The Greeks and Romans: languages, literatures, legacies.

Classics

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First Name:
Last Name:
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Careers:
  • Educator
  • Archivist
  • Museum Curator
  • Lawyer
  • Consultant
  • Journalist
  • Clergy
The Classics department is located in SDU Main Building.

Photo by Konstantinos Dafalias, used by Creative Commons agreement. 

The Greeks and the Romans laid foundations upon which Western Civilization rests. We owe to the Greeks the roots of much of our literature, science, philosophy and art, while the Romans gave the still living legacy of their language, literature and law to an empire that stretched from the North Sea to the Persian Gulf. To allow the student to share in this rich heritage, the Department of Classics offers courses in the languages, literature, history, philosophy and civilization of Greece and Rome.

Our courses in Greek and Roman Civilization are for students who wish to gain a general understanding of classical antiquity and are the usual basis for further work in Classics. The 2000 and 3000 level courses treat particular subjects and periods, but none of the Classics courses requires a knowledge of Greek or Latin.

There are, however, courses in the Greek and Latin languages for both beginning and advanced students. Those who wish to learn Greek and Latin are urged to begin their studies as early as possible in their university careers.

Students who pass in Classics 1010, 1020, 3120, 3420, 4310 and 4320 may claim credit for these courses in the Department of History.
 

Want more information about Classics? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Educator
  • Archivist
  • Museum Curator
  • Lawyer
  • Consultant
  • Journalist
  • Clergy
The Classics department is located in SDU Main Building.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CLASSICS

1. A Minor in Classics consists of 21 semester hours.

2. The 21 semester hours must be distributed as follows:

(a) 6 hours in Greek or 6 hours in Latin.
(b) 6 hours in civilization courses; i.e. non-language courses offered by the Classics Department or cross-listed courses recommended by the Department.
(c) 9 hours of electives at the 2000 level or above; at least 3 of these 9 hours must be at the 3000 level or above.

Want more information about Classics? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Educator
  • Archivist
  • Museum Curator
  • Lawyer
  • Consultant
  • Journalist
  • Clergy
The Classics department is located in SDU Main Building.
  • D.F. Buck (Chair) - Professor
Overview

Photo by Konstantinos Dafalias, used by Creative Commons agreement. 

The Greeks and the Romans laid foundations upon which Western Civilization rests. We owe to the Greeks the roots of much of our literature, science, philosophy and art, while the Romans gave the still living legacy of their language, literature and law to an empire that stretched from the North Sea to the Persian Gulf. To allow the student to share in this rich heritage, the Department of Classics offers courses in the languages, literature, history, philosophy and civilization of Greece and Rome.

Our courses in Greek and Roman Civilization are for students who wish to gain a general understanding of classical antiquity and are the usual basis for further work in Classics. The 2000 and 3000 level courses treat particular subjects and periods, but none of the Classics courses requires a knowledge of Greek or Latin.

There are, however, courses in the Greek and Latin languages for both beginning and advanced students. Those who wish to learn Greek and Latin are urged to begin their studies as early as possible in their university careers.

Students who pass in Classics 1010, 1020, 3120, 3420, 4310 and 4320 may claim credit for these courses in the Department of History.
 

Minor

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CLASSICS

1. A Minor in Classics consists of 21 semester hours.

2. The 21 semester hours must be distributed as follows:

(a) 6 hours in Greek or 6 hours in Latin.
(b) 6 hours in civilization courses; i.e. non-language courses offered by the Classics Department or cross-listed courses recommended by the Department.
(c) 9 hours of electives at the 2000 level or above; at least 3 of these 9 hours must be at the 3000 level or above.

Faculty
  • D.F. Buck (Chair) - Professor

Overview

Photo by Konstantinos Dafalias, used by Creative Commons agreement. 

The Greeks and the Romans laid foundations upon which Western Civilization rests. We owe to the Greeks the roots of much of our literature, science, philosophy and art, while the Romans gave the still living legacy of their language, literature and law to an empire that stretched from the North Sea to the Persian Gulf. To allow the student to share in this rich heritage, the Department of Classics offers courses in the languages, literature, history, philosophy and civilization of Greece and Rome.

Our courses in Greek and Roman Civilization are for students who wish to gain a general understanding of classical antiquity and are the usual basis for further work in Classics. The 2000 and 3000 level courses treat particular subjects and periods, but none of the Classics courses requires a knowledge of Greek or Latin.

There are, however, courses in the Greek and Latin languages for both beginning and advanced students. Those who wish to learn Greek and Latin are urged to begin their studies as early as possible in their university careers.

Students who pass in Classics 1010, 1020, 3120, 3420, 4310 and 4320 may claim credit for these courses in the Department of History.
 

Minor

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CLASSICS

1. A Minor in Classics consists of 21 semester hours.

2. The 21 semester hours must be distributed as follows:

(a) 6 hours in Greek or 6 hours in Latin.
(b) 6 hours in civilization courses; i.e. non-language courses offered by the Classics Department or cross-listed courses recommended by the Department.
(c) 9 hours of electives at the 2000 level or above; at least 3 of these 9 hours must be at the 3000 level or above.

Faculty

  • D.F. Buck (Chair) - Professor
Want more information about Classics? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Educator
Archivist
Museum Curator
Lawyer
Consultant
Journalist
Clergy
Civil Servant
Course Level: 
1000 Level
Courses: 
CLAS-1010 - GREEK CIVILIZATION This course surveys Greek Civilization from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great. It examines important political, literary and artistic creations, such as Athenian democracy, tragic drama and sculpture, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Greece, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2510). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
GR-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO GREEK I This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
LAT-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN I This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of the Latin language. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
CLAS-1020 - ROMAN CIVILIZATION This course surveys Roman Civilization from its beginnings to the fall of Rome. It examines important political, literary and material creations, such as the Empire, the Aeneid, and the Colosseum, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Rome, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2520). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
GR-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO GREEK II This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Greek 1010
3 hours credit
LAT-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN II This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Latin 1010
3 hours credit
CLAS-1210 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY This course surveys the Greek and Roman myths as they are found in the religion, pre-scientific thought, literature, philosophy and art of the Ancient World. These myths helped to make the universe, society and the individual intelligible to the Ancients and have contributed significantly to the art and literature of Western Civilization. The aim of the course is to provide both a general understanding of Greek and Roman culture and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Religious Studies (cf. Religious Studies 1210). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
RS-1210 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY This course surveys the Greek and Roman myths as they are found in the religion, pre-scientific thought, literature, philosophy and art of the Ancient World. These myths helped to make the universe, society and the individual intelligible to the Ancients and have contributed significantly to the art and literature of Western Civilization. The aim of the course is to provide both a general understanding of Greek and Roman culture and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1210) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
2000 Level
Courses: 
CLAS-2120 - ANCIENT TRAGEDY This course examines critically the more important surviving plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Seneca as dramatic reflections of the political, social, moral and religious concerns of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The aim is to develop a capacity for the critical appreciation of drama and an understanding of the society from which it emerged. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1010, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-2220 - ANCIENT COMEDY This course examines critically the more important surviving plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence as comic reflections of the changing political, social, moral and religious concerns of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The aim is to develop a capacity for the critical appreciation of comedy and an understanding of the society from which it emerged. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1010, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
HIST-2510 - GREEK CIVILIZATION This course surveys Greek Civilization from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great. It examines important political, literary and artistic creations, such as Athenian democracy, tragic drama and sculpture, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Greece, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1010) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2520 - ROMAN CIVILIZATION This course surveys Roman Civilization from its beginnings to the fall of Rome. It examines important political, literary and material creations, such as the Empire, the Aeneid, and the Colosseum, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Rome, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1020) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2710 - AUGUSTUS AND THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social and economic history of the Roman Empire from the assassination of Julius Caesar to the suicide of Nero. The focus is on the civil wars of the Late Republic, the achievements of the Augustan Principate and its evolution under the Julio-Claudian emperors. Particular attention is given to the literary and documentary sources, especially Tacitus' Annals and Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 3120) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2720 - THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE (A.D. 284-410) This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social, economic and religious history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Diocletian to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth. Attention is directed to the reasons why the Romans failed to halt the decline of their Empire. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 3420) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
CLAS-2880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
3000 Level
Courses: 
CLAS-3120 - AUGUSTUS AND THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social and economic history of the Roman Empire from the assassination of Julius Caesar to the suicide of Nero. The focus is on the civil wars of the Late Republic, the achievements of the Augustan Principate and its evolution under the Julio-Claudian emperors. Particular attention is given to the literary and documentary sources, especially Tacitus' Annals and Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2710). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3410 - ROMAN LAW Roman Law as opposed to British Common Law is the basis of the present law of most countries in Western Europe as well as of Quebec. It is not only fundamental for legal studies, but it also illuminates contemporary issues like divorce and human rights. This course examines the history, sources, procedure, substance and legacy of the Roman Civil and Criminal Law with special attention to Justinian's Institutes. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 3120, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3420 - THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE (A.D. 284-410) This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social, economic and religious history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Diocletian to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth. Attention is directed to the reasons why the Romans failed to halt the decline of their Empire. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 3120, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
4000 Level
Courses: 
CLAS-4310 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Classics
3 hours credit
CLAS-4320 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Classics
3 hours credit
CLAS-4880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
HIST-4930 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.) Restriction: Student must have third year standing or above, or have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HIST-4940 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.) Restriction: Student must have third year standing or above, or have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

CLAS-1010 - GREEK CIVILIZATION This course surveys Greek Civilization from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great. It examines important political, literary and artistic creations, such as Athenian democracy, tragic drama and sculpture, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Greece, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2510). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
GR-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO GREEK I This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
LAT-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN I This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of the Latin language. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
CLAS-1020 - ROMAN CIVILIZATION This course surveys Roman Civilization from its beginnings to the fall of Rome. It examines important political, literary and material creations, such as the Empire, the Aeneid, and the Colosseum, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Rome, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2520). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
GR-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO GREEK II This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Greek 1010
3 hours credit
LAT-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN II This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Latin 1010
3 hours credit
CLAS-1210 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY This course surveys the Greek and Roman myths as they are found in the religion, pre-scientific thought, literature, philosophy and art of the Ancient World. These myths helped to make the universe, society and the individual intelligible to the Ancients and have contributed significantly to the art and literature of Western Civilization. The aim of the course is to provide both a general understanding of Greek and Roman culture and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Religious Studies (cf. Religious Studies 1210). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
RS-1210 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY This course surveys the Greek and Roman myths as they are found in the religion, pre-scientific thought, literature, philosophy and art of the Ancient World. These myths helped to make the universe, society and the individual intelligible to the Ancients and have contributed significantly to the art and literature of Western Civilization. The aim of the course is to provide both a general understanding of Greek and Roman culture and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1210) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
CLAS-2120 - ANCIENT TRAGEDY This course examines critically the more important surviving plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Seneca as dramatic reflections of the political, social, moral and religious concerns of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The aim is to develop a capacity for the critical appreciation of drama and an understanding of the society from which it emerged. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1010, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-2220 - ANCIENT COMEDY This course examines critically the more important surviving plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence as comic reflections of the changing political, social, moral and religious concerns of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The aim is to develop a capacity for the critical appreciation of comedy and an understanding of the society from which it emerged. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1010, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
HIST-2510 - GREEK CIVILIZATION This course surveys Greek Civilization from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great. It examines important political, literary and artistic creations, such as Athenian democracy, tragic drama and sculpture, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Greece, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1010) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2520 - ROMAN CIVILIZATION This course surveys Roman Civilization from its beginnings to the fall of Rome. It examines important political, literary and material creations, such as the Empire, the Aeneid, and the Colosseum, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Rome, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1020) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2710 - AUGUSTUS AND THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social and economic history of the Roman Empire from the assassination of Julius Caesar to the suicide of Nero. The focus is on the civil wars of the Late Republic, the achievements of the Augustan Principate and its evolution under the Julio-Claudian emperors. Particular attention is given to the literary and documentary sources, especially Tacitus' Annals and Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 3120) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2720 - THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE (A.D. 284-410) This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social, economic and religious history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Diocletian to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth. Attention is directed to the reasons why the Romans failed to halt the decline of their Empire. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 3420) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
CLAS-2880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit
CLAS-3120 - AUGUSTUS AND THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social and economic history of the Roman Empire from the assassination of Julius Caesar to the suicide of Nero. The focus is on the civil wars of the Late Republic, the achievements of the Augustan Principate and its evolution under the Julio-Claudian emperors. Particular attention is given to the literary and documentary sources, especially Tacitus' Annals and Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2710). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3410 - ROMAN LAW Roman Law as opposed to British Common Law is the basis of the present law of most countries in Western Europe as well as of Quebec. It is not only fundamental for legal studies, but it also illuminates contemporary issues like divorce and human rights. This course examines the history, sources, procedure, substance and legacy of the Roman Civil and Criminal Law with special attention to Justinian's Institutes. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 3120, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3420 - THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE (A.D. 284-410) This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social, economic and religious history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Diocletian to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth. Attention is directed to the reasons why the Romans failed to halt the decline of their Empire. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 3120, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
CLAS-4310 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Classics
3 hours credit
CLAS-4320 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Classics
3 hours credit
CLAS-4880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
HIST-4930 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.) Restriction: Student must have third year standing or above, or have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HIST-4940 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.) Restriction: Student must have third year standing or above, or have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

1000 Level

CLAS-1010 - GREEK CIVILIZATION This course surveys Greek Civilization from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great. It examines important political, literary and artistic creations, such as Athenian democracy, tragic drama and sculpture, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Greece, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2510). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
GR-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO GREEK I This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
LAT-1010 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN I This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of the Latin language. Three hours a week
3 hours credit
CLAS-1020 - ROMAN CIVILIZATION This course surveys Roman Civilization from its beginnings to the fall of Rome. It examines important political, literary and material creations, such as the Empire, the Aeneid, and the Colosseum, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Rome, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2520). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
GR-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO GREEK II This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Greek 1010
3 hours credit
LAT-1020 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN II This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Latin 1010
3 hours credit
CLAS-1210 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY This course surveys the Greek and Roman myths as they are found in the religion, pre-scientific thought, literature, philosophy and art of the Ancient World. These myths helped to make the universe, society and the individual intelligible to the Ancients and have contributed significantly to the art and literature of Western Civilization. The aim of the course is to provide both a general understanding of Greek and Roman culture and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Religious Studies (cf. Religious Studies 1210). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
RS-1210 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY This course surveys the Greek and Roman myths as they are found in the religion, pre-scientific thought, literature, philosophy and art of the Ancient World. These myths helped to make the universe, society and the individual intelligible to the Ancients and have contributed significantly to the art and literature of Western Civilization. The aim of the course is to provide both a general understanding of Greek and Roman culture and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1210) Three hours a week
3 hours credit

2000 Level

CLAS-2120 - ANCIENT TRAGEDY This course examines critically the more important surviving plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Seneca as dramatic reflections of the political, social, moral and religious concerns of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The aim is to develop a capacity for the critical appreciation of drama and an understanding of the society from which it emerged. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1010, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-2220 - ANCIENT COMEDY This course examines critically the more important surviving plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence as comic reflections of the changing political, social, moral and religious concerns of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The aim is to develop a capacity for the critical appreciation of comedy and an understanding of the society from which it emerged. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1010, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
HIST-2510 - GREEK CIVILIZATION This course surveys Greek Civilization from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great. It examines important political, literary and artistic creations, such as Athenian democracy, tragic drama and sculpture, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Greece, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1010) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2520 - ROMAN CIVILIZATION This course surveys Roman Civilization from its beginnings to the fall of Rome. It examines important political, literary and material creations, such as the Empire, the Aeneid, and the Colosseum, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Rome, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 1020) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2710 - AUGUSTUS AND THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social and economic history of the Roman Empire from the assassination of Julius Caesar to the suicide of Nero. The focus is on the civil wars of the Late Republic, the achievements of the Augustan Principate and its evolution under the Julio-Claudian emperors. Particular attention is given to the literary and documentary sources, especially Tacitus' Annals and Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 3120) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
HIST-2720 - THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE (A.D. 284-410) This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social, economic and religious history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Diocletian to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth. Attention is directed to the reasons why the Romans failed to halt the decline of their Empire. Cross-listed with Classics (cf. Classics 3420) Three hours a week
3 hours credit
CLAS-2880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 2000 level.
3 hours credit

3000 Level

CLAS-3120 - AUGUSTUS AND THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social and economic history of the Roman Empire from the assassination of Julius Caesar to the suicide of Nero. The focus is on the civil wars of the Late Republic, the achievements of the Augustan Principate and its evolution under the Julio-Claudian emperors. Particular attention is given to the literary and documentary sources, especially Tacitus' Annals and Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2710). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 1210, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3410 - ROMAN LAW Roman Law as opposed to British Common Law is the basis of the present law of most countries in Western Europe as well as of Quebec. It is not only fundamental for legal studies, but it also illuminates contemporary issues like divorce and human rights. This course examines the history, sources, procedure, substance and legacy of the Roman Civil and Criminal Law with special attention to Justinian's Institutes. Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 3120, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3420 - THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE (A.D. 284-410) This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social, economic and religious history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Diocletian to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth. Attention is directed to the reasons why the Romans failed to halt the decline of their Empire. Cross-listed with History (cf. History 2720). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or Classics 3120, or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
CLAS-3880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit

4000 Level

CLAS-4310 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Classics
3 hours credit
CLAS-4320 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Classics
3 hours credit
CLAS-4880 - SPECIAL TOPICS Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
HIST-4930 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.) Restriction: Student must have third year standing or above, or have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
HIST-4940 - DIRECTED STUDIES Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of History Chair (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.) Restriction: Student must have third year standing or above, or have permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
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