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Asian Studies

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The Asian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.

Asia is the home of the most ancient and longest-lived civilizations the world has witnessed and of most of the world’s present population. Moreover, recent history would be impossible to write without frequent reference to Asia.

Many of the momentous events of modern times can be evoked by the names of Asian countries: Japan, China, Israel, India, Pakistan, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iran, and Iraq. The resolution of many of today’s pressing issues requires an understanding of the needs and interests of the Asian peoples.

Want more information about Asian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
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Careers:
  • Diplomat
  • Immigration Officer
  • Social Worker
  • Journalist
  • Economist
  • Teacher
The Asian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.

A minor in Asian Studies consists of twenty-one (21) semester hours of credit taken from the list of approved courses.  Either Asian Studies 201 or 202 is compulsory for the Minor. At least three semester hours of credit must be taken from any two of the four groups of Asian Studies electives. Students must take at least six semester hours of elective credit outside of their major area of study.

Guidelines for Taking Core and Elective Courses

Asian Studies at UPEI is a flexible interdisciplinary program. For this and other reasons, we have developed no formal regulations regarding when you should take the core and elective courses and how you can integrate them. But here are some flexible guidelines:

Most of the elective courses are introductory courses, which can be completed in your second, third, and fourth years at UPEI. You can take the Asian language courses (AS 101 and AS 102) in any semester/year we offer them, but we encourage you to complete at least AS 101 (Introduction to Japanese I) by your second year.

We also encourage you to take core courses (Asian Studies 201 and 202) in the first or second year, so that you can have a broad introductory preparation in Asian Studies before taking the electives offered by Religious Studies, Sociology/Anthropology, and Political Studies.

If this is not possible due to your Major requirements and academic schedule, then you may take Asian Studies 201 and 202 even in the junior and senior years, while taking some of the electives or after completing them.

The core courses will be offered every other year, alternating with the Japanese language courses: Asian Studies 201 in the first semester, and Asian Studies 202 in the second semester. But not all electives are offered every year because the participating departments have their own curriculum needs and plans. Accordingly, try to take the required number of electives as they are offered in different years.

For any questions or further guidelines, see Ms. Susie Jay (Secretary of Asian Studies, Main 330), call her at (902) 566-0480, or e-mail to jay@upei.ca

Want more information about Asian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Diplomat
  • Immigration Officer
  • Social Worker
  • Journalist
  • Economist
  • Teacher
The Asian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.

Asian Studies Core Courses

201 Introduction to West Asia
202 Introduction to East Asia
209 Special Topics
309 Special Topics
409 Special Topics
451-452 Directed Studies

Asian Language Courses

101 Introduction to [a selected language] I
102 Introduction to [a selected language] II

Asian Studies Electives

Language Courses (see above 101 and 102)

Peoples and Cultures

Sociology/Anthropology 212 - Peoples of South Asia

Religion and the Arts

Religious Studies 221 - Buddhism East and West
Religious Studies 242 - The Hindu Religious Tradition
Religious Studies 251 - Japanese Religion and Culture
Religious Studies 261 - Religion and Philosophy in China
Religious Studies 321 - Women in Eastern Religions

History and Politics

Political Science 343 - Comparative Politics of South Asia
Political Science 363 - Comparative Politics of the Middle East

Prerequisites

The Departments of Political Science, Religious Studies, and Sociology/Anthropology accept Asian Studies 201/202 as substitute prerequisites for any of their courses on this list.

Want more information about Asian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Diplomat
  • Immigration Officer
  • Social Worker
  • Journalist
  • Economist
  • Teacher
The Asian Studies program is located in SDU Main Building.

Coordinator

Edward Y. J. Chung, Chair

Coordinating Committee

Mian B. Ali, Economics
Ian Dowbiggin, History
Philip G. Davis, Religious Studies
Scott Lee, Modern Languages
Henry Srebrnik, Political Science

Team-teaching Faculty

Edward Chung, Religious Studies
Mian Ali, Economics
George Jia, Economics
Satadal Dasgupta, professor emeritus, Soc/Anth
Other interested professors from participating departments.

Sessional Instructors - core course team-teaching

Callum Beck, Religious Studies and University 100
Laura Lee Howard, Island Studies and Asian Studies

Sessional Instructors - Asian language teaching

Hiro Mitsumura, Asian Studies and Introductory Japanese
Fneghua Wu, Asian Studies and Introductory Chinese

Overview

Asia is the home of the most ancient and longest-lived civilizations the world has witnessed and of most of the world’s present population. Moreover, recent history would be impossible to write without frequent reference to Asia.

Many of the momentous events of modern times can be evoked by the names of Asian countries: Japan, China, Israel, India, Pakistan, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iran, and Iraq. The resolution of many of today’s pressing issues requires an understanding of the needs and interests of the Asian peoples.

Minor

A minor in Asian Studies consists of twenty-one (21) semester hours of credit taken from the list of approved courses.  Either Asian Studies 201 or 202 is compulsory for the Minor. At least three semester hours of credit must be taken from any two of the four groups of Asian Studies electives. Students must take at least six semester hours of elective credit outside of their major area of study.

Guidelines for Taking Core and Elective Courses

Asian Studies at UPEI is a flexible interdisciplinary program. For this and other reasons, we have developed no formal regulations regarding when you should take the core and elective courses and how you can integrate them. But here are some flexible guidelines:

Most of the elective courses are introductory courses, which can be completed in your second, third, and fourth years at UPEI. You can take the Asian language courses (AS 101 and AS 102) in any semester/year we offer them, but we encourage you to complete at least AS 101 (Introduction to Japanese I) by your second year.

We also encourage you to take core courses (Asian Studies 201 and 202) in the first or second year, so that you can have a broad introductory preparation in Asian Studies before taking the electives offered by Religious Studies, Sociology/Anthropology, and Political Studies.

If this is not possible due to your Major requirements and academic schedule, then you may take Asian Studies 201 and 202 even in the junior and senior years, while taking some of the electives or after completing them.

The core courses will be offered every other year, alternating with the Japanese language courses: Asian Studies 201 in the first semester, and Asian Studies 202 in the second semester. But not all electives are offered every year because the participating departments have their own curriculum needs and plans. Accordingly, try to take the required number of electives as they are offered in different years.

For any questions or further guidelines, see Ms. Susie Jay (Secretary of Asian Studies, Main 330), call her at (902) 566-0480, or e-mail to jay@upei.ca

Course Structure

Asian Studies Core Courses

201 Introduction to West Asia
202 Introduction to East Asia
209 Special Topics
309 Special Topics
409 Special Topics
451-452 Directed Studies

Asian Language Courses

101 Introduction to [a selected language] I
102 Introduction to [a selected language] II

Asian Studies Electives

Language Courses (see above 101 and 102)

Peoples and Cultures

Sociology/Anthropology 212 - Peoples of South Asia

Religion and the Arts

Religious Studies 221 - Buddhism East and West
Religious Studies 242 - The Hindu Religious Tradition
Religious Studies 251 - Japanese Religion and Culture
Religious Studies 261 - Religion and Philosophy in China
Religious Studies 321 - Women in Eastern Religions

History and Politics

Political Science 343 - Comparative Politics of South Asia
Political Science 363 - Comparative Politics of the Middle East

Prerequisites

The Departments of Political Science, Religious Studies, and Sociology/Anthropology accept Asian Studies 201/202 as substitute prerequisites for any of their courses on this list.

Faculty

Coordinator

Edward Y. J. Chung, Chair

Coordinating Committee

Mian B. Ali, Economics
Ian Dowbiggin, History
Philip G. Davis, Religious Studies
Scott Lee, Modern Languages
Henry Srebrnik, Political Science

Team-teaching Faculty

Edward Chung, Religious Studies
Mian Ali, Economics
George Jia, Economics
Satadal Dasgupta, professor emeritus, Soc/Anth
Other interested professors from participating departments.

Sessional Instructors - core course team-teaching

Callum Beck, Religious Studies and University 100
Laura Lee Howard, Island Studies and Asian Studies

Sessional Instructors - Asian language teaching

Hiro Mitsumura, Asian Studies and Introductory Japanese
Fneghua Wu, Asian Studies and Introductory Chinese

Overview

Asia is the home of the most ancient and longest-lived civilizations the world has witnessed and of most of the world’s present population. Moreover, recent history would be impossible to write without frequent reference to Asia.

Many of the momentous events of modern times can be evoked by the names of Asian countries: Japan, China, Israel, India, Pakistan, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iran, and Iraq. The resolution of many of today’s pressing issues requires an understanding of the needs and interests of the Asian peoples.

Minor

A minor in Asian Studies consists of twenty-one (21) semester hours of credit taken from the list of approved courses.  Either Asian Studies 201 or 202 is compulsory for the Minor. At least three semester hours of credit must be taken from any two of the four groups of Asian Studies electives. Students must take at least six semester hours of elective credit outside of their major area of study.

Guidelines for Taking Core and Elective Courses

Asian Studies at UPEI is a flexible interdisciplinary program. For this and other reasons, we have developed no formal regulations regarding when you should take the core and elective courses and how you can integrate them. But here are some flexible guidelines:

Most of the elective courses are introductory courses, which can be completed in your second, third, and fourth years at UPEI. You can take the Asian language courses (AS 101 and AS 102) in any semester/year we offer them, but we encourage you to complete at least AS 101 (Introduction to Japanese I) by your second year.

We also encourage you to take core courses (Asian Studies 201 and 202) in the first or second year, so that you can have a broad introductory preparation in Asian Studies before taking the electives offered by Religious Studies, Sociology/Anthropology, and Political Studies.

If this is not possible due to your Major requirements and academic schedule, then you may take Asian Studies 201 and 202 even in the junior and senior years, while taking some of the electives or after completing them.

The core courses will be offered every other year, alternating with the Japanese language courses: Asian Studies 201 in the first semester, and Asian Studies 202 in the second semester. But not all electives are offered every year because the participating departments have their own curriculum needs and plans. Accordingly, try to take the required number of electives as they are offered in different years.

For any questions or further guidelines, see Ms. Susie Jay (Secretary of Asian Studies, Main 330), call her at (902) 566-0480, or e-mail to jay@upei.ca

Course Structure

Asian Studies Core Courses

201 Introduction to West Asia
202 Introduction to East Asia
209 Special Topics
309 Special Topics
409 Special Topics
451-452 Directed Studies

Asian Language Courses

101 Introduction to [a selected language] I
102 Introduction to [a selected language] II

Asian Studies Electives

Language Courses (see above 101 and 102)

Peoples and Cultures

Sociology/Anthropology 212 - Peoples of South Asia

Religion and the Arts

Religious Studies 221 - Buddhism East and West
Religious Studies 242 - The Hindu Religious Tradition
Religious Studies 251 - Japanese Religion and Culture
Religious Studies 261 - Religion and Philosophy in China
Religious Studies 321 - Women in Eastern Religions

History and Politics

Political Science 343 - Comparative Politics of South Asia
Political Science 363 - Comparative Politics of the Middle East

Prerequisites

The Departments of Political Science, Religious Studies, and Sociology/Anthropology accept Asian Studies 201/202 as substitute prerequisites for any of their courses on this list.

Faculty

Coordinator

Edward Y. J. Chung, Chair

Coordinating Committee

Mian B. Ali, Economics
Ian Dowbiggin, History
Philip G. Davis, Religious Studies
Scott Lee, Modern Languages
Henry Srebrnik, Political Science

Team-teaching Faculty

Edward Chung, Religious Studies
Mian Ali, Economics
George Jia, Economics
Satadal Dasgupta, professor emeritus, Soc/Anth
Other interested professors from participating departments.

Sessional Instructors - core course team-teaching

Callum Beck, Religious Studies and University 100
Laura Lee Howard, Island Studies and Asian Studies

Sessional Instructors - Asian language teaching

Hiro Mitsumura, Asian Studies and Introductory Japanese
Fneghua Wu, Asian Studies and Introductory Chinese

Want more information about Asian Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Diplomat
Immigration Officer
Social Worker
Journalist
Economist
Teacher
Course Level: 
100 Level (Asian Language Courses)
Courses: 

101 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] I
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course provides an introduction to the language in question, through the study of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. It includes numerous oral drills, frequent written exercises, short oral presentations and simple readings.
Cross-listed with Modern Languages (cf. Modern Languages 101)
Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] II
This course is a continuation of 101. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammar and introduces aspects of civilization.
Cross-listed with Modern Languages (cf. Modern Languages 102)
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

201 INTRODUCTION TO WEST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of West Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of the Middle East, central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent, covering each region’s traditions and historical development. The course also deals with modernization and the impact of Western ideas, values, and institutions on modern West Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies.
Cross-listed with History (cf. History 291)
Three hours a week.

202 INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of East Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of China, Japan, and Korea, covering each region’s traditions and modern developments. This course also introduces Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the impact of Western ideas and institutions on modern East Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 292)
Three hours a week.

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 200 level.

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 300 level.

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 400 level.

451-452 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses may be offered to meet particular student needs or take advantage of special faculty expertise. Three hours a week per course.
NOTE: Directed Studies courses from other disciplines with an Asian focus may be accepted for credit towards the Minor with the approval of the Co-ordinator of Asian Studies. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
 

Calendar Courses

101 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] I
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course provides an introduction to the language in question, through the study of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. It includes numerous oral drills, frequent written exercises, short oral presentations and simple readings.
Cross-listed with Modern Languages (cf. Modern Languages 101)
Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] II
This course is a continuation of 101. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammar and introduces aspects of civilization.
Cross-listed with Modern Languages (cf. Modern Languages 102)
Three hours a week

201 INTRODUCTION TO WEST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of West Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of the Middle East, central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent, covering each region’s traditions and historical development. The course also deals with modernization and the impact of Western ideas, values, and institutions on modern West Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies.
Cross-listed with History (cf. History 291)
Three hours a week.

202 INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of East Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of China, Japan, and Korea, covering each region’s traditions and modern developments. This course also introduces Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the impact of Western ideas and institutions on modern East Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 292)
Three hours a week.

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 200 level.

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 300 level.

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 400 level.

451-452 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses may be offered to meet particular student needs or take advantage of special faculty expertise. Three hours a week per course.
NOTE: Directed Studies courses from other disciplines with an Asian focus may be accepted for credit towards the Minor with the approval of the Co-ordinator of Asian Studies. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
 

Calendar Courses

100 Level (Asian Language Courses)

101 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] I
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course provides an introduction to the language in question, through the study of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. It includes numerous oral drills, frequent written exercises, short oral presentations and simple readings.
Cross-listed with Modern Languages (cf. Modern Languages 101)
Three hours a week

102 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] II
This course is a continuation of 101. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammar and introduces aspects of civilization.
Cross-listed with Modern Languages (cf. Modern Languages 102)
Three hours a week

200 Level

201 INTRODUCTION TO WEST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of West Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of the Middle East, central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent, covering each region’s traditions and historical development. The course also deals with modernization and the impact of Western ideas, values, and institutions on modern West Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies.
Cross-listed with History (cf. History 291)
Three hours a week.

202 INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of East Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of China, Japan, and Korea, covering each region’s traditions and modern developments. This course also introduces Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the impact of Western ideas and institutions on modern East Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 292)
Three hours a week.

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 200 level.

300 Level

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 300 level.

400 Level

409 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 400 level.

451-452 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses may be offered to meet particular student needs or take advantage of special faculty expertise. Three hours a week per course.
NOTE: Directed Studies courses from other disciplines with an Asian focus may be accepted for credit towards the Minor with the approval of the Co-ordinator of Asian Studies. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)