A strong breadth of knowledge in the field of entrepreneurship.

Entrepreneurship

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First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneurial opportunities in all industries and sectors.
The School of Business is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353

The courses and experiences related to the specialization in entrepreneurship provide students with the knowledge and the experiential learning to start up a business or manage one in an entrepreneurial manner.

Students will study the various types of entrepreneurship including business, social, and innovation within existing organizations. The key learning outcomes for students will be to gain knowledge, confidence, skills, and practice in both entrepreneurial thinking and leading entrepreneurial initiatives. They will think analytically, ask questions, research the market, solve problems, start a new venture, launch new products/services/ideas, and develop other entrepreneurial skills.

 

Want more information about Entrepreneurship? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneurial opportunities in all industries and sectors.
The School of Business is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353

In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in entrepreneurship requires successful completion of the following courses:

Required:

  • Business 265 (Introduction to Small Business and Entrepreneurship)
  • Business 334 formerly BUS 421 (Personal Finance)
  • Business 365 (Small Business Management: Opportunity Analysis & Development)
  • Business 366 (Entrepreneurial Finance)
  • Business 468 (Self Employment - Behind the Scene)

Any FOUR of the following courses:

  • Business 287 (International Business)
  • Business 461 (Communications)
  • Business 465 (Project Management)
  • Business 471 (Organizational Development and Change)
  • Business 475 (E-commerce)
  • Business 476 (Intercultural Management)
  • Philosophy 111 (Critical Thinking)
  • Psychology 331 (Creativity)
  • Sociology 292/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 292 (Work and Society)
  • Sociology 311 (Small Groups)

Some of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 200-level and above, require 100-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 101 or Psychology 101 and 102) and may have additional 200-level or 300-level prerequisites.  Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.

To qualify for a specialization in entrepreneurship, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

 

Want more information about Entrepreneurship? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Entrepreneurial opportunities in all industries and sectors.
The School of Business is located in Don and Marion McDougall Hall.
(902) 628-4353
  • Juergen Krause, Dean, Associate Professor
  • Tim Carroll, Associate Professor
  • Andrew Carrothers, Assistant Professor
  • Mike Cassidy, Assistant Professor
  • Reuben Domike, Associate Professor
  • Gary Evans, Associate Professor
  • Adam Fenech, Associate Professor
  • Debbie Good, Assistant Professor
  • Susan Graham, Assistant Professor
  • Blake Jelley, Associate Professor
  • Melissa MacEachern, Assistant Professor
  • Amy MacFarlane, Assistant Professor
  • Tarek Mady, Assistant Professor
  • Tina Saksida, Assistant Professor
  • Don Wagner, Associate Professor
  • Karen Wight, Assistant Professor
Overview

The courses and experiences related to the specialization in entrepreneurship provide students with the knowledge and the experiential learning to start up a business or manage one in an entrepreneurial manner.

Students will study the various types of entrepreneurship including business, social, and innovation within existing organizations. The key learning outcomes for students will be to gain knowledge, confidence, skills, and practice in both entrepreneurial thinking and leading entrepreneurial initiatives. They will think analytically, ask questions, research the market, solve problems, start a new venture, launch new products/services/ideas, and develop other entrepreneurial skills.

 

Course Structure

In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in entrepreneurship requires successful completion of the following courses:

Required:

  • Business 265 (Introduction to Small Business and Entrepreneurship)
  • Business 334 formerly BUS 421 (Personal Finance)
  • Business 365 (Small Business Management: Opportunity Analysis & Development)
  • Business 366 (Entrepreneurial Finance)
  • Business 468 (Self Employment - Behind the Scene)

Any FOUR of the following courses:

  • Business 287 (International Business)
  • Business 461 (Communications)
  • Business 465 (Project Management)
  • Business 471 (Organizational Development and Change)
  • Business 475 (E-commerce)
  • Business 476 (Intercultural Management)
  • Philosophy 111 (Critical Thinking)
  • Psychology 331 (Creativity)
  • Sociology 292/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 292 (Work and Society)
  • Sociology 311 (Small Groups)

Some of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 200-level and above, require 100-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 101 or Psychology 101 and 102) and may have additional 200-level or 300-level prerequisites.  Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.

To qualify for a specialization in entrepreneurship, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

 

Faculty
  • Juergen Krause, Dean, Associate Professor
  • Tim Carroll, Associate Professor
  • Andrew Carrothers, Assistant Professor
  • Mike Cassidy, Assistant Professor
  • Reuben Domike, Associate Professor
  • Gary Evans, Associate Professor
  • Adam Fenech, Associate Professor
  • Debbie Good, Assistant Professor
  • Susan Graham, Assistant Professor
  • Blake Jelley, Associate Professor
  • Melissa MacEachern, Assistant Professor
  • Amy MacFarlane, Assistant Professor
  • Tarek Mady, Assistant Professor
  • Tina Saksida, Assistant Professor
  • Don Wagner, Associate Professor
  • Karen Wight, Assistant Professor

Overview

The courses and experiences related to the specialization in entrepreneurship provide students with the knowledge and the experiential learning to start up a business or manage one in an entrepreneurial manner.

Students will study the various types of entrepreneurship including business, social, and innovation within existing organizations. The key learning outcomes for students will be to gain knowledge, confidence, skills, and practice in both entrepreneurial thinking and leading entrepreneurial initiatives. They will think analytically, ask questions, research the market, solve problems, start a new venture, launch new products/services/ideas, and develop other entrepreneurial skills.

 

Course Structure

In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in entrepreneurship requires successful completion of the following courses:

Required:

  • Business 265 (Introduction to Small Business and Entrepreneurship)
  • Business 334 formerly BUS 421 (Personal Finance)
  • Business 365 (Small Business Management: Opportunity Analysis & Development)
  • Business 366 (Entrepreneurial Finance)
  • Business 468 (Self Employment - Behind the Scene)

Any FOUR of the following courses:

  • Business 287 (International Business)
  • Business 461 (Communications)
  • Business 465 (Project Management)
  • Business 471 (Organizational Development and Change)
  • Business 475 (E-commerce)
  • Business 476 (Intercultural Management)
  • Philosophy 111 (Critical Thinking)
  • Psychology 331 (Creativity)
  • Sociology 292/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 292 (Work and Society)
  • Sociology 311 (Small Groups)

Some of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 200-level and above, require 100-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 101 or Psychology 101 and 102) and may have additional 200-level or 300-level prerequisites.  Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.

To qualify for a specialization in entrepreneurship, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

 

Faculty

  • Juergen Krause, Dean, Associate Professor
  • Tim Carroll, Associate Professor
  • Andrew Carrothers, Assistant Professor
  • Mike Cassidy, Assistant Professor
  • Reuben Domike, Associate Professor
  • Gary Evans, Associate Professor
  • Adam Fenech, Associate Professor
  • Debbie Good, Assistant Professor
  • Susan Graham, Assistant Professor
  • Blake Jelley, Associate Professor
  • Melissa MacEachern, Assistant Professor
  • Amy MacFarlane, Assistant Professor
  • Tarek Mady, Assistant Professor
  • Tina Saksida, Assistant Professor
  • Don Wagner, Associate Professor
  • Karen Wight, Assistant Professor
Want more information about Entrepreneurship? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Entrepreneurial opportunities in all industries and sectors.

Calendar Courses

Calendar Courses

Calendar Courses

Full descriptions for courses in the specialization in entrepreneurship are listed on the Bachelor of Business Administration program page.