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Programs and Courses > Bachelor of Education

Bachelor of Education

Careers:
  • Classroom Teacher (K-12)
  • Literacy Specialist
  • Education Administrator
  • Adult Educator
  • Researcher
The Faculty of Education is located in Memorial Hall.
(902) 620-5154

The Bachelor of Education (BEd) is a 12-month post-degree program consisting of 20 three-hour credit courses in education. This program is designed to provide the variety of courses and extended field experiences through which students can develop the knowledge and skills needed to teach in the modern classroom. It is the opportunity for students to focus their studies in Primary/Elementary (K - 6) or Intermediate/Senior (7-12) and in  International, Indigenous, or Adult and Workplace Education.

 

 

Careers:
  • Classroom Teacher (K-12)
  • Literacy Specialist
  • Education Administrator
  • Adult Educator
  • Researcher
The Faculty of Education is located in Memorial Hall.
(902) 620-5154

REQUIRED COURSES:

PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION (K - 6)
INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7 - 12)

  • Ed 403 The Arts and Social Transformation
  • Ed 411 Learners and Learning
  • Ed 412 School and Classroom Culture
  • Ed 413 Multiliteracies
  • Ed 415 Inclusive Education
  • Ed 420 Teaching for Science, Technology, Math, and Engineering (STEM)
  • Ed 421 Teaching for the Humanities
  • Ed 431 Differentiated Instruction
  • Ed 463 Perspectives on Culture and Society in Education
  • Ed 464 Educating for Global Citizenship
  • Ed 466 Principles and Practices of Teaching English as Another Language
  • Ed 482 Assessment and Evaluation
  • Ed 495 Inquiry and Action
  • Ed 496 Inquiry and Action
  • Ed 497 Advocacy I – Differentiation and Diversity
  • Ed 498 Advocacy II – Becoming a Professional

PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION (K - 6)

  • Ed 423 Primary/Elementary Mathematics 
  • Ed 432 Primary/Elementary language and Literacies 
  • Ed 445 Primary/Elementary Science 
  • Ed 454 Primary/Elementary Social Studies 

INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7 - 12)

Students take 4 of:

  • Ed 426 Intermediate/Senior Mathematics I 
  • Ed 427 Intermediate/Senior Mathematics II
  • Ed 436 Intermediate/Senior English I 
  • Ed 437 Intermediate/Senior English II
  • Ed 446 Intermediate/Senior Science I 
  • Ed 447 Intermediate/Senior Science II
  • Ed 456 Intermediate/Senior Social Studies I 
  • Ed 457 Intermediate/Senior Social Studies II
Careers:
  • Classroom Teacher (K-12)
  • Literacy Specialist
  • Education Administrator
  • Adult Educator
  • Researcher
The Faculty of Education is located in Memorial Hall.
(902) 620-5154

Students may complete specializations in International, Indigenous, or Adult and Workplace Education by completing two courses beyond the 20 required for the BEd as outlined below:

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

  • Ed 462 International Education and one of:
  • Ed 467 Approaches and Methods for Teaching English as Another Language
  • Ed 459 Enterprise Education
  • Ed 465 International Development

INDIGENOUS EDUCATION

  • Ed 449 Introduction to Indigenous Education
  • Ed 451 Integrating indigenous Themes in the Curriculum K-12

ADULT AND WORKPLACE EDUCATION

  • Ed 363 The Adult Learner and one of:
  • Ed 309 an Introduction to Learning in the Workplace
  • Ed 375 Mentoring the Adult Learner

 

Careers:
  • Classroom Teacher (K-12)
  • Literacy Specialist
  • Education Administrator
  • Adult Educator
  • Researcher
The Faculty of Education is located in Memorial Hall.
(902) 620-5154
  • Ronald J. MacDonald - Interim Dean of Education
  • Ray Doiron - Professor Emeritus 
  • Martha Gabriel - Professor
  • Julie Gagnon - Lecturer 
  • Tim J. Goddard - Advisor to the President, International Relations
  • Linyuan Guo - Assistant Professor
  • Alexander (Sandy) McAuley - Associate Professor 
  • Tess Miller - Assistant Professor 
  • Lyndsay Moffat - Assistant Professor
  • Jane Preston - Assistant Professor
  • Kate Tilleczek - Professor and Canada Research Chair in Child/Youth Cultures and Transitions
  • Fiona Walton - Associate Professor
  • Sean Wiebe - Assistant Professor
Overview

The Bachelor of Education (BEd) is a 12-month post-degree program consisting of 20 three-hour credit courses in education. This program is designed to provide the variety of courses and extended field experiences through which students can develop the knowledge and skills needed to teach in the modern classroom. It is the opportunity for students to focus their studies in Primary/Elementary (K - 6) or Intermediate/Senior (7-12) and in  International, Indigenous, or Adult and Workplace Education.

 

 

Required Courses

REQUIRED COURSES:

PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION (K - 6)
INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7 - 12)

  • Ed 403 The Arts and Social Transformation
  • Ed 411 Learners and Learning
  • Ed 412 School and Classroom Culture
  • Ed 413 Multiliteracies
  • Ed 415 Inclusive Education
  • Ed 420 Teaching for Science, Technology, Math, and Engineering (STEM)
  • Ed 421 Teaching for the Humanities
  • Ed 431 Differentiated Instruction
  • Ed 463 Perspectives on Culture and Society in Education
  • Ed 464 Educating for Global Citizenship
  • Ed 466 Principles and Practices of Teaching English as Another Language
  • Ed 482 Assessment and Evaluation
  • Ed 495 Inquiry and Action
  • Ed 496 Inquiry and Action
  • Ed 497 Advocacy I – Differentiation and Diversity
  • Ed 498 Advocacy II – Becoming a Professional

PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION (K - 6)

  • Ed 423 Primary/Elementary Mathematics 
  • Ed 432 Primary/Elementary language and Literacies 
  • Ed 445 Primary/Elementary Science 
  • Ed 454 Primary/Elementary Social Studies 

INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7 - 12)

Students take 4 of:

  • Ed 426 Intermediate/Senior Mathematics I 
  • Ed 427 Intermediate/Senior Mathematics II
  • Ed 436 Intermediate/Senior English I 
  • Ed 437 Intermediate/Senior English II
  • Ed 446 Intermediate/Senior Science I 
  • Ed 447 Intermediate/Senior Science II
  • Ed 456 Intermediate/Senior Social Studies I 
  • Ed 457 Intermediate/Senior Social Studies II
Specializations

Students may complete specializations in International, Indigenous, or Adult and Workplace Education by completing two courses beyond the 20 required for the BEd as outlined below:

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

  • Ed 462 International Education and one of:
  • Ed 467 Approaches and Methods for Teaching English as Another Language
  • Ed 459 Enterprise Education
  • Ed 465 International Development

INDIGENOUS EDUCATION

  • Ed 449 Introduction to Indigenous Education
  • Ed 451 Integrating indigenous Themes in the Curriculum K-12

ADULT AND WORKPLACE EDUCATION

  • Ed 363 The Adult Learner and one of:
  • Ed 309 an Introduction to Learning in the Workplace
  • Ed 375 Mentoring the Adult Learner

 

Faculty
  • Ronald J. MacDonald - Interim Dean of Education
  • Ray Doiron - Professor Emeritus 
  • Martha Gabriel - Professor
  • Julie Gagnon - Lecturer 
  • Tim J. Goddard - Advisor to the President, International Relations
  • Linyuan Guo - Assistant Professor
  • Alexander (Sandy) McAuley - Associate Professor 
  • Tess Miller - Assistant Professor 
  • Lyndsay Moffat - Assistant Professor
  • Jane Preston - Assistant Professor
  • Kate Tilleczek - Professor and Canada Research Chair in Child/Youth Cultures and Transitions
  • Fiona Walton - Associate Professor
  • Sean Wiebe - Assistant Professor
Careers: 
Classroom Teacher (K-12)
Literacy Specialist
Education Administrator
Adult Educator
Researcher
Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

Please note: Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail. Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

211 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION
This course provides students with an introduction to education in Canada. Students examine: the purpose of schools, the characteristics of classrooms, the role of teachers, the relationship between schools and society, current issues in education, and teaching as a career and profession. A minimum of 25 hours of school-related experience is a requirement of this course.
Three lecture hours, plus one full morning or afternoon a week for school visits

213 INTRODUCTION A L’EDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS AU CANADA
This course provides students with an introduction to French first and second language education in Canada with a particular emphasis on the educational system on Prince Edward Island. Students analyze a variety of French programs in Canadian schools, the goals of these programs, and the roles of teachers within them. Students also examine current issues in education and their impact on French language education. A minimum of 25 hours of school-related experience is a course requirement.
Cross-listed with French (cf. French 261)
 

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

Please note: Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail.  Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

307 ETHICS FOR ADULT PRACTITIONERS
This course examines professional ethics in the practice of adult education by: exploring the meanings of “professional” and “ethics” in the context of adult education; discussing the ideas and skills that assist adult educators in applying professional ethics to their practice; examining current codes of ethics for adult educators; and, creating individual statements of ethical practice.

308 INTEGRATING ACTIVITY BASED LEARNING IN ADULT EDUCATION
In this course, learners explore theoretical aspects supporting activity based learning, reflect on personal teaching frameworks, examine and customize a variety of strategies designed to make learning and training active. Using these foundations, participants expand their teaching repertoires by integrating activity based learning with active training, team learning, peer teaching and independent learning, and develop lesson plans and units to be used in adult learning environments.

309 AN INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE
Fostering a learning culture at work is a complex process with many competing demands on both workers and those who train and manage them. This course will introduce participants to current issues and trends affecting workplace learning; key theories of learning, learning styles and motivation for learning in relation to the workplace; core competencies associated with workplace learning; the role of informal training programs and informal learning (communities of practice, mentoring etc.); and process models for workplace learning. Participants will apply their learning and design a workplace learning program that addresses a key issue and concern in their organization.

311 INTRODUCTION TO DISTANCE LEARNING
This course provides an orientation to the methodologies and varieties of distance education approaches currently available. Students explore learning technologies related to distance education in the form of e-learning, video conferencing, audio conferencing, etc., and apply them to adult learning contexts.

312 APPLIED RESEARCH IN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
In this practical course, students review the fundamental requirements to building a successful applied research group at a post secondary educational institution. Topics covered include: national setting, institutional context, funding, communication, management, staffing, student involvement, industry partners, and community economic development. As applied research complements the teaching activities at post-secondary institutions, in this course, each student develops and presents an applied research proposal suitable for submission to a funding agency.

313 ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION
This interactive course explores the current state of adult education in Canada and the statutory framework that largely determines the direction and capacity of the discipline and practice of adult education. Students examine the mandates and variety of provider agencies (adult learning associations, literacy networks, community-based and public education agencies, adult high schools, community colleges). The funding of adult education and the constitutional requirements of governments in Canada are considered. As well, the nature of regional differences and needs (e.g. economic and social development) and how the geography and demography of the Canadian landscape challenges the framework and delivery of adult education are discussed.

314 SOCIOLOGY OF ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines the social and political structures that have an impact on adult education. Students explore the influence of these structures in shaping public policy on adult education, and discuss their significance for program development and implementation.
Three hours a week

315 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING FOR THE ADULT EDUCATOR
In this course, students in the adult education context further refine their communication skills. Students will develop greater proficiency and effectiveness in oral communication. The assignments emphasize the writing process; the clear and correct use of the English language in developing reflective and critical thought; and writing in various genres, including research, professional documents, and correspondence.

319 CAREER AND LEARNING PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
(See Integrated Studies 193 and University 193)

361 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
(See English 245)

362 COMMUNICATION PRACTICES
This course covers both interpersonal and group communication skills necessary for adult learning. It teaches students to express thoughts and ideas in clear, well-defined terms both orally and in writing. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in active listening, public speaking, and small group facilitation, as well as in understanding the variables that affect human communication. Participants are encouraged to identify their own communication challenges through study, research, presentation, and self-reflection.
Three hours a week

363 THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the principles and processes of adult learning.  Topics covered include learning styles, personal experiences, social and cultural factors that affect learning, learning in formal and non-formal environments, and the characteristics of adult learners.
Three hours a week

364 ASSESSMENT OF ADULT LEARNING
This course examines general principles, processes, and techniques of assessment and evaluation that meet the needs of the instructors, learners, and stakeholders. New assessment techniques in the psychomotor domain are expected.  Students develop practical experience in designing and implementing strategies for identifying learners’ needs and assessing learning outcomes in the adult, technological, and/or business sectors.
Three hours a week

365 COUNSELLING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces students to the social and emotional development of adult learners, and explores the theoretical principles underlying vocational and personal counselling. It focuses on the development of practical application of counselling methods.

366 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the integration of computers and other technologies into adult technology education curricula and in business and industry sectors.  It provides an overview of current computer-based technologies (e.g. various software and presentation programs, Internet, World Wide Web resources, CD-Roms, online communication, Computer Assisted Technology), and the effective use of other multimedia technology (e.g. video and overhead projectors).  Students develop animation skills for instructional purposes and learn audio production processes.
Three hours a week

367 ENTREPRENEURIAL EDUCATION
This course introduces adult learners to the principles of entrepreneurial education.  Students identify enterprising opportunities, and gain experience in planning and facilitating learning by using specialized software to create enterprising educational ventures.
Three hours a week

368 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on curriculum development beginning with needs identification, content planning and research, leading to lesson design and delivery. Students develop an understanding of provincial outcomes and standards.  Students assess learners’ needs, set appropriate outcomes, plan methodologies and resources, implement program plans, evaluate learning, and reflect on teaching effectiveness.
Three hours a week

369 ISSUES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course introduces students to contemporary trends (e.g., societal, economic, political, and social trends), and diversity in the workplace. Also explored is the role of adult educators as change agents in shaping the fields of training, development, and adult education.
Three hours a week

371 INTRODUCTION TO ADULT EDUCATION
This course surveys the theories and historical practice of the adult education movement. It examines the characteristics of adult education in a variety of contexts, with particular emphasis on Canadian and provincial initiatives and challenges. Changing needs across a wide range of institutional settings within the field of adult education are identified and discussed.
Three hours a week

372 FACILITATING LITERACY IN ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students learn to apply the principles of adult learning and current theory and research to adult literacy settings. The course examines various instructional strategies and techniques that develop language and literacy skills in large or small groups, or in the context of coaching. There is recognition that barriers to literacy learning exist and that educators must understand not only the theory and practice of literacy but also the needs and goals of the individuals in a social learning environment.
Three hours a week

373 SPECIAL NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students are introduced to inclusive education and become aware of the issues and characteristics of adults with special needs. The course gives an overview of some common learning difficulties and challenges. It also provides suggestions for teaching strategies to encourage adults to learn from their strengths and increase independence. Of particular interest is the use of assistive technology, self-advocacy, and awareness of services available to adult learners. Also explored are secondary issues related to special needs and adults.
Three hours a week

374 TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
This course presents the theoretical foundation of transformative learning and transformational education, with an emphasis on practical application. It encompasses principles of adult learning coupled with teaching practices that establish leader empowerment. The role of a transformative educator is explored as a paradigm and establishes critical self-reflection as an essential component of teaching practice. Students should be prepared to examine their educational beliefs, values, and assumptions, and the impact of those beliefs on teaching practice.
Three hours a week

375 MENTORING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines effective methods of mentoring adult students in various contexts. The qualities, techniques, and necessary formal structures in facilitated mentoring relationships are studied using readings, case studies, discussion, presentations, and modelling. Students understand the depth of mentoring adults to the extent that individuals perform the role of mentor or assist others in a structured mentoring program.
Three hours a week

391 FOUNDATIONS OF COACHING
A course which examines the variety of sciences which are the foundations of coaching, such as: anatomy, physiology, philosophy, psychology, and sociology, as well as introduces coaching concerns in a number of popular sports (NCCP Level 1 Theory included).
Three hours a week

392 ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
A course concerned with the organizational and administrative principles in physical education. Major areas to be examined include: intramurals and recreation, interschool sports, equipment, facilities, and public relations.
Three hours a week

395 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADULT EDUCATION
Students investigate special topics that have particular reference to the fields of adult education, technological training and development, trades education, and other related areas. Students are expected to explore and research an approved topic of their choice.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

 

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

Please note:  Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail.  Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

401 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course is available to advanced students at the discretion of the faculty. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered are subject to the approval of the Dean of Education. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

402 MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE YOUNG LEARNER
This course examines topics in education psychology relevant to the early years classroom. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers for supporting students in need.
Three hours a week

403 ARTS AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION
This course facilitates creativity through a variety of multi-modal experiences in the visual, literary and performing arts. Students broaden knowledge and expertise in critical inquiry with a focus on the role of the arts in social transformation.
Three hours a week

411 LEARNERS AND LEARNING
This course explores the growth and development of learners from early childhood to late adolescence. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers.
Three hours a week

412 SCHOOL AND CLASSROOM CULTURE
This course will familiarize students with the variety of often contradictory and unnoticed social, epistemological, economic, political, and cultural influences that have shaped dominant beliefs about K-12 schooling. Students will develop critical inquiry skills as they examine educational assumptions and arrangements, with particular attention to their impact on educational outcomes, in their own lives, in schools, and in society at large.
Three hours a week

413 MULTILITERACIES
This course introduces students to the critical, developmental, and pedagogical dimensions of supporting students K-12 as they learn the range of literacies required for life in the twenty-first century.
Three hours a week

415 INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
This course provides an overview of students with different learning abilities in the regular classroom, and examines the evolution of services for children with particular learning needs. The course emphasizes the skills needed to ensure that the regular classroom is inclusive and that the teacher is sensitive to all needs.
Three hours a week

417 MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE ADOLESCENT LEARNER
This course examines topics in educational psychology relevant to the middle and senior years classroom. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers for supporting students in need.
Three hours a week

418 GUIDANCE IN THE SCHOOLS
This course examines principles, problems and procedures in the provision of guidance services in a school setting. Particular attention is given to such topics as the functions of school personnel in guidance; integration of school and community resources; guidance-testing programs; information services; placement and follow-up activities.
Three hours a week

420 TEACHING FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH (STEM)
This course introduces students to the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to success in the sciences, technology, engineering and maths.
Three hours a week

421 TEACHING FOR THE HUMANITIES
This course introduces students to the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to success in the social studies and humanities.
Three hours a week

422 MATHEMATICS FOR TEACHERS
The course provides opportunities for students to reason and make sense of mathematics in meaningful ways by discovering mathematics through inquiry-based instructional methods grounded in real-life contexts. Content will be drawn from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics five content (number & operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis & probability) and process (problem-solving, reasoning & proof, communications, connections, and representation) standards.
Three hours a week
NOTE: This course may be used as partial fulfillment of the Mathematics requirement for entrance to the BEd program, but cannot be used as a credit towards the BEd itself.

423 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS
This course examines the pedagogy of Primary/Elementary mathematics. Instruction focuses on how children learn mathematics, what it means to engage children in doing mathematics, teaching mathematics through problem solving, and curriculum sequencing. Underlying these foundational ideas for teaching, students will have the opportunity to re-learn key areas of mathematics in a twenty-first century approach to teaching and learning.
Three hours a week

426 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR MATHEMATICS I
Building on the pedagogy of mathematics at the Primary/Elementary grades, this course examines the pedagogy of Intermediate/Senior mathematics. Instruction focuses on how students learn mathematics in these grades, what it means to engage them in doing mathematics, teaching mathematics through problem solving, and curriculum sequencing. Students will also have the opportunity to re-learn key areas of mathematics in a twenty-first century approach.
Three hours a week

427 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR MATHEMATICS II
This course is a continuation of Education 426, and builds a conceptual foundation for the topics covered in the intermediate/senior years curriculum. Emphasis is placed on the critical examination of the current intermediate/senior years mathematics curriculum in relation to materials and methodologies. Experience in a variety of teaching methodologies is provided in addition to the development of an understanding of the principles and practices of assessment in mathematics.
PREREQUISITE: Education 426
Three hours a week

428 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS II
A continuation of Education 423, this course further examines and extends the pedagogy of Primary/Elementary focusing on how children conceptualize mathematics and instructional methods required to foster children's numeracy skills.
PREREQUISITE: Education 423
Three hours a week

429 MATHEMATICS IN THE MIDDLE YEARS II
This course provides pre-service teachers with an opportunity to design effective learning experiences, to enable students in the middle years to achieve the key stage outcomes of the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation Curriculum for Mathematics Grades 5 - 9.
PREREQUISITE: Education 425
Three hours a week

431 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
This course focuses on the design, implementation and assessment of differentiated instructional practices to simultaneously address curriculum outcomes and the significant range of student differences in regular K-12 classrooms.
Three hours a week

432 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE AND LITERACIES I
This course provides an examination of the foundations of language/literacy processes based on current theories of language acquisition and literacy development. The focus is on six core strands: reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing, as well as balanced approaches to teaching, learning and assessing literacy skills in the Primary/Elementary grades.
Three hours a week

433 LITERACY IN THE EARLY YEARS II
This course is a continuation of Education 432, in which students use language arts outcomes, materials, methods, and assessment techniques to design comprehensive literacy programs and activities.
PREREQUISITE: Education 432
Three hours a week

434 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE MIDDLE YEARS I
This course provides an introduction to current theory and conceptual frameworks for language arts, as well as teaching methods associated with teaching language arts in the middle years of school. The focus includes literacy acquisition with core strands of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing, with teaching methods that develop a balanced approach to teaching language arts in grades 5-9.
Three hours a week

436 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR ENGLISH I
This course familiarizes students with a variety of theories, practices, and values for addressing curriculum and pedagogy as they relate to the teaching of English at the Intermediate/Senior level. With a view to being and becoming English teachers, both locally and globally, students will participate in writing, speaking, listening, reading, viewing and representing activities as informed by research and in a range of developmental, socio-cultural, and media contexts.
Three hours a week

437 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR ENGLISH II
Building on Ed 436, placement experiences and a growing expertise in English education, students will critically inquire and contribute to current discussions and practices on the nature and cross-curricular scope of language and literacy. Emphasis will be on sense-making and concept development, effective writing instruction, the interactive/iterative relationship between teaching and assessment, and the evolving social/economic relevance of communication genres, modes, and media.
PREREQUISITE: Education 436
Three hours a week

441 INTRODUCTION TO CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This introductory course examines the foundational forces (historical, philosophical, psychological, and societal/cultural) which influence the curriculum, and presents various models for curriculum development. Specific references will be made to the PEI scene.
Three hours a week

445 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY SCIENCE 
The course examines methods of science teaching in the Primary/Elementary grades. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects of organizing and delivering active learning experiences in science, the reading of current literature on method and theory of science, the study of new curricular programs including the integration of science learning with other disciplines, and the relationship between sustainability and science.
Three hours a week

446 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SCIENCE I
This course provides an introduction to basic pedagogical concepts and skills needed for the successful and effective teaching of science to Intermediate/Senior school students. Using the concepts of general science and the provincial science curriculum, the course examines the nature and limitations of teaching, learning and technology within the Canadian science classroom context.
PREREQUISITE: At least a minor in a Natural Science, or permission of the instructor. 
Three hours a week

447 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SCIENCE II
This course examines the development, nature, and limitations of science and technology; the role of science and technology in society; and the teaching of science and technology in the schools. Time is devoted to an examination of the provincial science curricula, innovative teaching and assessment strategies and techniques, and the development of active learning opportunities.
PREREQUISITE: Education 446
Three hours a week

449 INTRODUCTION TO INDIGENOUS EDUCATION 
This course examines the needs of Indigenous learners and current issues affecting their school success. Participants investigate the history and approaches that have shaped First Nations, Inuit and Metis education in Canada and successful projects that challenge a long history of cultural and cognitive imperialism. Community-based cultural ceremonies and teachings provide a base for understanding and appreciating the increasing importance and power of traditional knowledge in today’s world.
Three hours a week

451 INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS THEMES IN THE CURRICULUM
This course promotes dynamic ways for the public school curriculum to acknowledge more faithfully the histories, cultures, worldviews and teachings of Indigenous peoples in Canada and globally. The importance of developing more culturally responsive pedagogies and assessment practices and more respectful and inclusive research is highlighted.  Insights are shared into the processes of recovery for Indigenous communities and the essential supports for their students to experience success at all grade levels.
Three hours a week

454 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY SOCIAL STUDIES
This course promotes dynamic teaching methods and inclusive approaches to inspire young learners and to elevate the quality of teaching and learning through Social Studies at the Primary/Elementary levels. Grounded in the needs of twenty-first century learners, this course offers concrete ways to create more vibrant, engaging, playful, supportive and inviting environments for this core curriculum area to give all learners dignity and honour their diverse ways of learning.
Three hours a week

456 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SOCIAL STUDIES I
This course promotes dynamic teaching methods and inclusive approaches to inspire learners in grades 7-12 and to elevate the quality of teaching and learning through Social Studies at the Intermediate/Senior levels.  Grounded in the needs of twenty-first century learners, this course offers concrete ways to create more vibrant, engaging, playful, supportive and inviting environments for this core curriculum area to give all learners dignity and honour their diverse ways of learning.
Three hours a week

457 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SOCIAL STUDIES II 
This course develops a rationale, framework and procedures for facilitating thematic teaching and learning on critical social issues appropriate for grades 7-12.  Skills in curriculum development are refined as students explore authentic assessment practices and ways of promoting student ownership of and co-responsibility for learning.
PREREQUISITE: Education 456
Three hours a week

459 ENTERPRISE EDUCATION 
This course introduces the key principles and components of Learning For Enterprise, an international movement that nurtures initiative, self-determination, creativity and innovation in twenty-first century learners.  A workshop design engages participants in classroom and community-based challenges that contribute to learners’ confidence in self and community as they apply enterprising capabilities in a wide range of contexts throughout their lives. Specific applications to historically dependent cultures are explored.
Three hours a week

462 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
This course introduces students to the economic, political, and cultural factors that influence public education in foreign countries. The public school systems of selected foreign countries are examined and compared to the provincial systems in Canada. Students are expected to carry out independent research on a foreign country of their choosing.
Three hours a week

463 PERSPECTIVES ON CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN EDUCATION 
This course introduces students to the visible and invisible impact of culture and society on education. As students develop an understanding of cultural and social perspectives in education, they examine the roles of schools in the proliferation of social and cultural norms as well as their potential as sites for change.
Three hours a week

464 EDUCATING FOR GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP
This course is intended to broaden pre-service teachers’ theoretical and pedagogical perspectives on global citizenship education by gaining an enhanced awareness of a world view that recognizes the interdependence and interconnections of the natural and social worlds. Participants will be introduced to the concept of global citizenship and, from this, develop an understanding of social justice, diversity, socio-cultural responsibility, sustainability, and agency. Demonstrating how to integrate global citizenship into educational practices is a key learning outcome of this course.

465 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This course introduces students to the history of international development and explores the models of development currently employed. Particular attention is given to the effects of economic, political, environmental, and cultural development on public education in emerging countries.
Three hours a week

466 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
This course explores the theoretical foundations for teaching English as a second/additional language (ESL/EAL). Students are introduced to fundamental aspects of additional language acquisition and the factors affecting language learning and teaching. The course introduces the needs of English language learners in various contexts including ESL/EAL, mainstream and foreign language classrooms. Students develop a critical perspective on issues related to language learning and teaching.
Three hours a week

467 APPROACHES AND METHODS FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE 
This course provides students with the foundations to facilitate language classes in contexts including ESL/EAL, mainstream and foreign language classrooms. The course introduces a range of English language teaching approaches and methodologies and addresses techniques specific to teaching listening, speaking, writing, reading, vocabulary and grammar in an additional language.
PREREQUISITE: Education 466
Three hours a week

468 SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY
This course examines the historical and cultural roles of the rural school. Emphasis is placed on the evolving role of the school as a community resource centre.
Three hours a week

469 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

471 ADMINISTRATION IN EDUCATION
This course is an introduction to the theory and practices of administration in education which includes an analysis of the nature of school organizations, effective administrative processes, the administrative structure of education on PEI, and legal issues in administration.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

473 COMMUNICATIONS
An introductory course covering both interpersonal and group communication, aimed at teaching the student to think and to express ideas in lucid and well-defined terms. The emphasis will be on the workshop approach involving constant practice in the techniques of voice and speech, public speaking, classroom drama, and creative movement. This should encourage in the students a flexible and resourceful attitude, and help them to develop self-confidence, together with the awareness and sensitivity needed for teaching.
Three hours a week

474 TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION
This course provides an introduction to the integration of digital technologies into teaching and learning. The focus is on use of technology as a tool to support the school curriculum. Web-based communication and work with web-based resources is an essential component.
Three hours a week

475 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION
This course provides an opportunity to explore, develop and post web-based resources. Digital photography, digital video, and other emerging technologies are explored and applied within the educational context.
PREREQUISITE: Education 474 or permission of instructor.
Three hours a week

476 FRENCH METHODS I
In this course, students explore the curriculum and teaching of core French in the intermediate and secondary schools. Students develop a variety of teaching methodologies in the area of core French.
PREREQUISITE: At least a minor in French, or permission of instructor.
Three hours a week

481 STATISTICS IN EDUCATION
This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics required to understand, interpret, express, and evaluate the results of measurement in education. Topics included are frequency distributions, histograms, frequency polygons, mean, median for grouped and raw data, normal distributions, standard deviation, normal approximation of a binomial random variable, random sampling and sampling distributions, estimation of means, confidence intervals, student distribution, small and large samples, one- and two-tail tests of hypotheses, correlation and regression, Chi-square test, analysis of variance.
Three hours a week

482 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION
This course examines the complexity of assessment by contrasting assessment theories with common practices in the classroom. Students explore the concept of a balanced assessment program that integrates formative and summative assessment practices. Students develop skills in creating a variety of assessment instruments (e.g., observation check-lists, tests, rubrics, portfolios). Issues and practices of large-scale assessment are also explored.
Three hours a week

485 PÉDAGOGIE EN IMMERSION: LES PRINCIPES DE BASE
This course explores the general pedagogical principles and techniques of content-based teaching in French Immersion at all levels. Topics covered include development of language skills, thematic teaching in immersion, integrating form and content in immersion, and strategy instruction in immersion. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years. Students must also meet the minimum standard, as determined by the Faculty of Education, on a French proficiency test administered before admission to the program.

486 DIDACTIQUE DU FRANÇAIS LANGUE SECONDE: UNE INTRODUCTION
This course explores the general pedagogical principles and techniques of communicative-experiential teaching in core and immersion French programs at all levels. Topics covered include three-stage lesson planning, personalization, pedagogical grammar, and culture teaching. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years.

487 L’ACQUISITION DES LANGUES SECONDES
This course explores students’ past experiences and beliefs about language learning and teaching, principal theories related to second language acquisition, and practical applications of theory to classroom contexts in French Immersion and core French at all levels. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years or with instructor’s permission.

488 LITTÉRATIE - ÉDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS - PARTIE I
This course introduces students to the general pedagogical principles and techniques of literacy development in French first and second language contexts at the early, middle and senior years. Using materials available in schools and applying appropriate methods and assessment techniques, students de- sign programs and activities based on the learning outcomes in the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation French Immersion Curriculum. This course is taught entirely in French and all assignments are completed in French.
Three hours a week

489 LITTÉRATIE - ÉDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS- PARTIE II
This course explores and deepens students’ understanding of the pedagogical principles and techniques of literacy development in French first and second language contexts at the early, middle and senior years. Using materials available in schools and applying appropriate methods and assessment techniques, students design programs and activities based on the learning outcomes in the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation French Immersion Curriculum. This course is taught entirely in French and all assignments are completed in French.
PREREQUISITE: Education 488

491 SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
This course involves an analysis of the reciprocal relations between school and society. It examines the influence of political and economic structures in shaping the education systems of various societies, as well as the relevance of different types of schooling in facilitating political and economic participation and cultural enrichment. Empirical attention is given to societies at various levels of general development, with particular emphasis on Canada.
PREREQUISITE: A university degree or two courses in Sociology and at least Third year status or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

493 FRENCH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY IN A SCHOOL SETTING/LES COMPÉTENCES
LANGAGIÈRES EN CONTEXTE ÉDUCATIF
This course will allow current and future teachers of French as an additional language to enhance their language skills and intercultural awareness. Participants will learn the importance of maintaining a high quality of French in the classroom through reflective and interactive activities. At the end of the course, participants will be able to reflect on their own language practices in the classroom, and communicate clearly and correctly in French in both written and spoken contexts. Additionally, they will be better equipped to guide students effectively in reading, writing, and understanding a variety of texts and identify, correct, and explain common errors in learning French as an additional language.
Three semester hours taught over 2 semesters

495 INQUIRY AND ACTION I
Through on-campus seminars and five weeks of school placement, students will observe, experience and reflect upon the various roles and responsibilities that a teacher has within the classroom and school and the impact of teaching on learners. They will begin to plan and teach lessons under the guidance of mentor teachers. Using an ePortfolio, they will begin to document their personal and professional growth as educators.
Three hours a week

496 INQUIRY AND ACTION II
Through on-campus seminars and six weeks of school experience, students will undertake planning and teaching effective lessons, themes and units of study. They will use strategies developed in methods courses to facilitate and assess student learning. Feedback from the mentor teacher and faculty advisor will inform self-assessment and personal and professional growth. ePortfolio development will continue.
PREREQUISITE: Education 495
Three hours a week

497 ADVOCACY I – DIFFERENTIATION AND DIVERSITY
On-campus seminars and five weeks of practicum placement will focus on developing the skills and strategies required to meet the diverse learning needs of students within the classroom setting. Students effectively plan, implement, and assess adaptations and modifications required for optimal learning by individuals and the entire group. ePortfolio development will continue.
PREREQUISITE: Education 496
Three hours a week

498 ADVOCACY II – BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL
On-campus seminars and six weeks of practicum placement will prepare students for professional certification in contexts chosen to deepen their knowledge and practice. ePortfolios will be completed and presented to meet course and program requirements.
PREREQUISITE: Education 497
Three hours a week
 

Course Level: 
500 Level
Courses: 

Please note: Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail.  Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

509 FOUNDATIONS OF TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP IN NUNAVUT EDUCATION
This course reviews the history and world view of the Inuit, with particular emphasis on culture, educational history, struggles with power and privilege, beliefs, values, and principles relevant to Nunavut. Traditional and contemporary views on leadership are studied as participants develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context in which they live and work as educational leaders. Participants examine the directions and philosophies established in Nunavut, including ties to the environment and practices that facilitate transformational educational leadership.
Three semester hours

511 PROACTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP IN NUNAVUT COMMUNITIES
The responsibilities, roles, and tasks of principals and other educational leaders are explored as they relate to the creation of a positive, inclusive, collaborative, and culturally responsive school community. The role of leadership in teaching and learning and building positive relationships, both in and outside school, is examined as a key factor in facilitating the academic achievement and well-being of learners. A variety of culturally appropriate facilitation strategies are introduced as participants analyze the legal, moral, ethical and policy rights of learners and educators in maintaining and strengthening culture and language and promoting success in schools, the local community, and the world beyond.
Three semester hours

512 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP—ENGAGING NUNAVUT PARENTS, ELDERS,  AND COMMUNITY
This course focuses on the development of collaborative relationships, positive communication, and empowerment of parents, elders, and community members who lead, support, and guide education in Nunavut. Participants discuss approaches that respond to and involve the community, and build accountability in ways that are transparent and reciprocal.  The involvement of the extended community in the daily life and long-term vision of the school provides a central focus as participants reflect on, and write about, the process of creating collaborative learning communities with parents, caregivers, and elders based on cultural values, beliefs, and principles.
Three semester hours

513 LEADERSHIP OF THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROCESS IN NUNAVUT COMMUNITIES
Policy implementation, supervision of teaching and the leadership of learning, staff evaluation, and program accountability play a key role in transformational educational leadership and are a major focus in this course. Participants discuss and write extensively about policy implementation that is culturally and linguistically responsive in promoting learning. Participants are challenged to develop skill sets they require to involve the community and parents in developing and implementing a vision for education based on current policies.
Three semester hours

514 REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR NUNAVUT
Participants propose, develop, and implement an approved reflective inquiry project based on their own educational practice. 
Three semester hours

559 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION
In this course, students investigate special topics in the field of education. Permission of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and the Dean is required.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

573 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE IN EDUCATION
An introduction to, and survey of, children’s literature with emphasis on contemporary books written for children. These include picture books, fiction, and nonfiction with special consideration of Canadian titles. Students examine, read, evaluate, and discuss different forms of literature and various genres of fiction, as well as the ways children’s literature is integrated into contemporary school curriculum.
Three hours a week

574 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE
An introduction to young adult literature with emphasis on contemporary books written for adolescents. These include picture books, fiction, and nonfiction with special consideration of Canadian titles. Students examine, read, evaluate, and discuss young adult books and explore the ways young adult literature is integrated into contemporary school curriculum.
Three hours a week

575 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEARNING RESOURCES
This course provides opportunities to consider principles of analysis, appraisal, and review of learning resources. Students develop criteria for evaluating and selecting a wide range of both print and non-print learning resources, and to formulate policies and procedures for the selection of learning resources to support the instructional program in the school.
Three hours a week

581 THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
Teachers examine the emergence of inclusive education and explore the history of services to children with special needs and attitudes teachers bring to the classroom. Recent research and practice in inclusive education is explored by the students.
Three hours a week

582 ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS
Teachers are introduced to individualized educational assessment of children with learning needs and become familiar with a variety of assessment tools and their implementation.
Three hours a week

583 DIFFERENTIATION AND INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION
This course introduces teachers to differentiation of curriculum and a variety of teaching methods for learners with exceptional needs, as well as the components and implementation of an individualized educational plan.
Three hours a week

584 LEADERSHIP AND COLLABORATION
Teachers explore inclusive teaming and classroom consultation as methods to promote inclusive education. Leadership traits required to facilitate the development of an inclusive school is also explored.
Three hours a week

585 IMPROVING LANGUAGE AND LITERACY ACHIEVEMENT
This course looks at strategies teachers can employ to develop language and literacy skills in the students in their classrooms. Current research in this area is presented and critiqued.
Three hours a week
 

Calendar Courses

Please note: Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail. Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

211 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION
This course provides students with an introduction to education in Canada. Students examine: the purpose of schools, the characteristics of classrooms, the role of teachers, the relationship between schools and society, current issues in education, and teaching as a career and profession. A minimum of 25 hours of school-related experience is a requirement of this course.
Three lecture hours, plus one full morning or afternoon a week for school visits

213 INTRODUCTION A L’EDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS AU CANADA
This course provides students with an introduction to French first and second language education in Canada with a particular emphasis on the educational system on Prince Edward Island. Students analyze a variety of French programs in Canadian schools, the goals of these programs, and the roles of teachers within them. Students also examine current issues in education and their impact on French language education. A minimum of 25 hours of school-related experience is a course requirement.
Cross-listed with French (cf. French 261)
 

Please note: Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail.  Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

307 ETHICS FOR ADULT PRACTITIONERS
This course examines professional ethics in the practice of adult education by: exploring the meanings of “professional” and “ethics” in the context of adult education; discussing the ideas and skills that assist adult educators in applying professional ethics to their practice; examining current codes of ethics for adult educators; and, creating individual statements of ethical practice.

308 INTEGRATING ACTIVITY BASED LEARNING IN ADULT EDUCATION
In this course, learners explore theoretical aspects supporting activity based learning, reflect on personal teaching frameworks, examine and customize a variety of strategies designed to make learning and training active. Using these foundations, participants expand their teaching repertoires by integrating activity based learning with active training, team learning, peer teaching and independent learning, and develop lesson plans and units to be used in adult learning environments.

309 AN INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE
Fostering a learning culture at work is a complex process with many competing demands on both workers and those who train and manage them. This course will introduce participants to current issues and trends affecting workplace learning; key theories of learning, learning styles and motivation for learning in relation to the workplace; core competencies associated with workplace learning; the role of informal training programs and informal learning (communities of practice, mentoring etc.); and process models for workplace learning. Participants will apply their learning and design a workplace learning program that addresses a key issue and concern in their organization.

311 INTRODUCTION TO DISTANCE LEARNING
This course provides an orientation to the methodologies and varieties of distance education approaches currently available. Students explore learning technologies related to distance education in the form of e-learning, video conferencing, audio conferencing, etc., and apply them to adult learning contexts.

312 APPLIED RESEARCH IN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
In this practical course, students review the fundamental requirements to building a successful applied research group at a post secondary educational institution. Topics covered include: national setting, institutional context, funding, communication, management, staffing, student involvement, industry partners, and community economic development. As applied research complements the teaching activities at post-secondary institutions, in this course, each student develops and presents an applied research proposal suitable for submission to a funding agency.

313 ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION
This interactive course explores the current state of adult education in Canada and the statutory framework that largely determines the direction and capacity of the discipline and practice of adult education. Students examine the mandates and variety of provider agencies (adult learning associations, literacy networks, community-based and public education agencies, adult high schools, community colleges). The funding of adult education and the constitutional requirements of governments in Canada are considered. As well, the nature of regional differences and needs (e.g. economic and social development) and how the geography and demography of the Canadian landscape challenges the framework and delivery of adult education are discussed.

314 SOCIOLOGY OF ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines the social and political structures that have an impact on adult education. Students explore the influence of these structures in shaping public policy on adult education, and discuss their significance for program development and implementation.
Three hours a week

315 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING FOR THE ADULT EDUCATOR
In this course, students in the adult education context further refine their communication skills. Students will develop greater proficiency and effectiveness in oral communication. The assignments emphasize the writing process; the clear and correct use of the English language in developing reflective and critical thought; and writing in various genres, including research, professional documents, and correspondence.

319 CAREER AND LEARNING PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
(See Integrated Studies 193 and University 193)

361 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
(See English 245)

362 COMMUNICATION PRACTICES
This course covers both interpersonal and group communication skills necessary for adult learning. It teaches students to express thoughts and ideas in clear, well-defined terms both orally and in writing. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in active listening, public speaking, and small group facilitation, as well as in understanding the variables that affect human communication. Participants are encouraged to identify their own communication challenges through study, research, presentation, and self-reflection.
Three hours a week

363 THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the principles and processes of adult learning.  Topics covered include learning styles, personal experiences, social and cultural factors that affect learning, learning in formal and non-formal environments, and the characteristics of adult learners.
Three hours a week

364 ASSESSMENT OF ADULT LEARNING
This course examines general principles, processes, and techniques of assessment and evaluation that meet the needs of the instructors, learners, and stakeholders. New assessment techniques in the psychomotor domain are expected.  Students develop practical experience in designing and implementing strategies for identifying learners’ needs and assessing learning outcomes in the adult, technological, and/or business sectors.
Three hours a week

365 COUNSELLING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces students to the social and emotional development of adult learners, and explores the theoretical principles underlying vocational and personal counselling. It focuses on the development of practical application of counselling methods.

366 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the integration of computers and other technologies into adult technology education curricula and in business and industry sectors.  It provides an overview of current computer-based technologies (e.g. various software and presentation programs, Internet, World Wide Web resources, CD-Roms, online communication, Computer Assisted Technology), and the effective use of other multimedia technology (e.g. video and overhead projectors).  Students develop animation skills for instructional purposes and learn audio production processes.
Three hours a week

367 ENTREPRENEURIAL EDUCATION
This course introduces adult learners to the principles of entrepreneurial education.  Students identify enterprising opportunities, and gain experience in planning and facilitating learning by using specialized software to create enterprising educational ventures.
Three hours a week

368 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on curriculum development beginning with needs identification, content planning and research, leading to lesson design and delivery. Students develop an understanding of provincial outcomes and standards.  Students assess learners’ needs, set appropriate outcomes, plan methodologies and resources, implement program plans, evaluate learning, and reflect on teaching effectiveness.
Three hours a week

369 ISSUES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course introduces students to contemporary trends (e.g., societal, economic, political, and social trends), and diversity in the workplace. Also explored is the role of adult educators as change agents in shaping the fields of training, development, and adult education.
Three hours a week

371 INTRODUCTION TO ADULT EDUCATION
This course surveys the theories and historical practice of the adult education movement. It examines the characteristics of adult education in a variety of contexts, with particular emphasis on Canadian and provincial initiatives and challenges. Changing needs across a wide range of institutional settings within the field of adult education are identified and discussed.
Three hours a week

372 FACILITATING LITERACY IN ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students learn to apply the principles of adult learning and current theory and research to adult literacy settings. The course examines various instructional strategies and techniques that develop language and literacy skills in large or small groups, or in the context of coaching. There is recognition that barriers to literacy learning exist and that educators must understand not only the theory and practice of literacy but also the needs and goals of the individuals in a social learning environment.
Three hours a week

373 SPECIAL NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students are introduced to inclusive education and become aware of the issues and characteristics of adults with special needs. The course gives an overview of some common learning difficulties and challenges. It also provides suggestions for teaching strategies to encourage adults to learn from their strengths and increase independence. Of particular interest is the use of assistive technology, self-advocacy, and awareness of services available to adult learners. Also explored are secondary issues related to special needs and adults.
Three hours a week

374 TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
This course presents the theoretical foundation of transformative learning and transformational education, with an emphasis on practical application. It encompasses principles of adult learning coupled with teaching practices that establish leader empowerment. The role of a transformative educator is explored as a paradigm and establishes critical self-reflection as an essential component of teaching practice. Students should be prepared to examine their educational beliefs, values, and assumptions, and the impact of those beliefs on teaching practice.
Three hours a week

375 MENTORING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines effective methods of mentoring adult students in various contexts. The qualities, techniques, and necessary formal structures in facilitated mentoring relationships are studied using readings, case studies, discussion, presentations, and modelling. Students understand the depth of mentoring adults to the extent that individuals perform the role of mentor or assist others in a structured mentoring program.
Three hours a week

391 FOUNDATIONS OF COACHING
A course which examines the variety of sciences which are the foundations of coaching, such as: anatomy, physiology, philosophy, psychology, and sociology, as well as introduces coaching concerns in a number of popular sports (NCCP Level 1 Theory included).
Three hours a week

392 ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
A course concerned with the organizational and administrative principles in physical education. Major areas to be examined include: intramurals and recreation, interschool sports, equipment, facilities, and public relations.
Three hours a week

395 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADULT EDUCATION
Students investigate special topics that have particular reference to the fields of adult education, technological training and development, trades education, and other related areas. Students are expected to explore and research an approved topic of their choice.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

 

Please note:  Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail.  Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

401 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course is available to advanced students at the discretion of the faculty. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered are subject to the approval of the Dean of Education. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

402 MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE YOUNG LEARNER
This course examines topics in education psychology relevant to the early years classroom. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers for supporting students in need.
Three hours a week

403 ARTS AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION
This course facilitates creativity through a variety of multi-modal experiences in the visual, literary and performing arts. Students broaden knowledge and expertise in critical inquiry with a focus on the role of the arts in social transformation.
Three hours a week

411 LEARNERS AND LEARNING
This course explores the growth and development of learners from early childhood to late adolescence. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers.
Three hours a week

412 SCHOOL AND CLASSROOM CULTURE
This course will familiarize students with the variety of often contradictory and unnoticed social, epistemological, economic, political, and cultural influences that have shaped dominant beliefs about K-12 schooling. Students will develop critical inquiry skills as they examine educational assumptions and arrangements, with particular attention to their impact on educational outcomes, in their own lives, in schools, and in society at large.
Three hours a week

413 MULTILITERACIES
This course introduces students to the critical, developmental, and pedagogical dimensions of supporting students K-12 as they learn the range of literacies required for life in the twenty-first century.
Three hours a week

415 INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
This course provides an overview of students with different learning abilities in the regular classroom, and examines the evolution of services for children with particular learning needs. The course emphasizes the skills needed to ensure that the regular classroom is inclusive and that the teacher is sensitive to all needs.
Three hours a week

417 MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE ADOLESCENT LEARNER
This course examines topics in educational psychology relevant to the middle and senior years classroom. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers for supporting students in need.
Three hours a week

418 GUIDANCE IN THE SCHOOLS
This course examines principles, problems and procedures in the provision of guidance services in a school setting. Particular attention is given to such topics as the functions of school personnel in guidance; integration of school and community resources; guidance-testing programs; information services; placement and follow-up activities.
Three hours a week

420 TEACHING FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH (STEM)
This course introduces students to the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to success in the sciences, technology, engineering and maths.
Three hours a week

421 TEACHING FOR THE HUMANITIES
This course introduces students to the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to success in the social studies and humanities.
Three hours a week

422 MATHEMATICS FOR TEACHERS
The course provides opportunities for students to reason and make sense of mathematics in meaningful ways by discovering mathematics through inquiry-based instructional methods grounded in real-life contexts. Content will be drawn from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics five content (number & operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis & probability) and process (problem-solving, reasoning & proof, communications, connections, and representation) standards.
Three hours a week
NOTE: This course may be used as partial fulfillment of the Mathematics requirement for entrance to the BEd program, but cannot be used as a credit towards the BEd itself.

423 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS
This course examines the pedagogy of Primary/Elementary mathematics. Instruction focuses on how children learn mathematics, what it means to engage children in doing mathematics, teaching mathematics through problem solving, and curriculum sequencing. Underlying these foundational ideas for teaching, students will have the opportunity to re-learn key areas of mathematics in a twenty-first century approach to teaching and learning.
Three hours a week

426 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR MATHEMATICS I
Building on the pedagogy of mathematics at the Primary/Elementary grades, this course examines the pedagogy of Intermediate/Senior mathematics. Instruction focuses on how students learn mathematics in these grades, what it means to engage them in doing mathematics, teaching mathematics through problem solving, and curriculum sequencing. Students will also have the opportunity to re-learn key areas of mathematics in a twenty-first century approach.
Three hours a week

427 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR MATHEMATICS II
This course is a continuation of Education 426, and builds a conceptual foundation for the topics covered in the intermediate/senior years curriculum. Emphasis is placed on the critical examination of the current intermediate/senior years mathematics curriculum in relation to materials and methodologies. Experience in a variety of teaching methodologies is provided in addition to the development of an understanding of the principles and practices of assessment in mathematics.
PREREQUISITE: Education 426
Three hours a week

428 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS II
A continuation of Education 423, this course further examines and extends the pedagogy of Primary/Elementary focusing on how children conceptualize mathematics and instructional methods required to foster children's numeracy skills.
PREREQUISITE: Education 423
Three hours a week

429 MATHEMATICS IN THE MIDDLE YEARS II
This course provides pre-service teachers with an opportunity to design effective learning experiences, to enable students in the middle years to achieve the key stage outcomes of the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation Curriculum for Mathematics Grades 5 - 9.
PREREQUISITE: Education 425
Three hours a week

431 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
This course focuses on the design, implementation and assessment of differentiated instructional practices to simultaneously address curriculum outcomes and the significant range of student differences in regular K-12 classrooms.
Three hours a week

432 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE AND LITERACIES I
This course provides an examination of the foundations of language/literacy processes based on current theories of language acquisition and literacy development. The focus is on six core strands: reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing, as well as balanced approaches to teaching, learning and assessing literacy skills in the Primary/Elementary grades.
Three hours a week

433 LITERACY IN THE EARLY YEARS II
This course is a continuation of Education 432, in which students use language arts outcomes, materials, methods, and assessment techniques to design comprehensive literacy programs and activities.
PREREQUISITE: Education 432
Three hours a week

434 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE MIDDLE YEARS I
This course provides an introduction to current theory and conceptual frameworks for language arts, as well as teaching methods associated with teaching language arts in the middle years of school. The focus includes literacy acquisition with core strands of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing, with teaching methods that develop a balanced approach to teaching language arts in grades 5-9.
Three hours a week

436 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR ENGLISH I
This course familiarizes students with a variety of theories, practices, and values for addressing curriculum and pedagogy as they relate to the teaching of English at the Intermediate/Senior level. With a view to being and becoming English teachers, both locally and globally, students will participate in writing, speaking, listening, reading, viewing and representing activities as informed by research and in a range of developmental, socio-cultural, and media contexts.
Three hours a week

437 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR ENGLISH II
Building on Ed 436, placement experiences and a growing expertise in English education, students will critically inquire and contribute to current discussions and practices on the nature and cross-curricular scope of language and literacy. Emphasis will be on sense-making and concept development, effective writing instruction, the interactive/iterative relationship between teaching and assessment, and the evolving social/economic relevance of communication genres, modes, and media.
PREREQUISITE: Education 436
Three hours a week

441 INTRODUCTION TO CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This introductory course examines the foundational forces (historical, philosophical, psychological, and societal/cultural) which influence the curriculum, and presents various models for curriculum development. Specific references will be made to the PEI scene.
Three hours a week

445 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY SCIENCE 
The course examines methods of science teaching in the Primary/Elementary grades. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects of organizing and delivering active learning experiences in science, the reading of current literature on method and theory of science, the study of new curricular programs including the integration of science learning with other disciplines, and the relationship between sustainability and science.
Three hours a week

446 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SCIENCE I
This course provides an introduction to basic pedagogical concepts and skills needed for the successful and effective teaching of science to Intermediate/Senior school students. Using the concepts of general science and the provincial science curriculum, the course examines the nature and limitations of teaching, learning and technology within the Canadian science classroom context.
PREREQUISITE: At least a minor in a Natural Science, or permission of the instructor. 
Three hours a week

447 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SCIENCE II
This course examines the development, nature, and limitations of science and technology; the role of science and technology in society; and the teaching of science and technology in the schools. Time is devoted to an examination of the provincial science curricula, innovative teaching and assessment strategies and techniques, and the development of active learning opportunities.
PREREQUISITE: Education 446
Three hours a week

449 INTRODUCTION TO INDIGENOUS EDUCATION 
This course examines the needs of Indigenous learners and current issues affecting their school success. Participants investigate the history and approaches that have shaped First Nations, Inuit and Metis education in Canada and successful projects that challenge a long history of cultural and cognitive imperialism. Community-based cultural ceremonies and teachings provide a base for understanding and appreciating the increasing importance and power of traditional knowledge in today’s world.
Three hours a week

451 INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS THEMES IN THE CURRICULUM
This course promotes dynamic ways for the public school curriculum to acknowledge more faithfully the histories, cultures, worldviews and teachings of Indigenous peoples in Canada and globally. The importance of developing more culturally responsive pedagogies and assessment practices and more respectful and inclusive research is highlighted.  Insights are shared into the processes of recovery for Indigenous communities and the essential supports for their students to experience success at all grade levels.
Three hours a week

454 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY SOCIAL STUDIES
This course promotes dynamic teaching methods and inclusive approaches to inspire young learners and to elevate the quality of teaching and learning through Social Studies at the Primary/Elementary levels. Grounded in the needs of twenty-first century learners, this course offers concrete ways to create more vibrant, engaging, playful, supportive and inviting environments for this core curriculum area to give all learners dignity and honour their diverse ways of learning.
Three hours a week

456 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SOCIAL STUDIES I
This course promotes dynamic teaching methods and inclusive approaches to inspire learners in grades 7-12 and to elevate the quality of teaching and learning through Social Studies at the Intermediate/Senior levels.  Grounded in the needs of twenty-first century learners, this course offers concrete ways to create more vibrant, engaging, playful, supportive and inviting environments for this core curriculum area to give all learners dignity and honour their diverse ways of learning.
Three hours a week

457 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SOCIAL STUDIES II 
This course develops a rationale, framework and procedures for facilitating thematic teaching and learning on critical social issues appropriate for grades 7-12.  Skills in curriculum development are refined as students explore authentic assessment practices and ways of promoting student ownership of and co-responsibility for learning.
PREREQUISITE: Education 456
Three hours a week

459 ENTERPRISE EDUCATION 
This course introduces the key principles and components of Learning For Enterprise, an international movement that nurtures initiative, self-determination, creativity and innovation in twenty-first century learners.  A workshop design engages participants in classroom and community-based challenges that contribute to learners’ confidence in self and community as they apply enterprising capabilities in a wide range of contexts throughout their lives. Specific applications to historically dependent cultures are explored.
Three hours a week

462 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
This course introduces students to the economic, political, and cultural factors that influence public education in foreign countries. The public school systems of selected foreign countries are examined and compared to the provincial systems in Canada. Students are expected to carry out independent research on a foreign country of their choosing.
Three hours a week

463 PERSPECTIVES ON CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN EDUCATION 
This course introduces students to the visible and invisible impact of culture and society on education. As students develop an understanding of cultural and social perspectives in education, they examine the roles of schools in the proliferation of social and cultural norms as well as their potential as sites for change.
Three hours a week

464 EDUCATING FOR GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP
This course is intended to broaden pre-service teachers’ theoretical and pedagogical perspectives on global citizenship education by gaining an enhanced awareness of a world view that recognizes the interdependence and interconnections of the natural and social worlds. Participants will be introduced to the concept of global citizenship and, from this, develop an understanding of social justice, diversity, socio-cultural responsibility, sustainability, and agency. Demonstrating how to integrate global citizenship into educational practices is a key learning outcome of this course.

465 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This course introduces students to the history of international development and explores the models of development currently employed. Particular attention is given to the effects of economic, political, environmental, and cultural development on public education in emerging countries.
Three hours a week

466 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
This course explores the theoretical foundations for teaching English as a second/additional language (ESL/EAL). Students are introduced to fundamental aspects of additional language acquisition and the factors affecting language learning and teaching. The course introduces the needs of English language learners in various contexts including ESL/EAL, mainstream and foreign language classrooms. Students develop a critical perspective on issues related to language learning and teaching.
Three hours a week

467 APPROACHES AND METHODS FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE 
This course provides students with the foundations to facilitate language classes in contexts including ESL/EAL, mainstream and foreign language classrooms. The course introduces a range of English language teaching approaches and methodologies and addresses techniques specific to teaching listening, speaking, writing, reading, vocabulary and grammar in an additional language.
PREREQUISITE: Education 466
Three hours a week

468 SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY
This course examines the historical and cultural roles of the rural school. Emphasis is placed on the evolving role of the school as a community resource centre.
Three hours a week

469 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

471 ADMINISTRATION IN EDUCATION
This course is an introduction to the theory and practices of administration in education which includes an analysis of the nature of school organizations, effective administrative processes, the administrative structure of education on PEI, and legal issues in administration.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

473 COMMUNICATIONS
An introductory course covering both interpersonal and group communication, aimed at teaching the student to think and to express ideas in lucid and well-defined terms. The emphasis will be on the workshop approach involving constant practice in the techniques of voice and speech, public speaking, classroom drama, and creative movement. This should encourage in the students a flexible and resourceful attitude, and help them to develop self-confidence, together with the awareness and sensitivity needed for teaching.
Three hours a week

474 TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION
This course provides an introduction to the integration of digital technologies into teaching and learning. The focus is on use of technology as a tool to support the school curriculum. Web-based communication and work with web-based resources is an essential component.
Three hours a week

475 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION
This course provides an opportunity to explore, develop and post web-based resources. Digital photography, digital video, and other emerging technologies are explored and applied within the educational context.
PREREQUISITE: Education 474 or permission of instructor.
Three hours a week

476 FRENCH METHODS I
In this course, students explore the curriculum and teaching of core French in the intermediate and secondary schools. Students develop a variety of teaching methodologies in the area of core French.
PREREQUISITE: At least a minor in French, or permission of instructor.
Three hours a week

481 STATISTICS IN EDUCATION
This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics required to understand, interpret, express, and evaluate the results of measurement in education. Topics included are frequency distributions, histograms, frequency polygons, mean, median for grouped and raw data, normal distributions, standard deviation, normal approximation of a binomial random variable, random sampling and sampling distributions, estimation of means, confidence intervals, student distribution, small and large samples, one- and two-tail tests of hypotheses, correlation and regression, Chi-square test, analysis of variance.
Three hours a week

482 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION
This course examines the complexity of assessment by contrasting assessment theories with common practices in the classroom. Students explore the concept of a balanced assessment program that integrates formative and summative assessment practices. Students develop skills in creating a variety of assessment instruments (e.g., observation check-lists, tests, rubrics, portfolios). Issues and practices of large-scale assessment are also explored.
Three hours a week

485 PÉDAGOGIE EN IMMERSION: LES PRINCIPES DE BASE
This course explores the general pedagogical principles and techniques of content-based teaching in French Immersion at all levels. Topics covered include development of language skills, thematic teaching in immersion, integrating form and content in immersion, and strategy instruction in immersion. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years. Students must also meet the minimum standard, as determined by the Faculty of Education, on a French proficiency test administered before admission to the program.

486 DIDACTIQUE DU FRANÇAIS LANGUE SECONDE: UNE INTRODUCTION
This course explores the general pedagogical principles and techniques of communicative-experiential teaching in core and immersion French programs at all levels. Topics covered include three-stage lesson planning, personalization, pedagogical grammar, and culture teaching. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years.

487 L’ACQUISITION DES LANGUES SECONDES
This course explores students’ past experiences and beliefs about language learning and teaching, principal theories related to second language acquisition, and practical applications of theory to classroom contexts in French Immersion and core French at all levels. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years or with instructor’s permission.

488 LITTÉRATIE - ÉDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS - PARTIE I
This course introduces students to the general pedagogical principles and techniques of literacy development in French first and second language contexts at the early, middle and senior years. Using materials available in schools and applying appropriate methods and assessment techniques, students de- sign programs and activities based on the learning outcomes in the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation French Immersion Curriculum. This course is taught entirely in French and all assignments are completed in French.
Three hours a week

489 LITTÉRATIE - ÉDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS- PARTIE II
This course explores and deepens students’ understanding of the pedagogical principles and techniques of literacy development in French first and second language contexts at the early, middle and senior years. Using materials available in schools and applying appropriate methods and assessment techniques, students design programs and activities based on the learning outcomes in the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation French Immersion Curriculum. This course is taught entirely in French and all assignments are completed in French.
PREREQUISITE: Education 488

491 SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
This course involves an analysis of the reciprocal relations between school and society. It examines the influence of political and economic structures in shaping the education systems of various societies, as well as the relevance of different types of schooling in facilitating political and economic participation and cultural enrichment. Empirical attention is given to societies at various levels of general development, with particular emphasis on Canada.
PREREQUISITE: A university degree or two courses in Sociology and at least Third year status or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

493 FRENCH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY IN A SCHOOL SETTING/LES COMPÉTENCES
LANGAGIÈRES EN CONTEXTE ÉDUCATIF
This course will allow current and future teachers of French as an additional language to enhance their language skills and intercultural awareness. Participants will learn the importance of maintaining a high quality of French in the classroom through reflective and interactive activities. At the end of the course, participants will be able to reflect on their own language practices in the classroom, and communicate clearly and correctly in French in both written and spoken contexts. Additionally, they will be better equipped to guide students effectively in reading, writing, and understanding a variety of texts and identify, correct, and explain common errors in learning French as an additional language.
Three semester hours taught over 2 semesters

495 INQUIRY AND ACTION I
Through on-campus seminars and five weeks of school placement, students will observe, experience and reflect upon the various roles and responsibilities that a teacher has within the classroom and school and the impact of teaching on learners. They will begin to plan and teach lessons under the guidance of mentor teachers. Using an ePortfolio, they will begin to document their personal and professional growth as educators.
Three hours a week

496 INQUIRY AND ACTION II
Through on-campus seminars and six weeks of school experience, students will undertake planning and teaching effective lessons, themes and units of study. They will use strategies developed in methods courses to facilitate and assess student learning. Feedback from the mentor teacher and faculty advisor will inform self-assessment and personal and professional growth. ePortfolio development will continue.
PREREQUISITE: Education 495
Three hours a week

497 ADVOCACY I – DIFFERENTIATION AND DIVERSITY
On-campus seminars and five weeks of practicum placement will focus on developing the skills and strategies required to meet the diverse learning needs of students within the classroom setting. Students effectively plan, implement, and assess adaptations and modifications required for optimal learning by individuals and the entire group. ePortfolio development will continue.
PREREQUISITE: Education 496
Three hours a week

498 ADVOCACY II – BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL
On-campus seminars and six weeks of practicum placement will prepare students for professional certification in contexts chosen to deepen their knowledge and practice. ePortfolios will be completed and presented to meet course and program requirements.
PREREQUISITE: Education 497
Three hours a week
 

Please note: Education courses (except 300-level) are graded as Pass or Fail.  Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd. 

509 FOUNDATIONS OF TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP IN NUNAVUT EDUCATION
This course reviews the history and world view of the Inuit, with particular emphasis on culture, educational history, struggles with power and privilege, beliefs, values, and principles relevant to Nunavut. Traditional and contemporary views on leadership are studied as participants develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context in which they live and work as educational leaders. Participants examine the directions and philosophies established in Nunavut, including ties to the environment and practices that facilitate transformational educational leadership.
Three semester hours

511 PROACTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP IN NUNAVUT COMMUNITIES
The responsibilities, roles, and tasks of principals and other educational leaders are explored as they relate to the creation of a positive, inclusive, collaborative, and culturally responsive school community. The role of leadership in teaching and learning and building positive relationships, both in and outside school, is examined as a key factor in facilitating the academic achievement and well-being of learners. A variety of culturally appropriate facilitation strategies are introduced as participants analyze the legal, moral, ethical and policy rights of learners and educators in maintaining and strengthening culture and language and promoting success in schools, the local community, and the world beyond.
Three semester hours

512 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP—ENGAGING NUNAVUT PARENTS, ELDERS,  AND COMMUNITY
This course focuses on the development of collaborative relationships, positive communication, and empowerment of parents, elders, and community members who lead, support, and guide education in Nunavut. Participants discuss approaches that respond to and involve the community, and build accountability in ways that are transparent and reciprocal.  The involvement of the extended community in the daily life and long-term vision of the school provides a central focus as participants reflect on, and write about, the process of creating collaborative learning communities with parents, caregivers, and elders based on cultural values, beliefs, and principles.
Three semester hours

513 LEADERSHIP OF THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROCESS IN NUNAVUT COMMUNITIES
Policy implementation, supervision of teaching and the leadership of learning, staff evaluation, and program accountability play a key role in transformational educational leadership and are a major focus in this course. Participants discuss and write extensively about policy implementation that is culturally and linguistically responsive in promoting learning. Participants are challenged to develop skill sets they require to involve the community and parents in developing and implementing a vision for education based on current policies.
Three semester hours

514 REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR NUNAVUT
Participants propose, develop, and implement an approved reflective inquiry project based on their own educational practice. 
Three semester hours

559 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION
In this course, students investigate special topics in the field of education. Permission of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and the Dean is required.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

573 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE IN EDUCATION
An introduction to, and survey of, children’s literature with emphasis on contemporary books written for children. These include picture books, fiction, and nonfiction with special consideration of Canadian titles. Students examine, read, evaluate, and discuss different forms of literature and various genres of fiction, as well as the ways children’s literature is integrated into contemporary school curriculum.
Three hours a week

574 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE
An introduction to young adult literature with emphasis on contemporary books written for adolescents. These include picture books, fiction, and nonfiction with special consideration of Canadian titles. Students examine, read, evaluate, and discuss young adult books and explore the ways young adult literature is integrated into contemporary school curriculum.
Three hours a week

575 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEARNING RESOURCES
This course provides opportunities to consider principles of analysis, appraisal, and review of learning resources. Students develop criteria for evaluating and selecting a wide range of both print and non-print learning resources, and to formulate policies and procedures for the selection of learning resources to support the instructional program in the school.
Three hours a week

581 THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
Teachers examine the emergence of inclusive education and explore the history of services to children with special needs and attitudes teachers bring to the classroom. Recent research and practice in inclusive education is explored by the students.
Three hours a week

582 ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS
Teachers are introduced to individualized educational assessment of children with learning needs and become familiar with a variety of assessment tools and their implementation.
Three hours a week

583 DIFFERENTIATION AND INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION
This course introduces teachers to differentiation of curriculum and a variety of teaching methods for learners with exceptional needs, as well as the components and implementation of an individualized educational plan.
Three hours a week

584 LEADERSHIP AND COLLABORATION
Teachers explore inclusive teaming and classroom consultation as methods to promote inclusive education. Leadership traits required to facilitate the development of an inclusive school is also explored.
Three hours a week

585 IMPROVING LANGUAGE AND LITERACY ACHIEVEMENT
This course looks at strategies teachers can employ to develop language and literacy skills in the students in their classrooms. Current research in this area is presented and critiqued.
Three hours a week