan
  • PSY 6204 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Adults

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 6102 Foundations II: Social Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 6103 Foundations III: Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 6206 Quantitative Approaches to Research in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6207 Qualitative Research in Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 6205 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Children and Adolescents

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 6501 Assessment Practicum 
  • PSY 6208 Introduction to Psychotherapy: Common Factors

YEAR 2

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 7101 Foundations IV: Biological Bases of Behaviour
  • PSY 7202 Intervention with Children and Adolescents
  • PSY 7201 Intervention with Adults
  • PSY 7801 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal I
  • PSY 6501 Assessment Practicum (con’t)

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 7203 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Behavioural, Cognitive & Related Approaches
  • PSY 7204 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Psychodynamic and Related Approaches
  • PSY 7205 Advanced Intervention with Children and Adolescents
  • PSY 7802 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal II
  • PSY 7501 Intervention Practicum

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 7501 Intervention Practicum (con’t)
  • PSY 7206 Biological Interventions

YEAR 3

Semester 1 (Fall)

  • PSY 8801 Clinical Dissertation: Project I
  • PSY 8201 Clinical Psychology in the Community
  • PSY 8202 Clinical Psychology for Organizational and Systems Change
  • PSY 8501 Advanced Practicum I

Semester 2 (Winter)

  • PSY 8502 Community Intervention Practicum
  • PSY 8802 Clinical Dissertation: Project II
  • PSY 8203 Clinical Supervision and Teaching
  • PSY 8204 Psychology Practice
  • PSY 8501 Advanced Practicum I

Semester 3 (Summer)

  • PSY 8503 Advanced Practicum II (optional)

YEAR 4

3 Semesters/
12 month, full-time

  • PSY 9000 Predoctoral Internship

 

Contact

For queries about UPEI's PsyD program, please contact:

Professor Stephen Butler, Director
UPEI Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) program
stbutler@upei.ca

or

Cathy Hennessey, Administrative Assistant
UPEI Department of Psychology
psychadmin@upei.ca

Want more information about Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Clinical psychologist
Course Level: 
6000 Level
Courses: 
PSY-6101 Foundations I: Human Development & Personality
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in human development and personality, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of development and of personality from a life-span perspective, examining typical and atypical growth across development, while considering consider the contribution of this body of knowledge to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in development and personality for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6102 Foundations II: Social Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in human development and personality, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of development and of personality from a life-span perspective, examining typical and atypical growth across development, while considering consider the contribution of this body of knowledge to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in development and personality for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6103 Foundations III: Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in cognitive and affective bases of behaviour, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of cognition and emotion in light of current research and consider their contribution to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in cognition and emotion for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6201 Critical Historical Perspectives on Clinical Psychology
This course places modern psychotherapy (and assessment) within its social and historical context by examining the various and continually evolving relationships between the "healer" and the "sufferer." The course begins with a review of the history of "abnormal" behavior from ancient to modern times, followed by a discussion of the emergence of modern psychotherapy in the late 19th century. World War II witnessed the rise of Psychology as the recognized professional body for psychological assessment and treatment. Numerous approaches to psychotherapy were soon developed, including behavior therapy, humanistic psychology, Gestalt therapy, cognitive therapy, systems therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (among others). The course concludes with an analysis of the current conditions of clinical therapeutic practice in North America, and a return to the question of the sufferer's relationship to the healer. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to the various individual and cultural influences that have characterized the story of clinical psychology so far, and how this narrative is connected to the larger social and historical conditions of Western societies.
3 hours credit
PSY-6202 Ethics and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology
This course introduces students to important ethical and professional issues in the practice of clinical psychology. Ethical issues are explored through an in-depth study of the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists. Students learn to resolve ethical dilemmas that are likely to emerge in clinical practice. The course also provides students with an opportunity to learn about legal and professional aspects of the practice of psychology including examination of relevant jurisprudence, regulatory issues within the profession, as well as a range of other topics that characterize the practice of professional psychology. Implications for the profession of an increasingly diverse client base are also considered.
3 hours credit
PSY-6203 Psychopathology and Diagnosis Across the Lifespan
This course introduces the concepts related to the classification of psychopathologies across the lifespan, emphasizing the DSM-5 and other classification systems. Students gain an in-depth familiarity with how psychological disorders are conceptualized and diagnosed and develop a strong understanding of the essential features of psychopathologies which occur across the lifespan. Significant emphasis is placed on a thorough analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of diagnostic systems, examination of categorical versus dimensional understandings of psychological functioning, and exploration of the historical and societal factors that have influenced, and continue to influence, how clinical psychologists conceptualize psychopathology. Students are also introduced to the rapidly growing field of developmental psychopathology, a theoretically and empirically-based framework that provides a unifying perspective for understanding the onset and development of both health and clinical disorder across life.
3 hours credit
PSY-6204 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Adults
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the foundational theory and practices in psychological assessment of adults and begins with an examination of the nature and limitations of psychological assessment through an in-depth review of psychometric theory. Students are then provided with a survey of prominent approaches to the assessment of various psychological constructs including intelligence, personality (objective and projective), and mental health symptoms. A critically informed analysis of the role, benefits and costs of psychological assessment and diagnosis is undertaken. An emphasis on issues related to psychological assessment with diverse populations is present throughout the course. Students receive hands-on instruction in the administration, scoring and interpretation of major psychological measures used with adults (e.g., tests of intelligence, academic achievement, personality and mental health). Within the context of conducting rigorous and comprehensive assessments, students are also introduced to the concept of "formulation", namely how clinical psychologists draw on theory and key empirical findings to examine a client's or family's problems, how they arose and what may currently be holding them in place. Moreover, the importance of considering cultural and individual differences when assessing clients is examined. Ethical issues that may arise when working with adults in an assessment context are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-6205 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Children and Adolescents
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the foundational theory and practices in psychological assessment of children and adolescents, grounded in application of psychometric theory. Students gain familiarity with a range of psychological assessment devices used with children and adolescents including measures of intelligence, academic achievement and mental health symptoms. Students receive hands-on instruction in the administration, scoring and interpretation of major objective and projective psychological tests used with children and adolescents and develop skills in explaining the tests results and their implications to parents and, at a developmentally appropriate level, children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on formulating problems experienced by children and adolescents, and looking at them in relation to a developmental psychopathology framework (e.g., individual, parent, parenting/family, and social risk and protective factors). Moreover, the importance of considering individual and cultural diversities when assessing children and adolescents is examined. Ethical issues that may arise when working with children and adolescents in an assessment context are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-6206 Quantitative Approaches to Research in Clinical Psychology
Building upon their undergraduate advanced statistics coursework, students learn to interpret and evaluate research designs and quantitative data analyses most commonly encountered in the clinical literature and in program evaluation. Included are epidemiological methods, single case designs, analysis of correlational data, quasi-experimental and experimental designs, structural equation modelling, and meta-analysis. Emic and etic approaches to research are discussed, and attention is paid to issues related to cross-cultural research, equivalence, and data collection with cultural minorities and vulnerable populations.
3 hours credit
PSY-6207 Qualitative Research in Clinical Psychology
This course builds on foundations in qualitative inquiry to support student's assessment of the transferability of qualitative empirical and theoretical work for psychological practice. Students learn how to interrogate qualitative research for ontology, epistemology, and methodology to assess the authenticity and trust worthiness of published accounts. Analysis of case study, phenomenological, and discursive applications enable students to discern the strength and limitations inherent in each approach. Evaluation of mixed methods is also included in the course, broadly-speaking for their applicability for understanding health and psychopathology, and specifically in areas such as understanding the appropriateness, impact, and effectiveness of psychological interventions.
3 hours credit
PSY-6208 Introduction to Psychotherapy: Common Factors
This course introduces students to the theoretical foundations of psychotherapy,including an analysis of the historical and cultural forces that have contributed to the ways that psychotherapy is practiced presently. A heavy emphasis is placed on the common factors that have been identified as contributors to helpful psychotherapeutic intervention, especially the contributions which have emerged out of the humanistic and person-centered theoretical tradition that emphasize what is means to be in a "helping" relationship. Students consider basic psychotherapy concepts including the differences between process and content, the various psychotherapy modalities, the role of assessment and diagnosis in psychotherapeutic intervention, approaches to discerning effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions and the role of the clinical psychologist as a change agent in the lives of clients. The implications of working with diverse clients are emphasized throughout. For instance, students review literature on the social and cultural factors that influence help-seeking behaviour. Students also are encouraged to take an active interest in clients' background and worldview, and to consider how potential differences in culture-specific beliefs and attitudes, lifestyles, or backgrounds may influence the development of the therapeutic alliance and communication during therapy.
3 hours credit
PSY-6501 Assessment Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 practicum hours focusing on assessment activities at the UPEI Psychology Clinic working about equally with adult and child/adolescent clients. Students also attend clinical teaching sessions and rounds relevant to specific issues relevant to psychology practice within the UPEI Psychology Clinic. Students also are provided with opportunities to engage in community outreach focused on the provision of intervention to under-served communities. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
7000 Level
Courses: 
PSY-7101 Foundations IV: Biological Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in the neurobiological bases of behaviour, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of the neurobiological bases of behaviour in light of current research. Students consider what is known about genetic influences on the development of clinical disorders and attention is paid to the methodologies for studying genetic transmission, as well as the complex interactions between genetic factors and the environment in the development of clinical problems. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in biological bases of behaviour for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-7201 Intervention With Adults
This course reviews major theoretical approaches to psychotherapy with adults including approaches from within the psychodynamic, existential, interpersonal, cognitive-behavioural and person-centered traditions. The theoretical foundations of these traditions are explored along with relevant evidence which speaks to their efficacy in the treatment of various psychological problems experienced by adults. Students gain experience in case conceptualization and intervention within each of these theoretical traditions. Moreover, students are encouraged to draw on the conceptual and empirical research base (or lack thereof) that informs our understanding of the impact of social and cultural factors on therapeutic effectiveness. Students are encouraged, through reflection and attention to theory and evolving evidence, to consider how clinical psychologists develop cultural sensitivities and competence in their ability to consider cultural factors when developing working alliances, conducting assessments, and delivering evidence-based interventions. This includes an ability for students of all backgrounds to draw on an awareness of their own cultural values and group affiliations and how these may influence their clinical practice. Ethical issues which are likely to emerge in clinical work with adults are discussed.
3 hours credit
PSY-7202 Intervention with Children and Adolescents
This course considers basic approaches to intervention with children and adolescents through the lens of developmental psychopathology and evidence-based practice. Students gain an understanding of the importance of selecting interventions that are appropriate to what we know about effectiveness for specific clinical problems, the developmental level of the client, and the wider ecology of risk and protective factors that characterize children's and adolescents' lives. Major approaches to psychotherapeutic intervention with children and adolescents are reviewed. Students gain experience in the development of basic clinical skills that can be applied within a variety of clinical interventions. Important ethical issues that often emerge in work with children and adolescents are discussed. The importance of cultural and individual diversities in key areas that are often targeted by interventions with children and adolescents are considered, e.g., parenting values, beliefs and practices or family hierarchies and communication patterns. Students also are encouraged to draw on the conceptual and empirical research base (or lack thereof) that informs our understanding of the impact of social and cultural factors on therapeutic effectiveness.
3 hours credit
PSY-7203 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Behavioural, Cognitive and Related Approaches
This course provides students with an opportunity to gain advanced understanding of psychotherapy approaches that fall within the cognitive and behavioural paradigms. Students learn to apply fundamental techniques to a range of clinical issues across the lifespan. The course emphasizes well-established approaches as well as emerging interventions that have gained prominence and research support. Basic skills are developed through a range of assigned readings and class presentations. Basic intervention skills are taught didactically and practiced during recorded practice sessions. Students gain experience in interventions aimed at modifying thinking, beliefs and behaviours. Integration of emerging approaches and techniques such as those that emphasize mindfulness and virtual-reality-assisted psychotherapy will be undertaken. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of behavioural, cognitive, and related approaches are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7204 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Psychodynamic and Related Approaches
The course provides an in-depth study of the major schools of psychodynamic theories including the work of Freud, Melanie Klein, the post-Klienians and Time Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy. Classic psychoanalysis and contemporary theoretical approaches are covered, thus giving the students a historical perspective of the development and changes within the field of psychodynamic theories and therapy. Case formulation with a psychodynamic orientation and the application of modern psychodynamic interventions in psychotherapy are studied as well. In order for students to gain a hands-on appreciation of the theories students have an opportunity to practice basic psychodynamic interventions in audiovisual recorded practice sessions. Emphasis is placed on helping students to develop skills that allow them to "think dynamically" so that dynamic approaches can be integrated when helpful. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of psychodynamic and related approaches are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7205 Advanced Intervention with Children and Adolescents
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore specific therapeutic interventions used in the treatment of psychological problems experienced by children and adolescents. Empirically supported approaches to the treatment of childhood behavioural problems, anxiety, depression and other issues impacting children will be reviewed. Students also have an opportunity to learn about approaches that are often used with parents, guardians and others who help children. Specific therapeutic approaches primarily used with adolescents are also reviewed. Students have opportunities to gain experience in practicing some of these techniques through experiences such as class-based role plays and delivery of an empirically supported parenting program to groups of parents. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for interventions with children and adolescents are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7206 Biological Interventions
This course focuses primarily on the psychopharmacological approaches to the treatment of mental illnesses. Topics include the basic neurophysiology and mechanisms of drug action on the brain with an emphasis on understanding the mechanisms related to classes of medications often used to treat mental illnesses including antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, antipsychotics and simulants. Research examining the efficacy and outcome of these medications along with guidelines for combined psychological and pharmacological treatments are reviewed. Students also learn about other established biological interventions such as electroconvulsive therapy as well as emerging biological approaches such as transcranial magnetic stimulation.
3 hours credit
PSY-7501 Intervention Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 practicum hours focusing on intervention activities at the UPEI Psychology Clinic working about equally with adult and child/adolescent clients. Students also attend clinical teaching sessions relevant to specific issues relevant to psychology practice within the UPEI Psychology Clinic. Students are provided with opportunities to engage in community outreach focused on the provision of intervention services to under-served communities. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-7801 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal I
The Clinical Dissertation is the major research component in the Doctor of Psychology Program. It is completed during the second and third year of the program and must be completed (via a formal defense) before students leave for internship. The project is carried out using a cohort model in which students develop independent research projects with the support of student colleagues and under the supervision of a graduate faculty member who serves as the Doctoral Research Coordinator. In this course students complete a comprehensive literature review which determines the type and scope of the research to be carried out. The research proposal is presented to the class and other members of the Department of Psychology and approved by the Doctoral Research Coordinator. Student projects must make a novel contribution to the clinical psychology research literature and may develop research within qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods paradigms. Research projects that do not include data gathering, such as novel research syntheses or work toward policy development, may be proposed.
3 hours credit
PSY-7802 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal II
This course is the second in a sequence of four courses leading to the completion of the Clinical Dissertation. Preparations for data gathering are made as required with community partners or other sources of participants. Students who are collecting data will develop a full submission to the Research Ethics Board and revise as required. After receiving REB approval students move into the data gathering phase of their research project. Qualitative and/or quantitative data analysis is carried out using accepted approaches. Students address any gaps in their competencies for completion of the data analysis procedures identified in their research plan. Students completing non-empirical research projects begin work on the novel synthesis of the scholarly material. Students address any gaps in their competencies for knowledge synthesis projects.
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
8000 Level
Courses: 
PSY-8201 Clinical Psychology in the Community
The course extends beyond clinical psychology's focus on the individual so that students may develop a greater understanding of the impacts clinical psychologists may have at the community level. This course allows students to explore established and novel approaches which may be used by clinical psychologists to effectively engage with communities. Topics are likely to include community-based health promotion and prevention, political action, and empowerment in the application of clinical psychology principles to community-based social, mental health, and environmental problems. It also emphasizes values, applied research, and action focused on promoting the welfare of the whole community through organizational, community, and societal-level action. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of clinical psychology in the community are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8202 Clinical Psychology for Organizational and Systems Change
Students explore roles for clinical psychology in development and change of organizations and of systems. We consider questions such as: What is the nature of organizations and systems in the public, not-for-profit, and private sectors? What are opportunities and responsibilities to influence policy and practice leadership? How can research evidence be translated to policy and practice? What is the psychologist's role when minorities and marginalized communities? How can communication and collaboration be fostered within and across organizations and systems to support health and wellness promotion; prevention of disorder; timely and appropriate assessment, intervention, and consultation; and meaningful support? What is the role of advocacy for clients and populations? Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of clinical psychology to organizational and systems change are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8203 Clinical Supervision and Teaching
The provision of clinical supervision is one of the most important aspects of training in psychology and is one of the core competencies associated with being a clinical psychologist. In this course students are exposed to the current state of the art of clinical supervision. Various models of supervision are reviewed and students gain experience by offering clinical peer supervision to graduate students in earlier years of the doctoral program. The course also provides students with opportunities to engage in the teaching of clinically-relevant material to undergraduate and early graduate students using a variety of pedagogical approaches and techniques. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for clinical supervision and teaching are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8204 Psychology Practice
In this "capstone" course students explore the many facets of what it means to be a professional clinical psychologist. Emphasis is placed on the psychologist's scope of practice and considers the specific advocacy approaches which psychologists may use to ensure that their full scope of practice is utilized. Opportunities and challenges associated with working collaboratively with other health professionals within various systems of practice are explored. Students consider the concept of Practice-based Evidence (PBE), namely the application of client-focused research into routine treatment and routine settings, and its relevance to research knowledge and routine practice. Specific professional issues related to the development of, and engagement in, both public setting practice and private practice, are considered. Approaches for integrating an appreciation of cultural and individual diversities, and of ethical decision making practices, across psychology practice are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8501 Advanced Practicum I
Students are required to complete a minimum of 300 practicum hours in a pre-authorized practicum setting that may focus on clinical work with children and adolescents and/or adults. This practicum offers students the opportunity to gain significant exposure to clinical work with a particular population and/or clinical issue. A number of previously established practicum settings are available. Students may also seek out their own clinical placement but must gain formal approval of the placement from the Associate Director of Clinical Experience. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-8502 Community Intervention Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 50 practicum hours involving intervention at the group or community level. This work may involve an intervention focused on improving mental health or an intervention aimed at preventing a mental health problem or at health promotion. Students may collaborate with other students, under the direction of a core faculty member, to work toward community engagement which will allow some form of clinically relevant and empirically supported intervention. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-8503 Advanced Practicum II
Students may complete a second advanced practicum consisting of at least 200 practicum hours. The practicum setting may be one that has been previously established or the student may seek out their own clinical placement which must be approved by the Associate Director of Clinical Experience. This course is graded pass/fail.
3 hours credit
PSY-8801 Clinical Dissertation: Project I
In this third course in the clinical dissertation sequence students carry out data collection and conduct qualitative and/or quantitative analyses appropriate to their projects. Students completing non-empirical research projects continue work on the novel synthesis of the scholarly material.
3 hours credit
PSY-8802 Clinical Dissertation: Project II
In this final course in the clinical dissertation sequence students prepare their research projects for a formal defense in front of student colleagues, members of the Department of Psychology faculty, the Doctoral Research Coordinator, and others in the community. The defense includes the submission of a written dissertation report, a concise knowledge translation document designed for a policy or practice audience appropriate to the research project, and a concise presentation of research findings. Following the research presentation students respond to questions from the audience. The quality of the written research report, knowledge translation document, oral presentation and responses to questions will be assessed by a committee, chaired by the Doctoral Research Coordinator and include two other faculty members within the Department of Psychology and, as appropriate, one member of the practice or policy community. This committee determines whether the work fulfills the requirements for the clinical dissertation project.
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

PSY-6101 Foundations I: Human Development & Personality
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in human development and personality, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of development and of personality from a life-span perspective, examining typical and atypical growth across development, while considering consider the contribution of this body of knowledge to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in development and personality for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6102 Foundations II: Social Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in human development and personality, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of development and of personality from a life-span perspective, examining typical and atypical growth across development, while considering consider the contribution of this body of knowledge to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in development and personality for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6103 Foundations III: Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in cognitive and affective bases of behaviour, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of cognition and emotion in light of current research and consider their contribution to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in cognition and emotion for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6201 Critical Historical Perspectives on Clinical Psychology
This course places modern psychotherapy (and assessment) within its social and historical context by examining the various and continually evolving relationships between the "healer" and the "sufferer." The course begins with a review of the history of "abnormal" behavior from ancient to modern times, followed by a discussion of the emergence of modern psychotherapy in the late 19th century. World War II witnessed the rise of Psychology as the recognized professional body for psychological assessment and treatment. Numerous approaches to psychotherapy were soon developed, including behavior therapy, humanistic psychology, Gestalt therapy, cognitive therapy, systems therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (among others). The course concludes with an analysis of the current conditions of clinical therapeutic practice in North America, and a return to the question of the sufferer's relationship to the healer. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to the various individual and cultural influences that have characterized the story of clinical psychology so far, and how this narrative is connected to the larger social and historical conditions of Western societies.
3 hours credit
PSY-6202 Ethics and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology
This course introduces students to important ethical and professional issues in the practice of clinical psychology. Ethical issues are explored through an in-depth study of the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists. Students learn to resolve ethical dilemmas that are likely to emerge in clinical practice. The course also provides students with an opportunity to learn about legal and professional aspects of the practice of psychology including examination of relevant jurisprudence, regulatory issues within the profession, as well as a range of other topics that characterize the practice of professional psychology. Implications for the profession of an increasingly diverse client base are also considered.
3 hours credit
PSY-6203 Psychopathology and Diagnosis Across the Lifespan
This course introduces the concepts related to the classification of psychopathologies across the lifespan, emphasizing the DSM-5 and other classification systems. Students gain an in-depth familiarity with how psychological disorders are conceptualized and diagnosed and develop a strong understanding of the essential features of psychopathologies which occur across the lifespan. Significant emphasis is placed on a thorough analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of diagnostic systems, examination of categorical versus dimensional understandings of psychological functioning, and exploration of the historical and societal factors that have influenced, and continue to influence, how clinical psychologists conceptualize psychopathology. Students are also introduced to the rapidly growing field of developmental psychopathology, a theoretically and empirically-based framework that provides a unifying perspective for understanding the onset and development of both health and clinical disorder across life.
3 hours credit
PSY-6204 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Adults
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the foundational theory and practices in psychological assessment of adults and begins with an examination of the nature and limitations of psychological assessment through an in-depth review of psychometric theory. Students are then provided with a survey of prominent approaches to the assessment of various psychological constructs including intelligence, personality (objective and projective), and mental health symptoms. A critically informed analysis of the role, benefits and costs of psychological assessment and diagnosis is undertaken. An emphasis on issues related to psychological assessment with diverse populations is present throughout the course. Students receive hands-on instruction in the administration, scoring and interpretation of major psychological measures used with adults (e.g., tests of intelligence, academic achievement, personality and mental health). Within the context of conducting rigorous and comprehensive assessments, students are also introduced to the concept of "formulation", namely how clinical psychologists draw on theory and key empirical findings to examine a client's or family's problems, how they arose and what may currently be holding them in place. Moreover, the importance of considering cultural and individual differences when assessing clients is examined. Ethical issues that may arise when working with adults in an assessment context are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-6205 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Children and Adolescents
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the foundational theory and practices in psychological assessment of children and adolescents, grounded in application of psychometric theory. Students gain familiarity with a range of psychological assessment devices used with children and adolescents including measures of intelligence, academic achievement and mental health symptoms. Students receive hands-on instruction in the administration, scoring and interpretation of major objective and projective psychological tests used with children and adolescents and develop skills in explaining the tests results and their implications to parents and, at a developmentally appropriate level, children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on formulating problems experienced by children and adolescents, and looking at them in relation to a developmental psychopathology framework (e.g., individual, parent, parenting/family, and social risk and protective factors). Moreover, the importance of considering individual and cultural diversities when assessing children and adolescents is examined. Ethical issues that may arise when working with children and adolescents in an assessment context are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-6206 Quantitative Approaches to Research in Clinical Psychology
Building upon their undergraduate advanced statistics coursework, students learn to interpret and evaluate research designs and quantitative data analyses most commonly encountered in the clinical literature and in program evaluation. Included are epidemiological methods, single case designs, analysis of correlational data, quasi-experimental and experimental designs, structural equation modelling, and meta-analysis. Emic and etic approaches to research are discussed, and attention is paid to issues related to cross-cultural research, equivalence, and data collection with cultural minorities and vulnerable populations.
3 hours credit
PSY-6207 Qualitative Research in Clinical Psychology
This course builds on foundations in qualitative inquiry to support student's assessment of the transferability of qualitative empirical and theoretical work for psychological practice. Students learn how to interrogate qualitative research for ontology, epistemology, and methodology to assess the authenticity and trust worthiness of published accounts. Analysis of case study, phenomenological, and discursive applications enable students to discern the strength and limitations inherent in each approach. Evaluation of mixed methods is also included in the course, broadly-speaking for their applicability for understanding health and psychopathology, and specifically in areas such as understanding the appropriateness, impact, and effectiveness of psychological interventions.
3 hours credit
PSY-6208 Introduction to Psychotherapy: Common Factors
This course introduces students to the theoretical foundations of psychotherapy,including an analysis of the historical and cultural forces that have contributed to the ways that psychotherapy is practiced presently. A heavy emphasis is placed on the common factors that have been identified as contributors to helpful psychotherapeutic intervention, especially the contributions which have emerged out of the humanistic and person-centered theoretical tradition that emphasize what is means to be in a "helping" relationship. Students consider basic psychotherapy concepts including the differences between process and content, the various psychotherapy modalities, the role of assessment and diagnosis in psychotherapeutic intervention, approaches to discerning effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions and the role of the clinical psychologist as a change agent in the lives of clients. The implications of working with diverse clients are emphasized throughout. For instance, students review literature on the social and cultural factors that influence help-seeking behaviour. Students also are encouraged to take an active interest in clients' background and worldview, and to consider how potential differences in culture-specific beliefs and attitudes, lifestyles, or backgrounds may influence the development of the therapeutic alliance and communication during therapy.
3 hours credit
PSY-6501 Assessment Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 practicum hours focusing on assessment activities at the UPEI Psychology Clinic working about equally with adult and child/adolescent clients. Students also attend clinical teaching sessions and rounds relevant to specific issues relevant to psychology practice within the UPEI Psychology Clinic. Students also are provided with opportunities to engage in community outreach focused on the provision of intervention to under-served communities. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-7101 Foundations IV: Biological Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in the neurobiological bases of behaviour, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of the neurobiological bases of behaviour in light of current research. Students consider what is known about genetic influences on the development of clinical disorders and attention is paid to the methodologies for studying genetic transmission, as well as the complex interactions between genetic factors and the environment in the development of clinical problems. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in biological bases of behaviour for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-7201 Intervention With Adults
This course reviews major theoretical approaches to psychotherapy with adults including approaches from within the psychodynamic, existential, interpersonal, cognitive-behavioural and person-centered traditions. The theoretical foundations of these traditions are explored along with relevant evidence which speaks to their efficacy in the treatment of various psychological problems experienced by adults. Students gain experience in case conceptualization and intervention within each of these theoretical traditions. Moreover, students are encouraged to draw on the conceptual and empirical research base (or lack thereof) that informs our understanding of the impact of social and cultural factors on therapeutic effectiveness. Students are encouraged, through reflection and attention to theory and evolving evidence, to consider how clinical psychologists develop cultural sensitivities and competence in their ability to consider cultural factors when developing working alliances, conducting assessments, and delivering evidence-based interventions. This includes an ability for students of all backgrounds to draw on an awareness of their own cultural values and group affiliations and how these may influence their clinical practice. Ethical issues which are likely to emerge in clinical work with adults are discussed.
3 hours credit
PSY-7202 Intervention with Children and Adolescents
This course considers basic approaches to intervention with children and adolescents through the lens of developmental psychopathology and evidence-based practice. Students gain an understanding of the importance of selecting interventions that are appropriate to what we know about effectiveness for specific clinical problems, the developmental level of the client, and the wider ecology of risk and protective factors that characterize children's and adolescents' lives. Major approaches to psychotherapeutic intervention with children and adolescents are reviewed. Students gain experience in the development of basic clinical skills that can be applied within a variety of clinical interventions. Important ethical issues that often emerge in work with children and adolescents are discussed. The importance of cultural and individual diversities in key areas that are often targeted by interventions with children and adolescents are considered, e.g., parenting values, beliefs and practices or family hierarchies and communication patterns. Students also are encouraged to draw on the conceptual and empirical research base (or lack thereof) that informs our understanding of the impact of social and cultural factors on therapeutic effectiveness.
3 hours credit
PSY-7203 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Behavioural, Cognitive and Related Approaches
This course provides students with an opportunity to gain advanced understanding of psychotherapy approaches that fall within the cognitive and behavioural paradigms. Students learn to apply fundamental techniques to a range of clinical issues across the lifespan. The course emphasizes well-established approaches as well as emerging interventions that have gained prominence and research support. Basic skills are developed through a range of assigned readings and class presentations. Basic intervention skills are taught didactically and practiced during recorded practice sessions. Students gain experience in interventions aimed at modifying thinking, beliefs and behaviours. Integration of emerging approaches and techniques such as those that emphasize mindfulness and virtual-reality-assisted psychotherapy will be undertaken. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of behavioural, cognitive, and related approaches are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7204 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Psychodynamic and Related Approaches
The course provides an in-depth study of the major schools of psychodynamic theories including the work of Freud, Melanie Klein, the post-Klienians and Time Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy. Classic psychoanalysis and contemporary theoretical approaches are covered, thus giving the students a historical perspective of the development and changes within the field of psychodynamic theories and therapy. Case formulation with a psychodynamic orientation and the application of modern psychodynamic interventions in psychotherapy are studied as well. In order for students to gain a hands-on appreciation of the theories students have an opportunity to practice basic psychodynamic interventions in audiovisual recorded practice sessions. Emphasis is placed on helping students to develop skills that allow them to "think dynamically" so that dynamic approaches can be integrated when helpful. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of psychodynamic and related approaches are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7205 Advanced Intervention with Children and Adolescents
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore specific therapeutic interventions used in the treatment of psychological problems experienced by children and adolescents. Empirically supported approaches to the treatment of childhood behavioural problems, anxiety, depression and other issues impacting children will be reviewed. Students also have an opportunity to learn about approaches that are often used with parents, guardians and others who help children. Specific therapeutic approaches primarily used with adolescents are also reviewed. Students have opportunities to gain experience in practicing some of these techniques through experiences such as class-based role plays and delivery of an empirically supported parenting program to groups of parents. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for interventions with children and adolescents are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7206 Biological Interventions
This course focuses primarily on the psychopharmacological approaches to the treatment of mental illnesses. Topics include the basic neurophysiology and mechanisms of drug action on the brain with an emphasis on understanding the mechanisms related to classes of medications often used to treat mental illnesses including antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, antipsychotics and simulants. Research examining the efficacy and outcome of these medications along with guidelines for combined psychological and pharmacological treatments are reviewed. Students also learn about other established biological interventions such as electroconvulsive therapy as well as emerging biological approaches such as transcranial magnetic stimulation.
3 hours credit
PSY-7501 Intervention Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 practicum hours focusing on intervention activities at the UPEI Psychology Clinic working about equally with adult and child/adolescent clients. Students also attend clinical teaching sessions relevant to specific issues relevant to psychology practice within the UPEI Psychology Clinic. Students are provided with opportunities to engage in community outreach focused on the provision of intervention services to under-served communities. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-7801 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal I
The Clinical Dissertation is the major research component in the Doctor of Psychology Program. It is completed during the second and third year of the program and must be completed (via a formal defense) before students leave for internship. The project is carried out using a cohort model in which students develop independent research projects with the support of student colleagues and under the supervision of a graduate faculty member who serves as the Doctoral Research Coordinator. In this course students complete a comprehensive literature review which determines the type and scope of the research to be carried out. The research proposal is presented to the class and other members of the Department of Psychology and approved by the Doctoral Research Coordinator. Student projects must make a novel contribution to the clinical psychology research literature and may develop research within qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods paradigms. Research projects that do not include data gathering, such as novel research syntheses or work toward policy development, may be proposed.
3 hours credit
PSY-7802 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal II
This course is the second in a sequence of four courses leading to the completion of the Clinical Dissertation. Preparations for data gathering are made as required with community partners or other sources of participants. Students who are collecting data will develop a full submission to the Research Ethics Board and revise as required. After receiving REB approval students move into the data gathering phase of their research project. Qualitative and/or quantitative data analysis is carried out using accepted approaches. Students address any gaps in their competencies for completion of the data analysis procedures identified in their research plan. Students completing non-empirical research projects begin work on the novel synthesis of the scholarly material. Students address any gaps in their competencies for knowledge synthesis projects.
3 hours credit
PSY-8201 Clinical Psychology in the Community
The course extends beyond clinical psychology's focus on the individual so that students may develop a greater understanding of the impacts clinical psychologists may have at the community level. This course allows students to explore established and novel approaches which may be used by clinical psychologists to effectively engage with communities. Topics are likely to include community-based health promotion and prevention, political action, and empowerment in the application of clinical psychology principles to community-based social, mental health, and environmental problems. It also emphasizes values, applied research, and action focused on promoting the welfare of the whole community through organizational, community, and societal-level action. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of clinical psychology in the community are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8202 Clinical Psychology for Organizational and Systems Change
Students explore roles for clinical psychology in development and change of organizations and of systems. We consider questions such as: What is the nature of organizations and systems in the public, not-for-profit, and private sectors? What are opportunities and responsibilities to influence policy and practice leadership? How can research evidence be translated to policy and practice? What is the psychologist's role when minorities and marginalized communities? How can communication and collaboration be fostered within and across organizations and systems to support health and wellness promotion; prevention of disorder; timely and appropriate assessment, intervention, and consultation; and meaningful support? What is the role of advocacy for clients and populations? Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of clinical psychology to organizational and systems change are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8203 Clinical Supervision and Teaching
The provision of clinical supervision is one of the most important aspects of training in psychology and is one of the core competencies associated with being a clinical psychologist. In this course students are exposed to the current state of the art of clinical supervision. Various models of supervision are reviewed and students gain experience by offering clinical peer supervision to graduate students in earlier years of the doctoral program. The course also provides students with opportunities to engage in the teaching of clinically-relevant material to undergraduate and early graduate students using a variety of pedagogical approaches and techniques. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for clinical supervision and teaching are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8204 Psychology Practice
In this "capstone" course students explore the many facets of what it means to be a professional clinical psychologist. Emphasis is placed on the psychologist's scope of practice and considers the specific advocacy approaches which psychologists may use to ensure that their full scope of practice is utilized. Opportunities and challenges associated with working collaboratively with other health professionals within various systems of practice are explored. Students consider the concept of Practice-based Evidence (PBE), namely the application of client-focused research into routine treatment and routine settings, and its relevance to research knowledge and routine practice. Specific professional issues related to the development of, and engagement in, both public setting practice and private practice, are considered. Approaches for integrating an appreciation of cultural and individual diversities, and of ethical decision making practices, across psychology practice are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8501 Advanced Practicum I
Students are required to complete a minimum of 300 practicum hours in a pre-authorized practicum setting that may focus on clinical work with children and adolescents and/or adults. This practicum offers students the opportunity to gain significant exposure to clinical work with a particular population and/or clinical issue. A number of previously established practicum settings are available. Students may also seek out their own clinical placement but must gain formal approval of the placement from the Associate Director of Clinical Experience. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-8502 Community Intervention Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 50 practicum hours involving intervention at the group or community level. This work may involve an intervention focused on improving mental health or an intervention aimed at preventing a mental health problem or at health promotion. Students may collaborate with other students, under the direction of a core faculty member, to work toward community engagement which will allow some form of clinically relevant and empirically supported intervention. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-8503 Advanced Practicum II
Students may complete a second advanced practicum consisting of at least 200 practicum hours. The practicum setting may be one that has been previously established or the student may seek out their own clinical placement which must be approved by the Associate Director of Clinical Experience. This course is graded pass/fail.
3 hours credit
PSY-8801 Clinical Dissertation: Project I
In this third course in the clinical dissertation sequence students carry out data collection and conduct qualitative and/or quantitative analyses appropriate to their projects. Students completing non-empirical research projects continue work on the novel synthesis of the scholarly material.
3 hours credit
PSY-8802 Clinical Dissertation: Project II
In this final course in the clinical dissertation sequence students prepare their research projects for a formal defense in front of student colleagues, members of the Department of Psychology faculty, the Doctoral Research Coordinator, and others in the community. The defense includes the submission of a written dissertation report, a concise knowledge translation document designed for a policy or practice audience appropriate to the research project, and a concise presentation of research findings. Following the research presentation students respond to questions from the audience. The quality of the written research report, knowledge translation document, oral presentation and responses to questions will be assessed by a committee, chaired by the Doctoral Research Coordinator and include two other faculty members within the Department of Psychology and, as appropriate, one member of the practice or policy community. This committee determines whether the work fulfills the requirements for the clinical dissertation project.
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

6000 Level

PSY-6101 Foundations I: Human Development & Personality
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in human development and personality, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of development and of personality from a life-span perspective, examining typical and atypical growth across development, while considering consider the contribution of this body of knowledge to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in development and personality for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6102 Foundations II: Social Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in human development and personality, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of development and of personality from a life-span perspective, examining typical and atypical growth across development, while considering consider the contribution of this body of knowledge to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in development and personality for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6103 Foundations III: Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in cognitive and affective bases of behaviour, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of cognition and emotion in light of current research and consider their contribution to understanding mental health and effectively treating clinical disorders. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in cognition and emotion for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-6201 Critical Historical Perspectives on Clinical Psychology
This course places modern psychotherapy (and assessment) within its social and historical context by examining the various and continually evolving relationships between the "healer" and the "sufferer." The course begins with a review of the history of "abnormal" behavior from ancient to modern times, followed by a discussion of the emergence of modern psychotherapy in the late 19th century. World War II witnessed the rise of Psychology as the recognized professional body for psychological assessment and treatment. Numerous approaches to psychotherapy were soon developed, including behavior therapy, humanistic psychology, Gestalt therapy, cognitive therapy, systems therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (among others). The course concludes with an analysis of the current conditions of clinical therapeutic practice in North America, and a return to the question of the sufferer's relationship to the healer. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to the various individual and cultural influences that have characterized the story of clinical psychology so far, and how this narrative is connected to the larger social and historical conditions of Western societies.
3 hours credit
PSY-6202 Ethics and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology
This course introduces students to important ethical and professional issues in the practice of clinical psychology. Ethical issues are explored through an in-depth study of the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists. Students learn to resolve ethical dilemmas that are likely to emerge in clinical practice. The course also provides students with an opportunity to learn about legal and professional aspects of the practice of psychology including examination of relevant jurisprudence, regulatory issues within the profession, as well as a range of other topics that characterize the practice of professional psychology. Implications for the profession of an increasingly diverse client base are also considered.
3 hours credit
PSY-6203 Psychopathology and Diagnosis Across the Lifespan
This course introduces the concepts related to the classification of psychopathologies across the lifespan, emphasizing the DSM-5 and other classification systems. Students gain an in-depth familiarity with how psychological disorders are conceptualized and diagnosed and develop a strong understanding of the essential features of psychopathologies which occur across the lifespan. Significant emphasis is placed on a thorough analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of diagnostic systems, examination of categorical versus dimensional understandings of psychological functioning, and exploration of the historical and societal factors that have influenced, and continue to influence, how clinical psychologists conceptualize psychopathology. Students are also introduced to the rapidly growing field of developmental psychopathology, a theoretically and empirically-based framework that provides a unifying perspective for understanding the onset and development of both health and clinical disorder across life.
3 hours credit
PSY-6204 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Adults
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the foundational theory and practices in psychological assessment of adults and begins with an examination of the nature and limitations of psychological assessment through an in-depth review of psychometric theory. Students are then provided with a survey of prominent approaches to the assessment of various psychological constructs including intelligence, personality (objective and projective), and mental health symptoms. A critically informed analysis of the role, benefits and costs of psychological assessment and diagnosis is undertaken. An emphasis on issues related to psychological assessment with diverse populations is present throughout the course. Students receive hands-on instruction in the administration, scoring and interpretation of major psychological measures used with adults (e.g., tests of intelligence, academic achievement, personality and mental health). Within the context of conducting rigorous and comprehensive assessments, students are also introduced to the concept of "formulation", namely how clinical psychologists draw on theory and key empirical findings to examine a client's or family's problems, how they arose and what may currently be holding them in place. Moreover, the importance of considering cultural and individual differences when assessing clients is examined. Ethical issues that may arise when working with adults in an assessment context are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-6205 Psychometrics and Assessment Practices with Children and Adolescents
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the foundational theory and practices in psychological assessment of children and adolescents, grounded in application of psychometric theory. Students gain familiarity with a range of psychological assessment devices used with children and adolescents including measures of intelligence, academic achievement and mental health symptoms. Students receive hands-on instruction in the administration, scoring and interpretation of major objective and projective psychological tests used with children and adolescents and develop skills in explaining the tests results and their implications to parents and, at a developmentally appropriate level, children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on formulating problems experienced by children and adolescents, and looking at them in relation to a developmental psychopathology framework (e.g., individual, parent, parenting/family, and social risk and protective factors). Moreover, the importance of considering individual and cultural diversities when assessing children and adolescents is examined. Ethical issues that may arise when working with children and adolescents in an assessment context are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-6206 Quantitative Approaches to Research in Clinical Psychology
Building upon their undergraduate advanced statistics coursework, students learn to interpret and evaluate research designs and quantitative data analyses most commonly encountered in the clinical literature and in program evaluation. Included are epidemiological methods, single case designs, analysis of correlational data, quasi-experimental and experimental designs, structural equation modelling, and meta-analysis. Emic and etic approaches to research are discussed, and attention is paid to issues related to cross-cultural research, equivalence, and data collection with cultural minorities and vulnerable populations.
3 hours credit
PSY-6207 Qualitative Research in Clinical Psychology
This course builds on foundations in qualitative inquiry to support student's assessment of the transferability of qualitative empirical and theoretical work for psychological practice. Students learn how to interrogate qualitative research for ontology, epistemology, and methodology to assess the authenticity and trust worthiness of published accounts. Analysis of case study, phenomenological, and discursive applications enable students to discern the strength and limitations inherent in each approach. Evaluation of mixed methods is also included in the course, broadly-speaking for their applicability for understanding health and psychopathology, and specifically in areas such as understanding the appropriateness, impact, and effectiveness of psychological interventions.
3 hours credit
PSY-6208 Introduction to Psychotherapy: Common Factors
This course introduces students to the theoretical foundations of psychotherapy,including an analysis of the historical and cultural forces that have contributed to the ways that psychotherapy is practiced presently. A heavy emphasis is placed on the common factors that have been identified as contributors to helpful psychotherapeutic intervention, especially the contributions which have emerged out of the humanistic and person-centered theoretical tradition that emphasize what is means to be in a "helping" relationship. Students consider basic psychotherapy concepts including the differences between process and content, the various psychotherapy modalities, the role of assessment and diagnosis in psychotherapeutic intervention, approaches to discerning effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions and the role of the clinical psychologist as a change agent in the lives of clients. The implications of working with diverse clients are emphasized throughout. For instance, students review literature on the social and cultural factors that influence help-seeking behaviour. Students also are encouraged to take an active interest in clients' background and worldview, and to consider how potential differences in culture-specific beliefs and attitudes, lifestyles, or backgrounds may influence the development of the therapeutic alliance and communication during therapy.
3 hours credit
PSY-6501 Assessment Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 practicum hours focusing on assessment activities at the UPEI Psychology Clinic working about equally with adult and child/adolescent clients. Students also attend clinical teaching sessions and rounds relevant to specific issues relevant to psychology practice within the UPEI Psychology Clinic. Students also are provided with opportunities to engage in community outreach focused on the provision of intervention to under-served communities. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit

7000 Level

PSY-7101 Foundations IV: Biological Bases of Behaviour
Students develop an appreciation of foundational theory and contemporary research in the neurobiological bases of behaviour, evaluated within the contexts of cultural and individual diversities, and in relation to competent clinical practice. Students assess major theories and models of the neurobiological bases of behaviour in light of current research. Students consider what is known about genetic influences on the development of clinical disorders and attention is paid to the methodologies for studying genetic transmission, as well as the complex interactions between genetic factors and the environment in the development of clinical problems. We explore what is known, and what is yet unknown, about the applicability of key concepts and findings across cultural and individual diversities. Students reflect upon the implications of theory and research in biological bases of behaviour for their own development as clinicians, and for the experiences of the clients they will serve.
3 hours credit
PSY-7201 Intervention With Adults
This course reviews major theoretical approaches to psychotherapy with adults including approaches from within the psychodynamic, existential, interpersonal, cognitive-behavioural and person-centered traditions. The theoretical foundations of these traditions are explored along with relevant evidence which speaks to their efficacy in the treatment of various psychological problems experienced by adults. Students gain experience in case conceptualization and intervention within each of these theoretical traditions. Moreover, students are encouraged to draw on the conceptual and empirical research base (or lack thereof) that informs our understanding of the impact of social and cultural factors on therapeutic effectiveness. Students are encouraged, through reflection and attention to theory and evolving evidence, to consider how clinical psychologists develop cultural sensitivities and competence in their ability to consider cultural factors when developing working alliances, conducting assessments, and delivering evidence-based interventions. This includes an ability for students of all backgrounds to draw on an awareness of their own cultural values and group affiliations and how these may influence their clinical practice. Ethical issues which are likely to emerge in clinical work with adults are discussed.
3 hours credit
PSY-7202 Intervention with Children and Adolescents
This course considers basic approaches to intervention with children and adolescents through the lens of developmental psychopathology and evidence-based practice. Students gain an understanding of the importance of selecting interventions that are appropriate to what we know about effectiveness for specific clinical problems, the developmental level of the client, and the wider ecology of risk and protective factors that characterize children's and adolescents' lives. Major approaches to psychotherapeutic intervention with children and adolescents are reviewed. Students gain experience in the development of basic clinical skills that can be applied within a variety of clinical interventions. Important ethical issues that often emerge in work with children and adolescents are discussed. The importance of cultural and individual diversities in key areas that are often targeted by interventions with children and adolescents are considered, e.g., parenting values, beliefs and practices or family hierarchies and communication patterns. Students also are encouraged to draw on the conceptual and empirical research base (or lack thereof) that informs our understanding of the impact of social and cultural factors on therapeutic effectiveness.
3 hours credit
PSY-7203 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Behavioural, Cognitive and Related Approaches
This course provides students with an opportunity to gain advanced understanding of psychotherapy approaches that fall within the cognitive and behavioural paradigms. Students learn to apply fundamental techniques to a range of clinical issues across the lifespan. The course emphasizes well-established approaches as well as emerging interventions that have gained prominence and research support. Basic skills are developed through a range of assigned readings and class presentations. Basic intervention skills are taught didactically and practiced during recorded practice sessions. Students gain experience in interventions aimed at modifying thinking, beliefs and behaviours. Integration of emerging approaches and techniques such as those that emphasize mindfulness and virtual-reality-assisted psychotherapy will be undertaken. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of behavioural, cognitive, and related approaches are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7204 Advanced Intervention with Adults: Psychodynamic and Related Approaches
The course provides an in-depth study of the major schools of psychodynamic theories including the work of Freud, Melanie Klein, the post-Klienians and Time Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy. Classic psychoanalysis and contemporary theoretical approaches are covered, thus giving the students a historical perspective of the development and changes within the field of psychodynamic theories and therapy. Case formulation with a psychodynamic orientation and the application of modern psychodynamic interventions in psychotherapy are studied as well. In order for students to gain a hands-on appreciation of the theories students have an opportunity to practice basic psychodynamic interventions in audiovisual recorded practice sessions. Emphasis is placed on helping students to develop skills that allow them to "think dynamically" so that dynamic approaches can be integrated when helpful. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of psychodynamic and related approaches are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7205 Advanced Intervention with Children and Adolescents
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore specific therapeutic interventions used in the treatment of psychological problems experienced by children and adolescents. Empirically supported approaches to the treatment of childhood behavioural problems, anxiety, depression and other issues impacting children will be reviewed. Students also have an opportunity to learn about approaches that are often used with parents, guardians and others who help children. Specific therapeutic approaches primarily used with adolescents are also reviewed. Students have opportunities to gain experience in practicing some of these techniques through experiences such as class-based role plays and delivery of an empirically supported parenting program to groups of parents. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for interventions with children and adolescents are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-7206 Biological Interventions
This course focuses primarily on the psychopharmacological approaches to the treatment of mental illnesses. Topics include the basic neurophysiology and mechanisms of drug action on the brain with an emphasis on understanding the mechanisms related to classes of medications often used to treat mental illnesses including antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, antipsychotics and simulants. Research examining the efficacy and outcome of these medications along with guidelines for combined psychological and pharmacological treatments are reviewed. Students also learn about other established biological interventions such as electroconvulsive therapy as well as emerging biological approaches such as transcranial magnetic stimulation.
3 hours credit
PSY-7501 Intervention Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 practicum hours focusing on intervention activities at the UPEI Psychology Clinic working about equally with adult and child/adolescent clients. Students also attend clinical teaching sessions relevant to specific issues relevant to psychology practice within the UPEI Psychology Clinic. Students are provided with opportunities to engage in community outreach focused on the provision of intervention services to under-served communities. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-7801 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal I
The Clinical Dissertation is the major research component in the Doctor of Psychology Program. It is completed during the second and third year of the program and must be completed (via a formal defense) before students leave for internship. The project is carried out using a cohort model in which students develop independent research projects with the support of student colleagues and under the supervision of a graduate faculty member who serves as the Doctoral Research Coordinator. In this course students complete a comprehensive literature review which determines the type and scope of the research to be carried out. The research proposal is presented to the class and other members of the Department of Psychology and approved by the Doctoral Research Coordinator. Student projects must make a novel contribution to the clinical psychology research literature and may develop research within qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods paradigms. Research projects that do not include data gathering, such as novel research syntheses or work toward policy development, may be proposed.
3 hours credit
PSY-7802 Clinical Dissertation: Research Proposal II
This course is the second in a sequence of four courses leading to the completion of the Clinical Dissertation. Preparations for data gathering are made as required with community partners or other sources of participants. Students who are collecting data will develop a full submission to the Research Ethics Board and revise as required. After receiving REB approval students move into the data gathering phase of their research project. Qualitative and/or quantitative data analysis is carried out using accepted approaches. Students address any gaps in their competencies for completion of the data analysis procedures identified in their research plan. Students completing non-empirical research projects begin work on the novel synthesis of the scholarly material. Students address any gaps in their competencies for knowledge synthesis projects.
3 hours credit

8000 Level

PSY-8201 Clinical Psychology in the Community
The course extends beyond clinical psychology's focus on the individual so that students may develop a greater understanding of the impacts clinical psychologists may have at the community level. This course allows students to explore established and novel approaches which may be used by clinical psychologists to effectively engage with communities. Topics are likely to include community-based health promotion and prevention, political action, and empowerment in the application of clinical psychology principles to community-based social, mental health, and environmental problems. It also emphasizes values, applied research, and action focused on promoting the welfare of the whole community through organizational, community, and societal-level action. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of clinical psychology in the community are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8202 Clinical Psychology for Organizational and Systems Change
Students explore roles for clinical psychology in development and change of organizations and of systems. We consider questions such as: What is the nature of organizations and systems in the public, not-for-profit, and private sectors? What are opportunities and responsibilities to influence policy and practice leadership? How can research evidence be translated to policy and practice? What is the psychologist's role when minorities and marginalized communities? How can communication and collaboration be fostered within and across organizations and systems to support health and wellness promotion; prevention of disorder; timely and appropriate assessment, intervention, and consultation; and meaningful support? What is the role of advocacy for clients and populations? Implications of cultural and individual diversities for application of clinical psychology to organizational and systems change are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8203 Clinical Supervision and Teaching
The provision of clinical supervision is one of the most important aspects of training in psychology and is one of the core competencies associated with being a clinical psychologist. In this course students are exposed to the current state of the art of clinical supervision. Various models of supervision are reviewed and students gain experience by offering clinical peer supervision to graduate students in earlier years of the doctoral program. The course also provides students with opportunities to engage in the teaching of clinically-relevant material to undergraduate and early graduate students using a variety of pedagogical approaches and techniques. Implications of cultural and individual diversities for clinical supervision and teaching are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8204 Psychology Practice
In this "capstone" course students explore the many facets of what it means to be a professional clinical psychologist. Emphasis is placed on the psychologist's scope of practice and considers the specific advocacy approaches which psychologists may use to ensure that their full scope of practice is utilized. Opportunities and challenges associated with working collaboratively with other health professionals within various systems of practice are explored. Students consider the concept of Practice-based Evidence (PBE), namely the application of client-focused research into routine treatment and routine settings, and its relevance to research knowledge and routine practice. Specific professional issues related to the development of, and engagement in, both public setting practice and private practice, are considered. Approaches for integrating an appreciation of cultural and individual diversities, and of ethical decision making practices, across psychology practice are explored.
3 hours credit
PSY-8501 Advanced Practicum I
Students are required to complete a minimum of 300 practicum hours in a pre-authorized practicum setting that may focus on clinical work with children and adolescents and/or adults. This practicum offers students the opportunity to gain significant exposure to clinical work with a particular population and/or clinical issue. A number of previously established practicum settings are available. Students may also seek out their own clinical placement but must gain formal approval of the placement from the Associate Director of Clinical Experience. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-8502 Community Intervention Practicum
Students are required to complete a minimum of 50 practicum hours involving intervention at the group or community level. This work may involve an intervention focused on improving mental health or an intervention aimed at preventing a mental health problem or at health promotion. Students may collaborate with other students, under the direction of a core faculty member, to work toward community engagement which will allow some form of clinically relevant and empirically supported intervention. This course is graded Pass/Fail
3 hours credit
PSY-8503 Advanced Practicum II
Students may complete a second advanced practicum consisting of at least 200 practicum hours. The practicum setting may be one that has been previously established or the student may seek out their own clinical placement which must be approved by the Associate Director of Clinical Experience. This course is graded pass/fail.
3 hours credit
PSY-8801 Clinical Dissertation: Project I
In this third course in the clinical dissertation sequence students carry out data collection and conduct qualitative and/or quantitative analyses appropriate to their projects. Students completing non-empirical research projects continue work on the novel synthesis of the scholarly material.
3 hours credit
PSY-8802 Clinical Dissertation: Project II
In this final course in the clinical dissertation sequence students prepare their research projects for a formal defense in front of student colleagues, members of the Department of Psychology faculty, the Doctoral Research Coordinator, and others in the community. The defense includes the submission of a written dissertation report, a concise knowledge translation document designed for a policy or practice audience appropriate to the research project, and a concise presentation of research findings. Following the research presentation students respond to questions from the audience. The quality of the written research report, knowledge translation document, oral presentation and responses to questions will be assessed by a committee, chaired by the Doctoral Research Coordinator and include two other faculty members within the Department of Psychology and, as appropriate, one member of the practice or policy community. This committee determines whether the work fulfills the requirements for the clinical dissertation project.
3 hours credit
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