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Sociology/Anthropology

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The Sociology/Anthropology department is located in SDU Main Building.

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers major/minor programs in Sociology (SOC), Anthropology (ANTH), and a Combined Major in Sociology/Anthropology (S/AN). We also offer honours programs for each major. Members of our internationally-recognized faculty possess a wealth of expertise acquired through study and research in a variety of countries and social settings. Since we cover nearly every topic in society and culture, you are sure to find courses that add to your knowledge of the world and provide you with the communications and analytical skills/insights required to succeed in a wide variety of careers.

Our graduates have also successfully entered a variety of post-graduate programs, including Masters study in sociology and anthropology, social work, education, law, international development, criminology, and law enforcement, to mention only a few.

Because of Sociology's broad areas of interest, a degree in sociology is an excellent preparation for a variety of careers, including further postgraduate studies in the social sciences (sociology, social work, education, law, criminology and law enforcement, international development). Sociology graduates have always been valuable players in both public and private sectors; their rich and multifaceted understanding of society, together with their skills in social analysis, communications and problem solving, make them in-demand in this constantly shifting social and economic world.

Similarly, a degree in Anthropology is a springboard for entry into a variety of professions. Our graduates have distinguished themselves in education, the legal and law enforcement professions, overseas development projects, large and small-scale corporations (including NGO's), museums, human resource departments, advertising and product research/development (some corporations even have their own anthropology units). The possibilities are endless.

Please link to our Department Site for more comprehensive information and resources and video links. And do visit us in the Main Building for further advisement.

Want more information about Sociology/Anthropology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Educator
  • Social Worker
  • International Development Worker
  • Corporate Consultant
  • Lawyer
  • Archive/Museum Specialist
The Sociology/Anthropology department is located in SDU Main Building.

We offer honours study in Sociology, Anthropology, and Sociology/Anthropology.

Honours Program Requirements

Research Component
The Honours research course (Sociology/Anthropology 490) constitutes the research component of the Honours program. The course involves supervised reading and research on specific topics. The student is required to write a substantial Honours essay or research report, which will be assessed by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, one additional member of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and a member from another Department.

Admission Requirements
Students intending to join the program must apply to the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Applicants must be registered in, or have completed, the combined Sociology/ Anthropology major program. Applications are normally submitted during the sixth semester. To be eligible to apply for admission to the program, students must have an average of 70% in all prior courses and an average of 75% in all previous Sociology and Anthropology courses taken. To continue in the Honours program, students must maintain an overall average of 70% in all courses and an average of 75% in Sociology and Anthropology courses.

Admission to the program is competitive, and subject to the availability of a full-time faculty supervisor in the student’s chosen thesis area.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY

For an Honours in Sociology/Anthropology, which is a combined Honours in Sociology and Anthropology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twenty-one semester hours of required courses as follows:

  1. Sociology 301 (Sociological Theory I), Sociology 302 (Sociological Theory II), Sociology 331 (Methodology and Research I), and Sociology 332 (Methodology and Research II).
  2. Anthropology 321 (Field Methods), Anthropology 332 (Knowledge and Culture), and Anthropology 361 (Anthropological Theory).

c. A six semester hour research course: Sociology/Anthropology 490 (Honours Research).

d. Twenty-four semester hours of elective courses, of which:

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level
  3. four must be at the 300-400 level.

To graduate with an Honours degree in Sociology/Anthropology a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN SOCIOLOGY

For an Honours in Sociology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twelve semester hours of required Sociology courses as follows: Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 331 and Sociology 332

c. A six semester-hour research course—Sociology/ Anthropology 490

d. Twenty-one semester hours of Sociology or Sociology/ Anthropology elective courses as follows:

  1. one must be an area course
  2. two must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- levels
  3. two must be at the 300- or 400- level
  4. two must be at the 400- level (excluding S-AN 490)

e. Twelve semester hours of Anthropology or Sociology Anthropology as follows:

  1. one of either Anthropology 321 (Field Methods); Anthropology 332 (Knowledge and Culture); or Anthropology 361 (Anthropology Theory). Please talk to your advisor. Course selection would depend on the nature of your thesis research.
  2. Sociology/Anthropology 442 (Social and Cultural Change)
  3. Sociology 335 (Globalization)
  4. one of either Sociology 432 (Comparative Sociology) or Sociology 401 (Doing Social Research) or Sociology 462 (Applied Sociology). Please talk to your supervisor or prospective supervisor. Course selection would depend on the nature of your thesis research.

To graduate with an Honours degree in Sociology, a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

For an Honours in Anthropology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twelve semester-hours of required anthropology courses as follows: Anthropology 321; Anthropology 332; Anthropology 361; Anthropology 402

c. A six semester hour research course—Sociology/ Anthropology 490

d. Twenty-one semester hours of Anthropology or Sociology/ Anthropology elective courses as follows:

  1. two must be area courses;
  2. three must be at the 300- level; and
  3. two must be at the 400- level (excluding SAN490)

e. Twelve semester-hours of Sociology or Sociology/ Anthropology as follows:

  1. one of Sociology 301; Sociology 302; Sociology 331; Sociology 332
  2. three other Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology courses at the 300-400 level

To graduate with an Honours degree in Anthropology, a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

 

Want more information about Sociology/Anthropology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
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  • Educator
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The Sociology/Anthropology department is located in SDU Main Building.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Four core courses (Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 331 and Sociology 332)

c. Eight electives, of which:

  1. one must be an area course
  2. two must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology
  3. three must be at the 300-400 level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology
  4. two must be at the 400- level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200 level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Three core courses (Anthropology 321, Anthropology 332, and Anthropology 361)

c. Nine electives, of which

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be 200-, 300-, or 400- level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology
  3. three must be 300-400 level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology
  4. two must be 400- level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200- level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A JOINT MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Six core courses (Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 332, Anthropology 332, Anthropology 361, and either Sociology 331 or Anthropology 321)

c. At least nine electives, of which

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be Sociology/Anthropology courses at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level
  3. four must be at the 300-400 level
  4. one must be any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200- level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

 

Want more information about Sociology/Anthropology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Educator
  • Social Worker
  • International Development Worker
  • Corporate Consultant
  • Lawyer
  • Archive/Museum Specialist
The Sociology/Anthropology department is located in SDU Main Building.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Five electives of Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology as follows:

  1. two courses must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- levels
  2. two courses must be at the 300-400 level
  3. one course must be at the 400- level

c. To qualify for a minor, students are required to have an overall average of 65% in all courses required for the minor with no mark below 60%.

NOTE: A minor in Anthropology is not available to students with a joint major in Sociology/Anthropology.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Five additional Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology courses:

  1. two must be at the 300 or 400 level
  2. three must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level.

c. To qualify for a minor, students are required to have an overall average of 65% in all courses with no mark below 60%.

NOTE: A minor in Sociology is not available to students with a joint major in Sociology and Anthropology.

Want more information about Sociology/Anthropology? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Educator
  • Social Worker
  • International Development Worker
  • Corporate Consultant
  • Lawyer
  • Archive/Museum Specialist
The Sociology/Anthropology department is located in SDU Main Building.

GENERAL PREREQUISITES

A. Sociology 101, completed with a minimum grade of 60%, will qualify a student for admission into any 200-level Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology course.

B. Anthropology 105, completed with a minimum grade of 60%, will qualify a student for admission into any 200-level Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology course.

C. All students must complete Anthropology 105 and Sociology 101, with a combined average of 60%, and at least one Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-level in order to enrol in any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 300-level. Normally, students take 200 level courses before proceeding to higher levels.

D. Students registering for their first 400-level course are required to have completed at least two 300-level courses.

E. Courses designated as Sociology/Anthropology (S/AN) are designed for both sociology and anthropology students and are appropriate for both majors.

Overview

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers major/minor programs in Sociology (SOC), Anthropology (ANTH), and a Combined Major in Sociology/Anthropology (S/AN). We also offer honours programs for each major. Members of our internationally-recognized faculty possess a wealth of expertise acquired through study and research in a variety of countries and social settings. Since we cover nearly every topic in society and culture, you are sure to find courses that add to your knowledge of the world and provide you with the communications and analytical skills/insights required to succeed in a wide variety of careers.

Our graduates have also successfully entered a variety of post-graduate programs, including Masters study in sociology and anthropology, social work, education, law, international development, criminology, and law enforcement, to mention only a few.

Because of Sociology's broad areas of interest, a degree in sociology is an excellent preparation for a variety of careers, including further postgraduate studies in the social sciences (sociology, social work, education, law, criminology and law enforcement, international development). Sociology graduates have always been valuable players in both public and private sectors; their rich and multifaceted understanding of society, together with their skills in social analysis, communications and problem solving, make them in-demand in this constantly shifting social and economic world.

Similarly, a degree in Anthropology is a springboard for entry into a variety of professions. Our graduates have distinguished themselves in education, the legal and law enforcement professions, overseas development projects, large and small-scale corporations (including NGO's), museums, human resource departments, advertising and product research/development (some corporations even have their own anthropology units). The possibilities are endless.

Please link to our Department Site for more comprehensive information and resources and video links. And do visit us in the Main Building for further advisement.

Honours

We offer honours study in Sociology, Anthropology, and Sociology/Anthropology.

Honours Program Requirements

Research Component
The Honours research course (Sociology/Anthropology 490) constitutes the research component of the Honours program. The course involves supervised reading and research on specific topics. The student is required to write a substantial Honours essay or research report, which will be assessed by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, one additional member of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and a member from another Department.

Admission Requirements
Students intending to join the program must apply to the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Applicants must be registered in, or have completed, the combined Sociology/ Anthropology major program. Applications are normally submitted during the sixth semester. To be eligible to apply for admission to the program, students must have an average of 70% in all prior courses and an average of 75% in all previous Sociology and Anthropology courses taken. To continue in the Honours program, students must maintain an overall average of 70% in all courses and an average of 75% in Sociology and Anthropology courses.

Admission to the program is competitive, and subject to the availability of a full-time faculty supervisor in the student’s chosen thesis area.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY

For an Honours in Sociology/Anthropology, which is a combined Honours in Sociology and Anthropology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twenty-one semester hours of required courses as follows:

  1. Sociology 301 (Sociological Theory I), Sociology 302 (Sociological Theory II), Sociology 331 (Methodology and Research I), and Sociology 332 (Methodology and Research II).
  2. Anthropology 321 (Field Methods), Anthropology 332 (Knowledge and Culture), and Anthropology 361 (Anthropological Theory).

c. A six semester hour research course: Sociology/Anthropology 490 (Honours Research).

d. Twenty-four semester hours of elective courses, of which:

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level
  3. four must be at the 300-400 level.

To graduate with an Honours degree in Sociology/Anthropology a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN SOCIOLOGY

For an Honours in Sociology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twelve semester hours of required Sociology courses as follows: Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 331 and Sociology 332

c. A six semester-hour research course—Sociology/ Anthropology 490

d. Twenty-one semester hours of Sociology or Sociology/ Anthropology elective courses as follows:

  1. one must be an area course
  2. two must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- levels
  3. two must be at the 300- or 400- level
  4. two must be at the 400- level (excluding S-AN 490)

e. Twelve semester hours of Anthropology or Sociology Anthropology as follows:

  1. one of either Anthropology 321 (Field Methods); Anthropology 332 (Knowledge and Culture); or Anthropology 361 (Anthropology Theory). Please talk to your advisor. Course selection would depend on the nature of your thesis research.
  2. Sociology/Anthropology 442 (Social and Cultural Change)
  3. Sociology 335 (Globalization)
  4. one of either Sociology 432 (Comparative Sociology) or Sociology 401 (Doing Social Research) or Sociology 462 (Applied Sociology). Please talk to your supervisor or prospective supervisor. Course selection would depend on the nature of your thesis research.

To graduate with an Honours degree in Sociology, a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

For an Honours in Anthropology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twelve semester-hours of required anthropology courses as follows: Anthropology 321; Anthropology 332; Anthropology 361; Anthropology 402

c. A six semester hour research course—Sociology/ Anthropology 490

d. Twenty-one semester hours of Anthropology or Sociology/ Anthropology elective courses as follows:

  1. two must be area courses;
  2. three must be at the 300- level; and
  3. two must be at the 400- level (excluding SAN490)

e. Twelve semester-hours of Sociology or Sociology/ Anthropology as follows:

  1. one of Sociology 301; Sociology 302; Sociology 331; Sociology 332
  2. three other Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology courses at the 300-400 level

To graduate with an Honours degree in Anthropology, a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

 

Majors

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Four core courses (Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 331 and Sociology 332)

c. Eight electives, of which:

  1. one must be an area course
  2. two must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology
  3. three must be at the 300-400 level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology
  4. two must be at the 400- level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200 level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Three core courses (Anthropology 321, Anthropology 332, and Anthropology 361)

c. Nine electives, of which

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be 200-, 300-, or 400- level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology
  3. three must be 300-400 level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology
  4. two must be 400- level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200- level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A JOINT MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Six core courses (Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 332, Anthropology 332, Anthropology 361, and either Sociology 331 or Anthropology 321)

c. At least nine electives, of which

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be Sociology/Anthropology courses at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level
  3. four must be at the 300-400 level
  4. one must be any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200- level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

 

Minors

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Five electives of Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology as follows:

  1. two courses must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- levels
  2. two courses must be at the 300-400 level
  3. one course must be at the 400- level

c. To qualify for a minor, students are required to have an overall average of 65% in all courses required for the minor with no mark below 60%.

NOTE: A minor in Anthropology is not available to students with a joint major in Sociology/Anthropology.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Five additional Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology courses:

  1. two must be at the 300 or 400 level
  2. three must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level.

c. To qualify for a minor, students are required to have an overall average of 65% in all courses with no mark below 60%.

NOTE: A minor in Sociology is not available to students with a joint major in Sociology and Anthropology.

Prerequisite Courses

GENERAL PREREQUISITES

A. Sociology 101, completed with a minimum grade of 60%, will qualify a student for admission into any 200-level Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology course.

B. Anthropology 105, completed with a minimum grade of 60%, will qualify a student for admission into any 200-level Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology course.

C. All students must complete Anthropology 105 and Sociology 101, with a combined average of 60%, and at least one Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-level in order to enrol in any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 300-level. Normally, students take 200 level courses before proceeding to higher levels.

D. Students registering for their first 400-level course are required to have completed at least two 300-level courses.

E. Courses designated as Sociology/Anthropology (S/AN) are designed for both sociology and anthropology students and are appropriate for both majors.

Overview

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers major/minor programs in Sociology (SOC), Anthropology (ANTH), and a Combined Major in Sociology/Anthropology (S/AN). We also offer honours programs for each major. Members of our internationally-recognized faculty possess a wealth of expertise acquired through study and research in a variety of countries and social settings. Since we cover nearly every topic in society and culture, you are sure to find courses that add to your knowledge of the world and provide you with the communications and analytical skills/insights required to succeed in a wide variety of careers.

Our graduates have also successfully entered a variety of post-graduate programs, including Masters study in sociology and anthropology, social work, education, law, international development, criminology, and law enforcement, to mention only a few.

Because of Sociology's broad areas of interest, a degree in sociology is an excellent preparation for a variety of careers, including further postgraduate studies in the social sciences (sociology, social work, education, law, criminology and law enforcement, international development). Sociology graduates have always been valuable players in both public and private sectors; their rich and multifaceted understanding of society, together with their skills in social analysis, communications and problem solving, make them in-demand in this constantly shifting social and economic world.

Similarly, a degree in Anthropology is a springboard for entry into a variety of professions. Our graduates have distinguished themselves in education, the legal and law enforcement professions, overseas development projects, large and small-scale corporations (including NGO's), museums, human resource departments, advertising and product research/development (some corporations even have their own anthropology units). The possibilities are endless.

Please link to our Department Site for more comprehensive information and resources and video links. And do visit us in the Main Building for further advisement.

Honours

We offer honours study in Sociology, Anthropology, and Sociology/Anthropology.

Honours Program Requirements

Research Component
The Honours research course (Sociology/Anthropology 490) constitutes the research component of the Honours program. The course involves supervised reading and research on specific topics. The student is required to write a substantial Honours essay or research report, which will be assessed by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, one additional member of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and a member from another Department.

Admission Requirements
Students intending to join the program must apply to the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Applicants must be registered in, or have completed, the combined Sociology/ Anthropology major program. Applications are normally submitted during the sixth semester. To be eligible to apply for admission to the program, students must have an average of 70% in all prior courses and an average of 75% in all previous Sociology and Anthropology courses taken. To continue in the Honours program, students must maintain an overall average of 70% in all courses and an average of 75% in Sociology and Anthropology courses.

Admission to the program is competitive, and subject to the availability of a full-time faculty supervisor in the student’s chosen thesis area.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY

For an Honours in Sociology/Anthropology, which is a combined Honours in Sociology and Anthropology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twenty-one semester hours of required courses as follows:

  1. Sociology 301 (Sociological Theory I), Sociology 302 (Sociological Theory II), Sociology 331 (Methodology and Research I), and Sociology 332 (Methodology and Research II).
  2. Anthropology 321 (Field Methods), Anthropology 332 (Knowledge and Culture), and Anthropology 361 (Anthropological Theory).

c. A six semester hour research course: Sociology/Anthropology 490 (Honours Research).

d. Twenty-four semester hours of elective courses, of which:

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level
  3. four must be at the 300-400 level.

To graduate with an Honours degree in Sociology/Anthropology a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN SOCIOLOGY

For an Honours in Sociology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twelve semester hours of required Sociology courses as follows: Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 331 and Sociology 332

c. A six semester-hour research course—Sociology/ Anthropology 490

d. Twenty-one semester hours of Sociology or Sociology/ Anthropology elective courses as follows:

  1. one must be an area course
  2. two must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- levels
  3. two must be at the 300- or 400- level
  4. two must be at the 400- level (excluding S-AN 490)

e. Twelve semester hours of Anthropology or Sociology Anthropology as follows:

  1. one of either Anthropology 321 (Field Methods); Anthropology 332 (Knowledge and Culture); or Anthropology 361 (Anthropology Theory). Please talk to your advisor. Course selection would depend on the nature of your thesis research.
  2. Sociology/Anthropology 442 (Social and Cultural Change)
  3. Sociology 335 (Globalization)
  4. one of either Sociology 432 (Comparative Sociology) or Sociology 401 (Doing Social Research) or Sociology 462 (Applied Sociology). Please talk to your supervisor or prospective supervisor. Course selection would depend on the nature of your thesis research.

To graduate with an Honours degree in Sociology, a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

For an Honours in Anthropology, the student will take fifty-seven semester hours of courses as listed below:

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Twelve semester-hours of required anthropology courses as follows: Anthropology 321; Anthropology 332; Anthropology 361; Anthropology 402

c. A six semester hour research course—Sociology/ Anthropology 490

d. Twenty-one semester hours of Anthropology or Sociology/ Anthropology elective courses as follows:

  1. two must be area courses;
  2. three must be at the 300- level; and
  3. two must be at the 400- level (excluding SAN490)

e. Twelve semester-hours of Sociology or Sociology/ Anthropology as follows:

  1. one of Sociology 301; Sociology 302; Sociology 331; Sociology 332
  2. three other Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology courses at the 300-400 level

To graduate with an Honours degree in Anthropology, a student requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours).

 

Majors

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Four core courses (Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 331 and Sociology 332)

c. Eight electives, of which:

  1. one must be an area course
  2. two must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology
  3. three must be at the 300-400 level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology
  4. two must be at the 400- level in Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200 level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Three core courses (Anthropology 321, Anthropology 332, and Anthropology 361)

c. Nine electives, of which

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be 200-, 300-, or 400- level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology
  3. three must be 300-400 level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology
  4. two must be 400- level courses in Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200- level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A JOINT MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Six core courses (Sociology 301, Sociology 302, Sociology 332, Anthropology 332, Anthropology 361, and either Sociology 331 or Anthropology 321)

c. At least nine electives, of which

  1. two must be area courses
  2. two must be Sociology/Anthropology courses at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level
  3. four must be at the 300-400 level
  4. one must be any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level

d.

  1. Prospective majors have to complete the prerequisite introductory courses with a combined average of 60%.
  2. When applying for a major the student must have a combined average of 65% in a minimum of four or more Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses at or above the 200- level.
  3. It is strongly recommended that students take 200- level courses in their second year.
  4. It is recommended that students apply for a major at the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year.

 

Minors

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Five electives of Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology as follows:

  1. two courses must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- levels
  2. two courses must be at the 300-400 level
  3. one course must be at the 400- level

c. To qualify for a minor, students are required to have an overall average of 65% in all courses required for the minor with no mark below 60%.

NOTE: A minor in Anthropology is not available to students with a joint major in Sociology/Anthropology.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY

a. Sociology 101 and Anthropology 105

b. Five additional Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology courses:

  1. two must be at the 300 or 400 level
  2. three must be at the 200-, 300-, or 400- level.

c. To qualify for a minor, students are required to have an overall average of 65% in all courses with no mark below 60%.

NOTE: A minor in Sociology is not available to students with a joint major in Sociology and Anthropology.

Prerequisite Courses

GENERAL PREREQUISITES

A. Sociology 101, completed with a minimum grade of 60%, will qualify a student for admission into any 200-level Sociology or Sociology/Anthropology course.

B. Anthropology 105, completed with a minimum grade of 60%, will qualify a student for admission into any 200-level Anthropology or Sociology/Anthropology course.

C. All students must complete Anthropology 105 and Sociology 101, with a combined average of 60%, and at least one Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 200-level in order to enrol in any Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course at the 300-level. Normally, students take 200 level courses before proceeding to higher levels.

D. Students registering for their first 400-level course are required to have completed at least two 300-level courses.

E. Courses designated as Sociology/Anthropology (S/AN) are designed for both sociology and anthropology students and are appropriate for both majors.

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Course Level: 
100 Level
Courses: 

100-Level Sociology Courses

101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
This course introduces many of the main concepts within the field of sociology such as culture, socialization, norms, social roles, values, deviance, and social structure. In addition,  this course utilizes the basic concepts and perspectives in sociology to examine critically and to interpret the kinds of interaction experienced in social institutions such as the economy, the polity, the family, education, and religion.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

105 CIVILITY AND SOCIETY
Civility and its practice is the backbone of social interaction in all settings. This multi-media course provides all students, regardless of their major, with a fascinating introduction to the important roles played by civility (courtesy) and incivility (discourtesy) in social life. Students will gain a very useful understanding of how conceptions and practices of civility have changed over the years. They will also be introduced to the fascinating social and emotional processes that are involved in the creation and maintenance of a civil culture.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

100-Level Anthropology Courses

105 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 
This course introduces students to the field of cultural anthropology through an examination of cultural practices (religious, political, familial, economic) in various areas of the world.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
200 Level
Courses: 

200-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Sociology courses have Sociology 101 as a prerequisite.   

201 DEVIANCE AND CONTROL
An objective analysis of different sociological approaches to the meaning of deviance and to the nature of social control. The causes and consequences of social deviance are critically examined utilizing the following theories: social disorganization, functionalism, anomie and opportunity, value-conflict, interactionism, labelling, and critical conflict. Ideologies associated with each approach are compared. Substantive areas include: crime and delinquency, suicide, drug use, as well as various forms of sexual, occupational, and institutional deviance.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

202 CRIMINOLOGY
This course examines the historical and contemporary structure and functions of the Canadian criminal justice system, including legislation, policing, courts, corrections, and parole.  Various forms of law breaking are studied such as youth offences, conventional street crime, family violence, white collar and corporate crime, and organized and political crime. Topics include social, cultural, and demographic correlates of crime; patterns of victimization; the role of the community and of society’s institutions; and various theoretical explanations used in criminology
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered by the Department of Sociology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

211 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY
Family and courtship are examined from a variety of perspectives: the origins and development of the family institutions, the family’s present position in Canadian society, the social, political and economic factors affecting modern marriage and the manner in which these are leading to the emergence of new family forms (e.g. single-parent and blended families).
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

221 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
(See Kinesiology 262)

242 SOCIAL PROBLEMS
A sociological approach to the nature and definition of social problems, their theoretical explanations, and their interventions. Topics are selected from: alcoholism and drug addiction, the criminal justice system, poverty, racism, sexism, familial instability, aging, mental disorders, alienation, political and religious dissent and overpopulation.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

271 SELF AND SOCIETY
This course presents students with the concepts and theories used in the study of social definitions of the Self and its relationship to social institutions and structures. Emphasis is placed on ideas regarding personality, communication, motivation, and the interpersonal forces at play in face-to-face and group processes. The course is based on a study of the “symbolic interactionist” paradigm, as well as important new sociological research emerging in the area of cross-cultural interaction.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

275 SOCIAL INEQUALITY
This course examines how social, economical and political inequality is organized along the lines of class, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Students are introduced to the major theoretical and ideological explanations (and justifications) for such inequalities and given the opportunity to engage in a critical examination of how power, ideology, and the distribution of material, cultural, and social resources continue to contribute to social injustice.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 275)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor.  For students taking the course as DSJS 275 see DSJS prerequisites.
Three hours a week

282 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
(Cross-listed with Psychology 242)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101

290 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK
This course provides students with an overview of the foundations and practice of social work. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the historical development of social work in Canada, what social workers do, the setting and methods used as part of social work and the opportunities available to professionally trained social workers. The course includes an evaluation of emerging issues and future directions.
PREREQUISITE: Sociology 101
Three hours a week

292 WORK AND SOCIETY
This survey of the sociology of work will focus on the study of the following aspects of work: how work has changed through history in keeping with technological and political change, the new workplace, work and inequality, work and the family, types of work, training for work, and future trends in a workplace increasingly affected by globalization.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 292)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101.  For students taking this course as DSJS 292 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

200-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Anthropology courses have Anthropology 105 as a prerequisite, except  where permission of the instructor is allowed.

201 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides a survey of the development, contributions, and contemporary socio-cultural issues of selected non-Western peoples and cultures. In addition, the course addresses how contact with non-Western cultures over the last 5 centuries has played a substantial role in developing modern Western thought.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105
Three hours a week

202 EVOLUTION OF HUMANKIND AND CULTURE
This course is a survey of the origin of humankind and culture from the earliest times to the end of the stone age; prehistoric humans and their primate ancestors; the development of modern human populations; and principles of evolutionary theory and prehistory of the old world during the stone age.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Anthropology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 

211 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
This course describes how archaeologists discover, reconstruct and interpret cultures of the past.  Topics include: the development of archaeology as a discipline; the framework of archaeological enquiry; the techniques of site identification, survey, and excavation; the methods used in artifact analysis; dating methods; and the theoretical approaches underlying the interpretation of archaeological remains.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

291 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY
This course is an overview of forensic anthropological methods and practices in the study of death, crime, and other relevant medico-legal concepts. Identification of the variation in human remains (gender, age, and ancestry, etc.) is of primary concern, but trauma, causes of death, decomposition, and the cultural contexts of death and crime are also examined.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

200-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require either Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 as a prerequisite, except where permission of the instructor is allowed.

208 DEVELOPING THE SOCIO-CULTURAL IMAGINATION
This course introduces students to the basic theoretical and methodological tools necessary for critical and analytical thinking. Explored are major anthropological and sociological concepts, with reference to selected readings and current events. Emphasis is placed on identifying assumptions and using both theory and research in the analysis of socio-cultural behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

211 ISLAND TOURISM: THE SEARCH FOR PARADISE
(See Island Studies 211)

212 PEOPLES OF SOUTH ASIA
A survey of the peoples of South Asia; an integrated description and analysis of their cultural history and present-day economics, social, political and religious ways of life.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

222 ABORIGINAL PEOPLES OF CANADA
Students will be introduced to the historical and contemporary social, economic, legal and political perspectives of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples of Canada. Using anthropological and sociological theories and scholarly work, as well as experiencing cultural practices through community connections and visual culture, the primary focus will be to develop a student’s understanding of and respect for Canadian Aboriginal peoples.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

242 PEOPLES OF OCEANIA
This course provides an introduction to the peoples and the complex cultures of the Pacific Islands (Oceania) in the areas known as Melanesia, Polynesia and Micronesia. Topics include gender, social stratification, leadership and exchange, conflict and war, ritual and symbolism as well as the relationship between tradition and modernity. The course examines the past and the present and the ways in which contact, colonization, the introduction of Christianity, and the cash economy shaped and continue to shape life in the Island Pacific.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

251 PEOPLES OF AFRICA
A survey of the principal cultures of sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on social and cultural change as a result of colonialism, urbanization and nationalization.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Seminar: Three hours a week

252 AGING AND SOCIETY
This is an introduction to the study of aging which provides an overview of the field of social gerontology, the variation of individual aging within societies and the social structures of aging. Special emphasis will be given  to social gerontology in the context of the Maritime Provinces.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

256 ANATOMY OF ADDICTIONS
This course provides an in-depth introduction to addictions and their impact on families, communities and societies. Students are given the opportunity to study various forms of addictions and the manner in which professionals intervene to help addicts as well as those who are impacted by them in a secondary way. An important part of the course focuses on the unintended additional social consequences and problems that emerge when communities are distracted from their usual norms and routines by substance abuse.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

259 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology/Anthropology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

261 SEX, GENDER, AND SOCIETY
This course examines gender (the social concept of masculinity and femininity) and compares it to current views about sex (the biological distinction of female and male). Several sociological and/or anthropological issues are examined, such as the biological bases and evolutionary development of sexual differences; abortion; homosexuality; sexual violence; and affirmative action. Cross-cultural information is introduced throughout the course.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 261)
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101. For students taking the course as DSJS 261 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

263 GLOBAL YOUTH CULTURES
The emergence of global youth cultures of desire, self expression, consumption and representation will be considered from a number of perspectives including gender, age and globalization. Issues related to youth, which are a critical factor in understanding contemporary change, conflict, and cleavages, will be explored cross-culturally.  Attention will be given to theoretical developments as well as ethnographic case studies.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 263)
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101. For students taking the course as DSJS 263 see DSJS prerequisites, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

266 SCIENCE, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY
This course considers three centuries of modern Western science as it has been imagined and practised in Europe, initially, and eventually the rest of the globe. It especially considers the relationships between contemporary science and its socio-cultural contexts; discrepancies between the ideal of Science and its actual practice; the role of gender, class, and race in the production of scientific knowledge; and some important debates within the field of science studies, such as the place of subjectivity and objectivity, or whether science is universal or dependent on time, place and field of study.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
300 Level
Courses: 

300-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Sociology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

301 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY I
This course examines the social and political contexts in which sociology was formally constituted as an academic discipline.  It also offers an interpretive analysis of some of the major ideas, systems of explanation, and modes of analysis generated by the early sociologists. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 301 and 302 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 331 and 332.
PREREQUISITES:  Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200-level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course  
Three hours a week

302 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY II
This course offers critical assessments of the varieties, structures, and directions of modern social theories, with major emphasis on their relevance and usefulness for understanding contemporary social systems. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 301 and 302 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 331 and 332.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and Sociology 301
Three hours a week

305 POPULATION AND SOCIETY
This course is an introduction to the study of human population. It exposes students to the essential theories and methods of analysis of populations, while focusing on the major elements of all population systems - composition, distribution, demographic processes, change - and the interrelationships among these elements. Students are introduced to a number of “population problems”, and to the role of demographics and of population policy in modern society.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

311 SMALL GROUPS
Students combine the use of theory and practical techniques to learn about and to participate in the processes that are unique to small groups.  Micro-level theories, such as symbolic interactionism and systems theory, are employed to examine small groups as social systems.  In addition, students learn how to apply theory to elementary, everyday relationships among individuals in small groups.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

331 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH I
An examination with practical experience, of current data-gathering techniques including experimental and quasi-experimental designs, surveys and interviewing, the use of available documents, and participant observation. Also covered are large scale sampling techniques, coding and procedures, composite and simple measures, and panel analysis. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and 332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

332 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH II
An introductory course in the sociological inquiry process giving the student a working knowledge of applied techniques in sociological data manipulation and analysis. Topics include measurement of sociological phenomena, association, elaboration of relationships between two or more variables, path and space analysis, and the logic and methods of hypothesis development and testing in sociological research. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and 332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, Sociology 331 or Anthropology 321, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

362 URBAN SOCIOLOGY
A critical review of major theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of urban communities. Specific topics include: the nature of urbanization, city growth patterns, urban life styles, suburbia, ethnic and racial urban groups, transportation problems, urban power structures, some world cities, and cities of the future. Emphasis is on Canadian urban development, particularly the role of developers, financial institutions, and government in shaping the nature of Canadian cities and in creating various urban problems.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

370 PENOLOGY AND CORRECTIONS
This course provides a critical analysis of the major theoretical orientations associated with the Canadian penal system, highlighting a variety of perspectives, ranging from the origins of the prevailing correctional philosophy in Canada, to a discussion of the various forms of punishment utilized over the centuries.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to critically assess past and future developments within the field of Penology and Corrections.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

371 CANADIAN SOCIETY
A sociological analysis of the overall structural and dynamic character of contemporary Canadian society. Several macro- level explanatory theories, such as functional and conflict, on the nature of Canadian society provide a framework for an integrated study of the following issues: the Canadian identity, regionalism, various elites, the class structure and class conflict, Quebec’s status, Canadian-American relations, and Canadian nationalism.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

372 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOUR AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
A sociological review and analysis of the various forms of collective norm-challenging social action: crowds, mobs, riots, fads, cults, revolutions and social movements. Students are introduced to their structural sources, their political content and their implications for social change.  Specific movements are studied via textual and video records.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

374 VICTIMS OF CRIME: AN INTRODUCTION TO VICTIMOLOGY
The fairly recent area of Victimology has given victims of crime their rightful place in the Criminal Justice System.  This course provides a survey of the evolution of victim rights, the emergence of victim-friendly legislation, and the establishment of victim services within the broader criminal justice system. Upon completion of the course, students should possess a comprehensive understanding of the complicated, sensitive and difficult issues associated with this long-overlooked segment of society.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

391 SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS
Formal/complex organizations are analyzed using classical and contemporary sociological theory and research. The course uses three levels of analysis which focus on individual/ group behaviour, organizational structures and processes, and organizations as social actors in their environments. Topics will include the nature of power/authority, conflict, decision- making, organizational change, effectiveness, socialization, goals, organizational technologies, and inter-organizational relations.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

392 MEDIA AND SOCIETY
This course looks at how media play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies. Drawing upon various media, including television, film, and the Internet, the course examines the social, economic, and political organization of media; the content of media messages; and the role the media plays in preserving and reforming social values at the local and global levels.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

394 MOVIES AND CULTURE
This course examines the powerful role played by movies in the preservation of social traditions as well as the introduction of new ways of thinking, feeling and behaving. Students will learn how to watch films from a critical perspective, and will use content analysis methods to probe into a film’s historical context, its explicit and implicit themes, and how its story-line and cinematographic methods contribute to the presentation of the social norms and values embedded in the film.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

300-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Anthropology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

310 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 311
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course 

321 FIELD METHODS
This course explores the different research methods used in cultural anthropology. In the evaluation of these methods, the course combines readings with field experience.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

332 KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
An advanced course on how the forms of knowledge production used influence social anthropology’s perspectives on structure and organization in human society. The principal focus is on comparing scientific and interpretive approaches to social organization in a range of societies through case studies. Two area courses are strongly recommended, but not required.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 332
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 332 see DSJS prerequisites.
Three hours a week

352 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 352 and Applied Human Sciences (Family Science 354)
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 352 see DSJS prerequisites; for students taking the course as F SC 354 see F SC prerequisites
Three hours a week

361 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY
History, construction, and evaluation of anthropological theory; anthropological theory as a response to changing social-cultural conditions.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

382 UNDERSTANDING FOLKLORE
The course begins with a survey of the history and approaches to the study of folklore as an aspect of culture with emphasis on Canadian examples. Students then analyze folklore with emphasis on structures and cultural contexts. Study of local data is encouraged.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

300-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

303 INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION, TRANSNATIONALISM, AND THE CANADIAN MOSAIC
This course focuses on some of the central issues and debates concerning immigration to Canada, and the experiences of immigrants within Canada.  The course examines both historical and contemporary sources that synthesize thematic issues of globalization, transnational migration, and ethno-racial diversity in Canada.  Topics may include theories of migration, Canadian immigration policies and forces that shape them, the economic adjustment of immigrants, immigrants and the labour market, ethno-racial diversity and racism, and migrant agricultural workers and domestics in Canada.
Three semester hours of credit

306 DEMOGRAPHY OF AGING
Students examine the relationship between demographic forces and our aging population. Considered are the effects of: migration on forming an aged ethnic population, social policies as related to the economics and health of an aged population, mortality levels as related to aging as a women’s issue, and baby boom and echo fertility levels. Demographic theories will be used to understand better these and other demographic forces.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

307 CONSTRUCTING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 302
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

312 RURAL SOCIETY IN CANADA
A basic course in the sociology of rural life with emphasis on Canadian rural life. The course systematically examines the structure of Canadian society in terms of distinctive features of its population, family, community, church, school and local government and how they have all been traditionally shaped by farming as the predominant economic activity. The course further explores how the mechanization and commercialization of farming and the forces of urbanization are revolutionizing Canadian rural life and threatening its very existence.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

331 THE COMMUNITY
A course on the social realities of rural and urban communities in Canada: rural neighbourhoods, villages, small towns, rural-urban fringe communities, and cities. The course examines the structure of each type of community and how structural features influence social lives and interactions of residents. Different theoretical perspectives used in the study of the community are examined and compared, in order to deepen understanding of how processes of centralization and urbanization are influencing the patterns of relationships among the various types of communities.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

341 TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This course explores the interaction between technology, science, society, and the environment in the past and present, and examines the potential implications of such interaction in the future.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

355 GLOBALIZATION
Students in this course study globalization as an ongoing, dynamic process as it affects societies, cultures, environments, communities, organizations, groups, and individuals. Debates over these effects are addressed by various theoretical perspectives, including structural-functionalism, conflict analysis, interactionism, cultural studies, and postmodernism. Issues include technological advances, free-market capitalism, cultural homogenization, national policies and programs, international relations, global institutions and organizations, social inequality, demographic trends, asocial problems, social conflicts, and opposition to globalization.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 355
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 355 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

359 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology/Anthropology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course

371 EVOLUTION OF THE BRAIN AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR
This course examines the evolutionary factors underlying human behaviour as well as the behaviour of other species. It examines case materials in order to evaluate the existing theories concerning the development of behaviour from the proto-human period to the present.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

374 TOURISM
This course examines both the sociological and anthropological theory/research in tourism and travel.  Since tourism is a significant force in shaping both travellers and their destinations, the course employs several analytical models to understand the nature, dynamics and effects of modern tourism. Topics include tourist behaviour, tourist systems, socio-cultural impact, tourist-local relations, tourism carrying capacity, commodification, and mass tourism.
Cross-listed with Island Studies 374
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as I ST 374 see I ST prerequisites
Three hours a week

Course Level: 
400 Level
Courses: 

400-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Sociology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

401 DOING SOCIAL RESEARCH
Students engage in sociological inquiry at an intermediate level. Using statistical computer software, such as SPSS and SAS, students learn to code, manipulate, analyze, and interpret data from a variety of data sources. Students learn also how to carry out multi-variate data analysis (including how to store and retrieve data and create graphic presentations).
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course,  and Soc 331 and Soc 332 or Anth 321 and Soc 332, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours per week

409 EVALUATION
This course is an introduction to the theories, methods and models of evaluation. The major focus of the course is on policy and program evaluation with an emphasis on the purpose, design, data collection/analysis, and application of results of evaluation research. The student gains some practical experience in the field of evaluation. A previous course in statistics is recommended.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, Sociology 331 or an equivalent course in Research Methodology, and one additional 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

412 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH
Students adopt a salutogenic (health promotion and illness prevention) approach to examine the relationship between social factors (lifestyle, environment, and organization of the health care system) and health. Health is posited as a multi-dimensional construct. The implications of adopting a mainstream theoretical view of the relationship between social factors and health are investigated, i.e., how adopting a certain theoretical perspective can help to explain further or to hinder our understanding of the effect of social factors on health.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

432 COMPARATIVE SOCIOLOGY
This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire a multinational and multidisciplinary understanding of a chosen topic in Comparative Sociology, which is the study of a given social phenomenon across national and cultural boundaries and/or different periods of time. Offered in the form of a seminar, themes are selected from year to year, and may include such topics as civility, sociology of emotions and the body, youth culture, socialization, childhood, and courtship.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

451 SOCIOLOGY OF THE BODY
What are the social forces that affect human bodies and human emotions? What is the body’s relation to the self? How do conceptions (and treatments) of the body vary in different societies and different historical periods? In this course, we will study the body as the product of complex social interactive processes and political-economic values; as the expression of the self; and as the object of social control. Particular attention will be paid to race, gender, identity symbols, and body awareness within a culture of consumption.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 DIRECTED STUDIES
Offered as a seminar in which selected topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within the specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and departmental permission; generally restricted to the majors in Sociology at Third and Fourth Year levels. 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

462 APPROACHES IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY
Sociologists are increasingly having influence in the development of public policy. Research projects in aging, work and globalization, social injustice, families, crime and media have contributed to the improvement of society. This course reviews the development of applied sociology and provides students with practical applications in a selected area of social life in which sociologists have had a strong impact.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

400-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being.  The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 401
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 401 see DSJS prerequisites, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

402 ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ANTHROPOLOGY
This course examines selected issues of an interdisciplinary nature which have contributed to the emergence and development of current interpretative theories in anthropology. Students explore issues relating to the concepts of culture and hybridity; representation and power; colonialism and postcolonialism. Feminist anthropology and recent ethnographies are of central interest as are issues related to modernity, memory, and identity.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses  or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

403 CYBERCULTURES
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 402
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 402 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

404 APPLIED AND PUBLIC INTEREST ANTHROPOLOGY
This course reviews the history of applied anthropology and investigates major case studies, research methodologies, intervention strategies, and theoretical issues. One of the fastest-growing areas within the discipline of anthropology, applied anthropology is also known as public interest anthropology.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology  courses
Three hours a week

431 DIRECTED STUDIES
Offered as a seminar in which topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within the specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses and Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology permission; generally restricted to majors in Anthropology at Third and Fourth Year levels. 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

400-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300-level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

421 RELIGION AND SOCIETY
This course examines religion as an institution in society. The principal functions of religion both for the person and for the whole society are explored; and the major processes and changes in modern religion are examined.
Cross-listed with Religious Studies 351 
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as RS 351 see RS prerequisites
Seminar: Three hours a week

431 MINORITY/ETHNIC GROUPS AND CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
A study of minority and ethnic groups (native and immigrant) within Canadian “multicultural” society. The course also includes a review of Canada’s immigration policies and their effects on Canada’s multicultural landscape.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 431
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 431 see DSJS prerequisites
Seminar: Three hours a week

442 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGE
Introduction to the study of various processes and theories of social and cultural change including innovation, acculturation and directed social change.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses
Seminar: Three hours a week

456 VISUAL CULTURE
This course addresses in a critical manner the importance of visual representation in Western thought. Topics include: analysis of stereotypes of non-Western people as portrayed in print and information media, advertising, ethnographic documentary production, and the entertainment industry. Students will also examine the export of Western visual culture to non-Western cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 456
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 456 see DSJS prerequisites.
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology and Anthropology at the fourth year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology  courses
Three hours a week

481 DIRECTED STUDIES IN SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY
This inter-disciplinary course is offered for advanced students as a seminar in which selected topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within a specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and departmental permission; generally restricted to majors in Sociology/Anthropology at third and fourth year levels 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

490 HONOURS RESEARCH
The course involves supervised reading and research on specific topics. The student is required to write a substantial honours essay or research report which is assessed by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, one additional member of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and a member from another Department.
Six semester hours of credit

Calendar Courses

100-Level Sociology Courses

101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
This course introduces many of the main concepts within the field of sociology such as culture, socialization, norms, social roles, values, deviance, and social structure. In addition,  this course utilizes the basic concepts and perspectives in sociology to examine critically and to interpret the kinds of interaction experienced in social institutions such as the economy, the polity, the family, education, and religion.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

105 CIVILITY AND SOCIETY
Civility and its practice is the backbone of social interaction in all settings. This multi-media course provides all students, regardless of their major, with a fascinating introduction to the important roles played by civility (courtesy) and incivility (discourtesy) in social life. Students will gain a very useful understanding of how conceptions and practices of civility have changed over the years. They will also be introduced to the fascinating social and emotional processes that are involved in the creation and maintenance of a civil culture.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

100-Level Anthropology Courses

105 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 
This course introduces students to the field of cultural anthropology through an examination of cultural practices (religious, political, familial, economic) in various areas of the world.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

200-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Sociology courses have Sociology 101 as a prerequisite.   

201 DEVIANCE AND CONTROL
An objective analysis of different sociological approaches to the meaning of deviance and to the nature of social control. The causes and consequences of social deviance are critically examined utilizing the following theories: social disorganization, functionalism, anomie and opportunity, value-conflict, interactionism, labelling, and critical conflict. Ideologies associated with each approach are compared. Substantive areas include: crime and delinquency, suicide, drug use, as well as various forms of sexual, occupational, and institutional deviance.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

202 CRIMINOLOGY
This course examines the historical and contemporary structure and functions of the Canadian criminal justice system, including legislation, policing, courts, corrections, and parole.  Various forms of law breaking are studied such as youth offences, conventional street crime, family violence, white collar and corporate crime, and organized and political crime. Topics include social, cultural, and demographic correlates of crime; patterns of victimization; the role of the community and of society’s institutions; and various theoretical explanations used in criminology
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered by the Department of Sociology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

211 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY
Family and courtship are examined from a variety of perspectives: the origins and development of the family institutions, the family’s present position in Canadian society, the social, political and economic factors affecting modern marriage and the manner in which these are leading to the emergence of new family forms (e.g. single-parent and blended families).
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

221 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
(See Kinesiology 262)

242 SOCIAL PROBLEMS
A sociological approach to the nature and definition of social problems, their theoretical explanations, and their interventions. Topics are selected from: alcoholism and drug addiction, the criminal justice system, poverty, racism, sexism, familial instability, aging, mental disorders, alienation, political and religious dissent and overpopulation.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

271 SELF AND SOCIETY
This course presents students with the concepts and theories used in the study of social definitions of the Self and its relationship to social institutions and structures. Emphasis is placed on ideas regarding personality, communication, motivation, and the interpersonal forces at play in face-to-face and group processes. The course is based on a study of the “symbolic interactionist” paradigm, as well as important new sociological research emerging in the area of cross-cultural interaction.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

275 SOCIAL INEQUALITY
This course examines how social, economical and political inequality is organized along the lines of class, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Students are introduced to the major theoretical and ideological explanations (and justifications) for such inequalities and given the opportunity to engage in a critical examination of how power, ideology, and the distribution of material, cultural, and social resources continue to contribute to social injustice.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 275)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor.  For students taking the course as DSJS 275 see DSJS prerequisites.
Three hours a week

282 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
(Cross-listed with Psychology 242)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101

290 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK
This course provides students with an overview of the foundations and practice of social work. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the historical development of social work in Canada, what social workers do, the setting and methods used as part of social work and the opportunities available to professionally trained social workers. The course includes an evaluation of emerging issues and future directions.
PREREQUISITE: Sociology 101
Three hours a week

292 WORK AND SOCIETY
This survey of the sociology of work will focus on the study of the following aspects of work: how work has changed through history in keeping with technological and political change, the new workplace, work and inequality, work and the family, types of work, training for work, and future trends in a workplace increasingly affected by globalization.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 292)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101.  For students taking this course as DSJS 292 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

200-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Anthropology courses have Anthropology 105 as a prerequisite, except  where permission of the instructor is allowed.

201 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides a survey of the development, contributions, and contemporary socio-cultural issues of selected non-Western peoples and cultures. In addition, the course addresses how contact with non-Western cultures over the last 5 centuries has played a substantial role in developing modern Western thought.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105
Three hours a week

202 EVOLUTION OF HUMANKIND AND CULTURE
This course is a survey of the origin of humankind and culture from the earliest times to the end of the stone age; prehistoric humans and their primate ancestors; the development of modern human populations; and principles of evolutionary theory and prehistory of the old world during the stone age.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Anthropology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 

211 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
This course describes how archaeologists discover, reconstruct and interpret cultures of the past.  Topics include: the development of archaeology as a discipline; the framework of archaeological enquiry; the techniques of site identification, survey, and excavation; the methods used in artifact analysis; dating methods; and the theoretical approaches underlying the interpretation of archaeological remains.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

291 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY
This course is an overview of forensic anthropological methods and practices in the study of death, crime, and other relevant medico-legal concepts. Identification of the variation in human remains (gender, age, and ancestry, etc.) is of primary concern, but trauma, causes of death, decomposition, and the cultural contexts of death and crime are also examined.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

200-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require either Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 as a prerequisite, except where permission of the instructor is allowed.

208 DEVELOPING THE SOCIO-CULTURAL IMAGINATION
This course introduces students to the basic theoretical and methodological tools necessary for critical and analytical thinking. Explored are major anthropological and sociological concepts, with reference to selected readings and current events. Emphasis is placed on identifying assumptions and using both theory and research in the analysis of socio-cultural behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

211 ISLAND TOURISM: THE SEARCH FOR PARADISE
(See Island Studies 211)

212 PEOPLES OF SOUTH ASIA
A survey of the peoples of South Asia; an integrated description and analysis of their cultural history and present-day economics, social, political and religious ways of life.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

222 ABORIGINAL PEOPLES OF CANADA
Students will be introduced to the historical and contemporary social, economic, legal and political perspectives of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples of Canada. Using anthropological and sociological theories and scholarly work, as well as experiencing cultural practices through community connections and visual culture, the primary focus will be to develop a student’s understanding of and respect for Canadian Aboriginal peoples.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

242 PEOPLES OF OCEANIA
This course provides an introduction to the peoples and the complex cultures of the Pacific Islands (Oceania) in the areas known as Melanesia, Polynesia and Micronesia. Topics include gender, social stratification, leadership and exchange, conflict and war, ritual and symbolism as well as the relationship between tradition and modernity. The course examines the past and the present and the ways in which contact, colonization, the introduction of Christianity, and the cash economy shaped and continue to shape life in the Island Pacific.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

251 PEOPLES OF AFRICA
A survey of the principal cultures of sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on social and cultural change as a result of colonialism, urbanization and nationalization.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Seminar: Three hours a week

252 AGING AND SOCIETY
This is an introduction to the study of aging which provides an overview of the field of social gerontology, the variation of individual aging within societies and the social structures of aging. Special emphasis will be given  to social gerontology in the context of the Maritime Provinces.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

256 ANATOMY OF ADDICTIONS
This course provides an in-depth introduction to addictions and their impact on families, communities and societies. Students are given the opportunity to study various forms of addictions and the manner in which professionals intervene to help addicts as well as those who are impacted by them in a secondary way. An important part of the course focuses on the unintended additional social consequences and problems that emerge when communities are distracted from their usual norms and routines by substance abuse.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

259 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology/Anthropology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

261 SEX, GENDER, AND SOCIETY
This course examines gender (the social concept of masculinity and femininity) and compares it to current views about sex (the biological distinction of female and male). Several sociological and/or anthropological issues are examined, such as the biological bases and evolutionary development of sexual differences; abortion; homosexuality; sexual violence; and affirmative action. Cross-cultural information is introduced throughout the course.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 261)
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101. For students taking the course as DSJS 261 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

263 GLOBAL YOUTH CULTURES
The emergence of global youth cultures of desire, self expression, consumption and representation will be considered from a number of perspectives including gender, age and globalization. Issues related to youth, which are a critical factor in understanding contemporary change, conflict, and cleavages, will be explored cross-culturally.  Attention will be given to theoretical developments as well as ethnographic case studies.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 263)
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101. For students taking the course as DSJS 263 see DSJS prerequisites, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

266 SCIENCE, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY
This course considers three centuries of modern Western science as it has been imagined and practised in Europe, initially, and eventually the rest of the globe. It especially considers the relationships between contemporary science and its socio-cultural contexts; discrepancies between the ideal of Science and its actual practice; the role of gender, class, and race in the production of scientific knowledge; and some important debates within the field of science studies, such as the place of subjectivity and objectivity, or whether science is universal or dependent on time, place and field of study.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

300-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Sociology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

301 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY I
This course examines the social and political contexts in which sociology was formally constituted as an academic discipline.  It also offers an interpretive analysis of some of the major ideas, systems of explanation, and modes of analysis generated by the early sociologists. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 301 and 302 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 331 and 332.
PREREQUISITES:  Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200-level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course  
Three hours a week

302 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY II
This course offers critical assessments of the varieties, structures, and directions of modern social theories, with major emphasis on their relevance and usefulness for understanding contemporary social systems. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 301 and 302 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 331 and 332.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and Sociology 301
Three hours a week

305 POPULATION AND SOCIETY
This course is an introduction to the study of human population. It exposes students to the essential theories and methods of analysis of populations, while focusing on the major elements of all population systems - composition, distribution, demographic processes, change - and the interrelationships among these elements. Students are introduced to a number of “population problems”, and to the role of demographics and of population policy in modern society.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

311 SMALL GROUPS
Students combine the use of theory and practical techniques to learn about and to participate in the processes that are unique to small groups.  Micro-level theories, such as symbolic interactionism and systems theory, are employed to examine small groups as social systems.  In addition, students learn how to apply theory to elementary, everyday relationships among individuals in small groups.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

331 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH I
An examination with practical experience, of current data-gathering techniques including experimental and quasi-experimental designs, surveys and interviewing, the use of available documents, and participant observation. Also covered are large scale sampling techniques, coding and procedures, composite and simple measures, and panel analysis. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and 332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

332 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH II
An introductory course in the sociological inquiry process giving the student a working knowledge of applied techniques in sociological data manipulation and analysis. Topics include measurement of sociological phenomena, association, elaboration of relationships between two or more variables, path and space analysis, and the logic and methods of hypothesis development and testing in sociological research. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and 332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, Sociology 331 or Anthropology 321, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

362 URBAN SOCIOLOGY
A critical review of major theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of urban communities. Specific topics include: the nature of urbanization, city growth patterns, urban life styles, suburbia, ethnic and racial urban groups, transportation problems, urban power structures, some world cities, and cities of the future. Emphasis is on Canadian urban development, particularly the role of developers, financial institutions, and government in shaping the nature of Canadian cities and in creating various urban problems.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

370 PENOLOGY AND CORRECTIONS
This course provides a critical analysis of the major theoretical orientations associated with the Canadian penal system, highlighting a variety of perspectives, ranging from the origins of the prevailing correctional philosophy in Canada, to a discussion of the various forms of punishment utilized over the centuries.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to critically assess past and future developments within the field of Penology and Corrections.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

371 CANADIAN SOCIETY
A sociological analysis of the overall structural and dynamic character of contemporary Canadian society. Several macro- level explanatory theories, such as functional and conflict, on the nature of Canadian society provide a framework for an integrated study of the following issues: the Canadian identity, regionalism, various elites, the class structure and class conflict, Quebec’s status, Canadian-American relations, and Canadian nationalism.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

372 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOUR AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
A sociological review and analysis of the various forms of collective norm-challenging social action: crowds, mobs, riots, fads, cults, revolutions and social movements. Students are introduced to their structural sources, their political content and their implications for social change.  Specific movements are studied via textual and video records.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

374 VICTIMS OF CRIME: AN INTRODUCTION TO VICTIMOLOGY
The fairly recent area of Victimology has given victims of crime their rightful place in the Criminal Justice System.  This course provides a survey of the evolution of victim rights, the emergence of victim-friendly legislation, and the establishment of victim services within the broader criminal justice system. Upon completion of the course, students should possess a comprehensive understanding of the complicated, sensitive and difficult issues associated with this long-overlooked segment of society.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

391 SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS
Formal/complex organizations are analyzed using classical and contemporary sociological theory and research. The course uses three levels of analysis which focus on individual/ group behaviour, organizational structures and processes, and organizations as social actors in their environments. Topics will include the nature of power/authority, conflict, decision- making, organizational change, effectiveness, socialization, goals, organizational technologies, and inter-organizational relations.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

392 MEDIA AND SOCIETY
This course looks at how media play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies. Drawing upon various media, including television, film, and the Internet, the course examines the social, economic, and political organization of media; the content of media messages; and the role the media plays in preserving and reforming social values at the local and global levels.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

394 MOVIES AND CULTURE
This course examines the powerful role played by movies in the preservation of social traditions as well as the introduction of new ways of thinking, feeling and behaving. Students will learn how to watch films from a critical perspective, and will use content analysis methods to probe into a film’s historical context, its explicit and implicit themes, and how its story-line and cinematographic methods contribute to the presentation of the social norms and values embedded in the film.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

300-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Anthropology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

310 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 311
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course 

321 FIELD METHODS
This course explores the different research methods used in cultural anthropology. In the evaluation of these methods, the course combines readings with field experience.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

332 KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
An advanced course on how the forms of knowledge production used influence social anthropology’s perspectives on structure and organization in human society. The principal focus is on comparing scientific and interpretive approaches to social organization in a range of societies through case studies. Two area courses are strongly recommended, but not required.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 332
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 332 see DSJS prerequisites.
Three hours a week

352 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 352 and Applied Human Sciences (Family Science 354)
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 352 see DSJS prerequisites; for students taking the course as F SC 354 see F SC prerequisites
Three hours a week

361 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY
History, construction, and evaluation of anthropological theory; anthropological theory as a response to changing social-cultural conditions.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

382 UNDERSTANDING FOLKLORE
The course begins with a survey of the history and approaches to the study of folklore as an aspect of culture with emphasis on Canadian examples. Students then analyze folklore with emphasis on structures and cultural contexts. Study of local data is encouraged.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

300-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

303 INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION, TRANSNATIONALISM, AND THE CANADIAN MOSAIC
This course focuses on some of the central issues and debates concerning immigration to Canada, and the experiences of immigrants within Canada.  The course examines both historical and contemporary sources that synthesize thematic issues of globalization, transnational migration, and ethno-racial diversity in Canada.  Topics may include theories of migration, Canadian immigration policies and forces that shape them, the economic adjustment of immigrants, immigrants and the labour market, ethno-racial diversity and racism, and migrant agricultural workers and domestics in Canada.
Three semester hours of credit

306 DEMOGRAPHY OF AGING
Students examine the relationship between demographic forces and our aging population. Considered are the effects of: migration on forming an aged ethnic population, social policies as related to the economics and health of an aged population, mortality levels as related to aging as a women’s issue, and baby boom and echo fertility levels. Demographic theories will be used to understand better these and other demographic forces.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

307 CONSTRUCTING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 302
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

312 RURAL SOCIETY IN CANADA
A basic course in the sociology of rural life with emphasis on Canadian rural life. The course systematically examines the structure of Canadian society in terms of distinctive features of its population, family, community, church, school and local government and how they have all been traditionally shaped by farming as the predominant economic activity. The course further explores how the mechanization and commercialization of farming and the forces of urbanization are revolutionizing Canadian rural life and threatening its very existence.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

331 THE COMMUNITY
A course on the social realities of rural and urban communities in Canada: rural neighbourhoods, villages, small towns, rural-urban fringe communities, and cities. The course examines the structure of each type of community and how structural features influence social lives and interactions of residents. Different theoretical perspectives used in the study of the community are examined and compared, in order to deepen understanding of how processes of centralization and urbanization are influencing the patterns of relationships among the various types of communities.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

341 TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This course explores the interaction between technology, science, society, and the environment in the past and present, and examines the potential implications of such interaction in the future.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

355 GLOBALIZATION
Students in this course study globalization as an ongoing, dynamic process as it affects societies, cultures, environments, communities, organizations, groups, and individuals. Debates over these effects are addressed by various theoretical perspectives, including structural-functionalism, conflict analysis, interactionism, cultural studies, and postmodernism. Issues include technological advances, free-market capitalism, cultural homogenization, national policies and programs, international relations, global institutions and organizations, social inequality, demographic trends, asocial problems, social conflicts, and opposition to globalization.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 355
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 355 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

359 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology/Anthropology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course

371 EVOLUTION OF THE BRAIN AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR
This course examines the evolutionary factors underlying human behaviour as well as the behaviour of other species. It examines case materials in order to evaluate the existing theories concerning the development of behaviour from the proto-human period to the present.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

374 TOURISM
This course examines both the sociological and anthropological theory/research in tourism and travel.  Since tourism is a significant force in shaping both travellers and their destinations, the course employs several analytical models to understand the nature, dynamics and effects of modern tourism. Topics include tourist behaviour, tourist systems, socio-cultural impact, tourist-local relations, tourism carrying capacity, commodification, and mass tourism.
Cross-listed with Island Studies 374
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as I ST 374 see I ST prerequisites
Three hours a week

400-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Sociology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

401 DOING SOCIAL RESEARCH
Students engage in sociological inquiry at an intermediate level. Using statistical computer software, such as SPSS and SAS, students learn to code, manipulate, analyze, and interpret data from a variety of data sources. Students learn also how to carry out multi-variate data analysis (including how to store and retrieve data and create graphic presentations).
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course,  and Soc 331 and Soc 332 or Anth 321 and Soc 332, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours per week

409 EVALUATION
This course is an introduction to the theories, methods and models of evaluation. The major focus of the course is on policy and program evaluation with an emphasis on the purpose, design, data collection/analysis, and application of results of evaluation research. The student gains some practical experience in the field of evaluation. A previous course in statistics is recommended.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, Sociology 331 or an equivalent course in Research Methodology, and one additional 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

412 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH
Students adopt a salutogenic (health promotion and illness prevention) approach to examine the relationship between social factors (lifestyle, environment, and organization of the health care system) and health. Health is posited as a multi-dimensional construct. The implications of adopting a mainstream theoretical view of the relationship between social factors and health are investigated, i.e., how adopting a certain theoretical perspective can help to explain further or to hinder our understanding of the effect of social factors on health.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

432 COMPARATIVE SOCIOLOGY
This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire a multinational and multidisciplinary understanding of a chosen topic in Comparative Sociology, which is the study of a given social phenomenon across national and cultural boundaries and/or different periods of time. Offered in the form of a seminar, themes are selected from year to year, and may include such topics as civility, sociology of emotions and the body, youth culture, socialization, childhood, and courtship.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

451 SOCIOLOGY OF THE BODY
What are the social forces that affect human bodies and human emotions? What is the body’s relation to the self? How do conceptions (and treatments) of the body vary in different societies and different historical periods? In this course, we will study the body as the product of complex social interactive processes and political-economic values; as the expression of the self; and as the object of social control. Particular attention will be paid to race, gender, identity symbols, and body awareness within a culture of consumption.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 DIRECTED STUDIES
Offered as a seminar in which selected topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within the specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and departmental permission; generally restricted to the majors in Sociology at Third and Fourth Year levels. 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

462 APPROACHES IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY
Sociologists are increasingly having influence in the development of public policy. Research projects in aging, work and globalization, social injustice, families, crime and media have contributed to the improvement of society. This course reviews the development of applied sociology and provides students with practical applications in a selected area of social life in which sociologists have had a strong impact.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

400-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being.  The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 401
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 401 see DSJS prerequisites, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

402 ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ANTHROPOLOGY
This course examines selected issues of an interdisciplinary nature which have contributed to the emergence and development of current interpretative theories in anthropology. Students explore issues relating to the concepts of culture and hybridity; representation and power; colonialism and postcolonialism. Feminist anthropology and recent ethnographies are of central interest as are issues related to modernity, memory, and identity.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses  or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

403 CYBERCULTURES
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 402
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 402 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

404 APPLIED AND PUBLIC INTEREST ANTHROPOLOGY
This course reviews the history of applied anthropology and investigates major case studies, research methodologies, intervention strategies, and theoretical issues. One of the fastest-growing areas within the discipline of anthropology, applied anthropology is also known as public interest anthropology.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology  courses
Three hours a week

431 DIRECTED STUDIES
Offered as a seminar in which topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within the specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses and Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology permission; generally restricted to majors in Anthropology at Third and Fourth Year levels. 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

400-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300-level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

421 RELIGION AND SOCIETY
This course examines religion as an institution in society. The principal functions of religion both for the person and for the whole society are explored; and the major processes and changes in modern religion are examined.
Cross-listed with Religious Studies 351 
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as RS 351 see RS prerequisites
Seminar: Three hours a week

431 MINORITY/ETHNIC GROUPS AND CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
A study of minority and ethnic groups (native and immigrant) within Canadian “multicultural” society. The course also includes a review of Canada’s immigration policies and their effects on Canada’s multicultural landscape.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 431
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 431 see DSJS prerequisites
Seminar: Three hours a week

442 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGE
Introduction to the study of various processes and theories of social and cultural change including innovation, acculturation and directed social change.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses
Seminar: Three hours a week

456 VISUAL CULTURE
This course addresses in a critical manner the importance of visual representation in Western thought. Topics include: analysis of stereotypes of non-Western people as portrayed in print and information media, advertising, ethnographic documentary production, and the entertainment industry. Students will also examine the export of Western visual culture to non-Western cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 456
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 456 see DSJS prerequisites.
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology and Anthropology at the fourth year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology  courses
Three hours a week

481 DIRECTED STUDIES IN SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY
This inter-disciplinary course is offered for advanced students as a seminar in which selected topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within a specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and departmental permission; generally restricted to majors in Sociology/Anthropology at third and fourth year levels 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

490 HONOURS RESEARCH
The course involves supervised reading and research on specific topics. The student is required to write a substantial honours essay or research report which is assessed by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, one additional member of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and a member from another Department.
Six semester hours of credit

Calendar Courses

100 Level

100-Level Sociology Courses

101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
This course introduces many of the main concepts within the field of sociology such as culture, socialization, norms, social roles, values, deviance, and social structure. In addition,  this course utilizes the basic concepts and perspectives in sociology to examine critically and to interpret the kinds of interaction experienced in social institutions such as the economy, the polity, the family, education, and religion.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

105 CIVILITY AND SOCIETY
Civility and its practice is the backbone of social interaction in all settings. This multi-media course provides all students, regardless of their major, with a fascinating introduction to the important roles played by civility (courtesy) and incivility (discourtesy) in social life. Students will gain a very useful understanding of how conceptions and practices of civility have changed over the years. They will also be introduced to the fascinating social and emotional processes that are involved in the creation and maintenance of a civil culture.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

100-Level Anthropology Courses

105 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 
This course introduces students to the field of cultural anthropology through an examination of cultural practices (religious, political, familial, economic) in various areas of the world.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

200 Level

200-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Sociology courses have Sociology 101 as a prerequisite.   

201 DEVIANCE AND CONTROL
An objective analysis of different sociological approaches to the meaning of deviance and to the nature of social control. The causes and consequences of social deviance are critically examined utilizing the following theories: social disorganization, functionalism, anomie and opportunity, value-conflict, interactionism, labelling, and critical conflict. Ideologies associated with each approach are compared. Substantive areas include: crime and delinquency, suicide, drug use, as well as various forms of sexual, occupational, and institutional deviance.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

202 CRIMINOLOGY
This course examines the historical and contemporary structure and functions of the Canadian criminal justice system, including legislation, policing, courts, corrections, and parole.  Various forms of law breaking are studied such as youth offences, conventional street crime, family violence, white collar and corporate crime, and organized and political crime. Topics include social, cultural, and demographic correlates of crime; patterns of victimization; the role of the community and of society’s institutions; and various theoretical explanations used in criminology
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered by the Department of Sociology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

211 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY
Family and courtship are examined from a variety of perspectives: the origins and development of the family institutions, the family’s present position in Canadian society, the social, political and economic factors affecting modern marriage and the manner in which these are leading to the emergence of new family forms (e.g. single-parent and blended families).
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

221 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
(See Kinesiology 262)

242 SOCIAL PROBLEMS
A sociological approach to the nature and definition of social problems, their theoretical explanations, and their interventions. Topics are selected from: alcoholism and drug addiction, the criminal justice system, poverty, racism, sexism, familial instability, aging, mental disorders, alienation, political and religious dissent and overpopulation.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

271 SELF AND SOCIETY
This course presents students with the concepts and theories used in the study of social definitions of the Self and its relationship to social institutions and structures. Emphasis is placed on ideas regarding personality, communication, motivation, and the interpersonal forces at play in face-to-face and group processes. The course is based on a study of the “symbolic interactionist” paradigm, as well as important new sociological research emerging in the area of cross-cultural interaction.
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101
Three hours a week

275 SOCIAL INEQUALITY
This course examines how social, economical and political inequality is organized along the lines of class, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Students are introduced to the major theoretical and ideological explanations (and justifications) for such inequalities and given the opportunity to engage in a critical examination of how power, ideology, and the distribution of material, cultural, and social resources continue to contribute to social injustice.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 275)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor.  For students taking the course as DSJS 275 see DSJS prerequisites.
Three hours a week

282 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
(Cross-listed with Psychology 242)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101

290 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK
This course provides students with an overview of the foundations and practice of social work. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the historical development of social work in Canada, what social workers do, the setting and methods used as part of social work and the opportunities available to professionally trained social workers. The course includes an evaluation of emerging issues and future directions.
PREREQUISITE: Sociology 101
Three hours a week

292 WORK AND SOCIETY
This survey of the sociology of work will focus on the study of the following aspects of work: how work has changed through history in keeping with technological and political change, the new workplace, work and inequality, work and the family, types of work, training for work, and future trends in a workplace increasingly affected by globalization.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 292)
PREREQUISITE:  Sociology 101.  For students taking this course as DSJS 292 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

200-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Anthropology courses have Anthropology 105 as a prerequisite, except  where permission of the instructor is allowed.

201 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides a survey of the development, contributions, and contemporary socio-cultural issues of selected non-Western peoples and cultures. In addition, the course addresses how contact with non-Western cultures over the last 5 centuries has played a substantial role in developing modern Western thought.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105
Three hours a week

202 EVOLUTION OF HUMANKIND AND CULTURE
This course is a survey of the origin of humankind and culture from the earliest times to the end of the stone age; prehistoric humans and their primate ancestors; the development of modern human populations; and principles of evolutionary theory and prehistory of the old world during the stone age.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

209 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Anthropology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 

211 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
This course describes how archaeologists discover, reconstruct and interpret cultures of the past.  Topics include: the development of archaeology as a discipline; the framework of archaeological enquiry; the techniques of site identification, survey, and excavation; the methods used in artifact analysis; dating methods; and the theoretical approaches underlying the interpretation of archaeological remains.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

291 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY
This course is an overview of forensic anthropological methods and practices in the study of death, crime, and other relevant medico-legal concepts. Identification of the variation in human remains (gender, age, and ancestry, etc.) is of primary concern, but trauma, causes of death, decomposition, and the cultural contexts of death and crime are also examined.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

200-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 200- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require either Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 as a prerequisite, except where permission of the instructor is allowed.

208 DEVELOPING THE SOCIO-CULTURAL IMAGINATION
This course introduces students to the basic theoretical and methodological tools necessary for critical and analytical thinking. Explored are major anthropological and sociological concepts, with reference to selected readings and current events. Emphasis is placed on identifying assumptions and using both theory and research in the analysis of socio-cultural behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

211 ISLAND TOURISM: THE SEARCH FOR PARADISE
(See Island Studies 211)

212 PEOPLES OF SOUTH ASIA
A survey of the peoples of South Asia; an integrated description and analysis of their cultural history and present-day economics, social, political and religious ways of life.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

222 ABORIGINAL PEOPLES OF CANADA
Students will be introduced to the historical and contemporary social, economic, legal and political perspectives of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples of Canada. Using anthropological and sociological theories and scholarly work, as well as experiencing cultural practices through community connections and visual culture, the primary focus will be to develop a student’s understanding of and respect for Canadian Aboriginal peoples.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

242 PEOPLES OF OCEANIA
This course provides an introduction to the peoples and the complex cultures of the Pacific Islands (Oceania) in the areas known as Melanesia, Polynesia and Micronesia. Topics include gender, social stratification, leadership and exchange, conflict and war, ritual and symbolism as well as the relationship between tradition and modernity. The course examines the past and the present and the ways in which contact, colonization, the introduction of Christianity, and the cash economy shaped and continue to shape life in the Island Pacific.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

251 PEOPLES OF AFRICA
A survey of the principal cultures of sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on social and cultural change as a result of colonialism, urbanization and nationalization.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Seminar: Three hours a week

252 AGING AND SOCIETY
This is an introduction to the study of aging which provides an overview of the field of social gerontology, the variation of individual aging within societies and the social structures of aging. Special emphasis will be given  to social gerontology in the context of the Maritime Provinces.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

256 ANATOMY OF ADDICTIONS
This course provides an in-depth introduction to addictions and their impact on families, communities and societies. Students are given the opportunity to study various forms of addictions and the manner in which professionals intervene to help addicts as well as those who are impacted by them in a secondary way. An important part of the course focuses on the unintended additional social consequences and problems that emerge when communities are distracted from their usual norms and routines by substance abuse.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

259 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology/Anthropology at the second year level.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

261 SEX, GENDER, AND SOCIETY
This course examines gender (the social concept of masculinity and femininity) and compares it to current views about sex (the biological distinction of female and male). Several sociological and/or anthropological issues are examined, such as the biological bases and evolutionary development of sexual differences; abortion; homosexuality; sexual violence; and affirmative action. Cross-cultural information is introduced throughout the course.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 261)
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101. For students taking the course as DSJS 261 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

263 GLOBAL YOUTH CULTURES
The emergence of global youth cultures of desire, self expression, consumption and representation will be considered from a number of perspectives including gender, age and globalization. Issues related to youth, which are a critical factor in understanding contemporary change, conflict, and cleavages, will be explored cross-culturally.  Attention will be given to theoretical developments as well as ethnographic case studies.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies (cf. DSJS 263)
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101. For students taking the course as DSJS 263 see DSJS prerequisites, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

266 SCIENCE, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY
This course considers three centuries of modern Western science as it has been imagined and practised in Europe, initially, and eventually the rest of the globe. It especially considers the relationships between contemporary science and its socio-cultural contexts; discrepancies between the ideal of Science and its actual practice; the role of gender, class, and race in the production of scientific knowledge; and some important debates within the field of science studies, such as the place of subjectivity and objectivity, or whether science is universal or dependent on time, place and field of study.
PREREQUISITE: Anthropology 105 or Sociology 101
Three hours a week

300 Level

300-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Sociology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

301 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY I
This course examines the social and political contexts in which sociology was formally constituted as an academic discipline.  It also offers an interpretive analysis of some of the major ideas, systems of explanation, and modes of analysis generated by the early sociologists. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 301 and 302 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 331 and 332.
PREREQUISITES:  Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200-level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course  
Three hours a week

302 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY II
This course offers critical assessments of the varieties, structures, and directions of modern social theories, with major emphasis on their relevance and usefulness for understanding contemporary social systems. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 301 and 302 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 331 and 332.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and Sociology 301
Three hours a week

305 POPULATION AND SOCIETY
This course is an introduction to the study of human population. It exposes students to the essential theories and methods of analysis of populations, while focusing on the major elements of all population systems - composition, distribution, demographic processes, change - and the interrelationships among these elements. Students are introduced to a number of “population problems”, and to the role of demographics and of population policy in modern society.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

311 SMALL GROUPS
Students combine the use of theory and practical techniques to learn about and to participate in the processes that are unique to small groups.  Micro-level theories, such as symbolic interactionism and systems theory, are employed to examine small groups as social systems.  In addition, students learn how to apply theory to elementary, everyday relationships among individuals in small groups.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

331 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH I
An examination with practical experience, of current data-gathering techniques including experimental and quasi-experimental designs, surveys and interviewing, the use of available documents, and participant observation. Also covered are large scale sampling techniques, coding and procedures, composite and simple measures, and panel analysis. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and 332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

332 METHODOLOGY AND RESEARCH II
An introductory course in the sociological inquiry process giving the student a working knowledge of applied techniques in sociological data manipulation and analysis. Topics include measurement of sociological phenomena, association, elaboration of relationships between two or more variables, path and space analysis, and the logic and methods of hypothesis development and testing in sociological research. It is strongly recommended that Sociology 331 and 332 not be taken in the same year as Sociology 301 and 302.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, Sociology 331 or Anthropology 321, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

362 URBAN SOCIOLOGY
A critical review of major theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of urban communities. Specific topics include: the nature of urbanization, city growth patterns, urban life styles, suburbia, ethnic and racial urban groups, transportation problems, urban power structures, some world cities, and cities of the future. Emphasis is on Canadian urban development, particularly the role of developers, financial institutions, and government in shaping the nature of Canadian cities and in creating various urban problems.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

370 PENOLOGY AND CORRECTIONS
This course provides a critical analysis of the major theoretical orientations associated with the Canadian penal system, highlighting a variety of perspectives, ranging from the origins of the prevailing correctional philosophy in Canada, to a discussion of the various forms of punishment utilized over the centuries.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to critically assess past and future developments within the field of Penology and Corrections.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

371 CANADIAN SOCIETY
A sociological analysis of the overall structural and dynamic character of contemporary Canadian society. Several macro- level explanatory theories, such as functional and conflict, on the nature of Canadian society provide a framework for an integrated study of the following issues: the Canadian identity, regionalism, various elites, the class structure and class conflict, Quebec’s status, Canadian-American relations, and Canadian nationalism.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

372 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOUR AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
A sociological review and analysis of the various forms of collective norm-challenging social action: crowds, mobs, riots, fads, cults, revolutions and social movements. Students are introduced to their structural sources, their political content and their implications for social change.  Specific movements are studied via textual and video records.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

374 VICTIMS OF CRIME: AN INTRODUCTION TO VICTIMOLOGY
The fairly recent area of Victimology has given victims of crime their rightful place in the Criminal Justice System.  This course provides a survey of the evolution of victim rights, the emergence of victim-friendly legislation, and the establishment of victim services within the broader criminal justice system. Upon completion of the course, students should possess a comprehensive understanding of the complicated, sensitive and difficult issues associated with this long-overlooked segment of society.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

391 SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS
Formal/complex organizations are analyzed using classical and contemporary sociological theory and research. The course uses three levels of analysis which focus on individual/ group behaviour, organizational structures and processes, and organizations as social actors in their environments. Topics will include the nature of power/authority, conflict, decision- making, organizational change, effectiveness, socialization, goals, organizational technologies, and inter-organizational relations.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

392 MEDIA AND SOCIETY
This course looks at how media play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies. Drawing upon various media, including television, film, and the Internet, the course examines the social, economic, and political organization of media; the content of media messages; and the role the media plays in preserving and reforming social values at the local and global levels.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

394 MOVIES AND CULTURE
This course examines the powerful role played by movies in the preservation of social traditions as well as the introduction of new ways of thinking, feeling and behaving. Students will learn how to watch films from a critical perspective, and will use content analysis methods to probe into a film’s historical context, its explicit and implicit themes, and how its story-line and cinematographic methods contribute to the presentation of the social norms and values embedded in the film.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

300-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

309 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Anthropology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

310 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 311
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course 

321 FIELD METHODS
This course explores the different research methods used in cultural anthropology. In the evaluation of these methods, the course combines readings with field experience.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

332 KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
An advanced course on how the forms of knowledge production used influence social anthropology’s perspectives on structure and organization in human society. The principal focus is on comparing scientific and interpretive approaches to social organization in a range of societies through case studies. Two area courses are strongly recommended, but not required.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 332
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 332 see DSJS prerequisites.
Three hours a week

352 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 352 and Applied Human Sciences (Family Science 354)
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 352 see DSJS prerequisites; for students taking the course as F SC 354 see F SC prerequisites
Three hours a week

361 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY
History, construction, and evaluation of anthropological theory; anthropological theory as a response to changing social-cultural conditions.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

382 UNDERSTANDING FOLKLORE
The course begins with a survey of the history and approaches to the study of folklore as an aspect of culture with emphasis on Canadian examples. Students then analyze folklore with emphasis on structures and cultural contexts. Study of local data is encouraged.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

300-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 300- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

303 INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION, TRANSNATIONALISM, AND THE CANADIAN MOSAIC
This course focuses on some of the central issues and debates concerning immigration to Canada, and the experiences of immigrants within Canada.  The course examines both historical and contemporary sources that synthesize thematic issues of globalization, transnational migration, and ethno-racial diversity in Canada.  Topics may include theories of migration, Canadian immigration policies and forces that shape them, the economic adjustment of immigrants, immigrants and the labour market, ethno-racial diversity and racism, and migrant agricultural workers and domestics in Canada.
Three semester hours of credit

306 DEMOGRAPHY OF AGING
Students examine the relationship between demographic forces and our aging population. Considered are the effects of: migration on forming an aged ethnic population, social policies as related to the economics and health of an aged population, mortality levels as related to aging as a women’s issue, and baby boom and echo fertility levels. Demographic theories will be used to understand better these and other demographic forces.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

307 CONSTRUCTING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 302
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

312 RURAL SOCIETY IN CANADA
A basic course in the sociology of rural life with emphasis on Canadian rural life. The course systematically examines the structure of Canadian society in terms of distinctive features of its population, family, community, church, school and local government and how they have all been traditionally shaped by farming as the predominant economic activity. The course further explores how the mechanization and commercialization of farming and the forces of urbanization are revolutionizing Canadian rural life and threatening its very existence.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

331 THE COMMUNITY
A course on the social realities of rural and urban communities in Canada: rural neighbourhoods, villages, small towns, rural-urban fringe communities, and cities. The course examines the structure of each type of community and how structural features influence social lives and interactions of residents. Different theoretical perspectives used in the study of the community are examined and compared, in order to deepen understanding of how processes of centralization and urbanization are influencing the patterns of relationships among the various types of communities.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

341 TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This course explores the interaction between technology, science, society, and the environment in the past and present, and examines the potential implications of such interaction in the future.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

355 GLOBALIZATION
Students in this course study globalization as an ongoing, dynamic process as it affects societies, cultures, environments, communities, organizations, groups, and individuals. Debates over these effects are addressed by various theoretical perspectives, including structural-functionalism, conflict analysis, interactionism, cultural studies, and postmodernism. Issues include technological advances, free-market capitalism, cultural homogenization, national policies and programs, international relations, global institutions and organizations, social inequality, demographic trends, asocial problems, social conflicts, and opposition to globalization.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 355
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as DSJS 355 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

359 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology/Anthropology at the third year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course

371 EVOLUTION OF THE BRAIN AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR
This course examines the evolutionary factors underlying human behaviour as well as the behaviour of other species. It examines case materials in order to evaluate the existing theories concerning the development of behaviour from the proto-human period to the present.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course
Three hours a week

374 TOURISM
This course examines both the sociological and anthropological theory/research in tourism and travel.  Since tourism is a significant force in shaping both travellers and their destinations, the course employs several analytical models to understand the nature, dynamics and effects of modern tourism. Topics include tourist behaviour, tourist systems, socio-cultural impact, tourist-local relations, tourism carrying capacity, commodification, and mass tourism.
Cross-listed with Island Studies 374
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, and one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course. For students taking the course as I ST 374 see I ST prerequisites
Three hours a week

400 Level

400-Level Sociology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Sociology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

401 DOING SOCIAL RESEARCH
Students engage in sociological inquiry at an intermediate level. Using statistical computer software, such as SPSS and SAS, students learn to code, manipulate, analyze, and interpret data from a variety of data sources. Students learn also how to carry out multi-variate data analysis (including how to store and retrieve data and create graphic presentations).
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course,  and Soc 331 and Soc 332 or Anth 321 and Soc 332, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours per week

409 EVALUATION
This course is an introduction to the theories, methods and models of evaluation. The major focus of the course is on policy and program evaluation with an emphasis on the purpose, design, data collection/analysis, and application of results of evaluation research. The student gains some practical experience in the field of evaluation. A previous course in statistics is recommended.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, Sociology 331 or an equivalent course in Research Methodology, and one additional 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, permission of the instructor.
Seminar: Three hours a week

412 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH
Students adopt a salutogenic (health promotion and illness prevention) approach to examine the relationship between social factors (lifestyle, environment, and organization of the health care system) and health. Health is posited as a multi-dimensional construct. The implications of adopting a mainstream theoretical view of the relationship between social factors and health are investigated, i.e., how adopting a certain theoretical perspective can help to explain further or to hinder our understanding of the effect of social factors on health.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

432 COMPARATIVE SOCIOLOGY
This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire a multinational and multidisciplinary understanding of a chosen topic in Comparative Sociology, which is the study of a given social phenomenon across national and cultural boundaries and/or different periods of time. Offered in the form of a seminar, themes are selected from year to year, and may include such topics as civility, sociology of emotions and the body, youth culture, socialization, childhood, and courtship.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

451 SOCIOLOGY OF THE BODY
What are the social forces that affect human bodies and human emotions? What is the body’s relation to the self? How do conceptions (and treatments) of the body vary in different societies and different historical periods? In this course, we will study the body as the product of complex social interactive processes and political-economic values; as the expression of the self; and as the object of social control. Particular attention will be paid to race, gender, identity symbols, and body awareness within a culture of consumption.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 DIRECTED STUDIES
Offered as a seminar in which selected topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within the specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and departmental permission; generally restricted to the majors in Sociology at Third and Fourth Year levels. 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

462 APPROACHES IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY
Sociologists are increasingly having influence in the development of public policy. Research projects in aging, work and globalization, social injustice, families, crime and media have contributed to the improvement of society. This course reviews the development of applied sociology and provides students with practical applications in a selected area of social life in which sociologists have had a strong impact.
PREREQUISITES: Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

400-Level Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

401 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides an overview of medical anthropology and its approaches to understanding human illness and healing systems in a cross-cultural context. Students examine theoretical and applied approaches to topics which include: ethno-medical systems; biomedical models; symbolism in the healing process; the interrelationships of gender, class, and race in the cultural construction of illness and well being.  The impact of colonialism and globalization, infections and inequalities, as well as cross-cultural conceptualizations of the body, are also considered.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 401
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 401 see DSJS prerequisites, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

402 ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ANTHROPOLOGY
This course examines selected issues of an interdisciplinary nature which have contributed to the emergence and development of current interpretative theories in anthropology. Students explore issues relating to the concepts of culture and hybridity; representation and power; colonialism and postcolonialism. Feminist anthropology and recent ethnographies are of central interest as are issues related to modernity, memory, and identity.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses  or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

403 CYBERCULTURES
This course examines how cyberspace in its various guises (e.g., web pages, virtual communities) and its associated technologies create numerous and often conflicting identities while shaping and being shaped by local and global cultural forces. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically upon, and engage with, the symbolic meanings and social effects of cyberspace. The course examines recent anthropological theories of technology, and looks at the impact of social organization and cultural practices of communities around the world and on the identities of individuals within those different cultural contexts.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 402
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 402 see DSJS prerequisites
Three hours a week

404 APPLIED AND PUBLIC INTEREST ANTHROPOLOGY
This course reviews the history of applied anthropology and investigates major case studies, research methodologies, intervention strategies, and theoretical issues. One of the fastest-growing areas within the discipline of anthropology, applied anthropology is also known as public interest anthropology.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology  courses
Three hours a week

431 DIRECTED STUDIES
Offered as a seminar in which topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within the specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses and Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology permission; generally restricted to majors in Anthropology at Third and Fourth Year levels. 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

400-Level Sociology/Anthropology Courses

NOTE: All 400- level Sociology/Anthropology courses require Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300-level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses as prerequisites, unless otherwise stated.

421 RELIGION AND SOCIETY
This course examines religion as an institution in society. The principal functions of religion both for the person and for the whole society are explored; and the major processes and changes in modern religion are examined.
Cross-listed with Religious Studies 351 
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as RS 351 see RS prerequisites
Seminar: Three hours a week

431 MINORITY/ETHNIC GROUPS AND CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
A study of minority and ethnic groups (native and immigrant) within Canadian “multicultural” society. The course also includes a review of Canada’s immigration policies and their effects on Canada’s multicultural landscape.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 431
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 431 see DSJS prerequisites
Seminar: Three hours a week

442 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGE
Introduction to the study of various processes and theories of social and cultural change including innovation, acculturation and directed social change.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses
Seminar: Three hours a week

456 VISUAL CULTURE
This course addresses in a critical manner the importance of visual representation in Western thought. Topics include: analysis of stereotypes of non-Western people as portrayed in print and information media, advertising, ethnographic documentary production, and the entertainment industry. Students will also examine the export of Western visual culture to non-Western cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 456
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses. For students taking the course as DSJS 456 see DSJS prerequisites.
Seminar: Three hours a week

461 SPECIAL TOPICS
Course code for Special Topics offered in Sociology and Anthropology at the fourth year level.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology  courses
Three hours a week

481 DIRECTED STUDIES IN SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY
This inter-disciplinary course is offered for advanced students as a seminar in which selected topics are studied in depth and/or as a directed reading course within a specialized area selected by the student in consultation with one or more members of the Department and approved by the Dean.
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology 105, Sociology 101, one 200- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology course, and two 300- level Anthropology, Sociology, or Sociology/Anthropology courses, and departmental permission; generally restricted to majors in Sociology/Anthropology at third and fourth year levels 
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

490 HONOURS RESEARCH
The course involves supervised reading and research on specific topics. The student is required to write a substantial honours essay or research report which is assessed by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, one additional member of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and a member from another Department.
Six semester hours of credit

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