Questioning identity, knowledge, and power.

Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) (formerly Women's Studies)

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) (formerly Women's Studies)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building
(902) 628-4353

Diversity and Social Justice Studies responds to the 21st century need for critical engaged citizens who can, through a variety of theoretical languages and methodologies: a) analyze the social construction of identity categories (gender, sexuality, race, class, age, national status, able-bodiedness, species, etc.) and recognize the difference these make to what we know and how we act in the world; b) recognize, address, and challenge global inequities around these intersecting identity categories and analyze how social structures and policies, systems of representation, and everyday practices perpetuate these inequities; c) see the world from multiple points of view at the same time, recognize the complexity of contexts in shaping those views, and understand that both knowledge and visions of social change are always situated and partial.

Diversity and Social Justice encourages interdisciplinary approaches and the development of intercultural knowledge through a variety of courses and other learning opportunities. Courses are divided into three thematic areas: 1) Gender and Sexuality; 2) Identities and Social Structures; 3) Cultural Representation and Analysis.

 

Dr. Ann Braithwaite
Coordinator, Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program
Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) (formerly Women's Studies)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building
(902) 628-4353

Students pursuing a Major in Diversity and Social Justice must complete 42 credit hours (14 courses) in the DSJS Program. These credit hours must be composed of the 2 required core courses in DSJS 109 and 404, and 12 additional courses from the list of DSJS courses, with at least four courses (12 semester hours) at the 300-400-level. Students must take a minimum of 2 courses from each of the 3 thematic areas.

1.  Core Courses:

  • DSJS 109 Special Topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies
  • DSJS 404 Theorizing Social Justice

2.  DSJS and cross-listed courses:

THEMATIC AREAS
Gender and Sexuality

DSJS 205 - Sex and Culture
DSJS 242 - Philosophies of Love and Sexuality (Philosophy 242)
DSJS 261 - Sex, Gender and Society (Sociology/Anthropology 261)
DSJS 385 - Women in 19th Century Canada (History 385)
DSJS 386 - Women in 20th Century Canada (History 386)
DSJS 391 - Psychology of Women (Psychology 391)
DSJS 395 - Gender and Violence (Psychology 395)
DSJS 406 - Queer Theory
DSJS 435 - Gender and Sexuality (Psychology 435)

Identities and Social Structures
DSJS 263 - Global Youth Cultures (Sociology/Anthropology 263)
DSJS 275 - Social Inequality (Sociology/Anthropology 275)
DSJS 292 - Work and Society (Sociology 292) 
DSJS 302 - Constructing Difference and Identity (Sociology/Anthropology 307)
DSJS 303 - Psychology of Aging (Psychology 303)
DSJS 352 - Kinship and Family (Anthropology 352)
DSJS 355 - Globalization (Sociology/Anthropology 355)
DSJS 371 - Community Based Ethical Inquiry (Philosophy 371)
DSJS 381 - Women, Economics and the Economy (Economics 381)
DSJS 384 - Cultural Psychology (Psychology 385)
DSJS 401 - Medical Anthropology (Anthropology 401)
DSJS 431 - Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism (Soc/Anth 431)
DSJS 451 - Women and Aging (Family Science 451)
DSJS 472 - Social Justice in Psychology (Psychology 472)

Cultural Representation and Analysis
DSJS 212 - Food and Cultural Studies (Foods & Nutrition 231)
DSJS 221 - Writings by Women (English 221)
DSJS 306 - Transgression, Resistance, Protest
DSJS 311 - Identity and Popular Culture (Anthropology 310/English 314)
DSJS 332 - Knowledge and Culture (Anthropology 332)
DSJS 374 - Qualitative Research Methods (Psychology 374)
DSJS 402 - Cybercultures (Anthropology 403)
DSJS 412 - Theories of the Body
DSJS 456 - Visual Culture (Sociology/Anthropology 456)
DSJS 466 - Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality (English 466)
DSJS 473 - 18th Century English Society and Culture (History 473)

 

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) (formerly Women's Studies)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building
(902) 628-4353

A minor in DSJS will be recognized when a student has successfully completed twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses in DSJS, including 109 and six additional courses from anywhere on the list of DSJS courses. At least six-semester hours must be at the 300- or 400-level.

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) (formerly Women's Studies)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building
(902) 628-4353

Each year, Diversity and Social Justice Studies is pleased to be able to award three monetary prizes to deserving students in the program. The Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Scholarship is funded through a scholarship fund established in 2001 in memory of Dr. Percival, who taught at UPEI from 1971 to 2001, and who was one of the primary founders of the program at the University. The Bonnie MacPherson award is funded through an endowment made to the University by the family of former UPEI student Bonnie MacPherson. The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is made possible by the generous donations of a group of community and academic supporters, the Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, started by Dr. Percival.

The Dr. Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Award

This award will be given to a returning UPEI student in high academic standing who demonstrates a focus on gender issues in Psychology and Diversity and Social Justice Studies and a commitment to advancing social justice across campus and/or in the larger community. A recipient will be chosen based on a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and the Chair of the Psychology Department, and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards committee. This award is given out at Deans' Honours and Awards Night in the fall semester.

The Bonnie Lynne MacPherson Award in Diversity and Social Justice Studies

The Bonnie L. MacPherson Memorial Award is presented annually to a graduating student who has exemplified excellence in scholarship in the Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program. A recipient will be chosen based upon a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards Committee.

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is presented annually, upon recommendation of the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, to a returning full-time student with an expressed interest in pursuing Diversity and Social Justice Studies through active participation in courses, and who has also demonstrated a strong commitment to social justice. This prize is awarded at the annual Deans’ Honours and Awards ceremony held each fall.

 

Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) (formerly Women's Studies)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Non-profit Careers
  • Social Worker
  • Human Rights Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer
The Diversity and Social Justice Studies program is located in SDU Main Building
(902) 628-4353

Core Faculty

  • Ann Braithwaite, Diversity and Social Justice Studies, Coordinator

Faculty, cross-listed courses

  • Charles Adeyanju (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Susan Brown (History)
  • Lisa Chilton (History)
  • Pam Courtenay-Hall (Philosophy)
  • Nicky Hyndman (Applied Human Sciences)
  • Udo Krautwurst (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Colleen MacQuarrie (Psychology)
  • Jean Mitchell (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Sharon Myers (History)
  • Nia Phillips (Psychology)
  • Jim Sentance (Economics)
Overview

Diversity and Social Justice Studies responds to the 21st century need for critical engaged citizens who can, through a variety of theoretical languages and methodologies: a) analyze the social construction of identity categories (gender, sexuality, race, class, age, national status, able-bodiedness, species, etc.) and recognize the difference these make to what we know and how we act in the world; b) recognize, address, and challenge global inequities around these intersecting identity categories and analyze how social structures and policies, systems of representation, and everyday practices perpetuate these inequities; c) see the world from multiple points of view at the same time, recognize the complexity of contexts in shaping those views, and understand that both knowledge and visions of social change are always situated and partial.

Diversity and Social Justice encourages interdisciplinary approaches and the development of intercultural knowledge through a variety of courses and other learning opportunities. Courses are divided into three thematic areas: 1) Gender and Sexuality; 2) Identities and Social Structures; 3) Cultural Representation and Analysis.

 

Coordinator, Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program
Dr. Ann Braithwaite
Major

Students pursuing a Major in Diversity and Social Justice must complete 42 credit hours (14 courses) in the DSJS Program. These credit hours must be composed of the 2 required core courses in DSJS 109 and 404, and 12 additional courses from the list of DSJS courses, with at least four courses (12 semester hours) at the 300-400-level. Students must take a minimum of 2 courses from each of the 3 thematic areas.

1.  Core Courses:

  • DSJS 109 Special Topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies
  • DSJS 404 Theorizing Social Justice

2.  DSJS and cross-listed courses:

THEMATIC AREAS
Gender and Sexuality

DSJS 205 - Sex and Culture
DSJS 242 - Philosophies of Love and Sexuality (Philosophy 242)
DSJS 261 - Sex, Gender and Society (Sociology/Anthropology 261)
DSJS 385 - Women in 19th Century Canada (History 385)
DSJS 386 - Women in 20th Century Canada (History 386)
DSJS 391 - Psychology of Women (Psychology 391)
DSJS 395 - Gender and Violence (Psychology 395)
DSJS 406 - Queer Theory
DSJS 435 - Gender and Sexuality (Psychology 435)

Identities and Social Structures
DSJS 263 - Global Youth Cultures (Sociology/Anthropology 263)
DSJS 275 - Social Inequality (Sociology/Anthropology 275)
DSJS 292 - Work and Society (Sociology 292) 
DSJS 302 - Constructing Difference and Identity (Sociology/Anthropology 307)
DSJS 303 - Psychology of Aging (Psychology 303)
DSJS 352 - Kinship and Family (Anthropology 352)
DSJS 355 - Globalization (Sociology/Anthropology 355)
DSJS 371 - Community Based Ethical Inquiry (Philosophy 371)
DSJS 381 - Women, Economics and the Economy (Economics 381)
DSJS 384 - Cultural Psychology (Psychology 385)
DSJS 401 - Medical Anthropology (Anthropology 401)
DSJS 431 - Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism (Soc/Anth 431)
DSJS 451 - Women and Aging (Family Science 451)
DSJS 472 - Social Justice in Psychology (Psychology 472)

Cultural Representation and Analysis
DSJS 212 - Food and Cultural Studies (Foods & Nutrition 231)
DSJS 221 - Writings by Women (English 221)
DSJS 306 - Transgression, Resistance, Protest
DSJS 311 - Identity and Popular Culture (Anthropology 310/English 314)
DSJS 332 - Knowledge and Culture (Anthropology 332)
DSJS 374 - Qualitative Research Methods (Psychology 374)
DSJS 402 - Cybercultures (Anthropology 403)
DSJS 412 - Theories of the Body
DSJS 456 - Visual Culture (Sociology/Anthropology 456)
DSJS 466 - Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality (English 466)
DSJS 473 - 18th Century English Society and Culture (History 473)

 

Minor

A minor in DSJS will be recognized when a student has successfully completed twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses in DSJS, including 109 and six additional courses from anywhere on the list of DSJS courses. At least six-semester hours must be at the 300- or 400-level.

Awards and Honours

Each year, Diversity and Social Justice Studies is pleased to be able to award three monetary prizes to deserving students in the program. The Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Scholarship is funded through a scholarship fund established in 2001 in memory of Dr. Percival, who taught at UPEI from 1971 to 2001, and who was one of the primary founders of the program at the University. The Bonnie MacPherson award is funded through an endowment made to the University by the family of former UPEI student Bonnie MacPherson. The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is made possible by the generous donations of a group of community and academic supporters, the Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, started by Dr. Percival.

The Dr. Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Award

This award will be given to a returning UPEI student in high academic standing who demonstrates a focus on gender issues in Psychology and Diversity and Social Justice Studies and a commitment to advancing social justice across campus and/or in the larger community. A recipient will be chosen based on a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and the Chair of the Psychology Department, and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards committee. This award is given out at Deans' Honours and Awards Night in the fall semester.

The Bonnie Lynne MacPherson Award in Diversity and Social Justice Studies

The Bonnie L. MacPherson Memorial Award is presented annually to a graduating student who has exemplified excellence in scholarship in the Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program. A recipient will be chosen based upon a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards Committee.

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is presented annually, upon recommendation of the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, to a returning full-time student with an expressed interest in pursuing Diversity and Social Justice Studies through active participation in courses, and who has also demonstrated a strong commitment to social justice. This prize is awarded at the annual Deans’ Honours and Awards ceremony held each fall.

 

Faculty

Core Faculty

  • Ann Braithwaite, Diversity and Social Justice Studies, Coordinator

Faculty, cross-listed courses

  • Charles Adeyanju (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Susan Brown (History)
  • Lisa Chilton (History)
  • Pam Courtenay-Hall (Philosophy)
  • Nicky Hyndman (Applied Human Sciences)
  • Udo Krautwurst (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Colleen MacQuarrie (Psychology)
  • Jean Mitchell (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Sharon Myers (History)
  • Nia Phillips (Psychology)
  • Jim Sentance (Economics)

Overview

Diversity and Social Justice Studies responds to the 21st century need for critical engaged citizens who can, through a variety of theoretical languages and methodologies: a) analyze the social construction of identity categories (gender, sexuality, race, class, age, national status, able-bodiedness, species, etc.) and recognize the difference these make to what we know and how we act in the world; b) recognize, address, and challenge global inequities around these intersecting identity categories and analyze how social structures and policies, systems of representation, and everyday practices perpetuate these inequities; c) see the world from multiple points of view at the same time, recognize the complexity of contexts in shaping those views, and understand that both knowledge and visions of social change are always situated and partial.

Diversity and Social Justice encourages interdisciplinary approaches and the development of intercultural knowledge through a variety of courses and other learning opportunities. Courses are divided into three thematic areas: 1) Gender and Sexuality; 2) Identities and Social Structures; 3) Cultural Representation and Analysis.

 

Dr. Ann Braithwaite
Coordinator, Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program

Major

Students pursuing a Major in Diversity and Social Justice must complete 42 credit hours (14 courses) in the DSJS Program. These credit hours must be composed of the 2 required core courses in DSJS 109 and 404, and 12 additional courses from the list of DSJS courses, with at least four courses (12 semester hours) at the 300-400-level. Students must take a minimum of 2 courses from each of the 3 thematic areas.

1.  Core Courses:

  • DSJS 109 Special Topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies
  • DSJS 404 Theorizing Social Justice

2.  DSJS and cross-listed courses:

THEMATIC AREAS
Gender and Sexuality

DSJS 205 - Sex and Culture
DSJS 242 - Philosophies of Love and Sexuality (Philosophy 242)
DSJS 261 - Sex, Gender and Society (Sociology/Anthropology 261)
DSJS 385 - Women in 19th Century Canada (History 385)
DSJS 386 - Women in 20th Century Canada (History 386)
DSJS 391 - Psychology of Women (Psychology 391)
DSJS 395 - Gender and Violence (Psychology 395)
DSJS 406 - Queer Theory
DSJS 435 - Gender and Sexuality (Psychology 435)

Identities and Social Structures
DSJS 263 - Global Youth Cultures (Sociology/Anthropology 263)
DSJS 275 - Social Inequality (Sociology/Anthropology 275)
DSJS 292 - Work and Society (Sociology 292) 
DSJS 302 - Constructing Difference and Identity (Sociology/Anthropology 307)
DSJS 303 - Psychology of Aging (Psychology 303)
DSJS 352 - Kinship and Family (Anthropology 352)
DSJS 355 - Globalization (Sociology/Anthropology 355)
DSJS 371 - Community Based Ethical Inquiry (Philosophy 371)
DSJS 381 - Women, Economics and the Economy (Economics 381)
DSJS 384 - Cultural Psychology (Psychology 385)
DSJS 401 - Medical Anthropology (Anthropology 401)
DSJS 431 - Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism (Soc/Anth 431)
DSJS 451 - Women and Aging (Family Science 451)
DSJS 472 - Social Justice in Psychology (Psychology 472)

Cultural Representation and Analysis
DSJS 212 - Food and Cultural Studies (Foods & Nutrition 231)
DSJS 221 - Writings by Women (English 221)
DSJS 306 - Transgression, Resistance, Protest
DSJS 311 - Identity and Popular Culture (Anthropology 310/English 314)
DSJS 332 - Knowledge and Culture (Anthropology 332)
DSJS 374 - Qualitative Research Methods (Psychology 374)
DSJS 402 - Cybercultures (Anthropology 403)
DSJS 412 - Theories of the Body
DSJS 456 - Visual Culture (Sociology/Anthropology 456)
DSJS 466 - Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality (English 466)
DSJS 473 - 18th Century English Society and Culture (History 473)

 

Minor

A minor in DSJS will be recognized when a student has successfully completed twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses in DSJS, including 109 and six additional courses from anywhere on the list of DSJS courses. At least six-semester hours must be at the 300- or 400-level.

Awards and Honours

Each year, Diversity and Social Justice Studies is pleased to be able to award three monetary prizes to deserving students in the program. The Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Scholarship is funded through a scholarship fund established in 2001 in memory of Dr. Percival, who taught at UPEI from 1971 to 2001, and who was one of the primary founders of the program at the University. The Bonnie MacPherson award is funded through an endowment made to the University by the family of former UPEI student Bonnie MacPherson. The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is made possible by the generous donations of a group of community and academic supporters, the Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, started by Dr. Percival.

The Dr. Elizabeth Fox Percival Memorial Award

This award will be given to a returning UPEI student in high academic standing who demonstrates a focus on gender issues in Psychology and Diversity and Social Justice Studies and a commitment to advancing social justice across campus and/or in the larger community. A recipient will be chosen based on a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and the Chair of the Psychology Department, and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards committee. This award is given out at Deans' Honours and Awards Night in the fall semester.

The Bonnie Lynne MacPherson Award in Diversity and Social Justice Studies

The Bonnie L. MacPherson Memorial Award is presented annually to a graduating student who has exemplified excellence in scholarship in the Diversity and Social Justice Studies Program. A recipient will be chosen based upon a recommendation from the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and will be approved by the UPEI Scholarships and Awards Committee.

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award

The Friends of Diversity and Social Justice Studies Award is presented annually, upon recommendation of the Coordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies, to a returning full-time student with an expressed interest in pursuing Diversity and Social Justice Studies through active participation in courses, and who has also demonstrated a strong commitment to social justice. This prize is awarded at the annual Deans’ Honours and Awards ceremony held each fall.

 

Faculty

Core Faculty

  • Ann Braithwaite, Diversity and Social Justice Studies, Coordinator

Faculty, cross-listed courses

  • Charles Adeyanju (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Susan Brown (History)
  • Lisa Chilton (History)
  • Pam Courtenay-Hall (Philosophy)
  • Nicky Hyndman (Applied Human Sciences)
  • Udo Krautwurst (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Colleen MacQuarrie (Psychology)
  • Jean Mitchell (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Sharon Myers (History)
  • Nia Phillips (Psychology)
  • Jim Sentance (Economics)
Want more information about Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS) (formerly Women's Studies)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Non-profit Careers
Social Worker
Human Rights Advocate
Journalist
Lawyer
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

109 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 100 level. Visit the DSJS Special Topics page for a complete description.

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

205 SEX AND CULTURE
This course examines theories of sex and sexuality, and investigates how they are central to the construction and function of contemporary North American culture. It explores how boundaries between ‘approved of ’ and ‘disapproved of ’ sexual behaviours reflect larger social and cultural concerns, and challenges students to think beyond the more usual either/or ways of identifying sexuality. Topics covered include the social construction of heterosexuality, changing definitions of lesbian/gay/bisexual, challenges posed by intersexed and transgendered people, sex work, sado/masochism, pornography, monogamy, intergenerational sex, internet and ‘cybersex,’ and the ‘feminist sex wars.’
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 200 level.

212 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
This course introduces students to the study of food and its relationships to identities (i.e., gender, race, class, national status), the body, community, popular culture, and politics. It explores how historical and contemporary food production and consumption practices both construct and reflect these relationships and examines such questions as how food is defined and how it circulates to both perpetuate and challenge power and privilege.
Cross-listed  with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 231)

221 WRITINGS BY WOMEN
(See English 221).

242 PHILOSOPIES OF LOVE AND SEXUALITY
(See Philosophy 242).

261 SEX, GENDER AND SOCIETY
(See Sociology/Anthropology 261).

263 GLOBAL YOUTH CULTURES
(See Sociology/Anthropology 263).

275 SOCIAL INEQUALITY
(See Sociology/Anthropology  275)

292 WORK AND SOCIETY
(See Sociology 292).

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

302 CONSTRUCTING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY
This course examines some of the differences between and among women, exploring how claims to various identities and politics have transformed Diversity and Social Justice Studies. It analyzes essentialist assumptions about identity categories such as race, sex, gender, and sexuality, and examines their social construction and contemporary interconnections at the institutional level.
Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology (cf. Soc/Anth 307)
PREREQUISITE:  DSJS 109, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

303 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING
(See Psychology 303).

306 TRANSGRESSION, RESISTANCE, PROTEST
This course introduces students to concepts of ‘transgression,’ resistance, and protest, exploring what kinds of events, people, and objects are thought to constitute social, political, and cultural practices of these concepts in various times and places. It explores how gender, sexuality, race, national identity, class, age, and abilities have been central to social definitions of--and anxieties about—transgression, resistance, and protest. It also focuses on how people have used these concepts to productively push against the limits of their social positionings.
PREREQUISITE: None

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 300 level.

311 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
This course introduces students to approaches to the study of popular culture and cultural studies, asking what is meant by the term “pop culture” and exploring it as a site of struggle and negotiation for a variety of identity groups. It explores both how social identities (gender, race, sexuality, and class) are constructed and represented in popular cultural objects and practices, and examines how those can make a difference to how people then interact with and in that pop culture. Course materials are drawn from advertising, popular events and trends, news items, film, TV, fan culture, zines, pornography, and the new communications technologies.
Cross-listed as English 314 and Anthropology 310
PREREQUISITE:  None
Three hours a week

332 KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
(See Anthropology 332).

352 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
(See Anthropology 352).

355 GLOBALIZATION
(See Sociology/Anthropology 355).

371 COMMUNITY BASED ETHICAL INQUIRY
(See Philosophy 371).

374 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS
(See Psychology 374).

381 WOMEN, ECONOMICS AND THE ECONOMY
(See Economics 381).

384 CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 385)

385 WOMEN IN 19TH CENTURY CANADA
(See History 385).

386 WOMEN, THE LAW, AND CIVIL RIGHTS IN 20TH CENTURY CANADA
(See History 386).

391 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
(See Psychology 391).

395 GENDER AND VIOLENCE
(See Psychology 395).

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
(See Anthropology 401).

402 CYBERCULTURES
(See Anthropology 403).

404 THEORIZING SOCIAL JUSTICE
This capstone course provides the opportunity for students to explore theories and practices of “social justice,” broadly defined, across a number of contexts. It examines how social movements and identity groups have defined this concept, investigates, through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, processes towards this goal in addition to barriers inhibiting its attainment.
PREREQUISITES:  DSJS 109 and at least two other DSJS courses.

406 QUEER THEORY
This course introduces students to the body of academic thought known as “queer theory” and to the ways it challenges assumptions about sexuality, gender, and other identity categories. It focuses on queer theory’s historical foundations, genealogies, and contributions, as well as on contemporary uses of and debates in the field.
PREREQUISITES: DSJS 109 and at least one other DSJS course at the 200  level or above, or permission of the instructor.

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 400 level.

412 THEORIES OF THE BODY
This course introduces students to what is often called “body studies,” exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions.
PREREQUISITE: At least one DSJS course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

431 MINORITY/ETHNIC GROUPS AND CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
(See Sociology/Anthropology 431).

435 GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See Psychology 435).

451 WOMEN AND AGING
(See Family Science 451).

456 VISUAL CULTURE
(See Sociology/Anthropology 456).

466 ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See English 466).

472 SOCIAL JUSTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 472).

474 BRITAIN IN THE 20th CENTURY: SOCIETY, CULTURE AND IDENTITY
(See History 472).

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty.
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
Three hours a week

Calendar Courses

109 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 100 level. Visit the DSJS Special Topics page for a complete description.

205 SEX AND CULTURE
This course examines theories of sex and sexuality, and investigates how they are central to the construction and function of contemporary North American culture. It explores how boundaries between ‘approved of ’ and ‘disapproved of ’ sexual behaviours reflect larger social and cultural concerns, and challenges students to think beyond the more usual either/or ways of identifying sexuality. Topics covered include the social construction of heterosexuality, changing definitions of lesbian/gay/bisexual, challenges posed by intersexed and transgendered people, sex work, sado/masochism, pornography, monogamy, intergenerational sex, internet and ‘cybersex,’ and the ‘feminist sex wars.’
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 200 level.

212 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
This course introduces students to the study of food and its relationships to identities (i.e., gender, race, class, national status), the body, community, popular culture, and politics. It explores how historical and contemporary food production and consumption practices both construct and reflect these relationships and examines such questions as how food is defined and how it circulates to both perpetuate and challenge power and privilege.
Cross-listed  with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 231)

221 WRITINGS BY WOMEN
(See English 221).

242 PHILOSOPIES OF LOVE AND SEXUALITY
(See Philosophy 242).

261 SEX, GENDER AND SOCIETY
(See Sociology/Anthropology 261).

263 GLOBAL YOUTH CULTURES
(See Sociology/Anthropology 263).

275 SOCIAL INEQUALITY
(See Sociology/Anthropology  275)

292 WORK AND SOCIETY
(See Sociology 292).

302 CONSTRUCTING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY
This course examines some of the differences between and among women, exploring how claims to various identities and politics have transformed Diversity and Social Justice Studies. It analyzes essentialist assumptions about identity categories such as race, sex, gender, and sexuality, and examines their social construction and contemporary interconnections at the institutional level.
Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology (cf. Soc/Anth 307)
PREREQUISITE:  DSJS 109, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

303 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING
(See Psychology 303).

306 TRANSGRESSION, RESISTANCE, PROTEST
This course introduces students to concepts of ‘transgression,’ resistance, and protest, exploring what kinds of events, people, and objects are thought to constitute social, political, and cultural practices of these concepts in various times and places. It explores how gender, sexuality, race, national identity, class, age, and abilities have been central to social definitions of--and anxieties about—transgression, resistance, and protest. It also focuses on how people have used these concepts to productively push against the limits of their social positionings.
PREREQUISITE: None

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 300 level.

311 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
This course introduces students to approaches to the study of popular culture and cultural studies, asking what is meant by the term “pop culture” and exploring it as a site of struggle and negotiation for a variety of identity groups. It explores both how social identities (gender, race, sexuality, and class) are constructed and represented in popular cultural objects and practices, and examines how those can make a difference to how people then interact with and in that pop culture. Course materials are drawn from advertising, popular events and trends, news items, film, TV, fan culture, zines, pornography, and the new communications technologies.
Cross-listed as English 314 and Anthropology 310
PREREQUISITE:  None
Three hours a week

332 KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
(See Anthropology 332).

352 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
(See Anthropology 352).

355 GLOBALIZATION
(See Sociology/Anthropology 355).

371 COMMUNITY BASED ETHICAL INQUIRY
(See Philosophy 371).

374 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS
(See Psychology 374).

381 WOMEN, ECONOMICS AND THE ECONOMY
(See Economics 381).

384 CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 385)

385 WOMEN IN 19TH CENTURY CANADA
(See History 385).

386 WOMEN, THE LAW, AND CIVIL RIGHTS IN 20TH CENTURY CANADA
(See History 386).

391 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
(See Psychology 391).

395 GENDER AND VIOLENCE
(See Psychology 395).

401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
(See Anthropology 401).

402 CYBERCULTURES
(See Anthropology 403).

404 THEORIZING SOCIAL JUSTICE
This capstone course provides the opportunity for students to explore theories and practices of “social justice,” broadly defined, across a number of contexts. It examines how social movements and identity groups have defined this concept, investigates, through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, processes towards this goal in addition to barriers inhibiting its attainment.
PREREQUISITES:  DSJS 109 and at least two other DSJS courses.

406 QUEER THEORY
This course introduces students to the body of academic thought known as “queer theory” and to the ways it challenges assumptions about sexuality, gender, and other identity categories. It focuses on queer theory’s historical foundations, genealogies, and contributions, as well as on contemporary uses of and debates in the field.
PREREQUISITES: DSJS 109 and at least one other DSJS course at the 200  level or above, or permission of the instructor.

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 400 level.

412 THEORIES OF THE BODY
This course introduces students to what is often called “body studies,” exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions.
PREREQUISITE: At least one DSJS course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

431 MINORITY/ETHNIC GROUPS AND CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
(See Sociology/Anthropology 431).

435 GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See Psychology 435).

451 WOMEN AND AGING
(See Family Science 451).

456 VISUAL CULTURE
(See Sociology/Anthropology 456).

466 ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See English 466).

472 SOCIAL JUSTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 472).

474 BRITAIN IN THE 20th CENTURY: SOCIETY, CULTURE AND IDENTITY
(See History 472).

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty.
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
Three hours a week

Calendar Courses

100 Level

109 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 100 level. Visit the DSJS Special Topics page for a complete description.

200 Level

205 SEX AND CULTURE
This course examines theories of sex and sexuality, and investigates how they are central to the construction and function of contemporary North American culture. It explores how boundaries between ‘approved of ’ and ‘disapproved of ’ sexual behaviours reflect larger social and cultural concerns, and challenges students to think beyond the more usual either/or ways of identifying sexuality. Topics covered include the social construction of heterosexuality, changing definitions of lesbian/gay/bisexual, challenges posed by intersexed and transgendered people, sex work, sado/masochism, pornography, monogamy, intergenerational sex, internet and ‘cybersex,’ and the ‘feminist sex wars.’
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 200 level.

212 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
This course introduces students to the study of food and its relationships to identities (i.e., gender, race, class, national status), the body, community, popular culture, and politics. It explores how historical and contemporary food production and consumption practices both construct and reflect these relationships and examines such questions as how food is defined and how it circulates to both perpetuate and challenge power and privilege.
Cross-listed  with Foods & Nutrition (cf. Foods & Nutrition 231)

221 WRITINGS BY WOMEN
(See English 221).

242 PHILOSOPIES OF LOVE AND SEXUALITY
(See Philosophy 242).

261 SEX, GENDER AND SOCIETY
(See Sociology/Anthropology 261).

263 GLOBAL YOUTH CULTURES
(See Sociology/Anthropology 263).

275 SOCIAL INEQUALITY
(See Sociology/Anthropology  275)

292 WORK AND SOCIETY
(See Sociology 292).

300 Level

302 CONSTRUCTING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY
This course examines some of the differences between and among women, exploring how claims to various identities and politics have transformed Diversity and Social Justice Studies. It analyzes essentialist assumptions about identity categories such as race, sex, gender, and sexuality, and examines their social construction and contemporary interconnections at the institutional level.
Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology (cf. Soc/Anth 307)
PREREQUISITE:  DSJS 109, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

303 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING
(See Psychology 303).

306 TRANSGRESSION, RESISTANCE, PROTEST
This course introduces students to concepts of ‘transgression,’ resistance, and protest, exploring what kinds of events, people, and objects are thought to constitute social, political, and cultural practices of these concepts in various times and places. It explores how gender, sexuality, race, national identity, class, age, and abilities have been central to social definitions of--and anxieties about—transgression, resistance, and protest. It also focuses on how people have used these concepts to productively push against the limits of their social positionings.
PREREQUISITE: None

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 300 level.

311 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
This course introduces students to approaches to the study of popular culture and cultural studies, asking what is meant by the term “pop culture” and exploring it as a site of struggle and negotiation for a variety of identity groups. It explores both how social identities (gender, race, sexuality, and class) are constructed and represented in popular cultural objects and practices, and examines how those can make a difference to how people then interact with and in that pop culture. Course materials are drawn from advertising, popular events and trends, news items, film, TV, fan culture, zines, pornography, and the new communications technologies.
Cross-listed as English 314 and Anthropology 310
PREREQUISITE:  None
Three hours a week

332 KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
(See Anthropology 332).

352 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
(See Anthropology 352).

355 GLOBALIZATION
(See Sociology/Anthropology 355).

371 COMMUNITY BASED ETHICAL INQUIRY
(See Philosophy 371).

374 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS
(See Psychology 374).

381 WOMEN, ECONOMICS AND THE ECONOMY
(See Economics 381).

384 CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 385)

385 WOMEN IN 19TH CENTURY CANADA
(See History 385).

386 WOMEN, THE LAW, AND CIVIL RIGHTS IN 20TH CENTURY CANADA
(See History 386).

391 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
(See Psychology 391).

395 GENDER AND VIOLENCE
(See Psychology 395).

400 Level

401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
(See Anthropology 401).

402 CYBERCULTURES
(See Anthropology 403).

404 THEORIZING SOCIAL JUSTICE
This capstone course provides the opportunity for students to explore theories and practices of “social justice,” broadly defined, across a number of contexts. It examines how social movements and identity groups have defined this concept, investigates, through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, processes towards this goal in addition to barriers inhibiting its attainment.
PREREQUISITES:  DSJS 109 and at least two other DSJS courses.

406 QUEER THEORY
This course introduces students to the body of academic thought known as “queer theory” and to the ways it challenges assumptions about sexuality, gender, and other identity categories. It focuses on queer theory’s historical foundations, genealogies, and contributions, as well as on contemporary uses of and debates in the field.
PREREQUISITES: DSJS 109 and at least one other DSJS course at the 200  level or above, or permission of the instructor.

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by DSJS at the 400 level.

412 THEORIES OF THE BODY
This course introduces students to what is often called “body studies,” exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions.
PREREQUISITE: At least one DSJS course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

431 MINORITY/ETHNIC GROUPS AND CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
(See Sociology/Anthropology 431).

435 GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See Psychology 435).

451 WOMEN AND AGING
(See Family Science 451).

456 VISUAL CULTURE
(See Sociology/Anthropology 456).

466 ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See English 466).

472 SOCIAL JUSTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 472).

474 BRITAIN IN THE 20th CENTURY: SOCIETY, CULTURE AND IDENTITY
(See History 472).

491-492 DIRECTED STUDIES
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in DSJS. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of DSJS and the Dean of the Faculty.
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
Three hours a week