What is lupoid dermatosis?

This is a recently recognized disorder in young German shorthaired pointers. Inflammation in the skin results in scaling and crusting on the head, the lower legs, and on the scrotum. The areas affected gradually spread and are commonly painful or itchy. There may be an immune component to this condition.

How is lupoid dermatosis inherited?

unknown

What breeds are affected by lupoid dermatosis?

German shorthaired pointer The disorder has been seen in the United States and Europe.

For many breeds and many disorders, the studies to determine the mode of inheritance or the frequency in the breed have not been carried out, or are inconclusive. We have listed breeds for which there is a consensus among those investigating in this field and among veterinary practitioners, that the condition is significant in this breed.

What does lupoid dermatosis mean to your dog & you?

Skin changes are usually noticed at about 6 months of age. The skin on the head, lower legs, and scrotum is affected first, becoming thickened and crusty. The lesions are painful or itchy, and commonly spread, or may wax and wane. The nails may fall out  and some dogs develop a fever and swollen lymph nodes.

How is lupoid dermatosis diagnosed?

The diagnosis is made through a skin biopsy. This is a simple procedure done with local anesthetic, in which your veterinarian removes a small sample of your dog's skin for examination by a veterinary pathologist. The biopsy will show inflammatory changes in the skin, consistent with this condition.

For the veterinarian: Occasional dogs with this disorder show proteinuria and a positive antinuclear antibody titer.

How is lupoid dermatosis treated?

No consistently effective treatment has been found as yet.

For the veterinarian: Some treatments that have been tried with varying success are anti-seborrheic baths, retinoids, immunosuppressive corticosteroids, and fatty acid supplements.

Breeding advice

Affected dogs, their siblings, and parents should not be bred. In this way, this new condition may be eliminated before it becomes established in the breed.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS DISORDER, PLEASE SEE YOUR VETERINARIAN.

Resources

Scott, D.W., Miller, W.H., Griffin, C.E. 1995. Muller and Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology. p. 765  W.B. Saunders Co., Toronto.

Copyright 1998 Canine Inherited Disorders Database. All rights reserved.
Revised: October 30, 2001.

This database is funded jointly by the Sir James Dunn Animal Welfare Centre at the Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, and the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association.