A self-directed BEd for adult educators.

Bachelor of Education (Human Resource Development)

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First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Post-secondary Instructor
  • Human Resources Professional
  • Teacher in Language Instruction Programs
  • Career and Technical Education Teacher
The Faculty of Education is located in Memorial Hall.
(902) 628-4353

The Bachelor of Education in Human Resource Development focuses on further developing the knowledge base related to adult learning, developing Prior Learning Recognition and Assessment portfolios, and completing academic credits from UPEI.

The BEd (HRD) is designed for mature individuals who have a combination of at least five years’ education and related vocational/occupational work experience. The applicants have successfully completed the Certificate in Adult Education and have met the requirements of the Faculty of Education. This degree does not certify applicants to teach in the public school system.

The BEd (HRD) is jointly offered by Holland College and UPEI and each institution will offer half of the courses. The BEd (HRD) consists of four stages:

  1. Completion of the Certificate in Adult Education
  2. Three elective adult education courses from Holland College plus one required course: Ed 319 Preparing for PLAR (Prior Learning and Assessment Recognition); and four elective adult education courses offered by UPEI
  3. Prior Learning Recognition and Assessment Portfolio and/ or specific occupational courses offered by Holland College (up to an equivalent of either 10 courses or 30 semester hours).
  4. Ten academic courses (30 semester hours) from UPEI including one of UPEI 101, 102 or 103 and a writing intensive course.

 

Bonnie Stewart, Program Coordinator
BEd (HRD)
Want more information about Bachelor of Education (Human Resource Development)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Post-secondary Instructor
  • Human Resources Professional
  • Teacher in Language Instruction Programs
  • Career and Technical Education Teacher
The Faculty of Education is located in Memorial Hall.
(902) 628-4353

Students may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Education (HRD) through Holland College. Tuition fees are to be paid directly to the institution that is offering the course.

To continue with the BEd (HRD), students must have successfully completed all of the courses in the Certificate in Adult Education and have submitted a written statement of intent and two references to the Faculty of Education. As this is a part-time program and there is continuous intake, students may begin study in September, January, May or July.

Transcript and Credit Assessment

Originally, the Certificate in Adult Education and BEd (Adult Education) were jointly offered by UNB and Holland College. As of September 2006, the CAE and BEd (HRD) programs are now being offered between Holland College and UPEI. Therefore, applicants who are transferring to Holland College and UPEI:

a) will have all UNB credits which were completed in the CAE/BEd (Adult Education) programs accepted by UPEI;
b) will have until 2012 to transfer their credits to UPEI.

In addition:

a) applicants may have taken academic courses from other universities. Courses will be considered for transfer credit based on both the marks achieved (not less than 60%) and the age of completed course. Courses over 10 years old may be deemed inappropriate and may require substitution. Exceptions will be made only with the permission of the Dean or Chair.

b) students who believe that they can meet, or have met, the requirements of a course, may seek UPEI credit by means of challenge for credit, Prior Assessment and Learning Recognition (PLAR), or recognition of Special Credits earned elsewhere (see Academic Regulations 15 & 16).

c) candidates beginning the CAE or BEd (HRD) in 2006 or later must complete one-half of the required course work at UPEI (see Academic Regulation 1e).

Students are urged to complete their degree within 10 years from the date of their first registration.

 

Want more information about Bachelor of Education (Human Resource Development)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers:
  • Post-secondary Instructor
  • Human Resources Professional
  • Teacher in Language Instruction Programs
  • Career and Technical Education Teacher
The Faculty of Education is located in Memorial Hall.
(902) 628-4353

As the courses are offered on a part-time basis and the students are all adult, mature learners, the participants may enrol in courses, and move through the certificate or degree at their own pace. To recognize the various levels of achievement throughout the program, the participants meet various Milestones. Each Milestone has a certain number of courses (both compulsory and elective), and a distinct field of knowledge.

The Certificate in Adult Education (CAE) is the first level of achievement or Milestone One. Upon completion of the CAE, students will graduate, and many will continue taking courses toward a BEd (HRD); for other students the CAE may be the qualification that they need.

For the BEd (HRD), there are three additional Milestones after the CAE.

 

Overview

The Bachelor of Education in Human Resource Development focuses on further developing the knowledge base related to adult learning, developing Prior Learning Recognition and Assessment portfolios, and completing academic credits from UPEI.

The BEd (HRD) is designed for mature individuals who have a combination of at least five years’ education and related vocational/occupational work experience. The applicants have successfully completed the Certificate in Adult Education and have met the requirements of the Faculty of Education. This degree does not certify applicants to teach in the public school system.

The BEd (HRD) is jointly offered by Holland College and UPEI and each institution will offer half of the courses. The BEd (HRD) consists of four stages:

  1. Completion of the Certificate in Adult Education
  2. Three elective adult education courses from Holland College plus one required course: Ed 319 Preparing for PLAR (Prior Learning and Assessment Recognition); and four elective adult education courses offered by UPEI
  3. Prior Learning Recognition and Assessment Portfolio and/ or specific occupational courses offered by Holland College (up to an equivalent of either 10 courses or 30 semester hours).
  4. Ten academic courses (30 semester hours) from UPEI including one of UPEI 101, 102 or 103 and a writing intensive course.

 

BEd (HRD)
Bonnie Stewart, Program Coordinator
Admissions

Students may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Education (HRD) through Holland College. Tuition fees are to be paid directly to the institution that is offering the course.

To continue with the BEd (HRD), students must have successfully completed all of the courses in the Certificate in Adult Education and have submitted a written statement of intent and two references to the Faculty of Education. As this is a part-time program and there is continuous intake, students may begin study in September, January, May or July.

Transcript and Credit Assessment

Originally, the Certificate in Adult Education and BEd (Adult Education) were jointly offered by UNB and Holland College. As of September 2006, the CAE and BEd (HRD) programs are now being offered between Holland College and UPEI. Therefore, applicants who are transferring to Holland College and UPEI:

a) will have all UNB credits which were completed in the CAE/BEd (Adult Education) programs accepted by UPEI;
b) will have until 2012 to transfer their credits to UPEI.

In addition:

a) applicants may have taken academic courses from other universities. Courses will be considered for transfer credit based on both the marks achieved (not less than 60%) and the age of completed course. Courses over 10 years old may be deemed inappropriate and may require substitution. Exceptions will be made only with the permission of the Dean or Chair.

b) students who believe that they can meet, or have met, the requirements of a course, may seek UPEI credit by means of challenge for credit, Prior Assessment and Learning Recognition (PLAR), or recognition of Special Credits earned elsewhere (see Academic Regulations 15 & 16).

c) candidates beginning the CAE or BEd (HRD) in 2006 or later must complete one-half of the required course work at UPEI (see Academic Regulation 1e).

Students are urged to complete their degree within 10 years from the date of their first registration.

 

Milestones

As the courses are offered on a part-time basis and the students are all adult, mature learners, the participants may enrol in courses, and move through the certificate or degree at their own pace. To recognize the various levels of achievement throughout the program, the participants meet various Milestones. Each Milestone has a certain number of courses (both compulsory and elective), and a distinct field of knowledge.

The Certificate in Adult Education (CAE) is the first level of achievement or Milestone One. Upon completion of the CAE, students will graduate, and many will continue taking courses toward a BEd (HRD); for other students the CAE may be the qualification that they need.

For the BEd (HRD), there are three additional Milestones after the CAE.

 

Overview

The Bachelor of Education in Human Resource Development focuses on further developing the knowledge base related to adult learning, developing Prior Learning Recognition and Assessment portfolios, and completing academic credits from UPEI.

The BEd (HRD) is designed for mature individuals who have a combination of at least five years’ education and related vocational/occupational work experience. The applicants have successfully completed the Certificate in Adult Education and have met the requirements of the Faculty of Education. This degree does not certify applicants to teach in the public school system.

The BEd (HRD) is jointly offered by Holland College and UPEI and each institution will offer half of the courses. The BEd (HRD) consists of four stages:

  1. Completion of the Certificate in Adult Education
  2. Three elective adult education courses from Holland College plus one required course: Ed 319 Preparing for PLAR (Prior Learning and Assessment Recognition); and four elective adult education courses offered by UPEI
  3. Prior Learning Recognition and Assessment Portfolio and/ or specific occupational courses offered by Holland College (up to an equivalent of either 10 courses or 30 semester hours).
  4. Ten academic courses (30 semester hours) from UPEI including one of UPEI 101, 102 or 103 and a writing intensive course.

 

Bonnie Stewart, Program Coordinator
BEd (HRD)

Admissions

Students may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Education (HRD) through Holland College. Tuition fees are to be paid directly to the institution that is offering the course.

To continue with the BEd (HRD), students must have successfully completed all of the courses in the Certificate in Adult Education and have submitted a written statement of intent and two references to the Faculty of Education. As this is a part-time program and there is continuous intake, students may begin study in September, January, May or July.

Transcript and Credit Assessment

Originally, the Certificate in Adult Education and BEd (Adult Education) were jointly offered by UNB and Holland College. As of September 2006, the CAE and BEd (HRD) programs are now being offered between Holland College and UPEI. Therefore, applicants who are transferring to Holland College and UPEI:

a) will have all UNB credits which were completed in the CAE/BEd (Adult Education) programs accepted by UPEI;
b) will have until 2012 to transfer their credits to UPEI.

In addition:

a) applicants may have taken academic courses from other universities. Courses will be considered for transfer credit based on both the marks achieved (not less than 60%) and the age of completed course. Courses over 10 years old may be deemed inappropriate and may require substitution. Exceptions will be made only with the permission of the Dean or Chair.

b) students who believe that they can meet, or have met, the requirements of a course, may seek UPEI credit by means of challenge for credit, Prior Assessment and Learning Recognition (PLAR), or recognition of Special Credits earned elsewhere (see Academic Regulations 15 & 16).

c) candidates beginning the CAE or BEd (HRD) in 2006 or later must complete one-half of the required course work at UPEI (see Academic Regulation 1e).

Students are urged to complete their degree within 10 years from the date of their first registration.

 

Milestones

As the courses are offered on a part-time basis and the students are all adult, mature learners, the participants may enrol in courses, and move through the certificate or degree at their own pace. To recognize the various levels of achievement throughout the program, the participants meet various Milestones. Each Milestone has a certain number of courses (both compulsory and elective), and a distinct field of knowledge.

The Certificate in Adult Education (CAE) is the first level of achievement or Milestone One. Upon completion of the CAE, students will graduate, and many will continue taking courses toward a BEd (HRD); for other students the CAE may be the qualification that they need.

For the BEd (HRD), there are three additional Milestones after the CAE.

 

Want more information about Bachelor of Education (Human Resource Development)? Leave your email address and we'll get in touch!
First Name:
Last Name:
E-mail:
Careers: 
Post-secondary Instructor
Human Resources Professional
Teacher in Language Instruction Programs
Career and Technical Education Teacher
Course Level: 
Milestone 1
Courses: 

The Certificate in Adult Education (CAE) is the first level of achievement or Milestone One. Upon completion of the CAE, students will graduate, and some will continue toward a BEd (HRD); for other students the CAE may be the qualification that they need.

ED 311 AN INTRODUCTION TO METHODS AND STRATEGIES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines key topics in applied terms to prepare new instructors for the first year of teaching. Topics include: planning instructional segments; writing objectives; evaluating students, programs and teaching; using and assessing teaching strategies, audio-visual aids and learning resources. Students will participate in micro-teaching activities.

ED 301 PRACTICUM IN ADULT EDUCATION
Practical, field based learning based on an individualized learning contract and completed in actual teaching/ learning settings. The intent of the practicum is to help learners participate in the delivery of adult education and develop the teaching, observational, critical and reflective skills required for employment in the adult education field. (Pre-requisite ED 311)

ED 362 COMMUNICATION PRACTICES
This course covers both interpersonal and group communication skills necessary for adult learning. It teaches students to express thoughts and ideas in clear, well-defined terms both orally and in writing. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in active listening, public speaking, and small group facilitation, as well as in understanding the variables that affect human communication. Participants are encouraged to identify their own communication challenges through study, research, presentation, and self-reflection.

ED 363 THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the principles and processes of adult learning.  Topics covered include learning styles, personal experiences, social and cultural factors that affect learning, learning in formal and non-formal environments, and the characteristics of adult learners.

364 ASSESSMENT OF ADULT LEARNING
This course examines general principles, processes, and techniques of assessment and evaluation that meet the needs of the instructors, learners, and stakeholders. New assessment techniques in the psychomotor domain are expected.  Students develop practical experience in designing and implementing strategies for identifying learners’ needs and assessing learning outcomes in the adult, technological, and/or business sectors.
Three hours a week

ED 422 METHODS AND STRATEGIES: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOR ONLINE LEARNING
This course provides the foundational skills necessary for designing and delivering a course on-line. Students explore different online learning platforms, compile content, and develop teaching strategies and authentic assessments appropriate to the on-line learning environment. (Pre-requisite ED 311)

3 EDUCATION ELECTIVES (from ED 308, ED 366, ED 368, and ED 373).

 

Course Level: 
Milestone 2
Courses: 

Milestone Two provides more depth and breadth to the issues related to adult education, adult learning, and the application of the skills and knowledge learned in Milestone One.

ED 319 CAREER AND LEARNING PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
This course is designed to review and clarify a student’s learning and career objectives, and to document and demonstrate experiential learning. Learners understand the various purposes of portfolios; know the conventions of developing and professionally presenting a portfolio; and are capable of articulating acquired learning in job descriptions or degree requirements.

7 EDUCATION ELECTIVES

Course Level: 
Milestone 3
Courses: 

The purpose of Milestone Three is to establish recognition of an occupational specialization. During Milestone Three, an assessment panel will review a portfolio to examine and potentially award credit for work, life, and education experiences in the occupational specialization in which the participant intends to teach or seek employment.

ED 394 OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALIZATION / PLAR
The purpose of Milestone Three is to establish recognition of an occupational specialization. During Milestone Three, an assessment panel will review a portfolio to examine and potentially award credit for work, life, and education experiences in the occupational specialization in which the participant intends to teach or seek employment. This component of the BEd (HRD) program identified as Occupational Specialization or PLAR represents the candidate's content expertise.

Course Level: 
Milestone 4
Courses: 

In Milestone Four, students may explore academic courses offered in various faculties at UPEI. Students may choose courses that relate to personal interest or that meet his/her educational plan.

The following are descriptions of the adult education courses that UPEI can offer as elective courses. Note that elective courses are not offered every year.

307 ETHICS FOR ADULT PRACTITIONERS
This course examines professional ethics in the practice of adult education by: exploring the meanings of “professional” and “ethics” in the context of adult education; discussing the ideas and skills that assist adult educators in applying professional ethics to their practice; examining current codes of ethics for adult educators; and, creating individual statements of ethical practice.

308 INTEGRATING ACTIVITY BASED LEARNING IN ADULT EDUCATION
In this course, learners explore theoretical aspects supporting activity based learning, reflect on personal teaching frameworks, examine and customize a variety of strategies designed to make learning and training active. Using these foundations, participants expand their teaching repertoires by integrating activity based learning with active training, team learning, peer teaching and independent learning, and develop lesson plans and units to be used in adult learning environments.

309 AN INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE
Fostering a learning culture at work is a complex process with many competing demands on both workers and those who train and manage them. This course will introduce participants to current issues and trends affecting workplace learning; key theories of learning, learning styles and motivation for learning in relation to the workplace; core competencies associated with workplace learning; the role of informal training programs and informal learning (communities of practice, mentoring etc.); and process models for workplace learning. Participants will apply their learning and design a workplace learning program that addresses a key issue and concern in their organization.

311 INTRODUCTION TO DISTANCE LEARNING
This course provides an orientation to the methodologies and varieties of distance education approaches currently available. Students explore learning technologies related to distance education in the form of e-learning, video conferencing, audio conferencing, etc., and apply them to adult learning contexts.

312 APPLIED RESEARCH IN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
In this practical course, students review the fundamental requirements to building a successful applied research group at a post secondary educational institution. Topics covered include: national setting, institutional context, funding, communication, management, staffing, student involvement, industry partners, and community economic development. As applied research complements the teaching activities at post-secondary institutions, in this course, each student develops and presents an applied research proposal suitable for submission to a funding agency.

313 ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION
This interactive course explores the current state of adult education in Canada and the statutory framework that largely determines the direction and capacity of the discipline and practice of adult education. Students examine the mandates and variety of provider agencies (adult learning associations, literacy networks, community-based and public education agencies, adult high schools, community colleges). The funding of adult education and the constitutional requirements of governments in Canada are considered. As well, the nature of regional differences and needs (e.g. economic and social development) and how the geography and demography of the Canadian landscape challenges the framework and delivery of adult education are discussed.

314 SOCIOLOGY OF ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines the social and political structures that have an impact on adult education. Students explore the influence of these structures in shaping public policy on adult education, and discuss their significance for program development and implementation.
Three hours a week

315 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING FOR THE ADULT EDUCATOR
In this course, students in the adult education context further refine their communication skills. Students will develop greater proficiency and effectiveness in oral communication. The assignments emphasize the writing process; the clear and correct use of the English language in developing reflective and critical thought; and writing in various genres, including research, professional documents, and correspondence.

365 COUNSELLING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces students to the social and emotional development of adult learners, and explores the theoretical principles underlying vocational and personal counselling. It focuses on the development of practical application of counselling methods.

366 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces learners to some of the most exciting and evolving computer technologies and features currently used in online instruction. Learners will examine the integration of current and future online computer technologies into today's and tomorrow's classroom. The course will provide an overview of current computer based technology (e.g. multimedia applications, streaming audio,streaming video, online audio chat, online discussion forums, web conferencing, blogs as well as other evolving technologies). Learners will self explore these computer technologies in order to better prepare themselves and enable them to deal with online educational technologies used in the classroom.

367 ENTREPRENEURIAL EDUCATION
This course introduces adult learners to the principles of entrepreneurial education.  Students identify enterprising opportunities, and gain experience in planning and facilitating learning by using specialized software to create enterprising educational ventures.
Three hours a week

368 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on curriculum development beginning with needs identification, content planning and research, leading to lesson design and delivery. Students develop an understanding of provincial outcomes and standards.  Students assess learners’ needs, set appropriate outcomes, plan methodologies and resources, implement program plans, evaluate learning, and reflect on teaching effectiveness.
Three hours a week

369 ISSUES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course introduces students to contemporary trends (e.g., societal, economic, political, and social trends), and diversity in the workplace. Also explored is the role of adult educators as change agents in shaping the fields of training, development, and adult education.
Three hours a week

371 INTRODUCTION TO ADULT EDUCATION
This course surveys the theories and historical practice of the adult education movement. It examines the characteristics of adult education in a variety of contexts, with particular emphasis on Canadian and provincial initiatives and challenges. Changing needs across a wide range of institutional settings within the field of adult education are identified and discussed.
Three hours a week

372 FACILITATING LITERACY IN ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students learn to apply the principles of adult learning and current theory and research to adult literacy settings. The course examines various instructional strategies and techniques that develop language and literacy skills in large or small groups, or in the context of coaching. There is recognition that barriers to literacy learning exist and that educators must understand not only the theory and practice of literacy but also the needs and goals of the individuals in a social learning environment.
Three hours a week

373 SPECIAL NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students are introduced to inclusive education and become aware of the issues and characteristics of adults with special needs. The course gives an overview of some common learning difficulties and challenges. It also provides suggestions for teaching strategies to encourage adults to learn from their strengths and increase independence. Of particular interest is the use of assistive technology, self-advocacy, and awareness of services available to adult learners. Also explored are secondary issues related to special needs and adults.
Three hours a week

374 TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
This course presents the theoretical foundation of transformative learning and transformational education, with an emphasis on practical application. It encompasses principles of adult learning coupled with teaching practices that establish leader empowerment. The role of a transformative educator is explored as a paradigm and establishes critical self-reflection as an essential component of teaching practice. Students should be prepared to examine their educational beliefs, values, and assumptions, and the impact of those beliefs on teaching practice.
Three hours a week

375 MENTORING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines effective methods of mentoring adult students in various contexts. The qualities, techniques, and necessary formal structures in facilitated mentoring relationships are studied using readings, case studies, discussion, presentations, and modelling. Students understand the depth of mentoring adults to the extent that individuals perform the role of mentor or assist others in a structured mentoring program.
Three hours a week

395 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADULT EDUCATION
Students investigate special topics that have particular reference to the fields of adult education, technological training and development, trades education, and other related areas. Students are expected to explore and research an approved topic of their choice.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

Calendar Courses

The Certificate in Adult Education (CAE) is the first level of achievement or Milestone One. Upon completion of the CAE, students will graduate, and some will continue toward a BEd (HRD); for other students the CAE may be the qualification that they need.

ED 311 AN INTRODUCTION TO METHODS AND STRATEGIES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines key topics in applied terms to prepare new instructors for the first year of teaching. Topics include: planning instructional segments; writing objectives; evaluating students, programs and teaching; using and assessing teaching strategies, audio-visual aids and learning resources. Students will participate in micro-teaching activities.

ED 301 PRACTICUM IN ADULT EDUCATION
Practical, field based learning based on an individualized learning contract and completed in actual teaching/ learning settings. The intent of the practicum is to help learners participate in the delivery of adult education and develop the teaching, observational, critical and reflective skills required for employment in the adult education field. (Pre-requisite ED 311)

ED 362 COMMUNICATION PRACTICES
This course covers both interpersonal and group communication skills necessary for adult learning. It teaches students to express thoughts and ideas in clear, well-defined terms both orally and in writing. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in active listening, public speaking, and small group facilitation, as well as in understanding the variables that affect human communication. Participants are encouraged to identify their own communication challenges through study, research, presentation, and self-reflection.

ED 363 THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the principles and processes of adult learning.  Topics covered include learning styles, personal experiences, social and cultural factors that affect learning, learning in formal and non-formal environments, and the characteristics of adult learners.

364 ASSESSMENT OF ADULT LEARNING
This course examines general principles, processes, and techniques of assessment and evaluation that meet the needs of the instructors, learners, and stakeholders. New assessment techniques in the psychomotor domain are expected.  Students develop practical experience in designing and implementing strategies for identifying learners’ needs and assessing learning outcomes in the adult, technological, and/or business sectors.
Three hours a week

ED 422 METHODS AND STRATEGIES: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOR ONLINE LEARNING
This course provides the foundational skills necessary for designing and delivering a course on-line. Students explore different online learning platforms, compile content, and develop teaching strategies and authentic assessments appropriate to the on-line learning environment. (Pre-requisite ED 311)

3 EDUCATION ELECTIVES (from ED 308, ED 366, ED 368, and ED 373).

 

Milestone Two provides more depth and breadth to the issues related to adult education, adult learning, and the application of the skills and knowledge learned in Milestone One.

ED 319 CAREER AND LEARNING PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
This course is designed to review and clarify a student’s learning and career objectives, and to document and demonstrate experiential learning. Learners understand the various purposes of portfolios; know the conventions of developing and professionally presenting a portfolio; and are capable of articulating acquired learning in job descriptions or degree requirements.

7 EDUCATION ELECTIVES

The purpose of Milestone Three is to establish recognition of an occupational specialization. During Milestone Three, an assessment panel will review a portfolio to examine and potentially award credit for work, life, and education experiences in the occupational specialization in which the participant intends to teach or seek employment.

ED 394 OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALIZATION / PLAR
The purpose of Milestone Three is to establish recognition of an occupational specialization. During Milestone Three, an assessment panel will review a portfolio to examine and potentially award credit for work, life, and education experiences in the occupational specialization in which the participant intends to teach or seek employment. This component of the BEd (HRD) program identified as Occupational Specialization or PLAR represents the candidate's content expertise.

In Milestone Four, students may explore academic courses offered in various faculties at UPEI. Students may choose courses that relate to personal interest or that meet his/her educational plan.

The following are descriptions of the adult education courses that UPEI can offer as elective courses. Note that elective courses are not offered every year.

307 ETHICS FOR ADULT PRACTITIONERS
This course examines professional ethics in the practice of adult education by: exploring the meanings of “professional” and “ethics” in the context of adult education; discussing the ideas and skills that assist adult educators in applying professional ethics to their practice; examining current codes of ethics for adult educators; and, creating individual statements of ethical practice.

308 INTEGRATING ACTIVITY BASED LEARNING IN ADULT EDUCATION
In this course, learners explore theoretical aspects supporting activity based learning, reflect on personal teaching frameworks, examine and customize a variety of strategies designed to make learning and training active. Using these foundations, participants expand their teaching repertoires by integrating activity based learning with active training, team learning, peer teaching and independent learning, and develop lesson plans and units to be used in adult learning environments.

309 AN INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE
Fostering a learning culture at work is a complex process with many competing demands on both workers and those who train and manage them. This course will introduce participants to current issues and trends affecting workplace learning; key theories of learning, learning styles and motivation for learning in relation to the workplace; core competencies associated with workplace learning; the role of informal training programs and informal learning (communities of practice, mentoring etc.); and process models for workplace learning. Participants will apply their learning and design a workplace learning program that addresses a key issue and concern in their organization.

311 INTRODUCTION TO DISTANCE LEARNING
This course provides an orientation to the methodologies and varieties of distance education approaches currently available. Students explore learning technologies related to distance education in the form of e-learning, video conferencing, audio conferencing, etc., and apply them to adult learning contexts.

312 APPLIED RESEARCH IN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
In this practical course, students review the fundamental requirements to building a successful applied research group at a post secondary educational institution. Topics covered include: national setting, institutional context, funding, communication, management, staffing, student involvement, industry partners, and community economic development. As applied research complements the teaching activities at post-secondary institutions, in this course, each student develops and presents an applied research proposal suitable for submission to a funding agency.

313 ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION
This interactive course explores the current state of adult education in Canada and the statutory framework that largely determines the direction and capacity of the discipline and practice of adult education. Students examine the mandates and variety of provider agencies (adult learning associations, literacy networks, community-based and public education agencies, adult high schools, community colleges). The funding of adult education and the constitutional requirements of governments in Canada are considered. As well, the nature of regional differences and needs (e.g. economic and social development) and how the geography and demography of the Canadian landscape challenges the framework and delivery of adult education are discussed.

314 SOCIOLOGY OF ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines the social and political structures that have an impact on adult education. Students explore the influence of these structures in shaping public policy on adult education, and discuss their significance for program development and implementation.
Three hours a week

315 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING FOR THE ADULT EDUCATOR
In this course, students in the adult education context further refine their communication skills. Students will develop greater proficiency and effectiveness in oral communication. The assignments emphasize the writing process; the clear and correct use of the English language in developing reflective and critical thought; and writing in various genres, including research, professional documents, and correspondence.

365 COUNSELLING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces students to the social and emotional development of adult learners, and explores the theoretical principles underlying vocational and personal counselling. It focuses on the development of practical application of counselling methods.

366 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces learners to some of the most exciting and evolving computer technologies and features currently used in online instruction. Learners will examine the integration of current and future online computer technologies into today's and tomorrow's classroom. The course will provide an overview of current computer based technology (e.g. multimedia applications, streaming audio,streaming video, online audio chat, online discussion forums, web conferencing, blogs as well as other evolving technologies). Learners will self explore these computer technologies in order to better prepare themselves and enable them to deal with online educational technologies used in the classroom.

367 ENTREPRENEURIAL EDUCATION
This course introduces adult learners to the principles of entrepreneurial education.  Students identify enterprising opportunities, and gain experience in planning and facilitating learning by using specialized software to create enterprising educational ventures.
Three hours a week

368 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on curriculum development beginning with needs identification, content planning and research, leading to lesson design and delivery. Students develop an understanding of provincial outcomes and standards.  Students assess learners’ needs, set appropriate outcomes, plan methodologies and resources, implement program plans, evaluate learning, and reflect on teaching effectiveness.
Three hours a week

369 ISSUES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course introduces students to contemporary trends (e.g., societal, economic, political, and social trends), and diversity in the workplace. Also explored is the role of adult educators as change agents in shaping the fields of training, development, and adult education.
Three hours a week

371 INTRODUCTION TO ADULT EDUCATION
This course surveys the theories and historical practice of the adult education movement. It examines the characteristics of adult education in a variety of contexts, with particular emphasis on Canadian and provincial initiatives and challenges. Changing needs across a wide range of institutional settings within the field of adult education are identified and discussed.
Three hours a week

372 FACILITATING LITERACY IN ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students learn to apply the principles of adult learning and current theory and research to adult literacy settings. The course examines various instructional strategies and techniques that develop language and literacy skills in large or small groups, or in the context of coaching. There is recognition that barriers to literacy learning exist and that educators must understand not only the theory and practice of literacy but also the needs and goals of the individuals in a social learning environment.
Three hours a week

373 SPECIAL NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students are introduced to inclusive education and become aware of the issues and characteristics of adults with special needs. The course gives an overview of some common learning difficulties and challenges. It also provides suggestions for teaching strategies to encourage adults to learn from their strengths and increase independence. Of particular interest is the use of assistive technology, self-advocacy, and awareness of services available to adult learners. Also explored are secondary issues related to special needs and adults.
Three hours a week

374 TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
This course presents the theoretical foundation of transformative learning and transformational education, with an emphasis on practical application. It encompasses principles of adult learning coupled with teaching practices that establish leader empowerment. The role of a transformative educator is explored as a paradigm and establishes critical self-reflection as an essential component of teaching practice. Students should be prepared to examine their educational beliefs, values, and assumptions, and the impact of those beliefs on teaching practice.
Three hours a week

375 MENTORING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines effective methods of mentoring adult students in various contexts. The qualities, techniques, and necessary formal structures in facilitated mentoring relationships are studied using readings, case studies, discussion, presentations, and modelling. Students understand the depth of mentoring adults to the extent that individuals perform the role of mentor or assist others in a structured mentoring program.
Three hours a week

395 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADULT EDUCATION
Students investigate special topics that have particular reference to the fields of adult education, technological training and development, trades education, and other related areas. Students are expected to explore and research an approved topic of their choice.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

Calendar Courses

Milestone 1

The Certificate in Adult Education (CAE) is the first level of achievement or Milestone One. Upon completion of the CAE, students will graduate, and some will continue toward a BEd (HRD); for other students the CAE may be the qualification that they need.

ED 311 AN INTRODUCTION TO METHODS AND STRATEGIES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines key topics in applied terms to prepare new instructors for the first year of teaching. Topics include: planning instructional segments; writing objectives; evaluating students, programs and teaching; using and assessing teaching strategies, audio-visual aids and learning resources. Students will participate in micro-teaching activities.

ED 301 PRACTICUM IN ADULT EDUCATION
Practical, field based learning based on an individualized learning contract and completed in actual teaching/ learning settings. The intent of the practicum is to help learners participate in the delivery of adult education and develop the teaching, observational, critical and reflective skills required for employment in the adult education field. (Pre-requisite ED 311)

ED 362 COMMUNICATION PRACTICES
This course covers both interpersonal and group communication skills necessary for adult learning. It teaches students to express thoughts and ideas in clear, well-defined terms both orally and in writing. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in active listening, public speaking, and small group facilitation, as well as in understanding the variables that affect human communication. Participants are encouraged to identify their own communication challenges through study, research, presentation, and self-reflection.

ED 363 THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the principles and processes of adult learning.  Topics covered include learning styles, personal experiences, social and cultural factors that affect learning, learning in formal and non-formal environments, and the characteristics of adult learners.

364 ASSESSMENT OF ADULT LEARNING
This course examines general principles, processes, and techniques of assessment and evaluation that meet the needs of the instructors, learners, and stakeholders. New assessment techniques in the psychomotor domain are expected.  Students develop practical experience in designing and implementing strategies for identifying learners’ needs and assessing learning outcomes in the adult, technological, and/or business sectors.
Three hours a week

ED 422 METHODS AND STRATEGIES: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOR ONLINE LEARNING
This course provides the foundational skills necessary for designing and delivering a course on-line. Students explore different online learning platforms, compile content, and develop teaching strategies and authentic assessments appropriate to the on-line learning environment. (Pre-requisite ED 311)

3 EDUCATION ELECTIVES (from ED 308, ED 366, ED 368, and ED 373).

 

Milestone 2

Milestone Two provides more depth and breadth to the issues related to adult education, adult learning, and the application of the skills and knowledge learned in Milestone One.

ED 319 CAREER AND LEARNING PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
This course is designed to review and clarify a student’s learning and career objectives, and to document and demonstrate experiential learning. Learners understand the various purposes of portfolios; know the conventions of developing and professionally presenting a portfolio; and are capable of articulating acquired learning in job descriptions or degree requirements.

7 EDUCATION ELECTIVES

Milestone 3

The purpose of Milestone Three is to establish recognition of an occupational specialization. During Milestone Three, an assessment panel will review a portfolio to examine and potentially award credit for work, life, and education experiences in the occupational specialization in which the participant intends to teach or seek employment.

ED 394 OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALIZATION / PLAR
The purpose of Milestone Three is to establish recognition of an occupational specialization. During Milestone Three, an assessment panel will review a portfolio to examine and potentially award credit for work, life, and education experiences in the occupational specialization in which the participant intends to teach or seek employment. This component of the BEd (HRD) program identified as Occupational Specialization or PLAR represents the candidate's content expertise.

Milestone 4

In Milestone Four, students may explore academic courses offered in various faculties at UPEI. Students may choose courses that relate to personal interest or that meet his/her educational plan.

The following are descriptions of the adult education courses that UPEI can offer as elective courses. Note that elective courses are not offered every year.

307 ETHICS FOR ADULT PRACTITIONERS
This course examines professional ethics in the practice of adult education by: exploring the meanings of “professional” and “ethics” in the context of adult education; discussing the ideas and skills that assist adult educators in applying professional ethics to their practice; examining current codes of ethics for adult educators; and, creating individual statements of ethical practice.

308 INTEGRATING ACTIVITY BASED LEARNING IN ADULT EDUCATION
In this course, learners explore theoretical aspects supporting activity based learning, reflect on personal teaching frameworks, examine and customize a variety of strategies designed to make learning and training active. Using these foundations, participants expand their teaching repertoires by integrating activity based learning with active training, team learning, peer teaching and independent learning, and develop lesson plans and units to be used in adult learning environments.

309 AN INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE
Fostering a learning culture at work is a complex process with many competing demands on both workers and those who train and manage them. This course will introduce participants to current issues and trends affecting workplace learning; key theories of learning, learning styles and motivation for learning in relation to the workplace; core competencies associated with workplace learning; the role of informal training programs and informal learning (communities of practice, mentoring etc.); and process models for workplace learning. Participants will apply their learning and design a workplace learning program that addresses a key issue and concern in their organization.

311 INTRODUCTION TO DISTANCE LEARNING
This course provides an orientation to the methodologies and varieties of distance education approaches currently available. Students explore learning technologies related to distance education in the form of e-learning, video conferencing, audio conferencing, etc., and apply them to adult learning contexts.

312 APPLIED RESEARCH IN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
In this practical course, students review the fundamental requirements to building a successful applied research group at a post secondary educational institution. Topics covered include: national setting, institutional context, funding, communication, management, staffing, student involvement, industry partners, and community economic development. As applied research complements the teaching activities at post-secondary institutions, in this course, each student develops and presents an applied research proposal suitable for submission to a funding agency.

313 ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION
This interactive course explores the current state of adult education in Canada and the statutory framework that largely determines the direction and capacity of the discipline and practice of adult education. Students examine the mandates and variety of provider agencies (adult learning associations, literacy networks, community-based and public education agencies, adult high schools, community colleges). The funding of adult education and the constitutional requirements of governments in Canada are considered. As well, the nature of regional differences and needs (e.g. economic and social development) and how the geography and demography of the Canadian landscape challenges the framework and delivery of adult education are discussed.

314 SOCIOLOGY OF ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines the social and political structures that have an impact on adult education. Students explore the influence of these structures in shaping public policy on adult education, and discuss their significance for program development and implementation.
Three hours a week

315 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING FOR THE ADULT EDUCATOR
In this course, students in the adult education context further refine their communication skills. Students will develop greater proficiency and effectiveness in oral communication. The assignments emphasize the writing process; the clear and correct use of the English language in developing reflective and critical thought; and writing in various genres, including research, professional documents, and correspondence.

365 COUNSELLING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces students to the social and emotional development of adult learners, and explores the theoretical principles underlying vocational and personal counselling. It focuses on the development of practical application of counselling methods.

366 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces learners to some of the most exciting and evolving computer technologies and features currently used in online instruction. Learners will examine the integration of current and future online computer technologies into today's and tomorrow's classroom. The course will provide an overview of current computer based technology (e.g. multimedia applications, streaming audio,streaming video, online audio chat, online discussion forums, web conferencing, blogs as well as other evolving technologies). Learners will self explore these computer technologies in order to better prepare themselves and enable them to deal with online educational technologies used in the classroom.

367 ENTREPRENEURIAL EDUCATION
This course introduces adult learners to the principles of entrepreneurial education.  Students identify enterprising opportunities, and gain experience in planning and facilitating learning by using specialized software to create enterprising educational ventures.
Three hours a week

368 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on curriculum development beginning with needs identification, content planning and research, leading to lesson design and delivery. Students develop an understanding of provincial outcomes and standards.  Students assess learners’ needs, set appropriate outcomes, plan methodologies and resources, implement program plans, evaluate learning, and reflect on teaching effectiveness.
Three hours a week

369 ISSUES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course introduces students to contemporary trends (e.g., societal, economic, political, and social trends), and diversity in the workplace. Also explored is the role of adult educators as change agents in shaping the fields of training, development, and adult education.
Three hours a week

371 INTRODUCTION TO ADULT EDUCATION
This course surveys the theories and historical practice of the adult education movement. It examines the characteristics of adult education in a variety of contexts, with particular emphasis on Canadian and provincial initiatives and challenges. Changing needs across a wide range of institutional settings within the field of adult education are identified and discussed.
Three hours a week

372 FACILITATING LITERACY IN ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students learn to apply the principles of adult learning and current theory and research to adult literacy settings. The course examines various instructional strategies and techniques that develop language and literacy skills in large or small groups, or in the context of coaching. There is recognition that barriers to literacy learning exist and that educators must understand not only the theory and practice of literacy but also the needs and goals of the individuals in a social learning environment.
Three hours a week

373 SPECIAL NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students are introduced to inclusive education and become aware of the issues and characteristics of adults with special needs. The course gives an overview of some common learning difficulties and challenges. It also provides suggestions for teaching strategies to encourage adults to learn from their strengths and increase independence. Of particular interest is the use of assistive technology, self-advocacy, and awareness of services available to adult learners. Also explored are secondary issues related to special needs and adults.
Three hours a week

374 TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
This course presents the theoretical foundation of transformative learning and transformational education, with an emphasis on practical application. It encompasses principles of adult learning coupled with teaching practices that establish leader empowerment. The role of a transformative educator is explored as a paradigm and establishes critical self-reflection as an essential component of teaching practice. Students should be prepared to examine their educational beliefs, values, and assumptions, and the impact of those beliefs on teaching practice.
Three hours a week

375 MENTORING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines effective methods of mentoring adult students in various contexts. The qualities, techniques, and necessary formal structures in facilitated mentoring relationships are studied using readings, case studies, discussion, presentations, and modelling. Students understand the depth of mentoring adults to the extent that individuals perform the role of mentor or assist others in a structured mentoring program.
Three hours a week

395 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADULT EDUCATION
Students investigate special topics that have particular reference to the fields of adult education, technological training and development, trades education, and other related areas. Students are expected to explore and research an approved topic of their choice.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

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