Rewarding field placements and community based learning opportunities.

Child and Family Studies

Want more information about Child and Family Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Parent Educator
  • Child and Family Services Officer
  • Youth Program Manager
  • Early Years Centre Director
  • Early Childhood Educator
  • Early Childhood Coach
The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

The Child and Family Studies program at UPEI is an exceptional opportunity for early childhood education graduates. I decided to pursue this program due to my innate desire to work with people of all ages. The program enables me to broaden my scope of knowledge while incorporating a variety of community field placements. The breadth of courses we can take is extensive, ranging from courses exploring issues related to Women and Aging, Human Sexuality, or Child's Health and Development, to Family Law and Social Policy.

The combination of course work and field placement opportunities broaden my horizons for my future career. There are a wide variety of career opportunities available to Child and Family Studies graduates. I am excited to complete my degree and pursue a career in service to children, youth and families.

Bethany Robichaud
Child and Family Studies Student
Want more information about Child and Family Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Parent Educator
  • Child and Family Services Officer
  • Youth Program Manager
  • Early Years Centre Director
  • Early Childhood Educator
  • Early Childhood Coach
The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies is a two-year post- diploma degree available to graduates of diploma programs in Early Childhood Education at Holland College or similar post-secondary institutions.

Successful completion of a grade 12 math course (or an equivalent course) is strongly recommended. Students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies must complete a total of 60 semester hours at UPEI.

Want more information about Child and Family Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Parent Educator
  • Child and Family Services Officer
  • Youth Program Manager
  • Early Years Centre Director
  • Early Childhood Educator
  • Early Childhood Coach
The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES DEGREE:

Family Science 2210 Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 Human Development
Family Science 2420 Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 Communications
Family Science 3310 Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 3810 Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
Family Science 4110 Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science elective at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level
Math 1010 or 1110 Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 2210 (formerly Math 2210) Introductory Statistics I
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
One writing intensive course
Six free electives

NOTES:
1. Suggested electives for those planning to apply to the Bachelor of Education Program at UPEI are found under the Admissions for Bachelor of Education

COURSE SEQUENCE

First Year
Family Science 2210 Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 Human Development
Family Science 2420 Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 Communications
Family Science 3810 Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
Math 1010 or 1110 Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 2210 (formerly Math 2210) Introductory Statistics I
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 and a writing intensive course
One free elective

Second Year
Family Science 3310 Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 4110 Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
Six free electives

 

Want more information about Child and Family Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Parent Educator
  • Child and Family Services Officer
  • Youth Program Manager
  • Early Years Centre Director
  • Early Childhood Educator
  • Early Childhood Coach
The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies program is located in the Health Sciences Building.

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATION— NATIONAL COUNCIL ON FAMILY RELATIONS

The Department of Applied Human Sciences is approved by the National Council on Family Relations to offer the course work in order for graduates from the Family Science and Child and Family Studies programs to apply for provisional certification as a Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE). CFLEs work in a variety of health and social service positions. In particular, CLFEs are prepared to work with individuals and families in the areas of prevention and education. Students interested in becoming a CFLE need to ensure that they have completed all of the required course work for their major in addition to completing the following Family Science electives:

  • Family Science 3830 Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
  • Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
  • Family Science 4910 Human Sexuality
Want more information about Child and Family Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers:
  • Parent Educator
  • Child and Family Services Officer
  • Youth Program Manager
  • Early Years Centre Director
  • Early Childhood Educator
  • Early Childhood Coach
The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies program is located in the Health Sciences Building.
  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer
Our Program

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

The Child and Family Studies program at UPEI is an exceptional opportunity for early childhood education graduates. I decided to pursue this program due to my innate desire to work with people of all ages. The program enables me to broaden my scope of knowledge while incorporating a variety of community field placements. The breadth of courses we can take is extensive, ranging from courses exploring issues related to Women and Aging, Human Sexuality, or Child's Health and Development, to Family Law and Social Policy.

The combination of course work and field placement opportunities broaden my horizons for my future career. There are a wide variety of career opportunities available to Child and Family Studies graduates. I am excited to complete my degree and pursue a career in service to children, youth and families.

Child and Family Studies Student
Bethany Robichaud
Overview

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies is a two-year post- diploma degree available to graduates of diploma programs in Early Childhood Education at Holland College or similar post-secondary institutions.

Successful completion of a grade 12 math course (or an equivalent course) is strongly recommended. Students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies must complete a total of 60 semester hours at UPEI.

Course Structure

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES DEGREE:

Family Science 2210 Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 Human Development
Family Science 2420 Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 Communications
Family Science 3310 Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 3810 Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
Family Science 4110 Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science elective at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level
Math 1010 or 1110 Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 2210 (formerly Math 2210) Introductory Statistics I
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
One writing intensive course
Six free electives

NOTES:
1. Suggested electives for those planning to apply to the Bachelor of Education Program at UPEI are found under the Admissions for Bachelor of Education

COURSE SEQUENCE

First Year
Family Science 2210 Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 Human Development
Family Science 2420 Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 Communications
Family Science 3810 Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
Math 1010 or 1110 Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 2210 (formerly Math 2210) Introductory Statistics I
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 and a writing intensive course
One free elective

Second Year
Family Science 3310 Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 4110 Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
Six free electives

 

Certification

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATION— NATIONAL COUNCIL ON FAMILY RELATIONS

The Department of Applied Human Sciences is approved by the National Council on Family Relations to offer the course work in order for graduates from the Family Science and Child and Family Studies programs to apply for provisional certification as a Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE). CFLEs work in a variety of health and social service positions. In particular, CLFEs are prepared to work with individuals and families in the areas of prevention and education. Students interested in becoming a CFLE need to ensure that they have completed all of the required course work for their major in addition to completing the following Family Science electives:

  • Family Science 3830 Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
  • Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
  • Family Science 4910 Human Sexuality
Faculty
  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer

Our Program

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

The Child and Family Studies program at UPEI is an exceptional opportunity for early childhood education graduates. I decided to pursue this program due to my innate desire to work with people of all ages. The program enables me to broaden my scope of knowledge while incorporating a variety of community field placements. The breadth of courses we can take is extensive, ranging from courses exploring issues related to Women and Aging, Human Sexuality, or Child's Health and Development, to Family Law and Social Policy.

The combination of course work and field placement opportunities broaden my horizons for my future career. There are a wide variety of career opportunities available to Child and Family Studies graduates. I am excited to complete my degree and pursue a career in service to children, youth and families.

Bethany Robichaud
Child and Family Studies Student

Overview

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies is a two-year post- diploma degree available to graduates of diploma programs in Early Childhood Education at Holland College or similar post-secondary institutions.

Successful completion of a grade 12 math course (or an equivalent course) is strongly recommended. Students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies must complete a total of 60 semester hours at UPEI.

Course Structure

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES DEGREE:

Family Science 2210 Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 Human Development
Family Science 2420 Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 Communications
Family Science 3310 Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 3810 Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
Family Science 4110 Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science elective at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level
Math 1010 or 1110 Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 2210 (formerly Math 2210) Introductory Statistics I
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
One writing intensive course
Six free electives

NOTES:
1. Suggested electives for those planning to apply to the Bachelor of Education Program at UPEI are found under the Admissions for Bachelor of Education

COURSE SEQUENCE

First Year
Family Science 2210 Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 Human Development
Family Science 2420 Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 Communications
Family Science 3810 Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
Math 1010 or 1110 Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 2210 (formerly Math 2210) Introductory Statistics I
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 and a writing intensive course
One free elective

Second Year
Family Science 3310 Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 4110 Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
Six free electives

 

Certification

Please note: The application process for this program has been suspended.

PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATION— NATIONAL COUNCIL ON FAMILY RELATIONS

The Department of Applied Human Sciences is approved by the National Council on Family Relations to offer the course work in order for graduates from the Family Science and Child and Family Studies programs to apply for provisional certification as a Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE). CFLEs work in a variety of health and social service positions. In particular, CLFEs are prepared to work with individuals and families in the areas of prevention and education. Students interested in becoming a CFLE need to ensure that they have completed all of the required course work for their major in addition to completing the following Family Science electives:

  • Family Science 3830 Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
  • Family Science 4710 Parent-Child Interaction
  • Family Science 4910 Human Sexuality

Faculty

  • Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus 
  • Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Chair and Professor
  • Jennifer Taylor, Professor
  • Debbie MacLellan, Professor 
  • William Montelpare, Professor
  • Lori Weeks, Associate Professor (on leave, August 2017)
  • Nicky Hyndman, Assistant Professor
  • Dany MacDonald, Assistant Professor
  • Rebecca Reed-Jones, Assistant Professor
  • Misty Rossiter, Assistant Professor
  • Travis Saunders, Assistant Professor
  • Colleen Walton, Assistant Professor
  • Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
  • Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
  • Charlene VanLeeuwen, Sessional Lecturer
Want more information about Child and Family Studies? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail Address:
Careers: 
Parent Educator
Child and Family Services Officer
Youth Program Manager
Early Years Centre Director
Early Childhood Educator
Early Childhood Coach
Course Level: 
1000 Level
Courses: 
FSC-1140 Families in Contemporary Society
This course is an introduction to the study of families and contemporary issues facing today's families. Topics include changing family structures, current trends in Canadian families, the interaction of families with other systems, and theories used to study families. The course also includes an introduction to family life education including the philosophy, nature and purpose of family education. Three lecture hours Note: BCFS students are not able to credit FSC 1140 as an elective.
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
2000 Level
Courses: 
FSC-2210 Family Resource Management
This course is a study of the management process and how it relates to decision making and resource use by individuals and families. Topics include management history and theories; values and goals; resources; planning and decision making. The management of stress and fatigue, time, finances and environ- mental resources are also discussed. Students gain experience in the application of theory to a variety of individual and family managerial situations. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or admission to the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies
3 hours credit
FSC-2410 Human Development
This course explores human development from conception to old age, including physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects. Topics include attachment across the lifespan; various theories used to study human development; gender; the aging process; and societal factors affecting human development. The reciprocal relationship between human development and their environments is emphasized. Cross-listed with Kinesiology 2410) Three lecture hours NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 2010.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140, or permission from the instructor for students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies Program
3 hours credit
FSC-2420 Dynamics of Family Living
This course examines the multiple realities of living in families. Using current theory and research in family science, it focuses on family diversity extending across history, gender, nationality, culture, and age. The course covers crucial issues such as family stress, later-life families, family violence, the work-family interface, parenting, and other areas of family living. The effects of legislation, and social economics and technical change on families are discussed. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or registration in the Child and Family Studies Program
3 hours credit
FSC-2430 Social Psychology
This course focuses on the ways in which an individual's thoughts, feelings, and actions are influenced by the social environment. It provides an introduction to major theories, principles, methods and findings of the discipline. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, gender, attraction, aggression, helping, conformity, obedience, group interaction, and cultural influences. Through a variety of assignments students are encouraged to attend to the operation of social psychological principles in daily living. The course includes both lectures and participation in group experiences. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2820 and Psychology 2420). (Offered in both semesters) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: FSC-1140
3 hours credit
FSC-2440 Philosophies of Love and Sexuality
This course explores philosophical issues related to love and sexuality as constructed and experienced in particular cultural and historical contexts in Anglo-American culture. Topics may include analysis of love and sexuality as portrayed in music, literature, film and art; kinds of love; conceptions of self and community underlying different accounts of love; sexual activity as expressive, communicative, sacred, profane, athletic, goal-oriented; the commodification of sex; competing conceptions of sexual health and sexual liberation; conservative, liberal, radical and feminist perspectives; ethical issues in intimate relation- ships, families, sex-trade work and pornography. (Cross-listed with Philosophy 2420 and Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2420). Lecture: Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140
3 hours credit
FSC-2610 Communications
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of communication. The course balances communication theory and research with skills acquisition and practice to help students communicate more effectively in a variety of professional settings. Students are provided with an opportunity to develop skills in interpersonal and group communication, public speaking, and interviewing. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition 2610). Three lecture hours Restriction: Student must have at least second year standing in Foods and Nutrition, or Radiography,or Kinesiology OR be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
3000 Level
Courses: 
FSC-3050 Adolescent Development and Adjustment
This course examines both the research and theoretical perspectives in areas that are integral to an understanding of the period of adolescence and of adolescents themselves. We address the following areas: puberty and psychobiology; the development of cognition and social cognition; the formation of identity, including career options, and the development of sexuality and a system of values, factors that influence the formation of identity, such as the family, the peer group, and the media, the school experience; and issues in adolescent development such as some aspects of psychopathology, juvenile justice, and the problems encountered by indigenous youth. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3050). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: FSC-3810
3 hours credit
FSC-3080 Child Development
This course explores children's development in depth by focussing on the various domains of change from birth to adolescence. Themes of change and stability throughout childhood are examined using analytical and descriptive theories of development. Implications of developmental approaches are examined for practice and public policy domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to assess critically these developmental changes and to apply that understanding to other contexts. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3080). Three hours a week NOTE: Students who have taken either 3040 or 3410 will not be eligible to enrol in 3080 without the instructor's permission.
REQUISITE: Family Sceince 3810
3 hours credit
FSC-3090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
FSC-3100 Adult Development
The purpose of this course is to better understand adult development by focussing on themes of change and stability from young adulthood through to older adulthood. Students use analytical and descriptive theories of adult development to explore how adults negotiate physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to evaluate critically the contemporary research in adult development and to apply their understanding of adult development to a wide array of contexts and policy environments. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3090). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
FSC-3310 Introduction to Research Methods
This course is an introduction to research intended to enable students to read critically and evaluate current research. Students are introduced to various types of research designs, research terminology, and the components of the research process. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3310) NOTE: Preference for admission will be given to students registered in the Family Science, Foods and Nutrition, Child and Family Studies, Kinesiology or Radiography programs. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Statistics 1210
3 hours credit
FSC-3440 Intimate Relationships
This course is designed to examine a variety of areas of study within the field of intimate relationships. Through in-class discussion of the major theoretical frameworks of the discipline and by designing their own original relationship research proposals, students will gain an increased understanding of the multifaceted nature of intimate relationships. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: attraction, social cognition, interdependency, conflict, and love. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3420).
PREREQUISITE: FSC-3810 AND PSY-2420
3 hours credit
FSC-3530 Programs and Services for Older Adults and Caregivers
This course is an examination of the diverse array of programs and services designed for older adults, and caregivers of older adults, from a legislative, consumer, and provider perspective. Students will gain insight into these programs and services including their place in the array of services for older adults and the implications of such programs and services for older adults, caregivers, and society. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 114
3 hours credit
FSC-3540 Kinship and Family
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Anthropology 3520). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
FSC-3610 Current Issues in Children's Health and Development
This course is an advanced study of current issues and research in children's health and development in a family context. Emphasis is placed on the promotion of healthy behaviours and development of children by exploring the linkages between research, policy, and practice.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3620 Family Violence
This course will examine the history and various definitions and theories used in investigating the problem of family violence across the life span (i.e. children in abusive families, dating violence, intimate partner violence, the abuse of older adults). Emphasis will be placed on violence against women and violence in diverse family forms. A particular emphasis will be placed on examining strategies for the prevention of family violence over the life course. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3810 Professional Practice With Children and Families
This course is designed to inform students of the range of professional practice issues confronted by helping professionals working with children, youth, adults and their families. The complexities of working with diverse populations with regard to professional ethics, standards of practice and advocacy are examined. Additional topics include: managing the field placement experience, professional roles, peer learning, reflective practice and portfolio development. Students gain experience in areas of professional practice with children, youth, adults of all ages, and their families through a field placement experience. Three lecture hours for first 4 weeks; for balance of semester 1 lecture hour per week and 32 hours field placement. Restriction: Student must have third year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies.
3 hours credit
FSC-3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3820). Three lecture hours per week and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3830 Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
This course is a study of how public policy shapes the context in which families live, and, in turn, influences human and family development. Topics include the relationship between family functioning and public policies at the local, provincial, and federal levels; the influence of demographic changes, values, attitudes, and perceptions of the well-being of children and families on public policy debates; the effectiveness of policies and programs from a family perspective; the policy making process; and the different roles professionals play in influencing policy development. Special attention is given to the consequences of various policies on current family issues. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3840 Women, Economics and the Economy
This course examines the treatment of women by the discipline of economics from both mainstream and feminist perspectives. It includes a review of the feminist critique of traditional economics, as well as an examination of the economic literature pertaining to women and women's activities. Topics include women in the workforce and the economic analysis of fertility, marriage and divorce, and household production. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Economics 3810). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420
3 hours credit
FSC-3950 Gender and Violence
This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Psychology 3950).
3 hours credit
Course Level: 
4000 Level
Courses: 
FSC-4090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
FSC-4110 Field Placement I
This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self- awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement. Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810, Family Science 3820 and fourth year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies
3 hours credit
FSC-4120 Field Placement II
This course is a continuation of Family Science 4110 and provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self-awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement. Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 4110
3 hours credit
FSC-4310 Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 4310). Three lecture hours
3 hours credit
FSC-4400 Senior Undergraduate Research Project
This course allows senior students majoring in Family Science to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department. Six semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must have fourth year standing in the Family Science or Child and Family Studies programs.
3 hours credit
FSC-4410 Directed Studies
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Family Science
3 hours credit
FSC-4420 Directed Studies
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Family Science
3 hours credit
FSC-4510 Women and Aging
This course examines older women's diverse experiences in today's families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 4510) Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or at least one introductory DSJS course.
3 hours credit
FSC-4710 Parent-Child Interaction
This course is a study of the developmental nature of parenting throughout the life cycle from birth through aging, with emphasis on the reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions. It includes parenting in various family structures, in various lifestyles, in high-risk families, in families with exceptional children, and in families from diverse cultures. Alternative approaches to parenting (e.g. adoption and assisted reproduction) are discussed. Contemporary strategies for parent guidance and education are introduced. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or Kinesiology 2410
3 hours credit
FSC-4910 Human Sexuality
This course is an examination of the psychological, social, and physiological aspects of sexual development throughout life. Aspects of human sexuality including reproduction, influence on relationships, gender issues, sexual orientation, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual values and decision-making are covered. Students examine current sexuality education methodologies. Implications for future trends in human interaction are analyzed. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

FSC-1140 Families in Contemporary Society
This course is an introduction to the study of families and contemporary issues facing today's families. Topics include changing family structures, current trends in Canadian families, the interaction of families with other systems, and theories used to study families. The course also includes an introduction to family life education including the philosophy, nature and purpose of family education. Three lecture hours Note: BCFS students are not able to credit FSC 1140 as an elective.
3 hours credit
FSC-2210 Family Resource Management
This course is a study of the management process and how it relates to decision making and resource use by individuals and families. Topics include management history and theories; values and goals; resources; planning and decision making. The management of stress and fatigue, time, finances and environ- mental resources are also discussed. Students gain experience in the application of theory to a variety of individual and family managerial situations. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or admission to the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies
3 hours credit
FSC-2410 Human Development
This course explores human development from conception to old age, including physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects. Topics include attachment across the lifespan; various theories used to study human development; gender; the aging process; and societal factors affecting human development. The reciprocal relationship between human development and their environments is emphasized. Cross-listed with Kinesiology 2410) Three lecture hours NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 2010.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140, or permission from the instructor for students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies Program
3 hours credit
FSC-2420 Dynamics of Family Living
This course examines the multiple realities of living in families. Using current theory and research in family science, it focuses on family diversity extending across history, gender, nationality, culture, and age. The course covers crucial issues such as family stress, later-life families, family violence, the work-family interface, parenting, and other areas of family living. The effects of legislation, and social economics and technical change on families are discussed. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or registration in the Child and Family Studies Program
3 hours credit
FSC-2430 Social Psychology
This course focuses on the ways in which an individual's thoughts, feelings, and actions are influenced by the social environment. It provides an introduction to major theories, principles, methods and findings of the discipline. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, gender, attraction, aggression, helping, conformity, obedience, group interaction, and cultural influences. Through a variety of assignments students are encouraged to attend to the operation of social psychological principles in daily living. The course includes both lectures and participation in group experiences. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2820 and Psychology 2420). (Offered in both semesters) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: FSC-1140
3 hours credit
FSC-2440 Philosophies of Love and Sexuality
This course explores philosophical issues related to love and sexuality as constructed and experienced in particular cultural and historical contexts in Anglo-American culture. Topics may include analysis of love and sexuality as portrayed in music, literature, film and art; kinds of love; conceptions of self and community underlying different accounts of love; sexual activity as expressive, communicative, sacred, profane, athletic, goal-oriented; the commodification of sex; competing conceptions of sexual health and sexual liberation; conservative, liberal, radical and feminist perspectives; ethical issues in intimate relation- ships, families, sex-trade work and pornography. (Cross-listed with Philosophy 2420 and Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2420). Lecture: Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140
3 hours credit
FSC-2610 Communications
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of communication. The course balances communication theory and research with skills acquisition and practice to help students communicate more effectively in a variety of professional settings. Students are provided with an opportunity to develop skills in interpersonal and group communication, public speaking, and interviewing. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition 2610). Three lecture hours Restriction: Student must have at least second year standing in Foods and Nutrition, or Radiography,or Kinesiology OR be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit
FSC-3050 Adolescent Development and Adjustment
This course examines both the research and theoretical perspectives in areas that are integral to an understanding of the period of adolescence and of adolescents themselves. We address the following areas: puberty and psychobiology; the development of cognition and social cognition; the formation of identity, including career options, and the development of sexuality and a system of values, factors that influence the formation of identity, such as the family, the peer group, and the media, the school experience; and issues in adolescent development such as some aspects of psychopathology, juvenile justice, and the problems encountered by indigenous youth. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3050). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: FSC-3810
3 hours credit
FSC-3080 Child Development
This course explores children's development in depth by focussing on the various domains of change from birth to adolescence. Themes of change and stability throughout childhood are examined using analytical and descriptive theories of development. Implications of developmental approaches are examined for practice and public policy domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to assess critically these developmental changes and to apply that understanding to other contexts. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3080). Three hours a week NOTE: Students who have taken either 3040 or 3410 will not be eligible to enrol in 3080 without the instructor's permission.
REQUISITE: Family Sceince 3810
3 hours credit
FSC-3090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
FSC-3100 Adult Development
The purpose of this course is to better understand adult development by focussing on themes of change and stability from young adulthood through to older adulthood. Students use analytical and descriptive theories of adult development to explore how adults negotiate physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to evaluate critically the contemporary research in adult development and to apply their understanding of adult development to a wide array of contexts and policy environments. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3090). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
FSC-3310 Introduction to Research Methods
This course is an introduction to research intended to enable students to read critically and evaluate current research. Students are introduced to various types of research designs, research terminology, and the components of the research process. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3310) NOTE: Preference for admission will be given to students registered in the Family Science, Foods and Nutrition, Child and Family Studies, Kinesiology or Radiography programs. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Statistics 1210
3 hours credit
FSC-3440 Intimate Relationships
This course is designed to examine a variety of areas of study within the field of intimate relationships. Through in-class discussion of the major theoretical frameworks of the discipline and by designing their own original relationship research proposals, students will gain an increased understanding of the multifaceted nature of intimate relationships. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: attraction, social cognition, interdependency, conflict, and love. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3420).
PREREQUISITE: FSC-3810 AND PSY-2420
3 hours credit
FSC-3530 Programs and Services for Older Adults and Caregivers
This course is an examination of the diverse array of programs and services designed for older adults, and caregivers of older adults, from a legislative, consumer, and provider perspective. Students will gain insight into these programs and services including their place in the array of services for older adults and the implications of such programs and services for older adults, caregivers, and society. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 114
3 hours credit
FSC-3540 Kinship and Family
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Anthropology 3520). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
FSC-3610 Current Issues in Children's Health and Development
This course is an advanced study of current issues and research in children's health and development in a family context. Emphasis is placed on the promotion of healthy behaviours and development of children by exploring the linkages between research, policy, and practice.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3620 Family Violence
This course will examine the history and various definitions and theories used in investigating the problem of family violence across the life span (i.e. children in abusive families, dating violence, intimate partner violence, the abuse of older adults). Emphasis will be placed on violence against women and violence in diverse family forms. A particular emphasis will be placed on examining strategies for the prevention of family violence over the life course. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3810 Professional Practice With Children and Families
This course is designed to inform students of the range of professional practice issues confronted by helping professionals working with children, youth, adults and their families. The complexities of working with diverse populations with regard to professional ethics, standards of practice and advocacy are examined. Additional topics include: managing the field placement experience, professional roles, peer learning, reflective practice and portfolio development. Students gain experience in areas of professional practice with children, youth, adults of all ages, and their families through a field placement experience. Three lecture hours for first 4 weeks; for balance of semester 1 lecture hour per week and 32 hours field placement. Restriction: Student must have third year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies.
3 hours credit
FSC-3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3820). Three lecture hours per week and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3830 Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
This course is a study of how public policy shapes the context in which families live, and, in turn, influences human and family development. Topics include the relationship between family functioning and public policies at the local, provincial, and federal levels; the influence of demographic changes, values, attitudes, and perceptions of the well-being of children and families on public policy debates; the effectiveness of policies and programs from a family perspective; the policy making process; and the different roles professionals play in influencing policy development. Special attention is given to the consequences of various policies on current family issues. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3840 Women, Economics and the Economy
This course examines the treatment of women by the discipline of economics from both mainstream and feminist perspectives. It includes a review of the feminist critique of traditional economics, as well as an examination of the economic literature pertaining to women and women's activities. Topics include women in the workforce and the economic analysis of fertility, marriage and divorce, and household production. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Economics 3810). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420
3 hours credit
FSC-3950 Gender and Violence
This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Psychology 3950).
3 hours credit
FSC-4090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
FSC-4110 Field Placement I
This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self- awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement. Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810, Family Science 3820 and fourth year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies
3 hours credit
FSC-4120 Field Placement II
This course is a continuation of Family Science 4110 and provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self-awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement. Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 4110
3 hours credit
FSC-4310 Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 4310). Three lecture hours
3 hours credit
FSC-4400 Senior Undergraduate Research Project
This course allows senior students majoring in Family Science to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department. Six semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must have fourth year standing in the Family Science or Child and Family Studies programs.
3 hours credit
FSC-4410 Directed Studies
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Family Science
3 hours credit
FSC-4420 Directed Studies
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Family Science
3 hours credit
FSC-4510 Women and Aging
This course examines older women's diverse experiences in today's families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 4510) Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or at least one introductory DSJS course.
3 hours credit
FSC-4710 Parent-Child Interaction
This course is a study of the developmental nature of parenting throughout the life cycle from birth through aging, with emphasis on the reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions. It includes parenting in various family structures, in various lifestyles, in high-risk families, in families with exceptional children, and in families from diverse cultures. Alternative approaches to parenting (e.g. adoption and assisted reproduction) are discussed. Contemporary strategies for parent guidance and education are introduced. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or Kinesiology 2410
3 hours credit
FSC-4910 Human Sexuality
This course is an examination of the psychological, social, and physiological aspects of sexual development throughout life. Aspects of human sexuality including reproduction, influence on relationships, gender issues, sexual orientation, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual values and decision-making are covered. Students examine current sexuality education methodologies. Implications for future trends in human interaction are analyzed. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit

Calendar Courses

1000 Level

FSC-1140 Families in Contemporary Society
This course is an introduction to the study of families and contemporary issues facing today's families. Topics include changing family structures, current trends in Canadian families, the interaction of families with other systems, and theories used to study families. The course also includes an introduction to family life education including the philosophy, nature and purpose of family education. Three lecture hours Note: BCFS students are not able to credit FSC 1140 as an elective.
3 hours credit

2000 Level

FSC-2210 Family Resource Management
This course is a study of the management process and how it relates to decision making and resource use by individuals and families. Topics include management history and theories; values and goals; resources; planning and decision making. The management of stress and fatigue, time, finances and environ- mental resources are also discussed. Students gain experience in the application of theory to a variety of individual and family managerial situations. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or admission to the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies
3 hours credit
FSC-2410 Human Development
This course explores human development from conception to old age, including physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects. Topics include attachment across the lifespan; various theories used to study human development; gender; the aging process; and societal factors affecting human development. The reciprocal relationship between human development and their environments is emphasized. Cross-listed with Kinesiology 2410) Three lecture hours NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 2010.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140, or permission from the instructor for students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies Program
3 hours credit
FSC-2420 Dynamics of Family Living
This course examines the multiple realities of living in families. Using current theory and research in family science, it focuses on family diversity extending across history, gender, nationality, culture, and age. The course covers crucial issues such as family stress, later-life families, family violence, the work-family interface, parenting, and other areas of family living. The effects of legislation, and social economics and technical change on families are discussed. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or registration in the Child and Family Studies Program
3 hours credit
FSC-2430 Social Psychology
This course focuses on the ways in which an individual's thoughts, feelings, and actions are influenced by the social environment. It provides an introduction to major theories, principles, methods and findings of the discipline. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, gender, attraction, aggression, helping, conformity, obedience, group interaction, and cultural influences. Through a variety of assignments students are encouraged to attend to the operation of social psychological principles in daily living. The course includes both lectures and participation in group experiences. (Cross-listed with Sociology 2820 and Psychology 2420). (Offered in both semesters) Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: FSC-1140
3 hours credit
FSC-2440 Philosophies of Love and Sexuality
This course explores philosophical issues related to love and sexuality as constructed and experienced in particular cultural and historical contexts in Anglo-American culture. Topics may include analysis of love and sexuality as portrayed in music, literature, film and art; kinds of love; conceptions of self and community underlying different accounts of love; sexual activity as expressive, communicative, sacred, profane, athletic, goal-oriented; the commodification of sex; competing conceptions of sexual health and sexual liberation; conservative, liberal, radical and feminist perspectives; ethical issues in intimate relation- ships, families, sex-trade work and pornography. (Cross-listed with Philosophy 2420 and Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2420). Lecture: Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140
3 hours credit
FSC-2610 Communications
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of communication. The course balances communication theory and research with skills acquisition and practice to help students communicate more effectively in a variety of professional settings. Students are provided with an opportunity to develop skills in interpersonal and group communication, public speaking, and interviewing. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition 2610). Three lecture hours Restriction: Student must have at least second year standing in Foods and Nutrition, or Radiography,or Kinesiology OR be granted permission of the instructor.
3 hours credit

3000 Level

FSC-3050 Adolescent Development and Adjustment
This course examines both the research and theoretical perspectives in areas that are integral to an understanding of the period of adolescence and of adolescents themselves. We address the following areas: puberty and psychobiology; the development of cognition and social cognition; the formation of identity, including career options, and the development of sexuality and a system of values, factors that influence the formation of identity, such as the family, the peer group, and the media, the school experience; and issues in adolescent development such as some aspects of psychopathology, juvenile justice, and the problems encountered by indigenous youth. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3050). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: FSC-3810
3 hours credit
FSC-3080 Child Development
This course explores children's development in depth by focussing on the various domains of change from birth to adolescence. Themes of change and stability throughout childhood are examined using analytical and descriptive theories of development. Implications of developmental approaches are examined for practice and public policy domains. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to assess critically these developmental changes and to apply that understanding to other contexts. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3080). Three hours a week NOTE: Students who have taken either 3040 or 3410 will not be eligible to enrol in 3080 without the instructor's permission.
REQUISITE: Family Sceince 3810
3 hours credit
FSC-3090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 3000 level.
3 hours credit
FSC-3100 Adult Development
The purpose of this course is to better understand adult development by focussing on themes of change and stability from young adulthood through to older adulthood. Students use analytical and descriptive theories of adult development to explore how adults negotiate physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development. Lectures, in-class assignments, and research projects are designed to encourage students to evaluate critically the contemporary research in adult development and to apply their understanding of adult development to a wide array of contexts and policy environments. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3090). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
FSC-3310 Introduction to Research Methods
This course is an introduction to research intended to enable students to read critically and evaluate current research. Students are introduced to various types of research designs, research terminology, and the components of the research process. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3310) NOTE: Preference for admission will be given to students registered in the Family Science, Foods and Nutrition, Child and Family Studies, Kinesiology or Radiography programs. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Statistics 1210
3 hours credit
FSC-3440 Intimate Relationships
This course is designed to examine a variety of areas of study within the field of intimate relationships. Through in-class discussion of the major theoretical frameworks of the discipline and by designing their own original relationship research proposals, students will gain an increased understanding of the multifaceted nature of intimate relationships. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: attraction, social cognition, interdependency, conflict, and love. (Cross-listed with Psychology 3420).
PREREQUISITE: FSC-3810 AND PSY-2420
3 hours credit
FSC-3530 Programs and Services for Older Adults and Caregivers
This course is an examination of the diverse array of programs and services designed for older adults, and caregivers of older adults, from a legislative, consumer, and provider perspective. Students will gain insight into these programs and services including their place in the array of services for older adults and the implications of such programs and services for older adults, caregivers, and society. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 114
3 hours credit
FSC-3540 Kinship and Family
A cross-cultural examination of marriage, family, descent groups and kin-like groups with the fundamental objective of understanding the primary and natural features of human values and organization, and their variations. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Anthropology 3520). Three hours a week
3 hours credit
FSC-3610 Current Issues in Children's Health and Development
This course is an advanced study of current issues and research in children's health and development in a family context. Emphasis is placed on the promotion of healthy behaviours and development of children by exploring the linkages between research, policy, and practice.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3620 Family Violence
This course will examine the history and various definitions and theories used in investigating the problem of family violence across the life span (i.e. children in abusive families, dating violence, intimate partner violence, the abuse of older adults). Emphasis will be placed on violence against women and violence in diverse family forms. A particular emphasis will be placed on examining strategies for the prevention of family violence over the life course. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3810 Professional Practice With Children and Families
This course is designed to inform students of the range of professional practice issues confronted by helping professionals working with children, youth, adults and their families. The complexities of working with diverse populations with regard to professional ethics, standards of practice and advocacy are examined. Additional topics include: managing the field placement experience, professional roles, peer learning, reflective practice and portfolio development. Students gain experience in areas of professional practice with children, youth, adults of all ages, and their families through a field placement experience. Three lecture hours for first 4 weeks; for balance of semester 1 lecture hour per week and 32 hours field placement. Restriction: Student must have third year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies.
3 hours credit
FSC-3820 Program Planning and Evaluation
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3820). Three lecture hours per week and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3830 Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
This course is a study of how public policy shapes the context in which families live, and, in turn, influences human and family development. Topics include the relationship between family functioning and public policies at the local, provincial, and federal levels; the influence of demographic changes, values, attitudes, and perceptions of the well-being of children and families on public policy debates; the effectiveness of policies and programs from a family perspective; the policy making process; and the different roles professionals play in influencing policy development. Special attention is given to the consequences of various policies on current family issues. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
FSC-3840 Women, Economics and the Economy
This course examines the treatment of women by the discipline of economics from both mainstream and feminist perspectives. It includes a review of the feminist critique of traditional economics, as well as an examination of the economic literature pertaining to women and women's activities. Topics include women in the workforce and the economic analysis of fertility, marriage and divorce, and household production. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Economics 3810). Three hours a week
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420
3 hours credit
FSC-3950 Gender and Violence
This course investigates the role of gender in violence and abuse. Adopting a critical perspective, the course considers the limitations of mainstream social constructions of forms of gender-based violence. Topics for consideration may include offenses such as domestic violence, stranger and acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. The course also explores how traditional, heteronormative understandings of domestic violence may fail to reflect accurately the experience of violence in GLBT relationships. Consideration is given to the psychological consequences of victimization, as well as to how societal institutions could better address the needs of both victims and offenders. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies/Psychology 3950).
3 hours credit

4000 Level

FSC-4090 Special Topics
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 4000 level.
3 hours credit
FSC-4110 Field Placement I
This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self- awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement. Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810, Family Science 3820 and fourth year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies
3 hours credit
FSC-4120 Field Placement II
This course is a continuation of Family Science 4110 and provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self-awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement. Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 4110
3 hours credit
FSC-4310 Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice. (Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 4310). Three lecture hours
3 hours credit
FSC-4400 Senior Undergraduate Research Project
This course allows senior students majoring in Family Science to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department. Six semester hours of credit. Restriction: Student must have fourth year standing in the Family Science or Child and Family Studies programs.
3 hours credit
FSC-4410 Directed Studies
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Family Science
3 hours credit
FSC-4420 Directed Studies
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing and 12 credit hours in the Department of Family Science
3 hours credit
FSC-4510 Women and Aging
This course examines older women's diverse experiences in today's families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored. (Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 4510) Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or at least one introductory DSJS course.
3 hours credit
FSC-4710 Parent-Child Interaction
This course is a study of the developmental nature of parenting throughout the life cycle from birth through aging, with emphasis on the reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions. It includes parenting in various family structures, in various lifestyles, in high-risk families, in families with exceptional children, and in families from diverse cultures. Alternative approaches to parenting (e.g. adoption and assisted reproduction) are discussed. Contemporary strategies for parent guidance and education are introduced. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or Kinesiology 2410
3 hours credit
FSC-4910 Human Sexuality
This course is an examination of the psychological, social, and physiological aspects of sexual development throughout life. Aspects of human sexuality including reproduction, influence on relationships, gender issues, sexual orientation, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual values and decision-making are covered. Students examine current sexuality education methodologies. Implications for future trends in human interaction are analyzed. Three lecture hours
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
3 hours credit
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