Questioning identity, knowledge, and power.

Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building

Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) named as one of three "standout programs" in the 2017 Maclean's Canadian Universities Guidebook! 


Diversity and Social Justice Studies responds to the 21st century need for critical engaged people who can, through a variety of theoretical languages and methodologies: a) analyze the social construction of identity categories (gender, sexuality, race, class, age, national status, able-bodiedness, species, etc.) and recognize the difference these make to what we know and how we act in the world; b) recognize, address, and challenge global inequities around these intersecting identity categories and analyze how social structures and policies, systems of representation, and everyday practices perpetuate these inequities; c) see the world from multiple points of view at the same time, recognize the complexity of contexts in shaping those views, and understand that both knowledge and visions of social change are always situated and partial.

Diversity and Social Justice encourages interdisciplinary approaches and the development of intercultural knowledge through a variety of courses and other learning opportunities. Courses are divided into three thematic areas: 1) Gender and Sexuality; 2) Identities and Social Structures; 3) Cultural Representation and Analysis. And because of its structure of bringing together courses from a variety of different disciplines, in addition to a standalone major DSJS also makes a great minor or double major, where up to three cross-listed courses can be counted towards both majors.

Want to know more about the program? Have questions? Contact the coordinator (via the form on the right, or at abraithwaite@upei.ca) or drop by her office in SDU Main Building 504. She can put you in touch with some current students too. Welcome to DSJS!

Dr. Ann Braithwaite
Coordinator, Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program
Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building

Students pursuing a Major in Diversity and Social Justice must complete 42 credit hours (14 courses) in the DSJS Program. These credit hours must be composed of the 2 required core courses in DSJS 1090 and 4040, and 12 additional courses from the list of DSJS courses, with at least four courses (12 semester hours) at the 3000-4000-level. Students must take a minimum of 2 courses from each of the 3 thematic areas.

DSJS is comprised largely of courses cross-listed from other departments. As such, in addition to doing a standalone major in DSJS, it's easy to get a double major or a minor. And some cross-listed courses can count towards two different majors. See the coordinator for more details.

1.  Core Courses:

  • DSJS 1090 Special Topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies
  • DSJS 4040 Theorizing Social Justice

2.  DSJS and cross-listed courses:

THEMATIC AREAS
Gender and Sexuality

DSJS 2050 - Sex and Culture
DSJS 2420 - Philosophies of Love and Sexuality (Philosophy 2420)
DSJS 2610 - Sex, Gender and Society (Sociology/Anthropology 2610)
DSJS 3850 - Women in 19th Century Canada (History 3850)
DSJS 3860 - Women, the Law, and Civil Rights in 20th Century Canada (History 3860)
DSJS 3910 - Psychology of Women (Psychology 3910)
DSJS 3950 - Gender and Violence (Psychology 3950)
DSJS 4060 - Queer Theory
DSJS 4350 - Gender and Sexuality (Psychology 4350)

Identities and Social Structures
DSJS 2630 - Global Youth Cultures (Sociology/Anthropology 2630)
DSJS 2750 - Social Inequality (Sociology/Anthropology 2750)
DSJS 2920 - Work and Society (Sociology 2920) 
DSJS 3020 - Constructing Difference and Identity (Sociology/Anthropology 3070)
DSJS 3030 - Psychology of Aging (Psychology 3030)
DSJS 3520 - Kinship and Family (Anthropology 3520)
DSJS 3550 - Globalization (Sociology/Anthropology 3550)
DSJS 3710 - Community Based Ethical Inquiry (Philosophy 3710)
DSJS 3810 - Women, Economics and the Economy (Economics 3810)
DSJS 3840 - Cultural Psychology (Psychology 3850)
DSJS 4010 - Medical Anthropology (Anthropology 4010)
DSJS 4310 - Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism (Soc/Anth 4310)
DSJS 4510 - Women and Aging (Family Science 4510)
DSJS 4720 - Social Justice in Psychology (Psychology 4720)

Cultural Representation and Analysis
DSJS 2120 - Food and Cultural Studies (Foods & Nutrition 2310)
DSJS 2210 - Writings by Women (English 2210)
DSJS 3060 - Transgression, Resistance, Protest
DSJS 3110 - Identity and Popular Culture (Anthropology 3100/English 3140)
DSJS 3320 - Knowledge and Culture (Anthropology 3320)
DSJS 3740 - Qualitative Research Methods (Psychology 3740)
DSJS 4020 - Cybercultures (Anthropology 4030)
DSJS 4120 - Theories of the Body
DSJS 4560 - Visual Culture (Sociology/Anthropology 4560)
DSJS 4660 - Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality (English 4660)
DSJS 4720 - Britain in the 20th Century: Society, Culture and Identity (History 4740)

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building

A minor in DSJS will be recognized when a student has successfully completed twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses in DSJS, including 1090 and six additional courses from anywhere on the list of DSJS courses. At least six-semester hours must be at the 3000- or 4000-level. Up to two cross-listed courses from your major can be counted towards a DSJS minor. See the coordinator for details.

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building

Each year, Diversity and Social Justice Studies is pleased to be able to award three monetary prizes to deserving students in the program. The Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Scholarship is funded through a scholarship fund established in 2001 in memory of Dr. Percival, who taught at UPEI from 1971 to 2001, and who was one of the primary founders of the program at the University. The Bonnie MacPherson award is funded through an endowment made to the University by the family of former UPEI student Bonnie MacPherson. The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is made possible by the generous donations of a group of community and academic supporters, the Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, started by Dr. Percival.

The Dr. Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Award

This award will be given to a returning UPEI student in high academic standing who demonstrates a focus on gender issues in Psychology and Diversity and Social Justice Studies and a commitment to advancing social justice across campus and/or in the larger community. A recipient will be chosen based on a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and the Chair of the Psychology Department, and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards committee. This award is given out at Deans' Honours and Awards Night in the fall semester.

The Bonnie Lynne MacPherson Award in Diversity and Social Justice Studies

The Bonnie L. MacPherson Memorial Award is presented annually to a graduating student who has exemplified excellence in scholarship in the Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program. A recipient will be chosen based upon a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards Committee.

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is presented annually, upon recommendation of the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, to a returning full-time student with an expressed interest in pursuing Diversity and Social Justice Studies through active participation in courses, and who has also demonstrated a strong commitment to social justice. This prize is awarded at the annual Deans’ Honours and Awards ceremony held each fall.

 

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building

Core Faculty

  • Ann Braithwaite, Diversity and Social Justice Studies, Coordinator

Faculty, cross-listed courses

  • Charles Adeyanju (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Susan Brown (History)
  • Lisa Chilton (History)
  • Pam Courtenay-Hall (Philosophy)
  • Udo Krautwurst (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Colleen MacQuarrie (Psychology)
  • Jean Mitchell (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Sharon Myers (History)
  • Nia Phillips (Psychology)
  • Jim Sentance (Economics)
Overview

Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) named as one of three "standout programs" in the 2017 Maclean's Canadian Universities Guidebook! 


Diversity and Social Justice Studies responds to the 21st century need for critical engaged people who can, through a variety of theoretical languages and methodologies: a) analyze the social construction of identity categories (gender, sexuality, race, class, age, national status, able-bodiedness, species, etc.) and recognize the difference these make to what we know and how we act in the world; b) recognize, address, and challenge global inequities around these intersecting identity categories and analyze how social structures and policies, systems of representation, and everyday practices perpetuate these inequities; c) see the world from multiple points of view at the same time, recognize the complexity of contexts in shaping those views, and understand that both knowledge and visions of social change are always situated and partial.

Diversity and Social Justice encourages interdisciplinary approaches and the development of intercultural knowledge through a variety of courses and other learning opportunities. Courses are divided into three thematic areas: 1) Gender and Sexuality; 2) Identities and Social Structures; 3) Cultural Representation and Analysis. And because of its structure of bringing together courses from a variety of different disciplines, in addition to a standalone major DSJS also makes a great minor or double major, where up to three cross-listed courses can be counted towards both majors.

Want to know more about the program? Have questions? Contact the coordinator (via the form on the right, or at abraithwaite@upei.ca) or drop by her office in SDU Main Building 504. She can put you in touch with some current students too. Welcome to DSJS!

Coordinator, Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program
Dr. Ann Braithwaite
Major

Students pursuing a Major in Diversity and Social Justice must complete 42 credit hours (14 courses) in the DSJS Program. These credit hours must be composed of the 2 required core courses in DSJS 1090 and 4040, and 12 additional courses from the list of DSJS courses, with at least four courses (12 semester hours) at the 3000-4000-level. Students must take a minimum of 2 courses from each of the 3 thematic areas.

DSJS is comprised largely of courses cross-listed from other departments. As such, in addition to doing a standalone major in DSJS, it's easy to get a double major or a minor. And some cross-listed courses can count towards two different majors. See the coordinator for more details.

1.  Core Courses:

  • DSJS 1090 Special Topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies
  • DSJS 4040 Theorizing Social Justice

2.  DSJS and cross-listed courses:

THEMATIC AREAS
Gender and Sexuality

DSJS 2050 - Sex and Culture
DSJS 2420 - Philosophies of Love and Sexuality (Philosophy 2420)
DSJS 2610 - Sex, Gender and Society (Sociology/Anthropology 2610)
DSJS 3850 - Women in 19th Century Canada (History 3850)
DSJS 3860 - Women, the Law, and Civil Rights in 20th Century Canada (History 3860)
DSJS 3910 - Psychology of Women (Psychology 3910)
DSJS 3950 - Gender and Violence (Psychology 3950)
DSJS 4060 - Queer Theory
DSJS 4350 - Gender and Sexuality (Psychology 4350)

Identities and Social Structures
DSJS 2630 - Global Youth Cultures (Sociology/Anthropology 2630)
DSJS 2750 - Social Inequality (Sociology/Anthropology 2750)
DSJS 2920 - Work and Society (Sociology 2920) 
DSJS 3020 - Constructing Difference and Identity (Sociology/Anthropology 3070)
DSJS 3030 - Psychology of Aging (Psychology 3030)
DSJS 3520 - Kinship and Family (Anthropology 3520)
DSJS 3550 - Globalization (Sociology/Anthropology 3550)
DSJS 3710 - Community Based Ethical Inquiry (Philosophy 3710)
DSJS 3810 - Women, Economics and the Economy (Economics 3810)
DSJS 3840 - Cultural Psychology (Psychology 3850)
DSJS 4010 - Medical Anthropology (Anthropology 4010)
DSJS 4310 - Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism (Soc/Anth 4310)
DSJS 4510 - Women and Aging (Family Science 4510)
DSJS 4720 - Social Justice in Psychology (Psychology 4720)

Cultural Representation and Analysis
DSJS 2120 - Food and Cultural Studies (Foods & Nutrition 2310)
DSJS 2210 - Writings by Women (English 2210)
DSJS 3060 - Transgression, Resistance, Protest
DSJS 3110 - Identity and Popular Culture (Anthropology 3100/English 3140)
DSJS 3320 - Knowledge and Culture (Anthropology 3320)
DSJS 3740 - Qualitative Research Methods (Psychology 3740)
DSJS 4020 - Cybercultures (Anthropology 4030)
DSJS 4120 - Theories of the Body
DSJS 4560 - Visual Culture (Sociology/Anthropology 4560)
DSJS 4660 - Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality (English 4660)
DSJS 4720 - Britain in the 20th Century: Society, Culture and Identity (History 4740)

Minor

A minor in DSJS will be recognized when a student has successfully completed twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses in DSJS, including 1090 and six additional courses from anywhere on the list of DSJS courses. At least six-semester hours must be at the 3000- or 4000-level. Up to two cross-listed courses from your major can be counted towards a DSJS minor. See the coordinator for details.

Awards and Honours

Each year, Diversity and Social Justice Studies is pleased to be able to award three monetary prizes to deserving students in the program. The Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Scholarship is funded through a scholarship fund established in 2001 in memory of Dr. Percival, who taught at UPEI from 1971 to 2001, and who was one of the primary founders of the program at the University. The Bonnie MacPherson award is funded through an endowment made to the University by the family of former UPEI student Bonnie MacPherson. The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is made possible by the generous donations of a group of community and academic supporters, the Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, started by Dr. Percival.

The Dr. Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Award

This award will be given to a returning UPEI student in high academic standing who demonstrates a focus on gender issues in Psychology and Diversity and Social Justice Studies and a commitment to advancing social justice across campus and/or in the larger community. A recipient will be chosen based on a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and the Chair of the Psychology Department, and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards committee. This award is given out at Deans' Honours and Awards Night in the fall semester.

The Bonnie Lynne MacPherson Award in Diversity and Social Justice Studies

The Bonnie L. MacPherson Memorial Award is presented annually to a graduating student who has exemplified excellence in scholarship in the Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program. A recipient will be chosen based upon a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards Committee.

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is presented annually, upon recommendation of the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, to a returning full-time student with an expressed interest in pursuing Diversity and Social Justice Studies through active participation in courses, and who has also demonstrated a strong commitment to social justice. This prize is awarded at the annual Deans’ Honours and Awards ceremony held each fall.

 

Faculty

Core Faculty

  • Ann Braithwaite, Diversity and Social Justice Studies, Coordinator

Faculty, cross-listed courses

  • Charles Adeyanju (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Susan Brown (History)
  • Lisa Chilton (History)
  • Pam Courtenay-Hall (Philosophy)
  • Udo Krautwurst (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Colleen MacQuarrie (Psychology)
  • Jean Mitchell (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Sharon Myers (History)
  • Nia Phillips (Psychology)
  • Jim Sentance (Economics)

Overview

Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) named as one of three "standout programs" in the 2017 Maclean's Canadian Universities Guidebook! 


Diversity and Social Justice Studies responds to the 21st century need for critical engaged people who can, through a variety of theoretical languages and methodologies: a) analyze the social construction of identity categories (gender, sexuality, race, class, age, national status, able-bodiedness, species, etc.) and recognize the difference these make to what we know and how we act in the world; b) recognize, address, and challenge global inequities around these intersecting identity categories and analyze how social structures and policies, systems of representation, and everyday practices perpetuate these inequities; c) see the world from multiple points of view at the same time, recognize the complexity of contexts in shaping those views, and understand that both knowledge and visions of social change are always situated and partial.

Diversity and Social Justice encourages interdisciplinary approaches and the development of intercultural knowledge through a variety of courses and other learning opportunities. Courses are divided into three thematic areas: 1) Gender and Sexuality; 2) Identities and Social Structures; 3) Cultural Representation and Analysis. And because of its structure of bringing together courses from a variety of different disciplines, in addition to a standalone major DSJS also makes a great minor or double major, where up to three cross-listed courses can be counted towards both majors.

Want to know more about the program? Have questions? Contact the coordinator (via the form on the right, or at abraithwaite@upei.ca) or drop by her office in SDU Main Building 504. She can put you in touch with some current students too. Welcome to DSJS!

Dr. Ann Braithwaite
Coordinator, Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program

Major

Students pursuing a Major in Diversity and Social Justice must complete 42 credit hours (14 courses) in the DSJS Program. These credit hours must be composed of the 2 required core courses in DSJS 1090 and 4040, and 12 additional courses from the list of DSJS courses, with at least four courses (12 semester hours) at the 3000-4000-level. Students must take a minimum of 2 courses from each of the 3 thematic areas.

DSJS is comprised largely of courses cross-listed from other departments. As such, in addition to doing a standalone major in DSJS, it's easy to get a double major or a minor. And some cross-listed courses can count towards two different majors. See the coordinator for more details.

1.  Core Courses:

  • DSJS 1090 Special Topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies
  • DSJS 4040 Theorizing Social Justice

2.  DSJS and cross-listed courses:

THEMATIC AREAS
Gender and Sexuality

DSJS 2050 - Sex and Culture
DSJS 2420 - Philosophies of Love and Sexuality (Philosophy 2420)
DSJS 2610 - Sex, Gender and Society (Sociology/Anthropology 2610)
DSJS 3850 - Women in 19th Century Canada (History 3850)
DSJS 3860 - Women, the Law, and Civil Rights in 20th Century Canada (History 3860)
DSJS 3910 - Psychology of Women (Psychology 3910)
DSJS 3950 - Gender and Violence (Psychology 3950)
DSJS 4060 - Queer Theory
DSJS 4350 - Gender and Sexuality (Psychology 4350)

Identities and Social Structures
DSJS 2630 - Global Youth Cultures (Sociology/Anthropology 2630)
DSJS 2750 - Social Inequality (Sociology/Anthropology 2750)
DSJS 2920 - Work and Society (Sociology 2920) 
DSJS 3020 - Constructing Difference and Identity (Sociology/Anthropology 3070)
DSJS 3030 - Psychology of Aging (Psychology 3030)
DSJS 3520 - Kinship and Family (Anthropology 3520)
DSJS 3550 - Globalization (Sociology/Anthropology 3550)
DSJS 3710 - Community Based Ethical Inquiry (Philosophy 3710)
DSJS 3810 - Women, Economics and the Economy (Economics 3810)
DSJS 3840 - Cultural Psychology (Psychology 3850)
DSJS 4010 - Medical Anthropology (Anthropology 4010)
DSJS 4310 - Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism (Soc/Anth 4310)
DSJS 4510 - Women and Aging (Family Science 4510)
DSJS 4720 - Social Justice in Psychology (Psychology 4720)

Cultural Representation and Analysis
DSJS 2120 - Food and Cultural Studies (Foods & Nutrition 2310)
DSJS 2210 - Writings by Women (English 2210)
DSJS 3060 - Transgression, Resistance, Protest
DSJS 3110 - Identity and Popular Culture (Anthropology 3100/English 3140)
DSJS 3320 - Knowledge and Culture (Anthropology 3320)
DSJS 3740 - Qualitative Research Methods (Psychology 3740)
DSJS 4020 - Cybercultures (Anthropology 4030)
DSJS 4120 - Theories of the Body
DSJS 4560 - Visual Culture (Sociology/Anthropology 4560)
DSJS 4660 - Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality (English 4660)
DSJS 4720 - Britain in the 20th Century: Society, Culture and Identity (History 4740)

Minor

A minor in DSJS will be recognized when a student has successfully completed twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses in DSJS, including 1090 and six additional courses from anywhere on the list of DSJS courses. At least six-semester hours must be at the 3000- or 4000-level. Up to two cross-listed courses from your major can be counted towards a DSJS minor. See the coordinator for details.

Awards and Honours

Each year, Diversity and Social Justice Studies is pleased to be able to award three monetary prizes to deserving students in the program. The Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Scholarship is funded through a scholarship fund established in 2001 in memory of Dr. Percival, who taught at UPEI from 1971 to 2001, and who was one of the primary founders of the program at the University. The Bonnie MacPherson award is funded through an endowment made to the University by the family of former UPEI student Bonnie MacPherson. The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is made possible by the generous donations of a group of community and academic supporters, the Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, started by Dr. Percival.

The Dr. Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Award

This award will be given to a returning UPEI student in high academic standing who demonstrates a focus on gender issues in Psychology and Diversity and Social Justice Studies and a commitment to advancing social justice across campus and/or in the larger community. A recipient will be chosen based on a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and the Chair of the Psychology Department, and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards committee. This award is given out at Deans' Honours and Awards Night in the fall semester.

The Bonnie Lynne MacPherson Award in Diversity and Social Justice Studies

The Bonnie L. MacPherson Memorial Award is presented annually to a graduating student who has exemplified excellence in scholarship in the Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program. A recipient will be chosen based upon a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards Committee.

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is presented annually, upon recommendation of the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, to a returning full-time student with an expressed interest in pursuing Diversity and Social Justice Studies through active participation in courses, and who has also demonstrated a strong commitment to social justice. This prize is awarded at the annual Deans’ Honours and Awards ceremony held each fall.

 

Faculty

Core Faculty

  • Ann Braithwaite, Diversity and Social Justice Studies, Coordinator

Faculty, cross-listed courses

  • Charles Adeyanju (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Susan Brown (History)
  • Lisa Chilton (History)
  • Pam Courtenay-Hall (Philosophy)
  • Udo Krautwurst (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Colleen MacQuarrie (Psychology)
  • Jean Mitchell (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Sharon Myers (History)
  • Nia Phillips (Psychology)
  • Jim Sentance (Economics)
Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Non-profit Careers
Social Worker
Human Rights Advocate
Journalist
Lawyer
Course Level: 
1000 Level
Courses: 
DSJS-1090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 1000 level. Visit the DSJS Special Topics page for a complete description.
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
2000 Level
Courses: 
DSJS-2050 Sex and Culture
This course examines theories of sex and sexuality, and investigates how they are central to the construction and function of contemporary North American culture. It explores how boundaries between 'approved of ' and 'disapproved of ' sexual behaviours reflect larger social and cultural concerns, and challenges students to think beyond the more usual either/or ways of identifying sexuality. Topics covered include the social construction of heterosexuality, changing definitions of lesbian/gay/bisexual, challenges posed by intersexed and transgendered people, sex work, sado/masochism, pornography, monogamy, intergenerational sex, internet and 'cybersex,' and the 'feminist sex wars.' Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-2120 Food and Cultural Studies
This course introduces students to the study of food and its relationships to identities (i.e., gender, race, class, national status), the body, community, popular culture, and politics. It explores how historical and contemporary food production and consumption practices both construct and reflect these relationships and examines such questions as how food is defined and how it circulates to both perpetuate and challenge power and privilege. (Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 2310).
3 hours credit
DSJS-2210 Writings by Women
Students explore a wide range of writing by women-poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays-in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures. (Cross-listed with English 2210). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2420 Philosophies of Love and Sexuality
This course explores philosophical issues related to love and sexuality as constructed and experienced in particular cultural and historical contexts in Anglo-American culture. Topics may include analysis of love and sexuality as portrayed in music, literature, film and art; kinds of love; conceptions of self and community underlying different accounts of love; sexual activity as expressive, communicative, sacred, profane, athletic, goal-oriented; the commodification of sex; competing conceptions of sexual health and sexual liberation; conservative, liberal, radical and feminist perspectives; ethical issues in intimate relation- ships, families, sex-trade work and pornography. (Cross-listed with Family Science 2440 and Philosophy 2420). Lecture: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2610 Sex, Gender, and Society
This course examines gender (the social concept of masculinity and femininity) and compares it to current views about sex (the biological distinction of female and male). Several sociological and/or anthropological issues are examined, such as the biological bases and evolutionary development of sexual differences; abortion; homosexuality; sexual violence; and affirmative action. Cross-cultural information is introduced throughout the course. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 2610). Three hours a week.
3 hours credit
DSJS-2630 Global Youth Cultures
The emergence of global youth cultures of desire, self expression, consumption and representation will be considered from a number of perspectives including gender, age and globalization. Issues related to youth, which are a critical factor in understanding contemporary change, conflict, and cleavages, will be explored cross-culturally. Attention will be given to theoretical developments as well as ethnographic case studies. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 2630). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2750 Social Inequality
This course examines how social, economical and political inequality is organized along the lines of class, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Students are introduced to the major theoretical and ideological explanations (and justifications) for such inequalities and given the opportunity to engage in a critical examination of how power, ideology, and the distribution of material, cultural, and social resources continue to contribute to social injustice. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2750). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2920 Work and Society
This survey of the sociology of work will focus on the study of the following aspects of work: how work has changed through history in keeping with technological and political change, the new workplace, work and inequality, work and the family, types of work, training for work, and future trends in a workplace increasingly affected by globalization. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2920). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A 1000 level DSJS course
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
3000 Level
Courses: 
DSJS-3020 Constructing Difference and Identity
This course examines some of the differences between and among women, exploring how claims to various identities and politics have transformed Diversity and Social Justice Studies. It analyzes essentialist assumptions about identity categories such as race, sex, gender, and sexuality, and examines their social construction and contemporary interconnections at the institutional level. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 3070). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3030 Psychology of Aging
This course is designed to examine the psychology of aging from a variety of perspectives, theories, and research themes applicable to the later part of adulthood. Situating the psychology of aging within the broader discipline of gerontological studies, this course examines historical and current conceptions of aging along with contemporary research topics ranging across the physical to the psycho-social domains of aging. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to engage students in a critical analysis of gerontological concepts, research directions, and practices. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3030). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000 level
3 hours credit
DSJS-3060 Transgression, Resistance, Protest
This course introduces students to concepts of 'transgression,' resistance, and protest, exploring what kinds of events, people, and objects are thought to constitute social, political, and cultural practices of these concepts in various times and places. It explores how gender, sexuality, race, national identity, class, age, and abilities have been central to social definitions of--and anxieties about--transgression, resistance, and protest. It also focuses on how people have used these concepts to productively push against the limits of their social positionings.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3110 Identity and Popular Culture
This course introduces students to approaches to the study of popular culture and cultural studies, asking what is meant by the term "pop culture" and exploring it as a site of struggle and negotiation for a variety of identity groups. It explores both how social identities (gender, race, sexuality, and class) are constructed and represented in popular cultural objects and practices, and examines how those can make a difference to how people then interact with and in that pop culture. Course materials are drawn from advertising, popular events and trends, news items, film, TV, fan culture, zines, pornography, and the new communications technologies. (Cross-listed as English 3140 and Anthropology 3100). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3320 Knowledge and Culture
An advanced course on how the forms of knowledge production used influence social anthropology's perspectives on structure and organization in human society. The principal focus is on comparing scientific and interpretive approaches to social organization in a range of societies through case studies. Two area courses are strongly recommended, but not required. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 3320).
PREREQUISITE: Sociology 1010, Anthropology 1050, and one 2000- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
3 hours credit
DSJS-3330 L.M. Montgomery
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery's contributions as a writer of women's and children's fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery's most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works. (Cross-listed with English 3330). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3520 Kinship and Family
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 3520 and Family Science 3540). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3550 Globalization
Students in this course study globalization as an ongoing, dynamic process as it affects societies, cultures, environments, communities, organizations, groups, and individuals. Debates over these effects are addressed by various theoretical perspectives, including structural-functionalism, conflict analysis, interactionism, cultural studies, and postmodernism. Issues include technological advances, free-market capitalism, cultural homogenization, national policies and programs, international relations, global institutions and organizations, social inequality, demographic trends, asocial problems, social conflicts, and opposition to globalization. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 3550). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3710 Community Based Ethical Inquiry
This course will engage students in work placements and dialogue in ethical inquiry with community leaders in one of the following areas (set by the instructor at the start of the year): Agriculture and globalization; Poverty and illiteracy in PEI; World hunger and international aid; Environmental problems and issues of sustainability on PEI. Students will explore the nature of moral experience and ethical inquiry while gaining on the ground work experience, so that class discussions will be informed by first-hand understanding of the issues, as well as by recent and classic ethical texts. This course will be led by a faculty member in collaboration with recognized community leaders in the field. (Cross-listed with Philosophy 3710). Seminar/field work: Averaged across the semester, 1.5 hours per week unpaid field placement in a relevant setting, supervised by a mentor. Three semester hours of credit.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3740 Qualitative Research Methods
The purpose of this course is to help students gain a theoretical, practical and critical understanding of qualitative research methodology, and to teach skills for the execution of research projects based upon qualitative data. Qualitative research is research that focuses upon understanding, rather than predicting or controlling phenomena. Nine different paradigms of qualitative research methodology, their implications, and applications, are examined in this course. These paradigms are: data display, grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, psychobiography and historiography, psychoanalytic approaches, narrative psychology, hermeneutics and textual deconstruction, and social constructivism. Political and ethical issues are also highlighted in order to problematize and promote more critically informed inquiry. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3740). Lecture/Tutorial: Three hours a week.
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090, and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000 level or above, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3810 Women, Economics and the Economy
This course examines the treatment of women by the discipline of economics from both mainstream and feminist perspectives. It includes a review of the feminist critique of traditional economics, as well as an examination of the economic literature pertaining to women and women's activities. Topics include women in the workforce and the economic analysis of fertility, marriage and divorce, and household production. (Cross-listed with Economics 3810 and Family Science 3840). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3840 Cultural Psychology
This course investigates how culture shapes human thought, behaviour, and the field of psychology broadly. The course begins with discussion of theoretical foundations and research methods in cultural psychology, followed by the application of a cultural perspective to psychological concepts including: self and identity, relationships, development, morality and justice, emotions, cognition, and physical and psychological health. Lectures, discussion, and in-class assignments challenge students to consider the sizeable impact of culture on human life. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3850).
PREREQUISITE: DSJS-1090 and 1 2000 Level DSJS course.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3850 Women in 19th Century Canada
This course examines the changes that have taken place in the historical roles of women in Canadian society, and the relationship of these changes to social, economic, and intellectual developments. Using both a thematic and chronological approach, the course examines women's roles from the beginning of the 19th Century to the achievement of suffrage in the 20th Century. (Cross-listed with History 3850). Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3860 Women, The Law, and Civil Rights in 20th Century Canada
This course examines the experiences of women in 20th-Century Canadian society viewed through the prism of law and civil rights. Topics of study include the struggle for the right to vote, the Persons Case, efforts to secure equality in the workplace, the regulation of sexuality and reproduction, and the particular experiences of immigrant and Indigenous women in relation to civil rights. (Cross-listed with History 3860). Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3910 Psychology of Women
This course will focus on women's development throughout the life span. Topics will include: views of the nature of women, biological influences, the socialization process and its consequences at the individual, interpersonal relationship, and societal levels, as well as recent alternative views of the psychology of women. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3910). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 AND 1 OTHER DSJS COURSE AT THE 2000, 3000, or 4000 LEVEL
3 hours credit
DSJS-3950 Gender and Violence
This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. (Cross-listed with Psychology/Family Science 3950).
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090, at least one other DSJS course at 2000 level or above, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
4000 Level
Courses: 
DSJS-4010 Medical Anthropology
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being. The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 4010). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4020 Cybercultures
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 4030). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4040 Theorizing Social Justice
This capstone course provides the opportunity for students to explore theories and practices of "social justice," broadly defined, across a number of contexts. It examines how social movements and identity groups have defined this concept, investigates, through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, processes towards this goal in addition to barriers inhibiting its attainment.
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level and at least two other DSJS courses
3 hours credit
DSJS-4060 Queer Theory
This course introduces students to the body of academic thought known as "queer theory" and to the ways it challenges assumptions about sexuality, gender, and other identity categories. It focuses on queer theory's historical foundations, genealogies, and contributions, as well as on contemporary uses of and debates in the field.
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000-level or above, or permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4120 Theories of the Body
This course introduces students to what is often called "body studies," exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least one DSJS course, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-4310 Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Mul Ticulturalism
A study of minority and ethnic groups (native and immigrant) within Canadian "multicultural" society. The course also includes a review of Canada's immigration policies and their effects on Canada's multicultural landscape. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 4310). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4350 Gender and Sexuality
This course provides a critical examination of gender and sexuality. It explores the individual, interpersonal, and societal constructions of gender and sexuality within varying biological, cultural, and historical contexts; and uses psychological theory and research to analyze experiences and representations of gender and sexuality. (Cross-listed with Psychology 4350). Three hours a week seminar
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 and at least 2 other DSJS courses, one of which must be at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4510 Women and Aging
This course examines older women's diverse experiences in today's families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored. (Cross-listed with Family Science 4510). Three lecture hours
3 hours credit
DSJS-4560 Visual Culture
This course addresses in a critical manner the importance of visual representation in Western thought. Topics include: analysis of stereotypes of non-Western people as portrayed in print and information media, advertising, ethnographic documentary production, and the entertainment industry. Students will also examine the export of Western visual culture to non-Western cultures. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 4560). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4610 Contending Approaches in Comparative Pol itics
This course gives students a theoretical overview of the field of comparative politics, the different treatments of recurring questions in the discipline, and the historical and geographic frameworks within which contemporary polities have developed. The course is retrospective in its critical examination of various models and classification schemes. (Cross-listed with Political Science 4510) PREREQUISITE: At least one course from the Comparative stream or permission of the instructor Note: Some background in the empirical literature of comparative politics is essential. Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4660 Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality
(Cross-listed with English 4660). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4720 Social Justice in Psychology
This course examines the praxis (practice and theory) of social justice through psychologies of liberation and decolonization. The focus is on a critical understanding of radical moments of theorizing and action and will examine psychologies created to resist broad social systems of colonization and control. Students interrogate contemporary issues of inequity embedded within systems of privilege and how these systems create as much as reflect psychological phenomena. (Cross-listed with Psychology 4720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS-1090 and 6 credits from DSJS
3 hours credit
DSJS-4740 Britain in the 20th Century: Society, Culture and Identity
This course explores the construction of British national identities in the twentieth century, in particular how issues of class, gender, race and nationalism have been represented in popular culture. Topics may include the social impacts of World War I, the experience of the Depression era, British Fascist movements, the Blitz, post-war austerity, youth culture, multi-racial Britain, and football violence. Course materials include journalism of the period, film footage, oral history, diaries, pop music and contemporary cinema. (Cross-listed with History 4720). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4910 Directed Studies
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-4920 Directed Studies
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

DSJS-1090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 1000 level. Visit the DSJS Special Topics page for a complete description.
3 hours credit
DSJS-2050 Sex and Culture
This course examines theories of sex and sexuality, and investigates how they are central to the construction and function of contemporary North American culture. It explores how boundaries between 'approved of ' and 'disapproved of ' sexual behaviours reflect larger social and cultural concerns, and challenges students to think beyond the more usual either/or ways of identifying sexuality. Topics covered include the social construction of heterosexuality, changing definitions of lesbian/gay/bisexual, challenges posed by intersexed and transgendered people, sex work, sado/masochism, pornography, monogamy, intergenerational sex, internet and 'cybersex,' and the 'feminist sex wars.' Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-2120 Food and Cultural Studies
This course introduces students to the study of food and its relationships to identities (i.e., gender, race, class, national status), the body, community, popular culture, and politics. It explores how historical and contemporary food production and consumption practices both construct and reflect these relationships and examines such questions as how food is defined and how it circulates to both perpetuate and challenge power and privilege. (Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 2310).
3 hours credit
DSJS-2210 Writings by Women
Students explore a wide range of writing by women-poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays-in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures. (Cross-listed with English 2210). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2420 Philosophies of Love and Sexuality
This course explores philosophical issues related to love and sexuality as constructed and experienced in particular cultural and historical contexts in Anglo-American culture. Topics may include analysis of love and sexuality as portrayed in music, literature, film and art; kinds of love; conceptions of self and community underlying different accounts of love; sexual activity as expressive, communicative, sacred, profane, athletic, goal-oriented; the commodification of sex; competing conceptions of sexual health and sexual liberation; conservative, liberal, radical and feminist perspectives; ethical issues in intimate relation- ships, families, sex-trade work and pornography. (Cross-listed with Family Science 2440 and Philosophy 2420). Lecture: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2610 Sex, Gender, and Society
This course examines gender (the social concept of masculinity and femininity) and compares it to current views about sex (the biological distinction of female and male). Several sociological and/or anthropological issues are examined, such as the biological bases and evolutionary development of sexual differences; abortion; homosexuality; sexual violence; and affirmative action. Cross-cultural information is introduced throughout the course. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 2610). Three hours a week.
3 hours credit
DSJS-2630 Global Youth Cultures
The emergence of global youth cultures of desire, self expression, consumption and representation will be considered from a number of perspectives including gender, age and globalization. Issues related to youth, which are a critical factor in understanding contemporary change, conflict, and cleavages, will be explored cross-culturally. Attention will be given to theoretical developments as well as ethnographic case studies. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 2630). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2750 Social Inequality
This course examines how social, economical and political inequality is organized along the lines of class, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Students are introduced to the major theoretical and ideological explanations (and justifications) for such inequalities and given the opportunity to engage in a critical examination of how power, ideology, and the distribution of material, cultural, and social resources continue to contribute to social injustice. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2750). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2920 Work and Society
This survey of the sociology of work will focus on the study of the following aspects of work: how work has changed through history in keeping with technological and political change, the new workplace, work and inequality, work and the family, types of work, training for work, and future trends in a workplace increasingly affected by globalization. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2920). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A 1000 level DSJS course
3 hours credit
DSJS-3020 Constructing Difference and Identity
This course examines some of the differences between and among women, exploring how claims to various identities and politics have transformed Diversity and Social Justice Studies. It analyzes essentialist assumptions about identity categories such as race, sex, gender, and sexuality, and examines their social construction and contemporary interconnections at the institutional level. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 3070). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3030 Psychology of Aging
This course is designed to examine the psychology of aging from a variety of perspectives, theories, and research themes applicable to the later part of adulthood. Situating the psychology of aging within the broader discipline of gerontological studies, this course examines historical and current conceptions of aging along with contemporary research topics ranging across the physical to the psycho-social domains of aging. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to engage students in a critical analysis of gerontological concepts, research directions, and practices. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3030). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000 level
3 hours credit
DSJS-3060 Transgression, Resistance, Protest
This course introduces students to concepts of 'transgression,' resistance, and protest, exploring what kinds of events, people, and objects are thought to constitute social, political, and cultural practices of these concepts in various times and places. It explores how gender, sexuality, race, national identity, class, age, and abilities have been central to social definitions of--and anxieties about--transgression, resistance, and protest. It also focuses on how people have used these concepts to productively push against the limits of their social positionings.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3110 Identity and Popular Culture
This course introduces students to approaches to the study of popular culture and cultural studies, asking what is meant by the term "pop culture" and exploring it as a site of struggle and negotiation for a variety of identity groups. It explores both how social identities (gender, race, sexuality, and class) are constructed and represented in popular cultural objects and practices, and examines how those can make a difference to how people then interact with and in that pop culture. Course materials are drawn from advertising, popular events and trends, news items, film, TV, fan culture, zines, pornography, and the new communications technologies. (Cross-listed as English 3140 and Anthropology 3100). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3320 Knowledge and Culture
An advanced course on how the forms of knowledge production used influence social anthropology's perspectives on structure and organization in human society. The principal focus is on comparing scientific and interpretive approaches to social organization in a range of societies through case studies. Two area courses are strongly recommended, but not required. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 3320).
PREREQUISITE: Sociology 1010, Anthropology 1050, and one 2000- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
3 hours credit
DSJS-3330 L.M. Montgomery
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery's contributions as a writer of women's and children's fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery's most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works. (Cross-listed with English 3330). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3520 Kinship and Family
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 3520 and Family Science 3540). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3550 Globalization
Students in this course study globalization as an ongoing, dynamic process as it affects societies, cultures, environments, communities, organizations, groups, and individuals. Debates over these effects are addressed by various theoretical perspectives, including structural-functionalism, conflict analysis, interactionism, cultural studies, and postmodernism. Issues include technological advances, free-market capitalism, cultural homogenization, national policies and programs, international relations, global institutions and organizations, social inequality, demographic trends, asocial problems, social conflicts, and opposition to globalization. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 3550). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3710 Community Based Ethical Inquiry
This course will engage students in work placements and dialogue in ethical inquiry with community leaders in one of the following areas (set by the instructor at the start of the year): Agriculture and globalization; Poverty and illiteracy in PEI; World hunger and international aid; Environmental problems and issues of sustainability on PEI. Students will explore the nature of moral experience and ethical inquiry while gaining on the ground work experience, so that class discussions will be informed by first-hand understanding of the issues, as well as by recent and classic ethical texts. This course will be led by a faculty member in collaboration with recognized community leaders in the field. (Cross-listed with Philosophy 3710). Seminar/field work: Averaged across the semester, 1.5 hours per week unpaid field placement in a relevant setting, supervised by a mentor. Three semester hours of credit.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3740 Qualitative Research Methods
The purpose of this course is to help students gain a theoretical, practical and critical understanding of qualitative research methodology, and to teach skills for the execution of research projects based upon qualitative data. Qualitative research is research that focuses upon understanding, rather than predicting or controlling phenomena. Nine different paradigms of qualitative research methodology, their implications, and applications, are examined in this course. These paradigms are: data display, grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, psychobiography and historiography, psychoanalytic approaches, narrative psychology, hermeneutics and textual deconstruction, and social constructivism. Political and ethical issues are also highlighted in order to problematize and promote more critically informed inquiry. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3740). Lecture/Tutorial: Three hours a week.
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090, and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000 level or above, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3810 Women, Economics and the Economy
This course examines the treatment of women by the discipline of economics from both mainstream and feminist perspectives. It includes a review of the feminist critique of traditional economics, as well as an examination of the economic literature pertaining to women and women's activities. Topics include women in the workforce and the economic analysis of fertility, marriage and divorce, and household production. (Cross-listed with Economics 3810 and Family Science 3840). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3840 Cultural Psychology
This course investigates how culture shapes human thought, behaviour, and the field of psychology broadly. The course begins with discussion of theoretical foundations and research methods in cultural psychology, followed by the application of a cultural perspective to psychological concepts including: self and identity, relationships, development, morality and justice, emotions, cognition, and physical and psychological health. Lectures, discussion, and in-class assignments challenge students to consider the sizeable impact of culture on human life. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3850).
PREREQUISITE: DSJS-1090 and 1 2000 Level DSJS course.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3850 Women in 19th Century Canada
This course examines the changes that have taken place in the historical roles of women in Canadian society, and the relationship of these changes to social, economic, and intellectual developments. Using both a thematic and chronological approach, the course examines women's roles from the beginning of the 19th Century to the achievement of suffrage in the 20th Century. (Cross-listed with History 3850). Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3860 Women, The Law, and Civil Rights in 20th Century Canada
This course examines the experiences of women in 20th-Century Canadian society viewed through the prism of law and civil rights. Topics of study include the struggle for the right to vote, the Persons Case, efforts to secure equality in the workplace, the regulation of sexuality and reproduction, and the particular experiences of immigrant and Indigenous women in relation to civil rights. (Cross-listed with History 3860). Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3910 Psychology of Women
This course will focus on women's development throughout the life span. Topics will include: views of the nature of women, biological influences, the socialization process and its consequences at the individual, interpersonal relationship, and societal levels, as well as recent alternative views of the psychology of women. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3910). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 AND 1 OTHER DSJS COURSE AT THE 2000, 3000, or 4000 LEVEL
3 hours credit
DSJS-3950 Gender and Violence
This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. (Cross-listed with Psychology/Family Science 3950).
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090, at least one other DSJS course at 2000 level or above, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-4010 Medical Anthropology
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being. The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 4010). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4020 Cybercultures
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 4030). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4040 Theorizing Social Justice
This capstone course provides the opportunity for students to explore theories and practices of "social justice," broadly defined, across a number of contexts. It examines how social movements and identity groups have defined this concept, investigates, through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, processes towards this goal in addition to barriers inhibiting its attainment.
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level and at least two other DSJS courses
3 hours credit
DSJS-4060 Queer Theory
This course introduces students to the body of academic thought known as "queer theory" and to the ways it challenges assumptions about sexuality, gender, and other identity categories. It focuses on queer theory's historical foundations, genealogies, and contributions, as well as on contemporary uses of and debates in the field.
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000-level or above, or permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4120 Theories of the Body
This course introduces students to what is often called "body studies," exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least one DSJS course, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-4310 Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Mul Ticulturalism
A study of minority and ethnic groups (native and immigrant) within Canadian "multicultural" society. The course also includes a review of Canada's immigration policies and their effects on Canada's multicultural landscape. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 4310). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4350 Gender and Sexuality
This course provides a critical examination of gender and sexuality. It explores the individual, interpersonal, and societal constructions of gender and sexuality within varying biological, cultural, and historical contexts; and uses psychological theory and research to analyze experiences and representations of gender and sexuality. (Cross-listed with Psychology 4350). Three hours a week seminar
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 and at least 2 other DSJS courses, one of which must be at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4510 Women and Aging
This course examines older women's diverse experiences in today's families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored. (Cross-listed with Family Science 4510). Three lecture hours
3 hours credit
DSJS-4560 Visual Culture
This course addresses in a critical manner the importance of visual representation in Western thought. Topics include: analysis of stereotypes of non-Western people as portrayed in print and information media, advertising, ethnographic documentary production, and the entertainment industry. Students will also examine the export of Western visual culture to non-Western cultures. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 4560). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4610 Contending Approaches in Comparative Pol itics
This course gives students a theoretical overview of the field of comparative politics, the different treatments of recurring questions in the discipline, and the historical and geographic frameworks within which contemporary polities have developed. The course is retrospective in its critical examination of various models and classification schemes. (Cross-listed with Political Science 4510) PREREQUISITE: At least one course from the Comparative stream or permission of the instructor Note: Some background in the empirical literature of comparative politics is essential. Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4660 Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality
(Cross-listed with English 4660). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4720 Social Justice in Psychology
This course examines the praxis (practice and theory) of social justice through psychologies of liberation and decolonization. The focus is on a critical understanding of radical moments of theorizing and action and will examine psychologies created to resist broad social systems of colonization and control. Students interrogate contemporary issues of inequity embedded within systems of privilege and how these systems create as much as reflect psychological phenomena. (Cross-listed with Psychology 4720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS-1090 and 6 credits from DSJS
3 hours credit
DSJS-4740 Britain in the 20th Century: Society, Culture and Identity
This course explores the construction of British national identities in the twentieth century, in particular how issues of class, gender, race and nationalism have been represented in popular culture. Topics may include the social impacts of World War I, the experience of the Depression era, British Fascist movements, the Blitz, post-war austerity, youth culture, multi-racial Britain, and football violence. Course materials include journalism of the period, film footage, oral history, diaries, pop music and contemporary cinema. (Cross-listed with History 4720). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4910 Directed Studies
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-4920 Directed Studies
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

1000 Level

DSJS-1090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 1000 level. Visit the DSJS Special Topics page for a complete description.
3 hours credit

2000 Level

DSJS-2050 Sex and Culture
This course examines theories of sex and sexuality, and investigates how they are central to the construction and function of contemporary North American culture. It explores how boundaries between 'approved of ' and 'disapproved of ' sexual behaviours reflect larger social and cultural concerns, and challenges students to think beyond the more usual either/or ways of identifying sexuality. Topics covered include the social construction of heterosexuality, changing definitions of lesbian/gay/bisexual, challenges posed by intersexed and transgendered people, sex work, sado/masochism, pornography, monogamy, intergenerational sex, internet and 'cybersex,' and the 'feminist sex wars.' Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-2120 Food and Cultural Studies
This course introduces students to the study of food and its relationships to identities (i.e., gender, race, class, national status), the body, community, popular culture, and politics. It explores how historical and contemporary food production and consumption practices both construct and reflect these relationships and examines such questions as how food is defined and how it circulates to both perpetuate and challenge power and privilege. (Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 2310).
3 hours credit
DSJS-2210 Writings by Women
Students explore a wide range of writing by women-poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays-in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures. (Cross-listed with English 2210). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2420 Philosophies of Love and Sexuality
This course explores philosophical issues related to love and sexuality as constructed and experienced in particular cultural and historical contexts in Anglo-American culture. Topics may include analysis of love and sexuality as portrayed in music, literature, film and art; kinds of love; conceptions of self and community underlying different accounts of love; sexual activity as expressive, communicative, sacred, profane, athletic, goal-oriented; the commodification of sex; competing conceptions of sexual health and sexual liberation; conservative, liberal, radical and feminist perspectives; ethical issues in intimate relation- ships, families, sex-trade work and pornography. (Cross-listed with Family Science 2440 and Philosophy 2420). Lecture: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2610 Sex, Gender, and Society
This course examines gender (the social concept of masculinity and femininity) and compares it to current views about sex (the biological distinction of female and male). Several sociological and/or anthropological issues are examined, such as the biological bases and evolutionary development of sexual differences; abortion; homosexuality; sexual violence; and affirmative action. Cross-cultural information is introduced throughout the course. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 2610). Three hours a week.
3 hours credit
DSJS-2630 Global Youth Cultures
The emergence of global youth cultures of desire, self expression, consumption and representation will be considered from a number of perspectives including gender, age and globalization. Issues related to youth, which are a critical factor in understanding contemporary change, conflict, and cleavages, will be explored cross-culturally. Attention will be given to theoretical developments as well as ethnographic case studies. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 2630). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2750 Social Inequality
This course examines how social, economical and political inequality is organized along the lines of class, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Students are introduced to the major theoretical and ideological explanations (and justifications) for such inequalities and given the opportunity to engage in a critical examination of how power, ideology, and the distribution of material, cultural, and social resources continue to contribute to social injustice. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2750). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-2920 Work and Society
This survey of the sociology of work will focus on the study of the following aspects of work: how work has changed through history in keeping with technological and political change, the new workplace, work and inequality, work and the family, types of work, training for work, and future trends in a workplace increasingly affected by globalization. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2920). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A 1000 level DSJS course
3 hours credit

3000 Level

DSJS-3020 Constructing Difference and Identity
This course examines some of the differences between and among women, exploring how claims to various identities and politics have transformed Diversity and Social Justice Studies. It analyzes essentialist assumptions about identity categories such as race, sex, gender, and sexuality, and examines their social construction and contemporary interconnections at the institutional level. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 3070). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3030 Psychology of Aging
This course is designed to examine the psychology of aging from a variety of perspectives, theories, and research themes applicable to the later part of adulthood. Situating the psychology of aging within the broader discipline of gerontological studies, this course examines historical and current conceptions of aging along with contemporary research topics ranging across the physical to the psycho-social domains of aging. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to engage students in a critical analysis of gerontological concepts, research directions, and practices. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3030). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000 level
3 hours credit
DSJS-3060 Transgression, Resistance, Protest
This course introduces students to concepts of 'transgression,' resistance, and protest, exploring what kinds of events, people, and objects are thought to constitute social, political, and cultural practices of these concepts in various times and places. It explores how gender, sexuality, race, national identity, class, age, and abilities have been central to social definitions of--and anxieties about--transgression, resistance, and protest. It also focuses on how people have used these concepts to productively push against the limits of their social positionings.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3110 Identity and Popular Culture
This course introduces students to approaches to the study of popular culture and cultural studies, asking what is meant by the term "pop culture" and exploring it as a site of struggle and negotiation for a variety of identity groups. It explores both how social identities (gender, race, sexuality, and class) are constructed and represented in popular cultural objects and practices, and examines how those can make a difference to how people then interact with and in that pop culture. Course materials are drawn from advertising, popular events and trends, news items, film, TV, fan culture, zines, pornography, and the new communications technologies. (Cross-listed as English 3140 and Anthropology 3100). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3320 Knowledge and Culture
An advanced course on how the forms of knowledge production used influence social anthropology's perspectives on structure and organization in human society. The principal focus is on comparing scientific and interpretive approaches to social organization in a range of societies through case studies. Two area courses are strongly recommended, but not required. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 3320).
PREREQUISITE: Sociology 1010, Anthropology 1050, and one 2000- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
3 hours credit
DSJS-3330 L.M. Montgomery
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery's contributions as a writer of women's and children's fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery's most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works. (Cross-listed with English 3330). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3520 Kinship and Family
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 3520 and Family Science 3540). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3550 Globalization
Students in this course study globalization as an ongoing, dynamic process as it affects societies, cultures, environments, communities, organizations, groups, and individuals. Debates over these effects are addressed by various theoretical perspectives, including structural-functionalism, conflict analysis, interactionism, cultural studies, and postmodernism. Issues include technological advances, free-market capitalism, cultural homogenization, national policies and programs, international relations, global institutions and organizations, social inequality, demographic trends, asocial problems, social conflicts, and opposition to globalization. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 3550). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3710 Community Based Ethical Inquiry
This course will engage students in work placements and dialogue in ethical inquiry with community leaders in one of the following areas (set by the instructor at the start of the year): Agriculture and globalization; Poverty and illiteracy in PEI; World hunger and international aid; Environmental problems and issues of sustainability on PEI. Students will explore the nature of moral experience and ethical inquiry while gaining on the ground work experience, so that class discussions will be informed by first-hand understanding of the issues, as well as by recent and classic ethical texts. This course will be led by a faculty member in collaboration with recognized community leaders in the field. (Cross-listed with Philosophy 3710). Seminar/field work: Averaged across the semester, 1.5 hours per week unpaid field placement in a relevant setting, supervised by a mentor. Three semester hours of credit.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3740 Qualitative Research Methods
The purpose of this course is to help students gain a theoretical, practical and critical understanding of qualitative research methodology, and to teach skills for the execution of research projects based upon qualitative data. Qualitative research is research that focuses upon understanding, rather than predicting or controlling phenomena. Nine different paradigms of qualitative research methodology, their implications, and applications, are examined in this course. These paradigms are: data display, grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, psychobiography and historiography, psychoanalytic approaches, narrative psychology, hermeneutics and textual deconstruction, and social constructivism. Political and ethical issues are also highlighted in order to problematize and promote more critically informed inquiry. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3740). Lecture/Tutorial: Three hours a week.
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090, and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000 level or above, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3810 Women, Economics and the Economy
This course examines the treatment of women by the discipline of economics from both mainstream and feminist perspectives. It includes a review of the feminist critique of traditional economics, as well as an examination of the economic literature pertaining to women and women's activities. Topics include women in the workforce and the economic analysis of fertility, marriage and divorce, and household production. (Cross-listed with Economics 3810 and Family Science 3840). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-3840 Cultural Psychology
This course investigates how culture shapes human thought, behaviour, and the field of psychology broadly. The course begins with discussion of theoretical foundations and research methods in cultural psychology, followed by the application of a cultural perspective to psychological concepts including: self and identity, relationships, development, morality and justice, emotions, cognition, and physical and psychological health. Lectures, discussion, and in-class assignments challenge students to consider the sizeable impact of culture on human life. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3850).
PREREQUISITE: DSJS-1090 and 1 2000 Level DSJS course.
3 hours credit
DSJS-3850 Women in 19th Century Canada
This course examines the changes that have taken place in the historical roles of women in Canadian society, and the relationship of these changes to social, economic, and intellectual developments. Using both a thematic and chronological approach, the course examines women's roles from the beginning of the 19th Century to the achievement of suffrage in the 20th Century. (Cross-listed with History 3850). Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3860 Women, The Law, and Civil Rights in 20th Century Canada
This course examines the experiences of women in 20th-Century Canadian society viewed through the prism of law and civil rights. Topics of study include the struggle for the right to vote, the Persons Case, efforts to secure equality in the workplace, the regulation of sexuality and reproduction, and the particular experiences of immigrant and Indigenous women in relation to civil rights. (Cross-listed with History 3860). Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-3910 Psychology of Women
This course will focus on women's development throughout the life span. Topics will include: views of the nature of women, biological influences, the socialization process and its consequences at the individual, interpersonal relationship, and societal levels, as well as recent alternative views of the psychology of women. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3910). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 AND 1 OTHER DSJS COURSE AT THE 2000, 3000, or 4000 LEVEL
3 hours credit
DSJS-3950 Gender and Violence
This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. (Cross-listed with Psychology/Family Science 3950).
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090, at least one other DSJS course at 2000 level or above, or permission of instructor
3 hours credit

4000 Level

DSJS-4010 Medical Anthropology
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being. The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 4010). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4020 Cybercultures
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts. (Cross-listed with Anthropology 4030). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4040 Theorizing Social Justice
This capstone course provides the opportunity for students to explore theories and practices of "social justice," broadly defined, across a number of contexts. It examines how social movements and identity groups have defined this concept, investigates, through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, processes towards this goal in addition to barriers inhibiting its attainment.
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level and at least two other DSJS courses
3 hours credit
DSJS-4060 Queer Theory
This course introduces students to the body of academic thought known as "queer theory" and to the ways it challenges assumptions about sexuality, gender, and other identity categories. It focuses on queer theory's historical foundations, genealogies, and contributions, as well as on contemporary uses of and debates in the field.
PREREQUISITE: A DSJS Special Topics course at the 1000-level and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000-level or above, or permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4120 Theories of the Body
This course introduces students to what is often called "body studies," exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least one DSJS course, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-4310 Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Mul Ticulturalism
A study of minority and ethnic groups (native and immigrant) within Canadian "multicultural" society. The course also includes a review of Canada's immigration policies and their effects on Canada's multicultural landscape. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 4310). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4350 Gender and Sexuality
This course provides a critical examination of gender and sexuality. It explores the individual, interpersonal, and societal constructions of gender and sexuality within varying biological, cultural, and historical contexts; and uses psychological theory and research to analyze experiences and representations of gender and sexuality. (Cross-listed with Psychology 4350). Three hours a week seminar
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090 and at least 2 other DSJS courses, one of which must be at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
DSJS-4510 Women and Aging
This course examines older women's diverse experiences in today's families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored. (Cross-listed with Family Science 4510). Three lecture hours
3 hours credit
DSJS-4560 Visual Culture
This course addresses in a critical manner the importance of visual representation in Western thought. Topics include: analysis of stereotypes of non-Western people as portrayed in print and information media, advertising, ethnographic documentary production, and the entertainment industry. Students will also examine the export of Western visual culture to non-Western cultures. (Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 4560). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4610 Contending Approaches in Comparative Pol itics
This course gives students a theoretical overview of the field of comparative politics, the different treatments of recurring questions in the discipline, and the historical and geographic frameworks within which contemporary polities have developed. The course is retrospective in its critical examination of various models and classification schemes. (Cross-listed with Political Science 4510) PREREQUISITE: At least one course from the Comparative stream or permission of the instructor Note: Some background in the empirical literature of comparative politics is essential. Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4660 Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality
(Cross-listed with English 4660). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4720 Social Justice in Psychology
This course examines the praxis (practice and theory) of social justice through psychologies of liberation and decolonization. The focus is on a critical understanding of radical moments of theorizing and action and will examine psychologies created to resist broad social systems of colonization and control. Students interrogate contemporary issues of inequity embedded within systems of privilege and how these systems create as much as reflect psychological phenomena. (Cross-listed with Psychology 4720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: DSJS-1090 and 6 credits from DSJS
3 hours credit
DSJS-4740 Britain in the 20th Century: Society, Culture and Identity
This course explores the construction of British national identities in the twentieth century, in particular how issues of class, gender, race and nationalism have been represented in popular culture. Topics may include the social impacts of World War I, the experience of the Depression era, British Fascist movements, the Blitz, post-war austerity, youth culture, multi-racial Britain, and football violence. Course materials include journalism of the period, film footage, oral history, diaries, pop music and contemporary cinema. (Cross-listed with History 4720). Seminar: Three hours a week
3 hours credit
DSJS-4910 Directed Studies
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
3 hours credit
DSJS-4920 Directed Studies
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
3 hours credit
Contact UPEI