An in-depth understanding of Canadian society and culture.

Canadian Studies

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First Name:
Last Name:
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  • Teacher
  • Foreign Service Officer
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  • Librarian
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The Canadian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

Canadian Studies is an interdisciplinary program drawing on the resources of eight departments at UPEI.

The goal of the program is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of Canadian society and culture. A student may major in Canadian Studies, may double major in Canadian Studies and another discipline, or may minor in Canadian Studies.

Want more information about Canadian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Teacher
  • Foreign Service Officer
  • Biographer
  • Librarian
  • Public Servant
The Canadian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353
  1. Students pursuing a Major in Canadian Studies must complete 42 semester hours (14 courses) in the Canadian Studies Program. These semester hours must be composed of the two required core courses in Canadian Studies (CST 102 and CST 411); one course in research methods (one of English 204, History 211, or Sociology 331); eleven courses from Option Lists A, B, C, and D, with at least two courses from each option list and at least three 300 level courses and three 400 level courses.
  2. Students are required to maintain an average of 65% in the Canadian-area courses.
  3. There is a French Language co-requisite of three semester hours in French. Students must achieve a level of comprehension, writing and speaking at the level of French VI (Fr 212). To take the French Placement Test, please contact the First-Year Advisement Centre in Student Services, in the W. A. Murphy Student Centre. During the summer months, the French Placement Test is available through the Department of Modern Languages’ website. Shortly after completion of the Placement Test, the student will be contacted by the Department of Modern Languages and notified of the appropriate course in which to enrol. Students are strongly urged to consider additional work in French.
  4. Students should consult with the coordinator of the program when registering, in order to better plan an individual program suitable to their needs and interests.

NOTE: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Also, some courses vary in their coverage of Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada that are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed. Even if Canadian Studies 411 is offered during the winter semester, students are strongly urged to make arrangements in order to find an advisor and a topic of research during the fall term of their fourth year.

CANADIAN STUDIES CORE COURSES
Canadian Studies 102—Imagining Canada
Canadian Studies 411—Research and Tutorial

RESEARCH METHODS
One of the following:  English 204, History 211, or Sociology 331

FRENCH LANGUAGE CO-REQUISITE
3 semester hours  (French 212 or above)

OPTION A—CANADIAN INSTITUTIONS
Economics 212—Regional Economics
Economics 304—Canadian Economic Problems
French 261 (or Education 213)—Introduction à l’éducation en français au Canada
Political Science 201—Canadian Politics I: Government
Political Science 202—Politics & Government of PEI
Political Science 209—Special Topics (only if it’s Canadian)
Political Science 211—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process I
Political Science 212—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II
Political Science 262—Canadian Politics II: Environment and Processes
Political Science 302—Canadian Federalism
Political Science 311—Canadian Public Administration
Political Science 314—Canadian Public Policy
Political Science 315—Canadian Foreign Policy
Political Science 353—The Politics of Canadian-American Relations
Political Science 401—Law, the Courts and the Constitution I
Political Science 411—Political Parties and Elections in Canada

OPTION B – ARTS, LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
English 315—English-Canada Drama
English 321—English-Canada Prose
English 322—English-Canada Poetry
English 323—Littérature canadienne-française I
English 324—Littérature canadienne-française II
English 331—Literature of Atlantic Canada
English 333—L.M. Montgomery
English 425—Advanced Studies in Canadian Literature
Fine Arts 321—Canadian Art
French 221—Langue et lectures I
French 222—Langue et lectures II
French 241—French Composition and Analysis I
French 242—French Composition and Analysis II
French 252—Le français des affaires
French 339—Théâtre canadien-français
French 441—Littérature canadienne-française I
French 442—Littérature canadienne-française II
French 443—Culture et littérature acadiennes I
French 444—Culture et littérature acadiennes II
French 446—Traduction: anglais-français
French 451—Directed Studies in French (where Canadian-area related)
Music 423— Canadian Music I
Music 424— Canadian Music II

OPTION C—HISTORICAL CONTEXTS
Economics 221—Canadian Economic History
History 101—Canadian History—Pre-Confederation
History 102—Canadian History—Post-Confederation
History 231—The Atlantic Region
History 232—The Atlantic Region
History 325—Canadian Social History to WW I
History 326—Canadian Social History since WWI
History 327—Migration to Canada I
History 328—Migration to Canada II
History 331—History of PEI—Pre-Confederation
History 332—History of PEI—Post Confederation
History 352— The History of Quebec and French Canada
History 385—Women in 19th Century Canada
History 386—Women in 20th Century Canada
History 424—History of Canadian Nationalism and the Canadian Identity
History 425—Childhood in Modern Canada
History 426—History of the Canadian Working Classes
History 489—20th Century PEI

OPTION D—HUMAN IDENTITIES
Acadian Studies 201—Introduction to Acadian Studies (in French)
Acadian Studies 491—Special Topics in Acadian Studies (in French)
Canadian Studies 302—The Canadian Experience
French 338—Introduction à la société québécoise
Sociology/Anthropology 252—Aging and Society
Sociology/Anthropology 259—Special Topics (when Canadian-area related)
Sociology/Anthropology 312—Rural Society in Canada
Sociology/Anthropology 431—Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism
Sociology 211—Marriage and the Family
Sociology 362—Urban Sociology
Sociology 371—Canadian Society

The following courses can be included in the above options (check with the Coordinator of the program concerning which option group the course belongs to in a given year).

Canadian Studies 109—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 209—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 309—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 409—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 451—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 452—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies

 

Want more information about Canadian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Teacher
  • Foreign Service Officer
  • Biographer
  • Librarian
  • Public Servant
The Canadian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353

A minor in Canadian Studies is recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses in Canadian Studies, including CST 102 and six other Canadian Studies elective courses from at least three different options, at least one of which is at the 400 level.

Note: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Some courses vary in their coverage or Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada which are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed.

 

Want more information about Canadian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Teacher
  • Foreign Service Officer
  • Biographer
  • Librarian
  • Public Servant
The Canadian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.
(902) 628-4353
  • Don Desserud, Co-ordinator - Political Science
  • Charles Adeyanju - Sociology/Anthropology
  • Greg Doran - English/Theatre Studies
  • Carlo Lavoie - Modern Languages
  • G. Edward MacDonald -History
  • Brent MacLaine - English
  • Jane Magrath - English
  • James Moran - History
  • Sharon Myers - History
  • James Sentance - Economics
  • Andrew Zinck - Music
Overview

Canadian Studies is an interdisciplinary program drawing on the resources of eight departments at UPEI.

The goal of the program is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of Canadian society and culture. A student may major in Canadian Studies, may double major in Canadian Studies and another discipline, or may minor in Canadian Studies.

Major
  1. Students pursuing a Major in Canadian Studies must complete 42 semester hours (14 courses) in the Canadian Studies Program. These semester hours must be composed of the two required core courses in Canadian Studies (CST 102 and CST 411); one course in research methods (one of English 204, History 211, or Sociology 331); eleven courses from Option Lists A, B, C, and D, with at least two courses from each option list and at least three 300 level courses and three 400 level courses.
  2. Students are required to maintain an average of 65% in the Canadian-area courses.
  3. There is a French Language co-requisite of three semester hours in French. Students must achieve a level of comprehension, writing and speaking at the level of French VI (Fr 212). To take the French Placement Test, please contact the First-Year Advisement Centre in Student Services, in the W. A. Murphy Student Centre. During the summer months, the French Placement Test is available through the Department of Modern Languages’ website. Shortly after completion of the Placement Test, the student will be contacted by the Department of Modern Languages and notified of the appropriate course in which to enrol. Students are strongly urged to consider additional work in French.
  4. Students should consult with the coordinator of the program when registering, in order to better plan an individual program suitable to their needs and interests.

NOTE: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Also, some courses vary in their coverage of Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada that are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed. Even if Canadian Studies 411 is offered during the winter semester, students are strongly urged to make arrangements in order to find an advisor and a topic of research during the fall term of their fourth year.

CANADIAN STUDIES CORE COURSES
Canadian Studies 102—Imagining Canada
Canadian Studies 411—Research and Tutorial

RESEARCH METHODS
One of the following:  English 204, History 211, or Sociology 331

FRENCH LANGUAGE CO-REQUISITE
3 semester hours  (French 212 or above)

OPTION A—CANADIAN INSTITUTIONS
Economics 212—Regional Economics
Economics 304—Canadian Economic Problems
French 261 (or Education 213)—Introduction à l’éducation en français au Canada
Political Science 201—Canadian Politics I: Government
Political Science 202—Politics & Government of PEI
Political Science 209—Special Topics (only if it’s Canadian)
Political Science 211—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process I
Political Science 212—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II
Political Science 262—Canadian Politics II: Environment and Processes
Political Science 302—Canadian Federalism
Political Science 311—Canadian Public Administration
Political Science 314—Canadian Public Policy
Political Science 315—Canadian Foreign Policy
Political Science 353—The Politics of Canadian-American Relations
Political Science 401—Law, the Courts and the Constitution I
Political Science 411—Political Parties and Elections in Canada

OPTION B – ARTS, LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
English 315—English-Canada Drama
English 321—English-Canada Prose
English 322—English-Canada Poetry
English 323—Littérature canadienne-française I
English 324—Littérature canadienne-française II
English 331—Literature of Atlantic Canada
English 333—L.M. Montgomery
English 425—Advanced Studies in Canadian Literature
Fine Arts 321—Canadian Art
French 221—Langue et lectures I
French 222—Langue et lectures II
French 241—French Composition and Analysis I
French 242—French Composition and Analysis II
French 252—Le français des affaires
French 339—Théâtre canadien-français
French 441—Littérature canadienne-française I
French 442—Littérature canadienne-française II
French 443—Culture et littérature acadiennes I
French 444—Culture et littérature acadiennes II
French 446—Traduction: anglais-français
French 451—Directed Studies in French (where Canadian-area related)
Music 423— Canadian Music I
Music 424— Canadian Music II

OPTION C—HISTORICAL CONTEXTS
Economics 221—Canadian Economic History
History 101—Canadian History—Pre-Confederation
History 102—Canadian History—Post-Confederation
History 231—The Atlantic Region
History 232—The Atlantic Region
History 325—Canadian Social History to WW I
History 326—Canadian Social History since WWI
History 327—Migration to Canada I
History 328—Migration to Canada II
History 331—History of PEI—Pre-Confederation
History 332—History of PEI—Post Confederation
History 352— The History of Quebec and French Canada
History 385—Women in 19th Century Canada
History 386—Women in 20th Century Canada
History 424—History of Canadian Nationalism and the Canadian Identity
History 425—Childhood in Modern Canada
History 426—History of the Canadian Working Classes
History 489—20th Century PEI

OPTION D—HUMAN IDENTITIES
Acadian Studies 201—Introduction to Acadian Studies (in French)
Acadian Studies 491—Special Topics in Acadian Studies (in French)
Canadian Studies 302—The Canadian Experience
French 338—Introduction à la société québécoise
Sociology/Anthropology 252—Aging and Society
Sociology/Anthropology 259—Special Topics (when Canadian-area related)
Sociology/Anthropology 312—Rural Society in Canada
Sociology/Anthropology 431—Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism
Sociology 211—Marriage and the Family
Sociology 362—Urban Sociology
Sociology 371—Canadian Society

The following courses can be included in the above options (check with the Coordinator of the program concerning which option group the course belongs to in a given year).

Canadian Studies 109—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 209—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 309—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 409—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 451—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 452—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies

 

Minor

A minor in Canadian Studies is recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses in Canadian Studies, including CST 102 and six other Canadian Studies elective courses from at least three different options, at least one of which is at the 400 level.

Note: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Some courses vary in their coverage or Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada which are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed.

 

Coordinating Committee
  • Don Desserud, Co-ordinator - Political Science
  • Charles Adeyanju - Sociology/Anthropology
  • Greg Doran - English/Theatre Studies
  • Carlo Lavoie - Modern Languages
  • G. Edward MacDonald -History
  • Brent MacLaine - English
  • Jane Magrath - English
  • James Moran - History
  • Sharon Myers - History
  • James Sentance - Economics
  • Andrew Zinck - Music

Overview

Canadian Studies is an interdisciplinary program drawing on the resources of eight departments at UPEI.

The goal of the program is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of Canadian society and culture. A student may major in Canadian Studies, may double major in Canadian Studies and another discipline, or may minor in Canadian Studies.

Major

  1. Students pursuing a Major in Canadian Studies must complete 42 semester hours (14 courses) in the Canadian Studies Program. These semester hours must be composed of the two required core courses in Canadian Studies (CST 102 and CST 411); one course in research methods (one of English 204, History 211, or Sociology 331); eleven courses from Option Lists A, B, C, and D, with at least two courses from each option list and at least three 300 level courses and three 400 level courses.
  2. Students are required to maintain an average of 65% in the Canadian-area courses.
  3. There is a French Language co-requisite of three semester hours in French. Students must achieve a level of comprehension, writing and speaking at the level of French VI (Fr 212). To take the French Placement Test, please contact the First-Year Advisement Centre in Student Services, in the W. A. Murphy Student Centre. During the summer months, the French Placement Test is available through the Department of Modern Languages’ website. Shortly after completion of the Placement Test, the student will be contacted by the Department of Modern Languages and notified of the appropriate course in which to enrol. Students are strongly urged to consider additional work in French.
  4. Students should consult with the coordinator of the program when registering, in order to better plan an individual program suitable to their needs and interests.

NOTE: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Also, some courses vary in their coverage of Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada that are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed. Even if Canadian Studies 411 is offered during the winter semester, students are strongly urged to make arrangements in order to find an advisor and a topic of research during the fall term of their fourth year.

CANADIAN STUDIES CORE COURSES
Canadian Studies 102—Imagining Canada
Canadian Studies 411—Research and Tutorial

RESEARCH METHODS
One of the following:  English 204, History 211, or Sociology 331

FRENCH LANGUAGE CO-REQUISITE
3 semester hours  (French 212 or above)

OPTION A—CANADIAN INSTITUTIONS
Economics 212—Regional Economics
Economics 304—Canadian Economic Problems
French 261 (or Education 213)—Introduction à l’éducation en français au Canada
Political Science 201—Canadian Politics I: Government
Political Science 202—Politics & Government of PEI
Political Science 209—Special Topics (only if it’s Canadian)
Political Science 211—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process I
Political Science 212—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II
Political Science 262—Canadian Politics II: Environment and Processes
Political Science 302—Canadian Federalism
Political Science 311—Canadian Public Administration
Political Science 314—Canadian Public Policy
Political Science 315—Canadian Foreign Policy
Political Science 353—The Politics of Canadian-American Relations
Political Science 401—Law, the Courts and the Constitution I
Political Science 411—Political Parties and Elections in Canada

OPTION B – ARTS, LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
English 315—English-Canada Drama
English 321—English-Canada Prose
English 322—English-Canada Poetry
English 323—Littérature canadienne-française I
English 324—Littérature canadienne-française II
English 331—Literature of Atlantic Canada
English 333—L.M. Montgomery
English 425—Advanced Studies in Canadian Literature
Fine Arts 321—Canadian Art
French 221—Langue et lectures I
French 222—Langue et lectures II
French 241—French Composition and Analysis I
French 242—French Composition and Analysis II
French 252—Le français des affaires
French 339—Théâtre canadien-français
French 441—Littérature canadienne-française I
French 442—Littérature canadienne-française II
French 443—Culture et littérature acadiennes I
French 444—Culture et littérature acadiennes II
French 446—Traduction: anglais-français
French 451—Directed Studies in French (where Canadian-area related)
Music 423— Canadian Music I
Music 424— Canadian Music II

OPTION C—HISTORICAL CONTEXTS
Economics 221—Canadian Economic History
History 101—Canadian History—Pre-Confederation
History 102—Canadian History—Post-Confederation
History 231—The Atlantic Region
History 232—The Atlantic Region
History 325—Canadian Social History to WW I
History 326—Canadian Social History since WWI
History 327—Migration to Canada I
History 328—Migration to Canada II
History 331—History of PEI—Pre-Confederation
History 332—History of PEI—Post Confederation
History 352— The History of Quebec and French Canada
History 385—Women in 19th Century Canada
History 386—Women in 20th Century Canada
History 424—History of Canadian Nationalism and the Canadian Identity
History 425—Childhood in Modern Canada
History 426—History of the Canadian Working Classes
History 489—20th Century PEI

OPTION D—HUMAN IDENTITIES
Acadian Studies 201—Introduction to Acadian Studies (in French)
Acadian Studies 491—Special Topics in Acadian Studies (in French)
Canadian Studies 302—The Canadian Experience
French 338—Introduction à la société québécoise
Sociology/Anthropology 252—Aging and Society
Sociology/Anthropology 259—Special Topics (when Canadian-area related)
Sociology/Anthropology 312—Rural Society in Canada
Sociology/Anthropology 431—Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism
Sociology 211—Marriage and the Family
Sociology 362—Urban Sociology
Sociology 371—Canadian Society

The following courses can be included in the above options (check with the Coordinator of the program concerning which option group the course belongs to in a given year).

Canadian Studies 109—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 209—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 309—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 409—Special Topics in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 451—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies
Canadian Studies 452—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies

 

Minor

A minor in Canadian Studies is recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses in Canadian Studies, including CST 102 and six other Canadian Studies elective courses from at least three different options, at least one of which is at the 400 level.

Note: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Some courses vary in their coverage or Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada which are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed.

 

Coordinating Committee

  • Don Desserud, Co-ordinator - Political Science
  • Charles Adeyanju - Sociology/Anthropology
  • Greg Doran - English/Theatre Studies
  • Carlo Lavoie - Modern Languages
  • G. Edward MacDonald -History
  • Brent MacLaine - English
  • Jane Magrath - English
  • James Moran - History
  • Sharon Myers - History
  • James Sentance - Economics
  • Andrew Zinck - Music
Want more information about Canadian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Teacher
Foreign Service Officer
Biographer
Librarian
Public Servant
Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

102 IMAGINING CANADA
This introductory course examines the creation and renegotiation of Canada’s national identity. Included are the myths, symbols, and stories that have led Canada to be imagined in specific ways. The course is interdisciplinary, drawing on institutional, political, economic, historical, sociological, artistic, linguistic, literary, and cultural perspectives.
Three hours a week

109 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 100 level.

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 200 level.

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

301 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to examine the development of Canadian culture from the perspectives of a number of distinct disciplines. The themes of colonialism, regionalism, metropolitanism and cultural diversity will provide the basis for this examination. The object of the course is to develop an awareness of the complex patterns of development in Canadian culture from the French period to the present. The course will consist of seminars and lectures by a variety of instructors.
Three hours a week

302 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
A continuation of Canadian Studies 301.
Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 300 level.

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 400 level.

411 RESEARCH TUTORIAL AND SEMINAR
This course is required for all senior students majoring in Canadian Studies. The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for interdisciplinary research in an area to be determined by the student and a participating faculty member. Readings and research on the course will be supervised by a faculty member. The student is expected to present the results of the research in the form of an essay or a public presentation. This is a tutorial and seminar course.
Three hours a week

451-452 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses are designed to provide an opportunity to examine special topics in Canadian Studies. The content and instructors will vary from year to year; open to both majors and non-majors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).

Calendar Courses

102 IMAGINING CANADA
This introductory course examines the creation and renegotiation of Canada’s national identity. Included are the myths, symbols, and stories that have led Canada to be imagined in specific ways. The course is interdisciplinary, drawing on institutional, political, economic, historical, sociological, artistic, linguistic, literary, and cultural perspectives.
Three hours a week

109 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 100 level.

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 200 level.

301 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to examine the development of Canadian culture from the perspectives of a number of distinct disciplines. The themes of colonialism, regionalism, metropolitanism and cultural diversity will provide the basis for this examination. The object of the course is to develop an awareness of the complex patterns of development in Canadian culture from the French period to the present. The course will consist of seminars and lectures by a variety of instructors.
Three hours a week

302 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
A continuation of Canadian Studies 301.
Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 300 level.

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 400 level.

411 RESEARCH TUTORIAL AND SEMINAR
This course is required for all senior students majoring in Canadian Studies. The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for interdisciplinary research in an area to be determined by the student and a participating faculty member. Readings and research on the course will be supervised by a faculty member. The student is expected to present the results of the research in the form of an essay or a public presentation. This is a tutorial and seminar course.
Three hours a week

451-452 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses are designed to provide an opportunity to examine special topics in Canadian Studies. The content and instructors will vary from year to year; open to both majors and non-majors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).

Calendar Courses

100 Level

102 IMAGINING CANADA
This introductory course examines the creation and renegotiation of Canada’s national identity. Included are the myths, symbols, and stories that have led Canada to be imagined in specific ways. The course is interdisciplinary, drawing on institutional, political, economic, historical, sociological, artistic, linguistic, literary, and cultural perspectives.
Three hours a week

109 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 100 level.

200 Level

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 200 level.

300 Level

301 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to examine the development of Canadian culture from the perspectives of a number of distinct disciplines. The themes of colonialism, regionalism, metropolitanism and cultural diversity will provide the basis for this examination. The object of the course is to develop an awareness of the complex patterns of development in Canadian culture from the French period to the present. The course will consist of seminars and lectures by a variety of instructors.
Three hours a week

302 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
A continuation of Canadian Studies 301.
Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 300 level.

400 Level

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 400 level.

411 RESEARCH TUTORIAL AND SEMINAR
This course is required for all senior students majoring in Canadian Studies. The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for interdisciplinary research in an area to be determined by the student and a participating faculty member. Readings and research on the course will be supervised by a faculty member. The student is expected to present the results of the research in the form of an essay or a public presentation. This is a tutorial and seminar course.
Three hours a week

451-452 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses are designed to provide an opportunity to examine special topics in Canadian Studies. The content and instructors will vary from year to year; open to both majors and non-majors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).

Contact UPEI