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Chemistry

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The department of Chemistry is located in the K.C. Irving Chemistry Centre

Central to most fields of science, chemistry helps us to understand a range of topics including environmental issues, drugs and medicine, production of plastics and other materials, and nutrition. A fundamental understanding of chemistry is also important and interesting for its own sake. There is a great demand for chemists in many industries and government agencies. In fact, the chemical industry in Charlottetown and the rest of Canada is a booming business.

At UPEI we focus on providing truly excellent undergraduate and graduate programs while carrying out innovative chemical research. Our four-year BSc Honours, Majors, Minors, and Master’s degrees are accredited through the Canadian Society for Chemistry. There is a tremendous sense of excitement in both teaching and research in Chemistry at UPEI.

The department is located in the K. C. Irving Chemistry Centre, which is fully equipped with dedicated research labs, undergraduate teaching labs, student computer room, and "smart” classrooms. We have a very active Chemistry Student Society, which organizes Chemistry Open Houses, fundraising barbecues, golf days, and other social events.

Dr. Rabin Bissessur, Chair
UPEI Department of Chemistry
Want more information about Chemistry ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
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Careers:
  • Pharmacist
  • Lab Technician
  • Lawyer
  • Plant Chemist
  • Research Chemist
The department of Chemistry is located in the K.C. Irving Chemistry Centre

The Honours Program in Chemistry is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post-graduate level in Chemistry or some related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours Program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report, in the requirement of 126 semester hours for the degree and in the requirement of an additional five advanced Chemistry courses. The following are the course requirements for the Honours Program in Chemistry:

First Year

  • Chemistry 1110-1120 - General Chemistry I and II
  • Biology 1310-1320 - General Biology I and II
  • Physics 1110-1120 or 1210-1220 - General Physics
  • Mathematics 1910-1920 - Single Variable Calculus I and II
  • Electives (6 semester hours)

Second Year

  • Chemistry 2210 - Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 - Organic Chemistry I & II
  • Chemistry 2310 - Physical Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 2720 - Inorganic Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 2910 - Multivariable and Vector Calculus
  • Electives (9 semester hours)

Third Year

  • Chemistry 3220 - Analytical Instrumentation
  • Chemistry 3310 - Physical Chemistry II
  • Chemistry 3420 - Advanced Organic Chemistry
  • Chemistry 3530 - Biochemistry 
  • Chemistry 3610 - Organic Spectrosopy 
  • Chemistry 3740 - Inorganic Chemistry II 
  • Chemistry elective (3 semester hours) 
  • Mathematics elective (3 semester hours) 
  • Electives (6 semester hours)

Fourth Year

  • Chemistry 4320 - Methods in Computational Chemistry
  • Chemistry 4410 - Physical Organic Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 4670 - Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis
    OR
    Chemistry 4680 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
  • Chemistry 4900 - Honours Thesis (12 semester hours)
  • Chemistry electives (6 semester hours)
  • Electives (9 semester hours) 

The Chemistry electives may be chosen from among Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, or 4690. The Mathematics elective may be chosen from Statistics 1210, 3210, Mathematics 2610 or 3010 in consultation with the Chair. As well, students in the Honours Program in Chemistry are strongly advised to take Physics 2120 (Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits) and/or Physics 3120 (Electromagnetism I).

Honours students should note that Chemistry 4900 is a two- semester course and carries twelve semester hours of credit. No credit for the first semester will be granted without successful completion of the second semester of the course.

For admission to the Honours Program, students must have a minimum average of 70% in all previous courses; normally the Department expects high second-class standing or first-class standing in previous Chemistry courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an Honours Advisor, on being assigned an advisory committee, on acceptance of the research project by the Chemistry Department, and on general acceptability. Students interested in doing Honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31 of the student’s third year.

To graduate with a BSc Honours in Chemistry, students must complete 126 semester hours of credit which meet the required courses outlined above. As well, students must attain a 75% average in all Chemistry courses combined and must achieve a minimum overall average of 70% in all courses submitted for the degree. Students failing to meet the Honours requirements may apply for a transfer to the BSc Chemistry Major Program or to other degree programs.

Want more information about Chemistry ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
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Careers:
  • Pharmacist
  • Lab Technician
  • Lawyer
  • Plant Chemist
  • Research Chemist
The department of Chemistry is located in the K.C. Irving Chemistry Centre
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Chemistry must take at least 48 semester hours of chemistry in total and must at the same time complete certain courses as specified by the major requirements.
 
The required Chemistry courses are: Chemistry 1110-1120, Chemistry 2210, Chemistry 2410-2420, Chemistry 2310, Chemistry 2720, Chemistry 3220, Chemistry 3310, Chemistry 3420, Chemistry 3530, Chemistry 3610, Chemistry 3740, Chemistry 4820 OR 4830 and two Chemistry electives, at least one of which is at the 4th year level.
 
Additional course requirements for the Chemistry major include the following courses from other disciplines: Biology 1310-1320, Mathematics 1910, Mathematics 1920, Mathematics 2910 and a Math elective; Physics 1110-1120 or Physics 1210-1220. As well, students majoring in Chemistry are advised to take Physics 2120 (Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits).
 
All programs of study of students declared as Chemistry majors must be approved by the Chair of the Department. An outline of the Chemistry major requirements in the suggested sequence for their completion is given below, but deviations from it are permitted provided that the pertinent prerequisites are fulfilled.
 
First Year
  • Chemistry 1110-1120 - General Chemistry I and II 
  • Biology 1310-1320 - General Biology I and II 
  • Physics 1110-1120 or 1210-1220 - General Physics 
  • Mathematics 1910-1920 - Single Variable Calculus I and II  
  • Electives (6 semester hours) 
Second Year
  • Chemistry 2210 - Analytical Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 - Organic Chemistry I & II 
  • Chemistry 2310 - Physical Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 2720 - Inorganic Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 2910 - Multivariable and Vector Calculus 
  • Electives (9 semester hours)
Third Year
  • Chemistry 3220 - Analytical Instrumentation
  • Chemistry 3310 - Physical Chemistry II
  • Chemistry 3420 - Advanced Organic Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 3610 - Organic Spectroscopy 
  • Chemistry 3740 - Inorganic Chemistry II 
  • Electives (15 semester hours)
Fourth Year
  • Chemistry 3530 - Biochemistry
  • Chemistry 4820 - Advanced Research Project* OR
    Chemistry 4830 - Advanced Chemistry Laboratory*
  • Chemistry Electives (6 semester hours)
  • Electives* (15 or 18 semester hours)
*The total number of electives depends on whether Chemistry 4820 (6 credits) or Chemistry 4830 (3 credits) is taken to fulfill the fourth year laboratory requirement.  The Chemistry electives may be chosen from the Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4320, 4410, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, 4690, 4820 or 4830. At least one of the electives must be a 4th year course. The mathematics elective may be selected from Statistics 1210, Mathematics 2420, 2610 or 2910.
Want more information about Chemistry ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Pharmacist
  • Lab Technician
  • Lawyer
  • Plant Chemist
  • Research Chemist
The department of Chemistry is located in the K.C. Irving Chemistry Centre

Students may obtain a degree with a minor in Chemistry by successfully completing the following courses:

  • Chemistry 1110-1120
  • Chemistry 2210
  • Chemistry 2310
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 OR Chemistry 2430
  • Chemistry 2020
  • Chemistry 2720

With permission of the chair, one of the above courses may be replaced with one of the Chemistry 3220, 3310, 3420, 3610 or 3740.

Want more information about Chemistry ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Pharmacist
  • Lab Technician
  • Lawyer
  • Plant Chemist
  • Research Chemist
The department of Chemistry is located in the K.C. Irving Chemistry Centre
  • Michael T.H. Liu, Professor Emeritus
  • Rabin Bissessur, Professor, Chair
  • Alaa Abd-El-Aziz, Professor 
  • Russell Kerr, Professor
  • Brian D. Wagner, Professor
  • Nola Etkin, Associate Professor
  • Barry Linkletter, Associate Professor 
  • Jason Pearson, Assistant Professor 
  • Richard Bethell, Adjunct Professor 
  • Matthias Bierenstiel, Adjunct Professor 
  • Robert Chapman, Adjunct Professor
  • J. Regis Duffy, Adjunct Professor 
  • Christopher Kirby, Adjunct Professor 
  • Stephanie MacQuarrie, Adjunct Professor
  • Gary Reid, Adjunct Professor
  • Junzeng Zhang, Adjunct Professor
Overview

Central to most fields of science, chemistry helps us to understand a range of topics including environmental issues, drugs and medicine, production of plastics and other materials, and nutrition. A fundamental understanding of chemistry is also important and interesting for its own sake. There is a great demand for chemists in many industries and government agencies. In fact, the chemical industry in Charlottetown and the rest of Canada is a booming business.

At UPEI we focus on providing truly excellent undergraduate and graduate programs while carrying out innovative chemical research. Our four-year BSc Honours, Majors, Minors, and Master’s degrees are accredited through the Canadian Society for Chemistry. There is a tremendous sense of excitement in both teaching and research in Chemistry at UPEI.

The department is located in the K. C. Irving Chemistry Centre, which is fully equipped with dedicated research labs, undergraduate teaching labs, student computer room, and "smart” classrooms. We have a very active Chemistry Student Society, which organizes Chemistry Open Houses, fundraising barbecues, golf days, and other social events.

UPEI Department of Chemistry
Dr. Rabin Bissessur, Chair
Honours

The Honours Program in Chemistry is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post-graduate level in Chemistry or some related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours Program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report, in the requirement of 126 semester hours for the degree and in the requirement of an additional five advanced Chemistry courses. The following are the course requirements for the Honours Program in Chemistry:

First Year

  • Chemistry 1110-1120 - General Chemistry I and II
  • Biology 1310-1320 - General Biology I and II
  • Physics 1110-1120 or 1210-1220 - General Physics
  • Mathematics 1910-1920 - Single Variable Calculus I and II
  • Electives (6 semester hours)

Second Year

  • Chemistry 2210 - Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 - Organic Chemistry I & II
  • Chemistry 2310 - Physical Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 2720 - Inorganic Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 2910 - Multivariable and Vector Calculus
  • Electives (9 semester hours)

Third Year

  • Chemistry 3220 - Analytical Instrumentation
  • Chemistry 3310 - Physical Chemistry II
  • Chemistry 3420 - Advanced Organic Chemistry
  • Chemistry 3530 - Biochemistry 
  • Chemistry 3610 - Organic Spectrosopy 
  • Chemistry 3740 - Inorganic Chemistry II 
  • Chemistry elective (3 semester hours) 
  • Mathematics elective (3 semester hours) 
  • Electives (6 semester hours)

Fourth Year

  • Chemistry 4320 - Methods in Computational Chemistry
  • Chemistry 4410 - Physical Organic Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 4670 - Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis
    OR
    Chemistry 4680 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
  • Chemistry 4900 - Honours Thesis (12 semester hours)
  • Chemistry electives (6 semester hours)
  • Electives (9 semester hours) 

The Chemistry electives may be chosen from among Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, or 4690. The Mathematics elective may be chosen from Statistics 1210, 3210, Mathematics 2610 or 3010 in consultation with the Chair. As well, students in the Honours Program in Chemistry are strongly advised to take Physics 2120 (Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits) and/or Physics 3120 (Electromagnetism I).

Honours students should note that Chemistry 4900 is a two- semester course and carries twelve semester hours of credit. No credit for the first semester will be granted without successful completion of the second semester of the course.

For admission to the Honours Program, students must have a minimum average of 70% in all previous courses; normally the Department expects high second-class standing or first-class standing in previous Chemistry courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an Honours Advisor, on being assigned an advisory committee, on acceptance of the research project by the Chemistry Department, and on general acceptability. Students interested in doing Honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31 of the student’s third year.

To graduate with a BSc Honours in Chemistry, students must complete 126 semester hours of credit which meet the required courses outlined above. As well, students must attain a 75% average in all Chemistry courses combined and must achieve a minimum overall average of 70% in all courses submitted for the degree. Students failing to meet the Honours requirements may apply for a transfer to the BSc Chemistry Major Program or to other degree programs.

Major
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Chemistry must take at least 48 semester hours of chemistry in total and must at the same time complete certain courses as specified by the major requirements.
 
The required Chemistry courses are: Chemistry 1110-1120, Chemistry 2210, Chemistry 2410-2420, Chemistry 2310, Chemistry 2720, Chemistry 3220, Chemistry 3310, Chemistry 3420, Chemistry 3530, Chemistry 3610, Chemistry 3740, Chemistry 4820 OR 4830 and two Chemistry electives, at least one of which is at the 4th year level.
 
Additional course requirements for the Chemistry major include the following courses from other disciplines: Biology 1310-1320, Mathematics 1910, Mathematics 1920, Mathematics 2910 and a Math elective; Physics 1110-1120 or Physics 1210-1220. As well, students majoring in Chemistry are advised to take Physics 2120 (Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits).
 
All programs of study of students declared as Chemistry majors must be approved by the Chair of the Department. An outline of the Chemistry major requirements in the suggested sequence for their completion is given below, but deviations from it are permitted provided that the pertinent prerequisites are fulfilled.
 
First Year
  • Chemistry 1110-1120 - General Chemistry I and II 
  • Biology 1310-1320 - General Biology I and II 
  • Physics 1110-1120 or 1210-1220 - General Physics 
  • Mathematics 1910-1920 - Single Variable Calculus I and II  
  • Electives (6 semester hours) 
Second Year
  • Chemistry 2210 - Analytical Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 - Organic Chemistry I & II 
  • Chemistry 2310 - Physical Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 2720 - Inorganic Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 2910 - Multivariable and Vector Calculus 
  • Electives (9 semester hours)
Third Year
  • Chemistry 3220 - Analytical Instrumentation
  • Chemistry 3310 - Physical Chemistry II
  • Chemistry 3420 - Advanced Organic Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 3610 - Organic Spectroscopy 
  • Chemistry 3740 - Inorganic Chemistry II 
  • Electives (15 semester hours)
Fourth Year
  • Chemistry 3530 - Biochemistry
  • Chemistry 4820 - Advanced Research Project* OR
    Chemistry 4830 - Advanced Chemistry Laboratory*
  • Chemistry Electives (6 semester hours)
  • Electives* (15 or 18 semester hours)
*The total number of electives depends on whether Chemistry 4820 (6 credits) or Chemistry 4830 (3 credits) is taken to fulfill the fourth year laboratory requirement.  The Chemistry electives may be chosen from the Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4320, 4410, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, 4690, 4820 or 4830. At least one of the electives must be a 4th year course. The mathematics elective may be selected from Statistics 1210, Mathematics 2420, 2610 or 2910.
Minor

Students may obtain a degree with a minor in Chemistry by successfully completing the following courses:

  • Chemistry 1110-1120
  • Chemistry 2210
  • Chemistry 2310
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 OR Chemistry 2430
  • Chemistry 2020
  • Chemistry 2720

With permission of the chair, one of the above courses may be replaced with one of the Chemistry 3220, 3310, 3420, 3610 or 3740.

Faculty
  • Michael T.H. Liu, Professor Emeritus
  • Rabin Bissessur, Professor, Chair
  • Alaa Abd-El-Aziz, Professor 
  • Russell Kerr, Professor
  • Brian D. Wagner, Professor
  • Nola Etkin, Associate Professor
  • Barry Linkletter, Associate Professor 
  • Jason Pearson, Assistant Professor 
  • Richard Bethell, Adjunct Professor 
  • Matthias Bierenstiel, Adjunct Professor 
  • Robert Chapman, Adjunct Professor
  • J. Regis Duffy, Adjunct Professor 
  • Christopher Kirby, Adjunct Professor 
  • Stephanie MacQuarrie, Adjunct Professor
  • Gary Reid, Adjunct Professor
  • Junzeng Zhang, Adjunct Professor

Overview

Central to most fields of science, chemistry helps us to understand a range of topics including environmental issues, drugs and medicine, production of plastics and other materials, and nutrition. A fundamental understanding of chemistry is also important and interesting for its own sake. There is a great demand for chemists in many industries and government agencies. In fact, the chemical industry in Charlottetown and the rest of Canada is a booming business.

At UPEI we focus on providing truly excellent undergraduate and graduate programs while carrying out innovative chemical research. Our four-year BSc Honours, Majors, Minors, and Master’s degrees are accredited through the Canadian Society for Chemistry. There is a tremendous sense of excitement in both teaching and research in Chemistry at UPEI.

The department is located in the K. C. Irving Chemistry Centre, which is fully equipped with dedicated research labs, undergraduate teaching labs, student computer room, and "smart” classrooms. We have a very active Chemistry Student Society, which organizes Chemistry Open Houses, fundraising barbecues, golf days, and other social events.

Dr. Rabin Bissessur, Chair
UPEI Department of Chemistry

Honours

The Honours Program in Chemistry is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post-graduate level in Chemistry or some related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours Program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report, in the requirement of 126 semester hours for the degree and in the requirement of an additional five advanced Chemistry courses. The following are the course requirements for the Honours Program in Chemistry:

First Year

  • Chemistry 1110-1120 - General Chemistry I and II
  • Biology 1310-1320 - General Biology I and II
  • Physics 1110-1120 or 1210-1220 - General Physics
  • Mathematics 1910-1920 - Single Variable Calculus I and II
  • Electives (6 semester hours)

Second Year

  • Chemistry 2210 - Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 - Organic Chemistry I & II
  • Chemistry 2310 - Physical Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 2720 - Inorganic Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 2910 - Multivariable and Vector Calculus
  • Electives (9 semester hours)

Third Year

  • Chemistry 3220 - Analytical Instrumentation
  • Chemistry 3310 - Physical Chemistry II
  • Chemistry 3420 - Advanced Organic Chemistry
  • Chemistry 3530 - Biochemistry 
  • Chemistry 3610 - Organic Spectrosopy 
  • Chemistry 3740 - Inorganic Chemistry II 
  • Chemistry elective (3 semester hours) 
  • Mathematics elective (3 semester hours) 
  • Electives (6 semester hours)

Fourth Year

  • Chemistry 4320 - Methods in Computational Chemistry
  • Chemistry 4410 - Physical Organic Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 4670 - Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis
    OR
    Chemistry 4680 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
  • Chemistry 4900 - Honours Thesis (12 semester hours)
  • Chemistry electives (6 semester hours)
  • Electives (9 semester hours) 

The Chemistry electives may be chosen from among Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, or 4690. The Mathematics elective may be chosen from Statistics 1210, 3210, Mathematics 2610 or 3010 in consultation with the Chair. As well, students in the Honours Program in Chemistry are strongly advised to take Physics 2120 (Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits) and/or Physics 3120 (Electromagnetism I).

Honours students should note that Chemistry 4900 is a two- semester course and carries twelve semester hours of credit. No credit for the first semester will be granted without successful completion of the second semester of the course.

For admission to the Honours Program, students must have a minimum average of 70% in all previous courses; normally the Department expects high second-class standing or first-class standing in previous Chemistry courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an Honours Advisor, on being assigned an advisory committee, on acceptance of the research project by the Chemistry Department, and on general acceptability. Students interested in doing Honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31 of the student’s third year.

To graduate with a BSc Honours in Chemistry, students must complete 126 semester hours of credit which meet the required courses outlined above. As well, students must attain a 75% average in all Chemistry courses combined and must achieve a minimum overall average of 70% in all courses submitted for the degree. Students failing to meet the Honours requirements may apply for a transfer to the BSc Chemistry Major Program or to other degree programs.

Major

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Chemistry must take at least 48 semester hours of chemistry in total and must at the same time complete certain courses as specified by the major requirements.
 
The required Chemistry courses are: Chemistry 1110-1120, Chemistry 2210, Chemistry 2410-2420, Chemistry 2310, Chemistry 2720, Chemistry 3220, Chemistry 3310, Chemistry 3420, Chemistry 3530, Chemistry 3610, Chemistry 3740, Chemistry 4820 OR 4830 and two Chemistry electives, at least one of which is at the 4th year level.
 
Additional course requirements for the Chemistry major include the following courses from other disciplines: Biology 1310-1320, Mathematics 1910, Mathematics 1920, Mathematics 2910 and a Math elective; Physics 1110-1120 or Physics 1210-1220. As well, students majoring in Chemistry are advised to take Physics 2120 (Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits).
 
All programs of study of students declared as Chemistry majors must be approved by the Chair of the Department. An outline of the Chemistry major requirements in the suggested sequence for their completion is given below, but deviations from it are permitted provided that the pertinent prerequisites are fulfilled.
 
First Year
  • Chemistry 1110-1120 - General Chemistry I and II 
  • Biology 1310-1320 - General Biology I and II 
  • Physics 1110-1120 or 1210-1220 - General Physics 
  • Mathematics 1910-1920 - Single Variable Calculus I and II  
  • Electives (6 semester hours) 
Second Year
  • Chemistry 2210 - Analytical Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 - Organic Chemistry I & II 
  • Chemistry 2310 - Physical Chemistry I
  • Chemistry 2720 - Inorganic Chemistry I
  • Mathematics 2910 - Multivariable and Vector Calculus 
  • Electives (9 semester hours)
Third Year
  • Chemistry 3220 - Analytical Instrumentation
  • Chemistry 3310 - Physical Chemistry II
  • Chemistry 3420 - Advanced Organic Chemistry 
  • Chemistry 3610 - Organic Spectroscopy 
  • Chemistry 3740 - Inorganic Chemistry II 
  • Electives (15 semester hours)
Fourth Year
  • Chemistry 3530 - Biochemistry
  • Chemistry 4820 - Advanced Research Project* OR
    Chemistry 4830 - Advanced Chemistry Laboratory*
  • Chemistry Electives (6 semester hours)
  • Electives* (15 or 18 semester hours)
*The total number of electives depends on whether Chemistry 4820 (6 credits) or Chemistry 4830 (3 credits) is taken to fulfill the fourth year laboratory requirement.  The Chemistry electives may be chosen from the Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4320, 4410, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, 4690, 4820 or 4830. At least one of the electives must be a 4th year course. The mathematics elective may be selected from Statistics 1210, Mathematics 2420, 2610 or 2910.

Minor

Students may obtain a degree with a minor in Chemistry by successfully completing the following courses:

  • Chemistry 1110-1120
  • Chemistry 2210
  • Chemistry 2310
  • Chemistry 2410-2420 OR Chemistry 2430
  • Chemistry 2020
  • Chemistry 2720

With permission of the chair, one of the above courses may be replaced with one of the Chemistry 3220, 3310, 3420, 3610 or 3740.

Faculty

  • Michael T.H. Liu, Professor Emeritus
  • Rabin Bissessur, Professor, Chair
  • Alaa Abd-El-Aziz, Professor 
  • Russell Kerr, Professor
  • Brian D. Wagner, Professor
  • Nola Etkin, Associate Professor
  • Barry Linkletter, Associate Professor 
  • Jason Pearson, Assistant Professor 
  • Richard Bethell, Adjunct Professor 
  • Matthias Bierenstiel, Adjunct Professor 
  • Robert Chapman, Adjunct Professor
  • J. Regis Duffy, Adjunct Professor 
  • Christopher Kirby, Adjunct Professor 
  • Stephanie MacQuarrie, Adjunct Professor
  • Gary Reid, Adjunct Professor
  • Junzeng Zhang, Adjunct Professor
Want more information about Chemistry ? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Pharmacist
Lab Technician
Lawyer
Plant Chemist
Research Chemist
Course Level: 
1000 Level
Courses: 
CHEM-110 General Chemistry
CHEM-1110 General Chemistry I
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of chemistry. Topics include: atoms, molecules and ions; stoichiometry; mass relations; gases and their behaviour; electronic structure and the periodic table; covalent bonding and molecular geometry; and thermochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses stoichiometry, qualitative analysis, atomic spectroscopy and thermochemistry. Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week Prerequisite: Grade XII Chemistry, Chemistry 0001 or the permission of the Chair in special cases
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110L
3 hours credit
CHEM-1120 General Chemistry II
This course continues the subject matter of Chemistry 1110. Topics include: chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, intermolecular forces, solutions, chemical kinetics, entropy and Gibbs energy, redox equations and electrochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses volumetric analysis, titration curves and chemical kinetics. Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
2000 Level
Courses: 
CHEM-2020 Environmental Chemistry
This course deals with the major topics of concern in environmental chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the chemistry involved, as well as assessment of the relative hazards and corrective methods available to provide abatement. Topics covered include: atmospheric free radical chemistry, the green- house effect, stratospheric ozone, tropospheric chemistry and photochemical smog, the chemistry of natural water systems, acid rain, indoor air quality, sewage and waste management, chlorinated organic compounds, and heavy metals in the environment. Three lecture hours a week & three laboratories during the term (scheduled during the first class)
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2020L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2210 Analytical Chemistry
The treatment of analytical data and the estimation of experimental error are considered in detail. Chemical equilibrium, rate and equilibrium constants, abundance and titration curves, complexometric and redox reactions are discussed. The Beer-Lambert law and colorimetry are also examined. The laboratory work includes a selection of gravimetric, volumetric and colorimetric techniques relevant to the theory discussed. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2210L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2310 Physical Chemistry I
This is an introductory course that deals with the topics of kinetic theory, introductory thermodynamics and thermo- chemistry, phase diagrams, conductivity, electrochemistry and introductory reaction kinetics. The latter includes first- and second-order reactions, as well as methods for dealing with the kinetics of complex reaction mechanisms. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2310L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120, Mathematics 1910-1920 or Mathematics 1120 with permission of the Chair
3 hours credit
CHEM-2410 Organic Chemistry I
This course introduces students to the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity, basic types of organic reactions and the application of spectroscopy to structure elucidation. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2410 and Chemistry 2430.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2420 Organic Chemistry II
This course provides a detailed examination of reactivity and mechanisms of organic reactions, including nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, electrophilic aromatic substitution, reactions of carbonyl compounds, and rearrangements. Some multistep synthesis and polymers (including biopolymers) are also discussed. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2420 and Chemistry 2430.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2420L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410
3 hours credit
CHEM-2430 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
This course is an introduction to organic chemistry for students in the life sciences (and others who do not intend to pursue a major in chemistry). Topics covered include the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity. Basic types of reactions discussed include nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, oxidation/reduction and reactions of carbonyl compounds. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2430 and Chemistry 2410 or 2420.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2430L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2720 Inorganic Chemistry I
This course examines the descriptive chemistry of the main group elements and their compounds; periodic trends in reactivity, structure and physical properties. Other topics include: electronic configuration, an introduction to symmetry operations and symmetry elements, bonding theories (molecular orbital theory), acid-base theory, and special topics (industrial application, bioinorganic chemistry). Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2720L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2820 Introduction to Scientific Research
This course introduces students to some of the basic skills required in planning and reporting scientific research. It includes electronic searching of the literature, planning and design of experiments, analysis of experimental data, assessment of experimental error, scientific proof, ethics in research, scientific publications, social media, and scientific presentations. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
3000 Level
Courses: 
CHEM-3220 Analytical Instrumentation
This course introduces a variety of instrumentation techniques, and examines the theory, advantages and limitations associated with each. Topics include UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy, operational components of spectrophotometers; electro- analytical methods, potentiometric methods, ion-specific electrodes, voltammetry, liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, spreadsheet methods and statistical software. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3220L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2210 and Chemistry 3610 or permission of the Chair
3 hours credit
CHEM-3310 Physical Chemistry II
This course is an introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy for chemists. Topics covered include blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect, diffraction, particle in a box, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom in detail. The course will also explore the interaction of light with matter and applications to rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2310 with a minimum of 60% and Mathematics 2910
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3310L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3420 Advanced Organic Chemistry
This course addresses the application of structure elucidation and synthetic methods to organic chemistry. Topics covered include: enolates, enamines, functional group interconversion, polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic compounds, cycloadditions, rearrangements, multistep syntheses, and natural product synthesis. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60% and Chemistry 3610
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3530 Biochemistry
This course is an introduction to biochemistry. Topics covered include the structure and function of biomolecules and their building blocks; protein structure; enzyme mechanism and kinetics; cell membrane structure and transmembrane signalling; thermodynamics of metabolism and an overview of the major metabolic pathways; DNA replication, transcription and translation of RNA for protein synthesis. The tutorial portion of the course focuses on the physical and chemical properties of proteins and enzymes. Students learn modern biochemistry techniques including ion-exchange and affinity chromatography, spectroscopy and enzyme assays. Three lecture hours and two hours tutorial a week NOTE: Students will not get credit for both BIO-2250 and CHEM-3530
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3530T
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2420 or Chemistry 2430
3 hours credit
CHEM-3610 Spectroscopic Methods in Structural Analysis
This course examines ultraviolet, visible, infrared and n.m.r. spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in terms of the physical processes responsible for the energy absorption and ion generation. Problems associated with the recording and interpretation of spectra are addressed and the application of spectral analysis to structural identification is stressed. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3610L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3740 Inorganic Chemistry II
This course examines the descriptive inorganic and organometallic chemistry of the main group elements and their compounds. Topics include: periodic trends in reactivity, structure and physical properties. Emphasis will be on molecular chemistry, but there will be some coverage of solid-state compounds such as borane clusters, silicates and aluminosilicates. The course also introduces the crystal structure of metallic and ionic solids, as well as band theory. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 3610
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2720 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
4000 Level
Courses: 
CHEM-4320 Methods in Computational Chemistry
In this class we will review the theoretical foundations of quantum mechanics as well as undergo practical investigations of real-world chemical problems using modern quantum chemical software. Topics include methods in first principles simulations such as Hartree-Fock, perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled cluster and density functional theories in addition to more approximate methods such as semi-empirical approaches and molecular mechanics force fields. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3310 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4410 Physical Organic Chemistry
This course examines the qualitative and quantitative relationships between the rates and mechanisms of organic reactions, and the electronic and physical structures of reactants. Among the topics considered are: theory and applications of inductive and resonance effects, linear free energy relationships, kinetic isotope effects, solvent effects, steric effects in substitution and elimination reactions, acids and bases and pericyclic reactions, applications of semi-empirical and ab initio molecular orbital calculations. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4610 Directed Studies
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the Department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Chemistry
3 hours credit
CHEM-4620 Directed Studies
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the Department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Chemistry
3 hours credit
CHEM-4640 Polymer Chemistry
This course examines the synthesis, properties, and applications of organic polymers. Topics include: ionic, radical and condensation polymerizations, as well as the newer catalytic methods. Three lecture hours and a one-hour laboratory a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 4640L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4670 Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis
Inorganic reaction mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on catalytic cycles and the application of organometallic compounds to synthesis. Topics include: basic inorganic reaction mechanisms, catalytic cycles and catalysis, application of organometallic chemistry to modern industrial synthesis and polymerization reactions, and chirality and enantioselectivity in catalysis. Fundamental concepts will be supplemented with material from the current literature to explore the broad range of interdisciplinary applications of inorganic and organometallic catalysts. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4680 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
This course deals with advanced topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Topics include: bioinorganic chemistry, green chemistry, solid state inorganic chemistry and advanced coverage of molecular orbital theory and bonding in transition metal and main group complexes. This course will also introduce advance spectroscopic techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Mossbauer spectroscopy and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. The current literature is explored to illustrate the broad range and interdisciplinary nature of inorganic chemistry. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4690 Materials Chemistry
This course discusses current topics in materials chemistry. Topics include the synthesis and characterization of intercalation compounds, conductive polymers and their applications, semiconductors and their applications, defects in inorganic solids, and transport measurements. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%, 3310, 3740 with a minimum of 60% in these courses
3 hours credit
CHEM-4810 Special Topics
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.
3 hours credit
CHEM-4820 Advanced Research Project
A laboratory research course designed to review, unify, and augment the content of previous chemistry courses and to provide an introduction to chemical research. Students will abstract and adapt procedures from the chemical literature and apply them in a one-semester research project carried out under the supervision of a Faculty Member. Components in the evaluation include a written thesis and its oral presentation. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department. Twelve hours laboratory a week (minimum); Six semester hours of credit
REQUISITE: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program
6 hours credit
CHEM-4830 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory
A capstone laboratory course designed to integrate and augment the content of previous chemistry courses in organic, in- organic, physical and analytical chemistry. Students will select and carry out a number of short projects which are developed by faculty members in the various areas of Chemistry. Students will be evaluated on their development of experimental procedures based on the chemical literature, scientific record-keeping, and preparation of reports. Six hours laboratory and one hour seminar a week
REQUISITE: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program
COREQUISITE: Chem-4830L
3 hours credit
CHEM-4900 Honours Research and Thesis
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program Twelve semester hours of credit
6 hours credit
CHEM-4901 Honours Research and Thesis - Part I
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. Twelve semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted to the Honours Program in Chemistry. NOTE: to receive credit for this course, Chemistry 49001 and Chemistry 49002 must be completed consecutively in one academic year.
6 hours credit
CHEM-4902 Honours Research and Thesis - Part II
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. Twelve semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted to the Honours Program in Chemistry. NOTE: to receive credit for this course, Chemistry 49001 and Chemistry 49002 must be completed consecutively in one academic year.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 49001
6 hours credit

Calendar Courses

CHEM-110 General Chemistry
CHEM-1110 General Chemistry I
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of chemistry. Topics include: atoms, molecules and ions; stoichiometry; mass relations; gases and their behaviour; electronic structure and the periodic table; covalent bonding and molecular geometry; and thermochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses stoichiometry, qualitative analysis, atomic spectroscopy and thermochemistry. Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week Prerequisite: Grade XII Chemistry, Chemistry 0001 or the permission of the Chair in special cases
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110L
3 hours credit
CHEM-1120 General Chemistry II
This course continues the subject matter of Chemistry 1110. Topics include: chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, intermolecular forces, solutions, chemical kinetics, entropy and Gibbs energy, redox equations and electrochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses volumetric analysis, titration curves and chemical kinetics. Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110
3 hours credit
CHEM-2020 Environmental Chemistry
This course deals with the major topics of concern in environmental chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the chemistry involved, as well as assessment of the relative hazards and corrective methods available to provide abatement. Topics covered include: atmospheric free radical chemistry, the green- house effect, stratospheric ozone, tropospheric chemistry and photochemical smog, the chemistry of natural water systems, acid rain, indoor air quality, sewage and waste management, chlorinated organic compounds, and heavy metals in the environment. Three lecture hours a week & three laboratories during the term (scheduled during the first class)
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2020L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2210 Analytical Chemistry
The treatment of analytical data and the estimation of experimental error are considered in detail. Chemical equilibrium, rate and equilibrium constants, abundance and titration curves, complexometric and redox reactions are discussed. The Beer-Lambert law and colorimetry are also examined. The laboratory work includes a selection of gravimetric, volumetric and colorimetric techniques relevant to the theory discussed. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2210L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2310 Physical Chemistry I
This is an introductory course that deals with the topics of kinetic theory, introductory thermodynamics and thermo- chemistry, phase diagrams, conductivity, electrochemistry and introductory reaction kinetics. The latter includes first- and second-order reactions, as well as methods for dealing with the kinetics of complex reaction mechanisms. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2310L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120, Mathematics 1910-1920 or Mathematics 1120 with permission of the Chair
3 hours credit
CHEM-2410 Organic Chemistry I
This course introduces students to the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity, basic types of organic reactions and the application of spectroscopy to structure elucidation. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2410 and Chemistry 2430.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2420 Organic Chemistry II
This course provides a detailed examination of reactivity and mechanisms of organic reactions, including nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, electrophilic aromatic substitution, reactions of carbonyl compounds, and rearrangements. Some multistep synthesis and polymers (including biopolymers) are also discussed. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2420 and Chemistry 2430.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2420L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410
3 hours credit
CHEM-2430 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
This course is an introduction to organic chemistry for students in the life sciences (and others who do not intend to pursue a major in chemistry). Topics covered include the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity. Basic types of reactions discussed include nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, oxidation/reduction and reactions of carbonyl compounds. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2430 and Chemistry 2410 or 2420.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2430L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2720 Inorganic Chemistry I
This course examines the descriptive chemistry of the main group elements and their compounds; periodic trends in reactivity, structure and physical properties. Other topics include: electronic configuration, an introduction to symmetry operations and symmetry elements, bonding theories (molecular orbital theory), acid-base theory, and special topics (industrial application, bioinorganic chemistry). Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2720L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2820 Introduction to Scientific Research
This course introduces students to some of the basic skills required in planning and reporting scientific research. It includes electronic searching of the literature, planning and design of experiments, analysis of experimental data, assessment of experimental error, scientific proof, ethics in research, scientific publications, social media, and scientific presentations. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-3220 Analytical Instrumentation
This course introduces a variety of instrumentation techniques, and examines the theory, advantages and limitations associated with each. Topics include UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy, operational components of spectrophotometers; electro- analytical methods, potentiometric methods, ion-specific electrodes, voltammetry, liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, spreadsheet methods and statistical software. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3220L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2210 and Chemistry 3610 or permission of the Chair
3 hours credit
CHEM-3310 Physical Chemistry II
This course is an introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy for chemists. Topics covered include blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect, diffraction, particle in a box, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom in detail. The course will also explore the interaction of light with matter and applications to rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2310 with a minimum of 60% and Mathematics 2910
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3310L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3420 Advanced Organic Chemistry
This course addresses the application of structure elucidation and synthetic methods to organic chemistry. Topics covered include: enolates, enamines, functional group interconversion, polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic compounds, cycloadditions, rearrangements, multistep syntheses, and natural product synthesis. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60% and Chemistry 3610
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3530 Biochemistry
This course is an introduction to biochemistry. Topics covered include the structure and function of biomolecules and their building blocks; protein structure; enzyme mechanism and kinetics; cell membrane structure and transmembrane signalling; thermodynamics of metabolism and an overview of the major metabolic pathways; DNA replication, transcription and translation of RNA for protein synthesis. The tutorial portion of the course focuses on the physical and chemical properties of proteins and enzymes. Students learn modern biochemistry techniques including ion-exchange and affinity chromatography, spectroscopy and enzyme assays. Three lecture hours and two hours tutorial a week NOTE: Students will not get credit for both BIO-2250 and CHEM-3530
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3530T
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2420 or Chemistry 2430
3 hours credit
CHEM-3610 Spectroscopic Methods in Structural Analysis
This course examines ultraviolet, visible, infrared and n.m.r. spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in terms of the physical processes responsible for the energy absorption and ion generation. Problems associated with the recording and interpretation of spectra are addressed and the application of spectral analysis to structural identification is stressed. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3610L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3740 Inorganic Chemistry II
This course examines the descriptive inorganic and organometallic chemistry of the main group elements and their compounds. Topics include: periodic trends in reactivity, structure and physical properties. Emphasis will be on molecular chemistry, but there will be some coverage of solid-state compounds such as borane clusters, silicates and aluminosilicates. The course also introduces the crystal structure of metallic and ionic solids, as well as band theory. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 3610
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2720 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4320 Methods in Computational Chemistry
In this class we will review the theoretical foundations of quantum mechanics as well as undergo practical investigations of real-world chemical problems using modern quantum chemical software. Topics include methods in first principles simulations such as Hartree-Fock, perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled cluster and density functional theories in addition to more approximate methods such as semi-empirical approaches and molecular mechanics force fields. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3310 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4410 Physical Organic Chemistry
This course examines the qualitative and quantitative relationships between the rates and mechanisms of organic reactions, and the electronic and physical structures of reactants. Among the topics considered are: theory and applications of inductive and resonance effects, linear free energy relationships, kinetic isotope effects, solvent effects, steric effects in substitution and elimination reactions, acids and bases and pericyclic reactions, applications of semi-empirical and ab initio molecular orbital calculations. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4610 Directed Studies
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the Department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Chemistry
3 hours credit
CHEM-4620 Directed Studies
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the Department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Chemistry
3 hours credit
CHEM-4640 Polymer Chemistry
This course examines the synthesis, properties, and applications of organic polymers. Topics include: ionic, radical and condensation polymerizations, as well as the newer catalytic methods. Three lecture hours and a one-hour laboratory a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 4640L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4670 Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis
Inorganic reaction mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on catalytic cycles and the application of organometallic compounds to synthesis. Topics include: basic inorganic reaction mechanisms, catalytic cycles and catalysis, application of organometallic chemistry to modern industrial synthesis and polymerization reactions, and chirality and enantioselectivity in catalysis. Fundamental concepts will be supplemented with material from the current literature to explore the broad range of interdisciplinary applications of inorganic and organometallic catalysts. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4680 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
This course deals with advanced topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Topics include: bioinorganic chemistry, green chemistry, solid state inorganic chemistry and advanced coverage of molecular orbital theory and bonding in transition metal and main group complexes. This course will also introduce advance spectroscopic techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Mossbauer spectroscopy and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. The current literature is explored to illustrate the broad range and interdisciplinary nature of inorganic chemistry. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4690 Materials Chemistry
This course discusses current topics in materials chemistry. Topics include the synthesis and characterization of intercalation compounds, conductive polymers and their applications, semiconductors and their applications, defects in inorganic solids, and transport measurements. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%, 3310, 3740 with a minimum of 60% in these courses
3 hours credit
CHEM-4810 Special Topics
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.
3 hours credit
CHEM-4820 Advanced Research Project
A laboratory research course designed to review, unify, and augment the content of previous chemistry courses and to provide an introduction to chemical research. Students will abstract and adapt procedures from the chemical literature and apply them in a one-semester research project carried out under the supervision of a Faculty Member. Components in the evaluation include a written thesis and its oral presentation. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department. Twelve hours laboratory a week (minimum); Six semester hours of credit
REQUISITE: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program
6 hours credit
CHEM-4830 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory
A capstone laboratory course designed to integrate and augment the content of previous chemistry courses in organic, in- organic, physical and analytical chemistry. Students will select and carry out a number of short projects which are developed by faculty members in the various areas of Chemistry. Students will be evaluated on their development of experimental procedures based on the chemical literature, scientific record-keeping, and preparation of reports. Six hours laboratory and one hour seminar a week
REQUISITE: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program
COREQUISITE: Chem-4830L
3 hours credit
CHEM-4900 Honours Research and Thesis
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program Twelve semester hours of credit
6 hours credit
CHEM-4901 Honours Research and Thesis - Part I
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. Twelve semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted to the Honours Program in Chemistry. NOTE: to receive credit for this course, Chemistry 49001 and Chemistry 49002 must be completed consecutively in one academic year.
6 hours credit
CHEM-4902 Honours Research and Thesis - Part II
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. Twelve semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted to the Honours Program in Chemistry. NOTE: to receive credit for this course, Chemistry 49001 and Chemistry 49002 must be completed consecutively in one academic year.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 49001
6 hours credit

Calendar Courses

1000 Level

CHEM-110 General Chemistry
CHEM-1110 General Chemistry I
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of chemistry. Topics include: atoms, molecules and ions; stoichiometry; mass relations; gases and their behaviour; electronic structure and the periodic table; covalent bonding and molecular geometry; and thermochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses stoichiometry, qualitative analysis, atomic spectroscopy and thermochemistry. Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week Prerequisite: Grade XII Chemistry, Chemistry 0001 or the permission of the Chair in special cases
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110L
3 hours credit
CHEM-1120 General Chemistry II
This course continues the subject matter of Chemistry 1110. Topics include: chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, intermolecular forces, solutions, chemical kinetics, entropy and Gibbs energy, redox equations and electrochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses volumetric analysis, titration curves and chemical kinetics. Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110
3 hours credit

2000 Level

CHEM-2020 Environmental Chemistry
This course deals with the major topics of concern in environmental chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the chemistry involved, as well as assessment of the relative hazards and corrective methods available to provide abatement. Topics covered include: atmospheric free radical chemistry, the green- house effect, stratospheric ozone, tropospheric chemistry and photochemical smog, the chemistry of natural water systems, acid rain, indoor air quality, sewage and waste management, chlorinated organic compounds, and heavy metals in the environment. Three lecture hours a week & three laboratories during the term (scheduled during the first class)
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2020L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2210 Analytical Chemistry
The treatment of analytical data and the estimation of experimental error are considered in detail. Chemical equilibrium, rate and equilibrium constants, abundance and titration curves, complexometric and redox reactions are discussed. The Beer-Lambert law and colorimetry are also examined. The laboratory work includes a selection of gravimetric, volumetric and colorimetric techniques relevant to the theory discussed. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2210L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2310 Physical Chemistry I
This is an introductory course that deals with the topics of kinetic theory, introductory thermodynamics and thermo- chemistry, phase diagrams, conductivity, electrochemistry and introductory reaction kinetics. The latter includes first- and second-order reactions, as well as methods for dealing with the kinetics of complex reaction mechanisms. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2310L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120, Mathematics 1910-1920 or Mathematics 1120 with permission of the Chair
3 hours credit
CHEM-2410 Organic Chemistry I
This course introduces students to the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity, basic types of organic reactions and the application of spectroscopy to structure elucidation. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2410 and Chemistry 2430.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2420 Organic Chemistry II
This course provides a detailed examination of reactivity and mechanisms of organic reactions, including nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, electrophilic aromatic substitution, reactions of carbonyl compounds, and rearrangements. Some multistep synthesis and polymers (including biopolymers) are also discussed. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2420 and Chemistry 2430.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2420L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410
3 hours credit
CHEM-2430 Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
This course is an introduction to organic chemistry for students in the life sciences (and others who do not intend to pursue a major in chemistry). Topics covered include the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity. Basic types of reactions discussed include nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, oxidation/reduction and reactions of carbonyl compounds. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week. NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2430 and Chemistry 2410 or 2420.
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2430L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2720 Inorganic Chemistry I
This course examines the descriptive chemistry of the main group elements and their compounds; periodic trends in reactivity, structure and physical properties. Other topics include: electronic configuration, an introduction to symmetry operations and symmetry elements, bonding theories (molecular orbital theory), acid-base theory, and special topics (industrial application, bioinorganic chemistry). Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 2720L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit
CHEM-2820 Introduction to Scientific Research
This course introduces students to some of the basic skills required in planning and reporting scientific research. It includes electronic searching of the literature, planning and design of experiments, analysis of experimental data, assessment of experimental error, scientific proof, ethics in research, scientific publications, social media, and scientific presentations. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
3 hours credit

3000 Level

CHEM-3220 Analytical Instrumentation
This course introduces a variety of instrumentation techniques, and examines the theory, advantages and limitations associated with each. Topics include UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy, operational components of spectrophotometers; electro- analytical methods, potentiometric methods, ion-specific electrodes, voltammetry, liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, spreadsheet methods and statistical software. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3220L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2210 and Chemistry 3610 or permission of the Chair
3 hours credit
CHEM-3310 Physical Chemistry II
This course is an introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy for chemists. Topics covered include blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect, diffraction, particle in a box, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom in detail. The course will also explore the interaction of light with matter and applications to rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2310 with a minimum of 60% and Mathematics 2910
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3310L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3420 Advanced Organic Chemistry
This course addresses the application of structure elucidation and synthetic methods to organic chemistry. Topics covered include: enolates, enamines, functional group interconversion, polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic compounds, cycloadditions, rearrangements, multistep syntheses, and natural product synthesis. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60% and Chemistry 3610
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3530 Biochemistry
This course is an introduction to biochemistry. Topics covered include the structure and function of biomolecules and their building blocks; protein structure; enzyme mechanism and kinetics; cell membrane structure and transmembrane signalling; thermodynamics of metabolism and an overview of the major metabolic pathways; DNA replication, transcription and translation of RNA for protein synthesis. The tutorial portion of the course focuses on the physical and chemical properties of proteins and enzymes. Students learn modern biochemistry techniques including ion-exchange and affinity chromatography, spectroscopy and enzyme assays. Three lecture hours and two hours tutorial a week NOTE: Students will not get credit for both BIO-2250 and CHEM-3530
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3530T
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2420 or Chemistry 2430
3 hours credit
CHEM-3610 Spectroscopic Methods in Structural Analysis
This course examines ultraviolet, visible, infrared and n.m.r. spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in terms of the physical processes responsible for the energy absorption and ion generation. Problems associated with the recording and interpretation of spectra are addressed and the application of spectral analysis to structural identification is stressed. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3610L
3 hours credit
CHEM-3740 Inorganic Chemistry II
This course examines the descriptive inorganic and organometallic chemistry of the main group elements and their compounds. Topics include: periodic trends in reactivity, structure and physical properties. Emphasis will be on molecular chemistry, but there will be some coverage of solid-state compounds such as borane clusters, silicates and aluminosilicates. The course also introduces the crystal structure of metallic and ionic solids, as well as band theory. Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
REQUISITE: Chemistry 3610
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2720 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit

4000 Level

CHEM-4320 Methods in Computational Chemistry
In this class we will review the theoretical foundations of quantum mechanics as well as undergo practical investigations of real-world chemical problems using modern quantum chemical software. Topics include methods in first principles simulations such as Hartree-Fock, perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled cluster and density functional theories in addition to more approximate methods such as semi-empirical approaches and molecular mechanics force fields. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3310 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4410 Physical Organic Chemistry
This course examines the qualitative and quantitative relationships between the rates and mechanisms of organic reactions, and the electronic and physical structures of reactants. Among the topics considered are: theory and applications of inductive and resonance effects, linear free energy relationships, kinetic isotope effects, solvent effects, steric effects in substitution and elimination reactions, acids and bases and pericyclic reactions, applications of semi-empirical and ab initio molecular orbital calculations. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4610 Directed Studies
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the Department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Chemistry
3 hours credit
CHEM-4620 Directed Studies
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the Department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Chemistry
3 hours credit
CHEM-4640 Polymer Chemistry
This course examines the synthesis, properties, and applications of organic polymers. Topics include: ionic, radical and condensation polymerizations, as well as the newer catalytic methods. Three lecture hours and a one-hour laboratory a week
COREQUISITE: Chemistry 4640L
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4670 Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis
Inorganic reaction mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on catalytic cycles and the application of organometallic compounds to synthesis. Topics include: basic inorganic reaction mechanisms, catalytic cycles and catalysis, application of organometallic chemistry to modern industrial synthesis and polymerization reactions, and chirality and enantioselectivity in catalysis. Fundamental concepts will be supplemented with material from the current literature to explore the broad range of interdisciplinary applications of inorganic and organometallic catalysts. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4680 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
This course deals with advanced topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Topics include: bioinorganic chemistry, green chemistry, solid state inorganic chemistry and advanced coverage of molecular orbital theory and bonding in transition metal and main group complexes. This course will also introduce advance spectroscopic techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Mossbauer spectroscopy and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. The current literature is explored to illustrate the broad range and interdisciplinary nature of inorganic chemistry. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit
CHEM-4690 Materials Chemistry
This course discusses current topics in materials chemistry. Topics include the synthesis and characterization of intercalation compounds, conductive polymers and their applications, semiconductors and their applications, defects in inorganic solids, and transport measurements. Three lecture hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410-2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%, 3310, 3740 with a minimum of 60% in these courses
3 hours credit
CHEM-4810 Special Topics
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.
3 hours credit
CHEM-4820 Advanced Research Project
A laboratory research course designed to review, unify, and augment the content of previous chemistry courses and to provide an introduction to chemical research. Students will abstract and adapt procedures from the chemical literature and apply them in a one-semester research project carried out under the supervision of a Faculty Member. Components in the evaluation include a written thesis and its oral presentation. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department. Twelve hours laboratory a week (minimum); Six semester hours of credit
REQUISITE: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program
6 hours credit
CHEM-4830 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory
A capstone laboratory course designed to integrate and augment the content of previous chemistry courses in organic, in- organic, physical and analytical chemistry. Students will select and carry out a number of short projects which are developed by faculty members in the various areas of Chemistry. Students will be evaluated on their development of experimental procedures based on the chemical literature, scientific record-keeping, and preparation of reports. Six hours laboratory and one hour seminar a week
REQUISITE: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program
COREQUISITE: Chem-4830L
3 hours credit
CHEM-4900 Honours Research and Thesis
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program Twelve semester hours of credit
6 hours credit
CHEM-4901 Honours Research and Thesis - Part I
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. Twelve semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted to the Honours Program in Chemistry. NOTE: to receive credit for this course, Chemistry 49001 and Chemistry 49002 must be completed consecutively in one academic year.
6 hours credit
CHEM-4902 Honours Research and Thesis - Part II
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students. Twelve semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must be accepted to the Honours Program in Chemistry. NOTE: to receive credit for this course, Chemistry 49001 and Chemistry 49002 must be completed consecutively in one academic year.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 49001
6 hours credit
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